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The Princeton union. (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, September 07, 1916, Image 7

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1916-09-07/ed-1/seq-7/

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THE COMFORTABLE WAV
GOING SOUTH GOING NORTH
7 :30 a. Sandstone 8:35 p. m.
8:30 Brook Park 8:00
9:10 Mora 7:20
9:25 Ogilvie 7:05
9:38 Bock 6:50
9:55 Milaca 6:35
10:10 Pease (f) 6:13
10:22 Long Siding (f) ..6:03
10:27 Brickton (f) 6:00
10:42 Princeton 5:55
11:02 Zimmerman 5:35
11:25 Elk River 5:12
11:56 Anoka 4:46
12 :52 p. Minneapolis 4 :00
1:25 St. Paul 3:30
ST. CLOUD TRAINS.
GOING WEST GOING EAST
10:00 a. Milaca 6:30 p.m.
10:09 Foreston 6:03
11:15 St. Cloud 5:00
WAY FREIGHT.
GOING SOUTH I GOING NORTH
Daily, ex. Sun. Daily, ex. Sun.
8:30 a. Milaca 2:10 p.m.
9:30 Princeton 1:00
10:30 Elk River 10:30
3:00 Anoka 8:00
Any information regarding sleeping
cars or connections will be furnished at
any time by J. W. MOSSMAN,
Agent, Princeton, Minn.
raraiBHraaaaiQ a a ma BBIBS & a sisrai
MILLE LACS COUNTY
TOWN CLERKS.
Bogus BrookA. J. Franzen....Route 2, Milaca
BorgholmW. Sorenson R. 1, Milaca
DaileyL. F. Read r. Onamia
East SideO. C. Anderson Opstead
GreenbushOscar Erickson R. 1, Foreston
HaylandC. W. Wills Milaca
Isle HarborSam Magaw Wahkon
MilacaHarvey Sandholm Milaca
MiloR. N. Atkinson Foreston
MudgettF. A. Maynard Milaca
namiaG. H. Carr Onamia
PageThore Lindberg Star R., Milaca
PrincetonAlbert Kuhfield R. 2, Princeton
KathioC. C. Kelty Garrison
South HarborF. W. Miller Cove
VILLAGE RECORDERS.
Clifton Cravens Princeton
O. L. Palmquist Milaca
Sylvan Sheets Foreston
Olof Wasenius Onamia
Roy Addington Wahkon
L. A. Matter Isle
NEIGHBORING TOWNS.
BaldwinWarren Angstman R. 1, Zimmerman
Blue HillGlen Leonard Princeton
Spencer BrookO.W.Blomquist, R. 3, Princeton
WyanettPeter Hilden R. 5, Cambridge
LivoniaA. W. Perman Zimmerman
SantiagoGeo. Roos Santiago
BradfordWm. Conklin R. 3, Cambridge
DalboM. W. TVIattson R. 2, Dalbo
StanfordA. N. Peterson St. Francis
Spring "ValeVictor E. Findell, R. 5. Cambridge
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
L. B. MALETTE, D. V. M.
Veterinary Physician and Surgeon
Office in Townsend Block. Northwestern,
office, 138 home, 5. Tri-State: Office, 320,
home, 187.
PRINCETON, MINNESOTA
GEORGE PRENTICE ROSS
Undertaker and State
Licensed Embalmer.
Disinfecting a Specialty
Rural Phone No. 30
PRINCETON, MINNESOTA
DR. D. A. McRiE
Dentist
Offce in Odd Fellows Block.
PRINCETON, MINNESOTA
DR. M. A. PRICE
DENTIST
Office over Allen's Store.
Princeton, Minn.
DR. NEIL A. STACEY
DENTIST
Located in Merchants Hotel temporarily.
Will be in new offices over First National
Bank when new addition is completed.
S. P. SKAHEN
Attorney at Law
Office in Princeton State Bank Bldg.
PRINCETON, MINNESOTA
ELVERO L. MCMILLAN,
Lawyer
Townsend Building.^
PRINCETON, MINNESOTA
G. ROSS CALEY, M. D.,
Physician and Surgeon
Office & Residence over Jack's Drug Store
TelephoneRural, 26.
PRINCETON, MINNESOTA
Dr. C. O. Dr. C. T.
FAY
DENTISTS
Graduates University of Minnesota and
Northwestern University. Offices 716
Hennepin Avenue, Lyric Theater Bldg.,
Minneapolis.
The Difference
When you bring a job of print
ing to the Union office you may
rest assured that you will get
as nice and neat work as can be
produced in any modern print
erieand by men who know
how.
OUR CLASS OF WORK
COSTS NO MORE THAN
THE OTHER KIND.
A
If you want printing that com
mands attention printing you
will like to take a pride in using,
leave your next order at the
Unio Printer^
PRINTERS THAT KNOW
HOW
Phones:
Tri-State 22 Rural 75
4.
LYON & HEALY PIANOS
Pure in Tone
D. R. BYERS, Agent PRINCETON
MUSIC
Eminent teachers including Victor Heinze
(piano), Wm. MacPhail (violin), Kathleen
Hart-Bibb (voice), Raymond Norman Carr
(public school music).
Courses leading to certificates and diplomas.
DRAMATIC ART
Under the direction of John Seaman Gams
Catalog Sent Free
The MacPhail School
(INCORPORA TED)
43 So. 6th St. Minneapolis
IBllllSglHiaillHlilgiaiSigiagllKllglSlSlglialBKaBlglll
Do you need a refrigerator?
Come and see our line. We
are selling at reduced prices.
Take comfort with one of our
hammocks. We have a large
assortment to select from
prices 4 Et to
from..
$1.5f0 $7.50
Are you going to travel We
can supply yous wants in Trunks
and Suit Cases.
See our 34-inch
Trunks for
They are a bargain
j&ii ^^iM:^^r:.^,^^^Xd^i^^' *J^3^^
EVENS HDW.
CO.
3HgplP|gHllgrag||g!!5llgll^
Silverware Cut Glass
D. R. BYERS
JEWELER
Watch Repairing a Specialty
Clocks Novelties
Hlg|glBIBIBlBlBIPllSlSllg|ISIKRIISIKIISlWRKap|H|g^
oooooooooooooooooooooooooc
FOR SALE
Registered
Red Polled Bull
A line annimal, and he
will be offered for sale
to the highest bidder at
the Mille Lacs County
Fair on Saturday, Sep
tember 16, at 3:30 p. m.
Fred Murphy
Owner
T. J. Kaliher, Auc
tioneer
oooooooooooooooooooooooooo
i iifoiiiwdfaaintoMMamaaag&f&B
THE
$5.00
PRINCETXJN
be discouraged because grain is not as
good as last year. The other fellow's
isn't either. Grain, corn, vegetables
or grassesbring the best you have
to G. F. Leipitz or P. C. Thoring. They
will be packed preparatory for the
fair. It takes three varieties of each
kind to score a point. Please bring it
not later than Tuesday, Sept. 12, or
the early morning of the 13th.
Changing Seasons Bring Colds
"Stuffed-up head," clogged-up nose,
tight chest, sore throat are sure signs
of cold, and Dr. King's New Discovery
is sure relief. A dose of this com
bination of antiseptic balsams soothes
the irritated membrane, clears the
head, loosens the phlegm, you breathe
easier and realize your cold is broken
up. Treat a cold persistently half
way measures leave a lingering cough.
Take Dr. King's New Discovery until
your cold is gone. For 47 years the
favorite remedy for young and "old.
At your druggist's, 50c. Adv.
ZIMMERMAN.
There was a regular honey bee hunt
in town last Wednesday evening. For
several days several persons had
passed remarks to the effect that they
had succeeded in lining up a bee tree
and expected to have a winter's sup
ply of fine honey. On that night as it
happened all had made arrangements
to hive the bees and in some peculiar
manner they all seemed "to have the
same tree. Promptly in the early
part of the evening, as though it had
been previously arranged, the follow
ing persons gathered on the school
house grounds: W. R. Hurtt, C. A.
Stillman, J. M. Cook, John Looney, Eu
gene Lovell and Billy Walker, bringing
with them tubs, wash boilers, pails,
tin cans and cups in which to put the
honey. No one seemed to think it
strange that all were going the same
way until they reached the school
grounds, when they seemed to realize
that all were bent on the same errand,
and here, when in the sight of the
precious bee tree, beheld Harry Pratt
with a saw working with might and
main to cut that tree down. It was
the prize they were all seeking and
they had to acknowledge their defeat.
Pratt, after a half hour's strenuous
labor, completed the work. On ex
tracting the honey he found that there
was such a bounteous supply that it
could all be put into a pint jar. Pratt
felt his work was not repaid, while
the rest of the bunch were so discour
aged they wanted to hire a dray to
haul their utensils home again. So
much for the bee liners.
Margaret Walker and Forest Angst
man Sundayed with Mr. and Mrs. Billy
Walker.
The Swedish Ladies' Aid society met
with Mrs. Frank Nyquist last Friday
afternoon. A large crowd turned out
and Mrs. Nyquist served a delicious
lunch.
Mr. and Mrs. Milford Jennison and
Mrs. J. E. Cohoes are in Minneapolis
this week attending the fair.
Ethel Nash went to Elk River and
remained until Sunday with friends.
Mrs. Fletcher and children have
been visiting relatives here. They re
turned home Sunday.
Fred Briggs came home from the
hospital last week, and is getting along
nicely.
Mrs. A. B. Briggs is very ill. She
is under Dr. Page's care.
B. N. Nash and family motored to
Stillwater Thursday.
Carrie Kight came home from Lake
Minnetonka Saturday evening.
Forest Brown drove to Elk River
Monday to attend school. He will
drive back and forth during the nice
weather.
Heeber Kilmartin and Niel Neu
man went to Clear Lake Tuesday to
work on a ditch.
Geo. Bowles, Fay Bowles, Alb. Bur
gett and Laura Lynch boarded the
train Monday for the fair.
Martin Swanson of Minneapolis
spent a few days last week here with
friends and relatives.
Mr. and Mrs. H. Stendahl and Lilly
Stendahl, Nora Stendahl and Irve Jen
nison spent Sunday at Foley, and
drove to Sauk Rapids Monday.
Miss Wyman left last Thursday for
Little Fork, where she will teach
school.
Charles Olson of St. Paul visited
here a few days last week with Henry
and Will Swanson.
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Mallory enter
tained their daughter and her husband
from Iowa Falls last week. They
made the trip in their Ford car.
C. A. Stillman was laid up a few
days of last week with la grippe.
E. H. Foley went to Minneapolis on
Tuesday of last week, and bought a car
which he sold to Albert 2ilge.
Mrs. Edwin Hanson entertained last
Wednesday afternoon, Mrs. G. N. Sten
dahl, Mrs. J. W. Mode, Nora Stendahl,
Mrs. Herman Stendahl and Mrs. Anton
Hanson.
School began Tuesday morning with
Miss Mathisen in the upper room and
Miss Walker in the lower rqpm.
The Ladies' Aid society will meet
with Mrs. H. Jensen Friday afternoon
of this week.
Mr. and Mrs. H. Swanson, Miss Wy
man, Chas. Olson, Lyle Illiff, Geo.
Kight and Earl Whiteoak attended the
,mjmtyywy*vii^^
UNION: THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1916.
dance at Big Lake last Wednesday
eyening.
Robert Mitchell of Big Lake was in
town a short time Wednesday evening.
Mrs. Chas. Youngnickel returned
from Minneapolis last Friday, after a
week's visit with relatives.
B. A. Kettleson autoed to Minneap
olis Sunday to see his brother. He
returned Monday morning.
M. C. Blanchett made a business trip
to North Dakota last week.
Mr. and Mrs. Will Lundberg re
turned to Minneapolis Saturday, after
a few days visit with relatives here.
Marie and Bernice Foley left Satur
day for Crookston, where they will
attend school.
Mr. Lang of Bruce, Wis., spent a
few days here.
Mr. and Mrs. Berglund are enter
taining relatives this week.
Sloan's Liniment for Neuralgia Aches
The dull throb of neuralgia is quick
ly relieved by Sloan's Liniment, the
universal remedy for pain. Easy to
apply it quickly penetrates without
rubbing and soothes the sore muscles.
Cleaner and more promptly effective
than mussy plasters or ointment does
not stain the skin or clog the pores.
For stiff muscles, chronic rheumatism,
gout, lumbago, sprains and strains it
gives quick relief. Sloan's Liniment
reduces the pain and inflammation in
insect bites, bruises, bumps and other
minor injuries to children. Get a bottle
today at your druggist's, 25c. Adv.
WEST BRANCH.
After a* two week's visit with Flor
ence Stark, Miss Helen Swanson re
turned to her home in Minneapolis.
Miss Mabel Jacobson went to Min
neapolis Saturday to receive medical
treatment.
Sigval Homme and Rudolph Erstad
returned Tuesday from Minneapolis,
after a few days stay.
Olof Olson left on Saturday for
Isanti, where he will visit Rev. Lund
quist for a few days, and from there
he will go to the cities to attend the
state fair.
Mr. and Mrs. A. Homme entertained
a few friends Saturday evening in an
nouncement of the marriage of their
daughter, Miss Rose, to James Cox.
The wedding took place in Minneapolis
that same evening at 8 o'clock.
Miss Margaret Osborne left Satur
day for Marshall to resume her stu
dies as a senior in high school at that
place.
Mrs. Holm and two nieces, of Mil-
aca,' spent a few days at the Jacob
Ege home recently.
Callers at the J. S. Jacobson home
Thursday evening were Mr. and Mrs.
George Hanson and child, Mrs. Jacob
Knutson and daughter, Violet, Laura
Gisch and Myrtle Curry.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Hartman re
turned on Thursday evening from
Wisconsin, where they attended the
funeral of Mr. Hartman's brother.
Mr. and Mrs. Nordahl Munson have
been entertaining Mr. Munson's par
ents this week.
Florence Stark left for St. Cloud
Monday to take up her second year of
work at the normal school.
Nels Ege departed Monday for the
cities, where he will endeavor to find
employment.
Albert Nelson came up from Min
neapolis Wednesday evening for a
visit with relatives.
Miss Hildegard Erstad came up
from the cities for a short stay. She
was accompanied on her return Tues
day by her sister, Zelpha, who will
enter school there.
Mr. and Mrs. Osborne entertained
about fifty guests Wednesday evening
in honor of their daughter, Margaret.
The evening was pleasantly spent in
playing cards, dancing and singing.
Mrs. Osborne served a most delicious
lunch at midnight.
Mr. and Mrs. Jenson and family
autoed up from Minneapolis Sunday
for a visit with Mr. and Mrs. A.
Homme. Lucille Homme returned
with them to remain for a few days.
Mr. and Mrs. Jacobson and daugh
ter, Sally, called on Mr. and Mrs. Oscar
Peterson Sunday.
The Misses Ida Mae Schmidt and
Etta Davis spent Thursday evening
with the Erstad family.
Olga, Ethel "and Florence Teutz
spent Thursday afternoon with Flora
Ege.
Margaret Pintz, Alvina Hartman,
Margaret Homme and Flora Ege left
Sunday for Princeton, where they will
attend school.
Ethel and Florence Teutz have gone
to Milaca. Ethel as a sophomore and
Florence as a freshman at the high
school there.
Charley Homme arrived here from
North Dakota last Thursday, and left
again Saturday for Minneapolis where
he will be employed/
Mr. and Mrs. A. Homme and O. H.
Uglem and daughter, Miss Karen, left
Tuesday for Minneapolis in the lat
ter's car, where they will visit friends
and attend the fair.
Just Has to Grin and Bear It.
The traveling and consuming public
occasionally has a grievance of its
own, but no chance to strike.Wash
ington Star.
SyimjUffgnieu-j^gMMi
f&%
*?-A
ORDER IRON ORE RATES CUT
Shipments Originating in Minnesota
Are Affected.
Washington, Sept. 6.The inter
state commerce commission has order
ed decreases in the freight rate on
iron ore from Toledo and other ports
to points in the East.
The proceedings involve shipments
of ore originating in Minnesota, Wis
consin and the Upper Peninsula of
Michigan, from the lower Lake Erie
ports to points in Ohio, Kentucky, West
Virginia and Western Pennsylvania.
The traffic amounts to about 25,(M)0,000
long tons annually and yields to the
rail carriers a revenue of about $20,-
000,000. The decision directs the car
riers to adjust rates, rules and regu
lations, as outlined, by Dec. 1.
NONUNION MEN PROTESTING
Eight-Hour Law Ignores 1,500,000 Rail
road Employes.
Chicago, Sept. 6.Employes of the
railroads other than members "of the
four brotherhoods are making a de
termined fight on the Adamson eight
hour law, according to Robert T. Fra
zier, employe of the Nashville, Chat
tanooga and St. Louis railroad.
He said he had obtained many sig
natures to a petition to congress pro
testing against the law.
Mr. Frazier has left for Pittsburg
and following a visit to Philadelphia
and New York will go to Washington
to present his petition to congress.
He asserts the new law affects only
400,000 men and ignores 1,500,000 other
railroad employes.
Admiral Pritchard Is Dead.
Baltimore, Sept., 6.Rear Admiral
Arthur John Pritchard, U. S. N., re
tired, died here. He was born in
Dorcheschire county, Maryland, eighty
years ago and "entered the navy at the
beginning of the Civil war. He serv
ed in Farragut's squadron from 1S61
to 1863, participating in engagements
on the Mississippi river.
Many Hurt in Train Crash.
Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 6.Ten per
sons were injured and many slightly
hurt in a headon collision of two pas
senger trains on the Pacific Eastern
railway at West Bay.
RESULTS ON THE DIAMOND
National League.
Standing of the ClubsBrooklyn,
.599 Philadelphia, .599 Boston, .592
New York, .487 Pittsburg, .464 Chi
cago, .454 St. Louis, .434 Cincinnati.
.389.
Brooklyn 5, New York 2.
Boston 2, 0 Philadelphia 4, 0.
Cincinnati 3, Chicago 2.
American League.
Standing of the ClubsBoston, .574
Detroit, .565 Chicago, .554 St. Louis,
.527' New Yerk, .523 Cleveland. .519
Washington, .508 Philadelphia, .227.
Boston 2, 7 Philadelphia 1, 5.
Washington 2, New York 0.
GRAIN AND PROVISION PRICES
Duluth Wheat and Flax.
Duluth, Sept. 5.WheatOn track
and to arrive, No. 1 hard, $1.66% No.
1 Northern, $1.64%@1.65% No. 2
Northern, $1.613,4. FlaxOn track and
to arrive, $2.02^.
St. Paul Grain.
St. Paul, Sept. 5. Wheat No. 1
Northern, $1.60%@1.63% No. 2
Northern, $1.57%@1.62% No. 2 Mon
tana hard, $1.55%@1.58% corn, 85@
86c oats, 45@45%c barley, 64@98c
rye, $1.16@1.17 flax, $2.04y*.
Minneapolis Grain.
Minneapolis, Sept. 5. Wheat
Sept., $1.60% Dec, $1.58 May, $1.-
57%. Cash close on track: No. 1 hard,
$1.67% No. 1 Northern, $1.60% 1.1
66% No. 2 Northern, $1.57%@1.62%
No 3 Northern, $1,50%@1.58% No. 3
yellow corn, 85@86c No. 3 white
oats, 45'@45%c flax, $2.04%.
South St. Paul Live Stock.
South St. Paul, Sept. 5. Cattle
Receipts, 1,000 steers, $4.75@ 9.50
cows and heifers, $4.75@7.75 calves,
$4.00@10.75 stockers and feeders, $4.-
00@ 7.00. HogsReceipts, 1,100 range,
$9.75@10.45. SheepReceipts, 200
lambs, $6.00 9.50 wethers, $5.00@7.-
25 ewes, $2,506.75.
Chicago Grain and Provisions.
Chicago, Sept. 5. Wheat Sept,
$1.51% Dec, $1.53 May, $1.54. Corn
Sept., 88c Dec, 76c, May, 79 %c.
OatsSept., 46%c Dec, 49%c May,
52%c. orkSept., $27.75 Oct., $26.-
90. ButterCreameries, 28@31%c
Ejggs20@25c. PoultrySprings, 18
@18^c fowls, 13@16c.
Chicago Live Stock.
Chicago, Sept. 5.CattleReceipts,
1,000 steers, $6.85@11.50 cows and
heifers, $3.75@9.50 calves, $8.50@11.-
25. HogsReceipts, 3,000 light, $10.-
50@11.3O mixed, $10.15@11.30 heavy,
$10.05@11.15 rough, $10.00@10.25
pigs, $6.50@9.10. 3heepReceipts,
13,000 native, $6.50@7.85 lamos, $6.-
50@10.80.
St. Paul Hay.
St. Paul, Sept. 5.HayChoice tim
othy, $14.50 No. 1 timothy, $13.00@
13.75 No. 1 clover, mixed, $12.00@
12.75 No.i 1 mixed, different grasses,
$12.00@12.75 No. 1 mixed, timothy
and wild, $12.25@13.0O choice upland,
$13150 No. 1 upland, $12.50@13.25
No. 1 midland, $8.50@9.25 No. laal
falfa. S13.50O14.25.
f^^^^M^Mi-^^^^
w*
PAGE SEVEN.
What is the best of preparedness
against sickness and disease? A
thorough cleansing, purifying herb
laxative taken occasionally, say once
a week, is the safest, surest way to
health and happiness. Holister's Rocky
Mountain Tea will "prepare the way."
C. A. Jack Drug Co.Advt.
Notice of Bridge Letting.-
Sealed bids will be received by the town
board of Princeton township, Mille Lacs coun
ty, at the office of the town clerk at Princeton.
Minn., until Oct. 7 at 2 o'clock p. m., 1916,
for the construction of the following bridge:
State Bridge No. 353, between' sections 29
and 30, township 36 north, range 27 west,
township of Princeton.
Seventy-five foot steel truss spans, 18 foot
roadway, reinforced concrete floor, or rein
forced concrete abutments.
Plans and specifications are on file in the
office above specified or may be seen at the
office of the State Highway Commission, 300
Shubert Building, St. Paul, Minn.
Each proposal must be accompanied by a
satisfactory bidder's bond, cash or a certified
check for at least five (5) per cent of the
amount pf the bid payable to the town treas
urer of said township.
All bids must be upon blank forms fur
nished by the undersigned.
The board reserves the right to accept or
reject any proposal.
Dated at Princeton, Minn., this 19th day
of August, 1916.
ALBERT KUHFIELD,
Town Clerk.
(First Pub. Sept. 7-3t)
Citation for Hearing on Final Account and
for Distribution.
ESTATE OF MOSE JESMER.
State of Minnesota, County of Mille Lacs.
In Probate Court.
In the matter of the estate of Mose Jesmer,
decedent.
The State of Minnesota to all persons in
terested in the above entitled matter:
Whereas May Jesmer has filed in this court
her final account of her administration of the
estate of the above-named decedent, together
with her petition praying for the adjustment
and allowance of said final account and for
distribution of the residue of said estate to the
persons thereunto entitled
It is ordered, that said petition be heard, and
that all persons interested in said matter be
and appear before this court on the 2nd day
of October, 1916, at 10 o'clock a. m., at the
probate court rooms in the court house at
Princeton, in said county, and then and there,
or as soon thereafter as the matter can be
heard, show cause, if any they have, why said
petition should not be granted and that this
citation be served by the publication thereof in
the Princeton Union, according to law.
Witness the Honorable Wm. V. Sanford,
Judge of said court, and the seal of said
court, this 29th day of August, 1916.
WM. V. SANFORD,
(Court Seal.) Judge.
S. P. Skahen,
Attorney for Petitioner,
Princeton, Minn.
(First Pub. Aug. 24-3t.)
Notice of Filing of and Hearing on Ditch
Petition.
NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that a petition, of
which the following is a copy, has been filed
in the office of the county auditor of Mille
Lacs county, state of Minnesota, and that a
hearing will be had upon said petition before
the county board at the office of the county
auditor of said county, in the village of Prince
ton on the 19th day of September, A. D. 1916,
at 11 o'clock A. M.
Dated at Princeton, Minn., this 22nd day
of August, 1916.
W. C. DOANE,
County Auditor.
By Walter Peltier, Deputy.
(Official Seal.)
PETITION FOR PUBLIC DITCH.
To the County Board of the County of Mille
Lacs, State of Minnesota:
The undersigned land owners, whose lands
will be liable to be affected by, or assessed for,
the expense of the construction of the county
ditch hereinafter described, would respectfully
represent that the public health, convenience
and welfare and the reclamation of wet and
overflowed lands require the establishment and
construction of a county ditch along the fol
lowing described route in the town of Prince
ton (T. 36 R. 26) in said county ot ^ille Lacs
and that the construction of the same would
be of public benefit and utility and is neces
sary for the following reasons, to-wit:
That the public health, convenience and wel
fare and the reclamation of wet and over
flowed lands require the establishment and con
struction of a public ditch for drainage pur
poses.
A general description of the proposed start
ing point, route and terminus of said ditch
is as follows: Commencing at a point in the
ne}4 of the ne'/i of section eleven (11) in
T. 36 N. R. 26 W., twenty rods west and two
rods south of the northeast corner of said
section eleven thence in a southwesterly direc
tion through the ne% of section 11 thence
in a southeasterly direction through the n%
of se% of section 11 thence in a southwesterly
direction through the sy2 of se1^.
'-1
of section
11 thence in a southwesterly direction through
the nw% of ne*4 and the ne% of nwi4 of sec
tion 14 thence in a southeasterly direction
through
the^nef%section
of nw%
and the se1
anthencee
th w% of ne\i
14 in a south
erly direction through the e% and sei/i of sw%
of section 23 in4 a southerly directiontlo
through the e1/thence
of nw
and government
two (2) in section 26 to an outlet in Silver
lake (so-called) at a point in said government
lot 2 about the center of the south side thereof,
all in said town 36, range 26, Mille Lacs
county, Minn.
And your petitioners pray that you will
proceed to establish such county ditch and
cause the same to be constructed as provided
by Chapter Two Hundred thirty (230) of the
General Laws of Minnesota for 1905, and acts
amendatory thereof and supplementary thereto.
Dated August 22nd, 1916.
WM. C. A. NEUMANN,
WM. NEUMANN,
M. B. CATER.
ANTON FALK,
E. G. PIKE,
A. MILBRANDT,
A. BOCKOVEN.
GEO. SCHMIDT,
A. W. STEEVES,
H. MILBRANDT,
E. MILLBRANDT,
Petitioners.
(First Pub. Aug. 3-6t)
Notice of Mortgage Foreclosure Sale.
Notice is hereby given that default has been
made in the conditions of a certain mortgage
executed by Joel Carlson, as mortgagor, to
Olaf O. Searle, as mortgagee, dated the 20\h
day of April, 1914, and recorded in the joffice
of the Register of Deeds of Mille Lacs county,
Minnesota, on the 11th day of May, 1914, at
2 o'clock P. M. of said day in Book 4 of
Mortgages on page 612 thereof of the records
of said office. That no action or proceeding
has been instituted at law or otherwise to
recover said debt secured by said mortgage,
or any part thereof.
That by reason of said default said mort
gagee has elected to declare the whole sum
specified in said mortgage to be due and
payable.
That there is claimed to be due and pay
able and that there is now due and payable
at the date of this notice, upon said mortgage
and upon the debt thereby secured the sum of
five hundred and seventy-three and 75-100
dollars ($573.75).
Notice is hereby further given that by
virtue of the power of sale in said mortgage
contained and recorded therewith, which by
reason of the facts aforesaid, has become
operative, and pursuant to the statute in such
case made and provided, the said mortgage
will be foreclosed and the land and premises
covered by said mortgage, to-wit:
All that tract or parcel of land lying and
being in the County of slille Lacs, state of
Minnesota, described as follows, to-wit* The
northeast quarter (ne%) of the northwest
quarter (nw%) of section number fifteen (15)
township number forty-one (41) of range
twenty-six (26), will be sold at public auction
to the highest bidder therefor, for cash, by
the sheriff of Mille Lacs county, Minnesota, to
satisfy and pay the debt which will then be
due on the note secured by said mortgage,
together with the sum of $40.00 stipulated in
said mortgage as attorney's fees and the costs
and expenses of these foreclosure proceedings
as allowed by law.
That said sale will be made at the front
door of the courthouse in the village of Prince
ton, county of Mille Laus and state of Min
nesota, at 10 o'clock in the forenoon on Tues
day, the 19th day of September A. D. 1916.
Dated August 3, 1916.
OLAF O. SEARLE,
G. H. SMITH. Mortgagee.
Attorney for Mortgagee,
510 New York Life Bldg.,
Minneapolis, Minnesota.
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