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The Princeton union. (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, September 14, 1916, Image 2

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1916-09-14/ed-1/seq-2/

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PAGE TWO.
MITCHEL FAILSTO
HALT CUR STRIKE
Both Sides Ignore His Appeal
for Arbitration.
FRAYNE ISSUES STATEMENT
Declares Railway Officials Must Be
Met With Sort of Force They Apply
to MenPublic Service Commission
to Hold Hearing.
New York, Sept. 13.Mayor Mit
chel has failed in an effort to stop the
street car strike which already has
almost paralyzed traffic in Greater
New York and threatens to spread to
other industries.
A few hours after the mayor had
issued a memorandum recommending
that the strike be discontinued im
mediately and that the opposing lead
ers hold conferences with a view to
agreeing upon arbitration, plans not
only to continue, but to extend the tie
up were being discussed at a meeting
of the United Labor conference of the
Central bodies of Greater New York.
Shonts Refuses Request.
While the labor leaders were in ses-.
sion, ignoring the appeal of the mayor,
President Shonts of the Interborough
Rapid Transit company announced
that he would not accept Mayor Mit
chel's recommendation.
Alter the conference Hugh Frayne,
New York state organizer of the
American Federation of Labor, issued
this statement-
"The concensus of opinion among
the members of the various organiza
tions represented was that the rail
road officials must be met with the
sort of force they were applying to
the men
To Meet ^Commission.
Representatives of the strikers an
nounced they would not comment on
the plans of the mayor and the public
service commission to have the strike
arbitrated until they appeared before
the commission. Both sides will be
permitted to express their views.
Minor disturbances occurred in sev
eral places. Traffic on virtually all
surface car lines affected by the strike
was suspended again. Subway and
elevated train service continued about
normal
MICHIGAN MAN CONFESSES
Admits Crime for Which Servant Was
to Die.
Ironwood, Mich., Sept. 13.Arthur
Waltonen, alias John Lind, a barber,
-"/as arrested here for the murder of
Mrs. Elizabeth Nichols, a New York
widow, who was strangled to death in
her home and money and jewelry to
the, value of $28,000 stolen.
Mrs. Nichols lived at 4 East Seven
ty-ninth street, New York city. On the
night of Sept. 7, 1915, according to the
confession, Waltenen is said to have
made to the police, he and three other
men entered the widow's home
through the aid of one of her servants,
Connie Talus, strangled the woman
and made away with jewelry and
money.
The men escaped and police suspi
cion rested "on the servant Talus final
ly was arrested and the strong cir
cumstantial evidence offered led to his
conviction and sentence to the elec
tric chair.
Friends of the man interceded for
him and his sentence was commuted
last month to life imprisonment.
TRAGEDY AT SEA HINTED
Note Found in Bottle Indicates Sever
al Were in Danger.
San Francisco, Sept. 13.The brief
story of what may have been a sea
tragedy was revealed here when a
bottle containing the following mes
sage was picked up on the beach
"September 10, 1914.
"At sea in an open boat without
food or water. Have now been adrift
eight days. Two dead. Not expecting
to live much longer. We last saw the
Farallone islands, Sept. 1. My strength
is fast leaving me.
"Harry P. James, Niagara, N. Y."
Kaiser Replies to President.
Washington, Sept. 13.The state
department has received from Ameri
can Ambassador Gerard at Berlin the
kaiser's personal reply to President
Wilson's personal letter urging that a
Polish relief agreement be reached be
tween the belligerents. The letter
was forwarded to the president. The
kaiser's reply was sent through Ge
rard in order to avoid the British cen
sorship. J* *5* *S* *J* *J* *5* "S* *5* *J* *J* *I* *5* *f* *S*
4*
BEAR KILLS MAN IN NA-
TIONAL PARK.
Livingston, Mont, Sept. 13.
Frank Welsh, teamster, is dead
in the military hospital at Mam
moth Hot Springs, Yellowstone
National park, from a mauling
received from a bear.
Welsh was asleep under a
wagon In the park when he was
attacked by thebear.
^'^^^^^^^^^^fr^^+J county not to permit the meet.
S'?gp4[jf^fF
MAYOR MITCHEL
Ignored in His Appeal for
Arbitration in Car Strike.
by American Press Association.
BRITISH HOLD UP
AMERICAN SHIP
Washington, Sept. IS.Violations of
American neutrality by a British tor
pedo boat, which held up and examin
ed the Philippine steamer Cebu with
in the territorial waters of the Philip
pines, was reported to the war depart
ment by Governor General Harrison.
The dispatch immediately was trans
mitted to the state department and
will be made the subject of a vigor
ous protest to Great Britain.
The incident occurred one mile and
a half off Carabao island. According
to the report of the steamer's master,
Lieutenant Bailes, commanding H. M.
S. destroyer No. 2, boarded the Cebu,
made inquiries about her passengers
and took both the ship's manifest and
her passenger list. Apparently the
officer was searching for a man named
Bady, who was not found.
HEARING SET FOR SEPT. 25
Special Commissioner Announces In
vestigations Will Be Made.
St. Paul, Sept. 13.Investigation of
alleged illegal expenditures of more
than $200,000 'of Koochiching county
funds and charges of malfeasance
and nonfeasance against County Au
ditor L. H. Slocum and County Com
missioner William Harrington, Har
old Royem and R. S. McDonald, sus
pended from office by Governor Burn
quist pending an inquiry, will begin
Sept 25 in International Falls.
M. J. Brown, Bemidji. attorney, ap
pointed commissioner by the Governor
to take evidence in the matter, an
nounced this date after a long confer
ence with the chief executive.
The charges against Slocum will be
investigated, despite his recent resig
nation, as well as those against the
county commissioners, Mr. Brown said.
CABINET OFFICER IS JAILED
Opium Smuggling Plot Involves Prom
inent Chinese.
Shanghai, Aug. 13.Chang Yao
Tseng, new minister of justice, has
been arrested in connection with a
gigantic opium smuggling case, which
threatens to disrupt the cabinet and
involve many prominent Chinese.
British Take Gold, Give Paper.
Berlin, Sept. 13."A Roman Catho
lic priest who is a citizen of the Unit
ed States says that when the British
took the Scandinavian-American line
steamship Frederick VIII., on which
he was a passenger, into Kirkwall
early in August," says the Overseas
news agency, "he saw the British take
from another passenger, who is an
American citizen also, $10,000 in gold,
giving him paper money In place of
it."
Forger May Be Auto Thief.
Chicago, Sept. 13.Edwin L. Thack
er, recently trapped in mid-ocean and
brought back from the Barbadoes to
face charges of having profited to the
extent of $50,000 through alleged for
geries, is one of the three men under
arrest here in connection with a so
called syndicate of automobile thieves
unearthed by the police. Thacker's
companions are Edward Collins and
Roman Dietz.
Alleged Bomber on Trial for Life.
San Francisco, Sept. 13.Warren K.
Billings, a machinist, charged with
planting the suitcase bomb which
caused the death of ten persons and
injuries to forty more on prepared
ness day here, July 22, went to trial
here for his life. Four other persons,
including one woman, are under in
dictment.
Race Meet Barred by Governor.
Little Rock, Ark., Sept. 13.The
race meet at Hot Springs, which was
scheduled for Nov. 11, was declared
off after Governor George W. Hayes
notified Sheriff Hanley of Gardner
"^^LJi4^v^^^*^
1?Ktl^^l^N l)Mt
NOTED EDUCATOR IS DEAD
Body Is Found in River and Suicide
Is Suspected.
Columbus, O., Sept. 13.A fisher
man found the body of Charles S.
Prosser, fifty years old, head of the
geology department of Ohio state
university and a well known scientific
writer, floating in the Olentangy riv
er near the university campus.
Professor Prosser was considered
one of the leading authorities on ge
ology in this country.
Friends believe Professor Prosser's
mind became deranged and that he
committed suicide.
BANDITS HEAD FOR BORDER
American Troops in Readiness to Re.
pel Invaders.
Presidio, Tex., Sept. 1$.Mexican
military authorities of Ojinaga receiv
ed word by wire from Chihuahua City
that several hundred bandits were in
the vicinity of Lajitas, about eighty
miles from here, headed for the bor
der.
The troops here are awaiting orders
to move to intercepting points.
White House Sends Tribute.
Minneapolis, Sept. 13.A floral
tribute from the White House was
among the many flowers at the funeral
of James Gray, former Minneapolis
mayor and recently Washington cor
respondent for the Minneapolis Jour
nal, held from the Church of the Re
deemed, Minneapolis. The body lay
in state at the church preceding the
services and scores of friends viewed
it. The Minneapolis Press club attend
ed the services in a body. Associates
of Mr. Gray in the newspaper field and
in politics including three, who, like
himself, had served as mayor of Min
neapolis, followed his body to Lake
cemetery.
RESULTS ON THE DIAMOND
National League.
Standing of the ClubsBrooklyn,
.595 Philadelphia, .589 Boston, .575
New York, .512 Pittsburg, .477 Chi
cago, .452 St. Louis, .426 Cincinnati,
.390.
Boston 1, 3 Chicago 0, 3.
Brooklyn 6, 1 Pittsburg 0, 2.
New York 3, Cincinnati 2.
Philadelphia 4, St. Louis 3.
American League.
Standing of the ClubsBoston, .578
Detroit, .572 Chicago, .562 New York.
.526 St. Louis, .522 Cleveland, .500
Washington, .493 Philadelphia,. 226.
Detroit 10, Cleveland 2.
Washington 4, Boston 3.
St. Louis 5, Chicago 3.
American Association.
Standing of the ClubsLouisville,
.582 Indianapolis, .572 Kansas City,
.545 Minneapolis, .523 St. Paul, .507
Toledo, .483 Columbus, .437 Milwau
kee, .347.
St. Paul 2, Louisville 0.
Indianapolis 3, Minneapolis 1.
Kansas City 6, Toledo 5.
GRAIN AND PROVISION PRICES
Duluth Wheat and Flax.
Duluth, Sept. 12.WheatOn track
and to arrive, No. 1 hard, $1.66^4 No.
1 Northern, $1.64y3@1.65% No. 2
Northern, $1.61 1.63%. FlaxOn
track and to arrive, $2.05%.
St. Paul Grain.
St. Paul, Sept. 12. Wheat No. 1
Northern, $1.61%@1.68% No. 2
Northern, $1.58%@1.63% No. 2 Mon
tana hard, $1.56%@1.59% corn, 82@
83c oats, 42%@43c barley, 65c@$l.-
03 rye, $1.21 1.22 flax, $2.07%.
Chicago Grain and Provisions.
Chicago, Sept. 12. Wheat Sept.,
$1.50% Dec, $1.51 May, $1.51%.
CornSept., 8514c Dec, 71%c May,
74%c. OatsSept., 4414c Dec, 47c
May, 50%c. PorkSept., $27.80 Oct.,
$26.45. ButterCreameries, 28%@30c.
Eggs21 27c. PoultrySprings. 18
@19c fowls, 18%c.
South St. Paul Live Stock.
South St. Paul, Sept. 12. Cattle
Receipts, 9,000 steers, $4.75@10.00
cows and heifers, $4.75@7.75 calves,
$4.50@11.75 stockers and feeders, $4.-
00@7.00. HogsReceipts, 6,000 range,
$10.00 10.40. SheepReceipts, 1,700
lambs, $6 25@10 00 wethers, $5 00
7.50 ewes, $3.00@7.25.
Minneapolis Grain.
Minneapolis, Sept. 12. Wheat
Sept., $1.61% Dec, $1.57 May, $1.-
56%. Cash close on track: No. 1 hard,
$1.69% No. 1 Ndrthern, $1.61%@1.-
65% No. 2 Northern, $1.58%@1.63%
No. 3 Northern, $1.5L%@1.59% No.
3 yellow corn, 82@83c No. 3 white
oats, 42% 43c flax, $2.07%.
Chicago Live Stock.
Chicago, Sept. 12.CattleReceipts,
9,000 steers, $6.40@11.20 cows and
heifers, $3.40@9.20 calves, $8.50@ 12.-
75. HogsReceipts, 10,000 light, $9.90
@11.20 mixed, $9.75@11.25 heavy,
$9.60@11.05 rough, $9.60@9.80 pigs,
$6.50@9.50. SheepReceipts, 15,000
native, $6.90@8.50 lambs, $7.25
11.40.
St. Paul Hay.
St. Paul, Sept.:L2.HayChoice tim
othy, $15.00 No. 1 timothy, $13.50@
14.50 No. 1 clover, mixed, $11.00
11.75 No. 1 mixed, different grasses,
$11.00@ 11.75 No. 1 mixed, timothy
and wild, $il.00@11.75 choice upland,
$14.00 No. 1 upland, $12.25@ 13.50
No. 1 midland, $9.50@10.25 No. 1 al
falfa, $13.50 14.25.
wKitf^y^ i ^Jti
iiiutJJiimiiiuitiiiiit
*&
MOVE
After Monday, Sept. 4, you
will find us at our new location
on Main street, next to Foltz'
feed store, where we will be
glad to see all our old and many
new customers. We want your
cream, poultry, veal, etc.
C.H.WERLING
Tri-State Phone 356.
1 tiiiHiitiimmirmiHimiimm
PAYETTE'S
Popular HAS
Priced HE
Photos TAKEN
Please YOUR
Particular PHOTO
People YET?
Come in and arrange for a
Sitting To-day! The Latest
Creations in Photography are
Always to be found at The
PAYETTE STUDIO
Princeton, Minnesota
niiMMMiiiiiiitiiiiiiHiiiMiiiiiiiiiimmiiittiiitiiiim
BLACKSMITHING
llteMtellKlillllKBllHll{MHll|lHBliaMtllSl
AND WAGON SHOP
Good Work and Prices Absolute-
ly Right.
Special Attention Given to
Horses With Sore Feet
J.A.MADSEH
North of Postoffice
Princeton Minnesota
an
ARBER COLLEGE. Learn
the Barber Trade at the old
est and most successful col
lege in the Northwest Write
now for free illustrated
catalogue and rates.
HOLER BARBER COLLEGH
Established 1893.
25 Nicollet Av Minneapolis
ENLIST
In the number of discerning men
who realize the opportunity open to
those who receive a thorough train
ing in the Cleanest and Best
Equipped School in this part of the
country.
Come and convince yourself. No
tice the number of handsome, pay
ing shops in the city, many of which
were opened by us.
The International Barbe College
110 Hennepin Ave., Minneapolis
Doctors Agree O
Eczema Remedy
Comfirm the Statements About
D. D. D. Prescription
Geo. T. Richardson, M. D.: "In~my
opinion, D. D.. D. should be applied in all
cases of skin diseasean immediate relief
to the itch, a calm to excited nerves, soft,!
soothing, yet a powerful agent, a strength
to the general system."
Dr. Unna Holmes: "D. D. D. is as
near a specific for eczema and the dreaded
psoriasis as is quinine for malaria. I con
stantly prescribe D. D. D. also for salt
rheum, tetter, barber's itch, pimples, all
forms of itching eruptions, scales, sores."
Dr. Ira T. Gabbert: "I freely admit
that D. D. D. reaches most cases of
eczema and permanently cures them."
Dr. Gabbert of Caldwell, Kansas, is one
of the best skin specialists in the state.
Write and ask him about D. D. D.
Druggists are glad to recommend this
soothing, cooling liquid. 25c, 50c and $1.00.
Come to us and we will tell you more about
this remarkable remedy. Your money Back
unless the first bottle relieves you. D. D. D.
Soap keeps your skin healthy. Ask about$fc
C. A. Jack Drug Co.
Keeps Stove
Shining Bright
Gives a brilliant glossy shine that
does not rub off or dust oftthat
anneals to the ironthat lasts four
times as long as any other.
BlackSilkStove Polish
is in a class by itself. It's more
cat efully madeandmade
from better materials.
Try it on your parlor
stove, yourcookstove
or your ga3 range.
If you don't find it
the best polishyou
ever used, your
hardware or
grocery dealer is
authorized to re-
yo
money.
Thero'm"A
Shlnoln Evmry Drop'
Get a Can TOD AT
A General Banking Business
Transacted.
Loans Made on Approved
Securtiy.
m*x*x+x+x*x*x*x*x^^^
Dow a G*n*ral
&*X+X*X*X*XW*M^^
MAIN STREET,
First National Bank
OF PRINCETON, MINNESOTA.
PAID UP CAPITAL, $30,000
S. S. PETTERSON, President.
T. H. CALEY, Vice President.
J. F. PETTERSON, Cashier.
1 Princeton State Bank
CAPITAL
INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS
11 Farm Mortgages, J.J.SKAHEN, jj
l\ Insurance, Collections. Cashier.
Security State Bank
PRINCETON, MINNESOTA
Capital, $32,000 Surplus $4,000
JOHN W. GOULDING, President G. A. EATON, Cashier
I FARMLANDS FARM LOANS
HcMillan & Stanley
Successors to
H. 5. RUTHERFORD & CO.
PRINCETON, MINNESOTA
We Handle the Great Northern Railway Co. Lands.
I FARM LOANS FARMLANDS
Pierson & Blocker
(Successors to L. C. Hummel)
Fresh and Salt Meats, Lard,
POULTRY, FISH and GAME IN SEASON.
Both Telephones
South IH.IO street Princeton, Mlno.
^^^^iic^tXKKt^MiXtiaaiCTiKwiwxtx*^:*)!:*]!:^*^^!^!)!:^*)!^ ^mmmmmmmrnmmmmfmmmmmmmmmmmmK
You'll find no BARK on our Lumber, although we do
E a good deal of BARKING about it. We have the:
stock and feel justified in the BARKING. When youi
want the best lumber BARK up this tree
AND YUU'LL FIND IT
f GEO. A. COATES, flanager
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Prime Meats of Every Variety,
Poultry, Fish, Etc.
Higest Market Prices Paid for Cattle and Hogs
1 ^wx
Interest Paid On Time Do
posits.
Foreign and Domestic Ex
change.
m$
I!
$20,000 I\
Banking Business
il
Dressed Lumber 1
Is Like a Dead Dog!
THE BARK
Is All Off!
Rudd Lumber Co. 1
A. C. SMITH
3j, "1.T A
$?
IS
PRINCETON
Cvj-VaS. .****3t ^?~^^%^sk&h^^433*^ &
^^m^j^hMisi-^j^i &$*Jd

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