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The Princeton union. (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, June 23, 1921, Image 2

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1921-06-23/ed-1/seq-2/

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PAGE TWO
1/
to*) LEAD S INJPOTATOE S
Minnesota's Certified Seed Acreage in
1920 More Than Double That
of Nearest Rival.
Steps Are This Year Being Taken to
Raise the Standard of Cer-
tified Seed Potatoes.
Hundreds of applications for seed
potato certification and inspection are
being received at the office of A. G.
Tolaas, state inspector, at University
farm, giving assurance this early that
the number of applications will equal
if not surpass the number received
in 1820, with Minnesota leading all
other states in the union in this partic
ular phase of the farming industry.
In a tabulated summary of potato
seed certification in the United states
and Canada in 1920, Minnesota leads
all states in the number of applica
tions for inspection, acreage, number
of fields certified, acreage which final
ly qualified, and in bushels actually
certified. Minnesota last year raised
317,975 bushels of certified potatoes
Wisconsin was second with 194,000
bushels New York third with 189,-
242 bushels and Maine fourth with
130,000 bushels.
The total number of bushels certi
fied for all of Canada was 234,552.
Eight different varieties of potatoes
passed muster in Mmnasotr, and sold
at from 25 cents to $1.00 per cv/t above
the price for ordinary stock.
Reports from different states of
which there are 14 carrying on potato
seed inspection and certification work,
show that the applications for inspec
tion in 1920 embraced 12,665 acres,
while applications for inspection in
Canada embraced 7,613 acres, making
a total of 20,279 acres. In the United
States 6,618 rcres qualified for certi
fication with approximately 636,930
cwt, while in Carrda 3,966 pcres quali
fied with a total of 140,371 ewt. These
figures do not give the total yields
from the fields inspected but refer to
the amount of certificate stock listed
for sale.
After showing the development of
certification in potato growing states,
Mr. Tolsas says that in 1919 applica
tions were made for 8,600 acres of
which 3,750 acres qualified. In other
words, approximately 431/
per cent of
the acreage inspected met the require
ments prescribed in the different
states. In 1920 approximately 52 per
cent of the acreage met the require
ments. The fact that a large percen
tage of the acreage passed the require
ments last year is taken as an indica
tion of the employment of better meth
ods of those having their fields in
spected. The large increase of appli
cations over 1919 indicated, too, the
increasing interest that is 'being taken
in certification work by progressive
seed potato growers in the seed pro
ducing sections of the country.
Steps are being taken this year to
raise the standard of certified seed po
tatoes and eliminate complaints of
quite up to the mark. "Now that con
fidence is becoming established in cer
tification and seed potato buyers are
willing to pay a premium for certified
seed," says Mr. Tolaas, ''it is up to
the growers whose potatoes have met
the certification requirements to put
up their stock in an attractive way.
Final inspection in most cases is made
shortly after harvest before any grad
ing has been done. This lonves the
work of properly grading and remov
ing undesirable tubers, such as those
affected with dry rot, which may have
developed after the final inspection, to
the grower. In the last analysis the
grower should see that every sack of
potatoes he loads into the car will
stand a rigid inspection."
Nominated for Dairy Market Board.
The Minnesota Farm Bureau feder
ation has nominated three Minnesota
dairymen for places on the Commit
tee of Eleven,which is to conduct a na
tionwide dairy marketing investiga-
*AJ ^UMtAdfttrtiHi
tion. The three suggested are H. B.
Nickerson, Elk River, president of the
Minnesota Co-operative Creameries
Association, Inc. John Brandt, Litch
field, secretary of the association, and
H. R. Leonard, manager of the Twin
City Milk Producers' association. Jas.
R. Howard, president of the American
Farm Bureau federation, was author
ized by a national convention of dairy
men in Chicago last month to appoint
the investigating body.
This committee will work out plans
for centralization of co-operative mar
keting of dairy products, recommend
ways to improve prices and market
and transportation conditions, and help
form co-operative associations where
none now exists.
Minnesota, as the foremost butter
producing state, is expected to play
a leading part in the inquiry. Its new
state association, now being organized
with the co-operation of the farm bu
reau federation, probably will furnish
a model for recommendations of the in
vestigating committee, farm bureau
officials said today.
SOLID FOR COMBINE.
Ninety Per Cent of Livestock Ship
ping Locals Unite to Sell Through
Their Own Company.
St. Paul, June 23.The movement
for centralized co-operative marketing,
backed by the farm bureaus, is sweep
ing the state. Ninety per cent of the
farmers' co-operative livestock ship
ping associations in Minnesota are
uniting to market all their stock
through their own agency on the South
St. Paul market.
Results of the first three weeks of
organization work, announced today
by the Minnesota Farm Bureau feder
ation and W. A. McKerrow, manager
of the new sales agency, show that
more than 250 local shipping associa
tions already have joined the Minne
sota Central Co-operative Commission
company. The association was orga
nized by delegates from farmers' ship
ping units who met in St. Paul and
voted unanimously to combine co-op
erative livestock marketing under the
direction of a single company, owned
and controlled by farmers and operat
ed on a co-operative basis.
"The success of the centralized live
stock marketing enterprise, the first
of three great co-operative marketing
projects to be launched in Minnesota
this year, is assured by the early re
sults of the campaign," Mr. McKerrow
said today. "The rapidity with which
local shipping associatons are joining
the new central sales agency is break
ing all records. The federation of 250
independent shipping units in two
weeks, in support of an entirely nev
venture in livestock marketing in the
northwest, demonstrates that farmer
are determined to take the process if
marketing into their own hands in ar
effort to eliminate waste and get a
squarer deal for themselves and for
the consumers as well.
"Six counties have made a perfect
record in their support of centralized
marketing. Every local shipping as
sociation in Lincolna, Dakota, ScDtt,
3om
ha
Sl0U
*Chas E Bennett. A7mn*a/o/j
Co-operahv
Centr
buyers who occasionally in case of I Hubbaredd and Lac qui Parle counties
long shipments find their potatoes not
th
Commission association. I'n L.yonni
County all associationvse with the excep
tion ofi which is tributary to the
joined
tone
N
market
ha
ty per cent of the associations we have
reached have voted without hesitation
to concentrate the sale of all their
livestock through the farmers' agen-
cy."
Mr. McKerrow asserted today that
within the next two years the co-op
erative sales agency at South St. Paul
will be "the greatest institution of its
kind in the world." It will become
the sales agency for farmers' asso
ciations in Minnesota, the Dakotas,
Montana and Wisconsin, he said.
A Woman Farm Bureau President.
Congresswomen and lady aviators
have long been with us, but Sanders
county, Mont., has the unique distinc
tion of having the only woman county
farm bureau president in the United
States. Mrs. Lizzie Lynch was elected
to this office a year ago and filled the
office with such efficiency that she was
Rain Will Ruin Any Machine
It's a shame to see that valuable binder standing out
there in the rain today and the snow tomorrow when just
a few boards would protect it against the elements and pro-
long its life enough to pay for half a dozen sheds. How is it
with your idle machinery Just standing around just where
you last used it, or did you draw it into the farm yard to
rust and rot?
Why not stop the next time you're in town and take
home a "jag" of lumber for those much needed sheds
Caley Lumber Co.
BENJ. SOULE, Manager
unanimously re-elected for the endent's
suing year. Miss Lynch has been a
resident of Plains Villey for the past
35 years and is a farmer and stock
raiser. She has personally superin
tended the Lynch ranch for the past
20 years and has made it one of the
best hay ranches in the state.
Cheese Parties at White House.
In the good old days of bygone
years cheese (not the kind you had to
keep muzzled and chloroformed) was
considered a popular article of refresh
ment to serve at state social functions
in the national capital.
Pink teas with their anaemic accom
paniment of lady fingers, sickly sand
wiches and ice cream had not yet been
dreamed of.
Two notable cheese parties have
been held in the white houseAmeri
ca's best known residence. The first
cheese party was staged during the
regime of Thomas Jefferspn, and the
second one was held while Andrew
Jackson was at the head of the govern
ment.
The sage of Monticello had many
warm admirers in the little town of
Cheshire, Mass. These admirers want
ed to do something out of the ordi
nary for their friend in the white
house. Consequently they hit upon the
unique scheme of presenting him with
the largest cheese ever made. On a
given day every cow owner brought
his quota of freshly made curd to a
large cider press, which had been con
verted into a cheese press, and in
which a cheese was pressed that
weighed one thousand six hundred
pounds. It was brought to Washing
ton in the following winter on a sled,
under the charge of Parson Leland,
and in the name of the people of Che
shire, was formerly presented to
President Jefferson in the then un
furnished e?st room of the white
house. Jefferson, of course, returned
thanks, and after having great
wedge cut from the cheese, to send
back to the donors, he invited all
present to help themselves. The
cheese was variegated in appearance,
owing to so m?ny dairies having con
tributed the curd, but the flavor was
prouounccd the best ever tested in
Washington.
When Jackson became president his
admirers thought that every honor
which Jefferson had ever received
should be paid him, so some of them,
residing in a rural district of New
York, got up, under the superinten
dence of a Mr. Mcacham, a mammoth
cheese for "Old Hickory." After hav
ing been exhibited at New York, Phil
adelphia and Baltimore, it was kept
for some time in the vestibule at the
whit house, and was finally cut at
an afternoon reception en the 22rd of
February, 1837. For ^ours a crowd of
men, women and boyj hacked at the
cheese, mrny taking largo hunks of it
away with them. When they com
menced the cheese weighed one thou
ennd four hundred pounds, and only
a small piece was saved for the presi-
Years of
Reputation
&L
This Is The Minnesota State Prison
As a taxpayer your money has helped to build this institution
and as a Minnesota farmer you can get your money back
many fold. Farmers are saving hundreds of thousands of
dollars on agricultural implements manufactured here. If
you have hot benefited, here is your chance to share in the
profits. Savings have been effected by keeping prices of
competing machinery built outside the state down and still
selling way under any other manufacturer.
of agricultural machinery is guaranteed by the state. It is
all made of the best materials obtainable and throughout its
production is constantly under the supervision of state
employed experts.
MinrtPcntn Rinflf*r
i
Princeton, CALEY HDW. CO.
Cambride, KLEMS & KLING
w.
THE PRINCETON UNION: THURSDAY, JUNE 23, 1921
use. The air was redolent with
cheese, the carpet was slippery with
cheese, and nothing else was talked
about at Washington that day. Even
the alleged scandal about the wife of
the president's secretary cf war was
forgotten in the tumultuous jubilation
of that great occasion.
General Jackson received that day
for the last time at the vhite house,
and was so feeble that he had to re
main seated. Mrs. Donelson stood on nal
one side and on Ihe other "W,n Buren,
who w?s inaugurated as president a
fortnight later.National Republican.
Mr. Gompers and the Middle Way.
Samuel Gompers and the executive
council of the American Federation of
Labor come in for a deal of criticism
just now because of their break with
European radicals. Two international
bodies ask the federation to repudiate
Mr. Gompers because of his position.
It is evident today, as it has been
for some time, that Mr. Gompers is
making his way between extreme radi
calism on the fn hand and extreme
conservatism on the other. He is fol
lowing the middle way. This is not al
ways easy to do but it is the states
manlike method.
Mr. Gompers has a European back
ground such as few labor leaders have.
He realizes the difference between old
world conditions and those prevailing
in this country. He speaks as a high
ly competent authority when he points
out this difference in these words:
"What strikes the American is how
little the European renting wage
earner gets for his money. Very sel
dom, indeed, has he a bit of garden
his rooms are fewer and smaller than
is ordinarily the case in an American
house. The rent payer is usually a
rent payer all his life. The struggle
for a barely decent living is ever be
fore them. Living is cheap to the
wage worker in Europe only 'because
he does without what in America
usually becomes a necessity for him."
The American worker enjovs a
standard of living unknown to Euro
pean workers. He has opportun
MINNESOTA
LINE:
8d as the bestshow
a
lvunnesoia. pinaers a
favorabie comparison in
price and quality with any other. For example, the 3 foot
binder is exactly $26.61 lower than its competitor. These
binders compare as favorably as the twine and this economy
is well worth while.
This Is Your Opportunity
Thousands of farmers throughout the Northwest have benefited through the saving on Minnesota
Machinery. Do likewise. You are financially interested in this institution and it is financially
interested in you. Insist upon the Minnesota Line from your dealer.
T5he MINNESOTA STATEIPRISON
Stillwater, Minnesota.
%?M&*J$* ^~S-jP
j^j&a^itt^l-..* jjjjgyi^^il&gjg&ljll
w$5S ^"i mwwf
ties
to get ahead and to become the owner
of a shop or business himself that do
not obtain in the old world. He Iivec
a larger, finer and freer life than
Europe provides. American problems
are not like those of Europe, Asia or
South America. Our economic posi-
lack Drug Co., Druggist.
tion is as unique as our geographic
one.
Mr. Gompers is not disposed to jeo
pardize the opportunities and advan
tages enjoyed by all in this country
for-dangerous abstractions and en
tangling alliances. He appreciates
America for what it is, and thoughtful
citizens here should honor him for
standing firm in the face of bitter and
blind opposition.Minneapolis Jour-
Moonshine!
The New Orleans Times-Picayune
calls attention to a race disorder of
the human balancing apparatus known
as Meniere's disease, which exhilarates
the eighth cranial nerve so that a man
takes to revolving on his toes, or
perhaps on his ear, if he happens to
lose his fcoting. Moonrhine!De
troit Free Press.
Cigarette
To seal in the
delicious Burley
tobacco flavor.
It's Toasted
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
DR. D. A. McRAE
Dentist
Office in Odd Fellows Block
Princeton, Minnesota
DR. NEIL A. STACEY
Dentist
Over Jack's Drug Store. Phone 212
Princeton, Minnesota
I ELVERO L. MCMILLAN
I Lawyer
Office in Townsend Building
Princeton, Minnesota
&
W. C. DOANE
Lawyer
County Attorney. I. O. O. F. Blk.
Princeton, Minnesota
EVAN H. PETERSON
Attorney
Office in Odd Fellows Block
Princeton, Minnesota
GEORGE PRENTICE ROSS
Undertaker and State Licensed
Embalmer
Disinfecting a Specialty. Phone 30
Princeton, Minnesota
Get Your Share O This
A saving of at least $800,000 has been made to the farmers
of Minnesota on the famous Minnesota Binder Twine. Our
wholesale price of this twine is 2J^c per pound lower than
any other, and there is another 2J^c for freight and jobbers'
profit which must be added. Therefore, on the 16,000,000
which we will make this year there will be more than
three quarter million dollars saved to the farmers of this
state.
Minnesnta. Mnwprs
Guaranteed
by the State
MinnASAla Ralr^e are just $8.44 lower than any
Minnesota itaites
reputation
vear
wIt
minnesoca mowers
behind them
5 foot length, for$13.00less than any other. When you
sider the many points of superiority and long wearing qualities
of this line you will see that these are the implements to buy.
are sol
other
Milaca, HAGMAN HDW. CO.
Elk River, HAROLD R. CALEY
contd
goodfoot, 1Ine
sold
state. This difference in price on the 12 36 tooth size.
Our Policy
has always been to keep the assets of our
institution thoroughly liquid. Our mem
bership in the Federal Reserve System
accomplishes this aim to a degree previously
impossible. In the Federal Reserve Bank
we have an unfailing reservoir of cash
obtainable in exchange for commercial
paper which we hold.
First National Bank
Princeton, Minn.
Community
Headquarters
We want you to think of the Princeton State
Bank as contmunity headquarters, where you can
come in at any time for counsel and advice re
garding your financial problems, where you can
meet your friends and where you are always sure
of willing, considerate and friendly banking ser
vice.
This bank is big enough to provide complete
banking service but will ne\er be too big to know
its patrons as friends and fellow citizens.
THE PRINCETON
STATE BANK
%7f Interest Paid on Certificates of Deposit
FARM LOANS INSURANCE
Bank your Money
Then,
M80KSOK)K)MaOEm^^
in thi*
HAVEN'T YOU AND YOUR WIFE OFTEN TALKED ABOUT
"BUYING A HOME?" WELL, IT CAN BE DONE. IT RESTS
ENTIRELY WITH YOU.
THE FIRST THING IS TO COME IN AND START A BANK
ACCOUNT. THEN REGULARLY ADD AS MUCH AS YOU CAN
SPARE. KEEP THIS UP AND IT WON'T BE LONG UNTIL YOU
CAN BUY THAT HOME. AND YOU CAN BUY IT CHEAPER
FOR CASH.
YOU WILL RECEIVE 5 PER CENT INTEREST.
Security State Bank
TlMtWMattKWrreMaWBIW^IMWPIMGWWtB^
R. D. N. SPRINGER, Opb. D.
OPTOMETRIST
of Dr. Kline's Sanatorium, Anaka Will b ia
Princeton, Sunday, June 19
(UNTIL
At MERCHANTS HOTEL
Byes Examined and Glasaea Fitted
"If your credit is goocj at the bank, it is
N good with me."
M1 I'll

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