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The Princeton union. (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, June 30, 1921, Image 2

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1921-06-30/ed-1/seq-2/

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PAGE TWO
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GRAIN GRADE FIGHT
State of Minnesota, Blocked by Fed-
eral Law, Seeks New Standards
Through Legislation.
Farm Bureau Agents in Washington
Testifying Before House Com-
mittee on Agriculture.
St. Paul, June 30.Minnesota farm
ers and other spring wheat producers
have carried their fight for grain grade
changes straight to congress.
Provisions of federal transportation
laws, coupled and threatened with
Tailroad congestion if state grades
should be adopted, caused the state
board of grain appeals to ignore the
legislature's resolution instructing it
to restore old Minnesota grades. In
stead, it adopted federal standards.
Officers of the Minnesota Frrm Bu
reau federation at once took the fight
to congress. Representatives of the
state federation, together with Minne
sota legislators and railroad and ware
house commission experts, are in
Washington this wees. They are tes
tifying before the house committee on
agriculture in an effort to obtain pas
sage of the Stccncrson grain-grading
bill. This bill wou'd give the spring
wheat producers the changes they
want, while doing away with dual
standards and leaving grades for other
parts of the country unchanged.
BACKED BY STOCKMEN.
Into Marketing Association Spreads
Fifty Counties and Com
bines 250 Locals.
St. Paul, June 30.Thirty-five
thousand Minnesota livestock produc
ers will market their stocy through
the new co-operative sales agency,
farm bureau federation officers said
today.
More than 250 local co-operative
shipping associations in 50 counties
have joined the central agency.
In the first three weeks of organiza
tion work 215 shares of stock were
taken by local co-operatives, W. A.
McKerrow, manager of the Minnesota
Contral Co-operntive Commission as
sociation, announced. He predicted
12,000 cars of stock will be handled an
nually.
Minnesota Farmers Lead.
St. Paul, June 30.Minnesota farm
ers again have demonstrated trat they
lead the country in organizaticn.
In the nationwide farm bureau ref
erendum, they cv&t more vctes than
the first nine other states to send in
returns. The first report sent to na
tional headquarters by the Minnesota
Farm Bureau federation, giving only
incomplete returns from 64 counties,
showed 24,000 votes.
The first ten states reporting, in
cluding Minnesota with its 24,000
votes, showed 48,000 ballots cast.
fv
Farmer and Miller.
Whether the impressive argument of
Mr. A. L. Goetzmann, president of the
Millers National federation, before the
Tri-State Grain Shippers association
in behalf of the milling industry solves
the marketing problem or not, the con
siderations he presents ought to make
a strong appeal to the farmers re
gardless of his apprehensions con
cenrning the plans of the formers for
a better system of marketing their
grain.
We can see no necessary difficulties
between the accomplishment of the
ends he aims at and the bttterment of
methods for placing the farmers' grain
products upon the market. It is true
that the farmer's marketing plans
usually contemplate handling facili
ties calculated to move the grain for
ward to the ultimate market with the
least obstruction or delay. The pur
pose of the farmer in this undertaking
is to eliminate middlemen and protect
himself from the manipulation of the
price of his product through pure spec
ulation, but the farmer ought to be in
entire sympathy with the argument
which Mr. Goetzmann makes for the
milling of his product as near home
vChas E Bennett. MinntsppJu"
as possible. Experience has proven
that this creates for him a bettor
price to begin with, it creates an in
dustry which is to his advantage in
many respects not necessary to enu
merate, while it is of very great im
portance to him to retain within his
reach the by-products of the milling
process, which the farmer needs in
his business. If he is going to be a
diversified farmer, as he ought to be,
he needs and must have for his use
the by-products of bran, shorts and
low grade flour, which arc almost in
dispensable to the producer of dairy
products and the raiser of livestock
of all kinds.
Instead, therefore, of ''greasing the
ways" for the export of wheat, the
farmer ought to be interested in the
manufacture of it at home and so
direct his marketing machinery as to
promote that result. He ought, also,
to be equally interested with the mil
ler in obtaining and maintaining
reasonable freight rates on flour for
export or domestic distribution. Nor
is there anyone naturally more sym
pathetic with the farmer in the secur
ing of a good price for his grain prod
uct than the miller. A stiff, stable
market is a better condition for him
than a weak and unstable one wholly
controlled by foreign conditions and
the state of foreign markets.
Viewed from the standpoint of an
outsider, it would seem as if the mu
tuality of interests of the miller and
the grain grower ought to encourage
them to co-operate for their common
benefit and that the contemplated
plans of the farmers to procure better
market conditions ought not to con
flict in the least with the efforts of the
miller to promote an industry so es
sential to the grain grower, and so
much more serviceable to him when
located so as to preserve for him con
venient access to its by-products.
Minneapolis Tribune.
FOUND VALUABLE WAR RELIC
Oregon Legion Man's Best Trophy of
Big Conflict, Is Worth
Large Sum.
Souvenirs varying from a chip off
Eiffel tower to a German beer stem
captured In Se
dan, were brought
back from France
by the returning
Americans. But
few of the me
mentoes stored in
a doughboy's
pack are as val
uable as that be
longing to George
D. Foster, former-
ly a corporal of
the Fourth Engi
neers, Fourth Division, who found a
rare Roman coin that is perhaps worth
several hundred dollars.
While looking for a safe and soft
spot in the ruins of an old house near
Sergy, France, Corporal Foster, now
a peace-loving member of the Ameri
can Legion in Cottage Grove, Ore.,
found an old gilt case containing a
com. He thrust it into his pack and
recently turned it over to a college
protestor who pronounced it worth
more than its weight in gold. Its date
is 306 A. D. On one side it bears the
inscription "Magnus," the title given
the Emperor Constantine. On the oth
er side are the inscriptions "Voties
XX," "Beatas Tranquilitas.," and
"Percursa Treveris." The latter
words, the professor declares, indi
cate that the coin was minted in Trier,
Germany, formerly a seat of the Ro
man empire.
Characters Taken From Life.
Topsy, of pigtails and ebon face,
wh scampers obiquitously through
the pages of Harriet Beecher Stowe's
"Uncle Tom's Cabin," lived, outside of
those pages and the imagination of
her creator. Black Sam, another well
known character in the book, also
had a living prototype.
Both Sam and Topsy lived over half
a century ago in the home of D. Howe
Allen, grandfather of Arthur G.
Beach, professor of English in Mari
etta college, whose estate was situ
ated on what is now known as Wal
nut Hills, Cincinnati.
Rain Will Ruin Any Machine
It's/a shame to see that valuable binder standing out
there in the rain today and the snow tomorrow when just
a few boards would protect it against the elements and pro-
long its life enough to pay for half a dozen sheds. How is it
with your idle machinery Just standing around just where
you last used it, or did you draw it into the farm yard to
rust and rot?
Why not stop the next time you're in town and take
home a "jag" of lumber for those much needed sheds?
Caley Lumber Co.
BENJ. SOULE, Manager
i """"""......i
American Legion
Notes
"There is not the least doubt in
my mind that if it had not been for the
.determined stand of the American Le
gion, Zimmer and I would still be in
prison,* writes Sergeant Neff, who
'with Sergeant Zimmer was arrested
by the Germans following an attempt
to capture Grover Cleveland Bergdoll,
notorious slacker. "The American Le
'gion came to my aid during one of
my darkest hours, and it demonstrated
by its unwavering loyalty toward a
comrade that its sublime aspirations
and lofty ideals concerning comrade
ship are a living truth."
Men entitled to navy retainer pay
and not receiving it should communi
cate with the navy allotment officer,
navy retainer pay section, Navy de
partment, Washington, D. C., accord
ing to the American Legion Weekly.
Applicants should give the following
data: Full name, date of enrollment,
rating and class* in which enrolled,
present address, present rating, num
ber of retainer pay checks received
(If any) and amount of each, date of
release from active duty, date of dis
charge from reserves.
One of the largest single cash con
tributions for the benefit of disabled
,ex-service men has been received by
'the St. Louis city central executive
committee of the American Legion.
.The amount was $5,000, "without a
string to it," given by Mrs. Newton
L. G. Wilson, wealthy philanthropist
of the city. The fund will be used
exclusively to assist disabled men in
obtaining just compensation and for
the relief of their dependents.
American Legion posts in Minnesota
are having a lively controversy as to
which one has the oldest Legionnaire
on its rolls*. Redwood Falls presented
Dr. Gibson, seventy-two years old, who
served with the medical corps at Fort
Benjamin Harrison, Ind., and held the
record until Kimball post introduced
Adam Brower, seventy-six vears old,
and Joe Mason, who admits eighty-six
.years and a highly prized membership
,in the Legion.
As a result of a fight waged on the
floor of congress by Representative
Hamilton Fish, Jr., of New York, a
prominent American Legion worker,
relatives' of aliens who served in the
American army, navy and marine
corps during the World war are en
titled to prefer led right of entry in
to the United States in the three-per
cent immigration to be allowed during
'the next vear under the immigration
bill.
Members of the American Legion in
St. Paul, Minn., cast their bread up
on the waters and it was returned
a hundredfold. Last spring they gave
assistance to a needy man. When the
Legion men were selling theater tick
ets for a benefit performance for un
employed veterans the ex-service man
sold 500 tickets in two days'. As a
result, 150 men were sent out on jobt
the follow ing-day.
A vigorous campaign waged by the
American Legion against disloyal ac
tivities of the Industrial Workers of
the oi Id is responsible for the stab
bing of a Legion worker by an I. W. W.
fanatic, according to reports received
at Legion national headquarters from
'Pocatello, Idaho. True to form, the
I. W. W. member attacked the Legion
man in a dark alley, stabbing him in
SOxS^-inch Cord
32x4
34x4%
it 11
THE PRINCETON UNION: THURSDAY, JUNE 30, 1921
the back.
For the prompt relief of disabled
'and unemployed ex-service men of Chi
cago, Theodore Roosevelt post of the
[American Legion staged a stag party,
at which Judge K. M. Landis was a
i guest. Battling Nelson was in charge
of the athletic program, the band of
the Great Lakes naval training station
provided music and" stage stars con
tributed their services to a midnight
frolic.
i Commuters and street car fans of
'New Orleans may have to walk when
the American Legion meets. Em
ployees of tlie New Orleans Railway
and Light company have formed a
post of the Legion. The street railway
men are enthusiastic members of their
post and have promised to attend meet
ings even if they have to bring along
their private cars.
An American Legion speaker has
been asked to explain the aims and
purposes of the organization at the an
nual labor picnic to be held June 18 in
Kansas City, Kan. The action, (which
followed a conference with the mayor
of the city, is intended to clear up any
i misunderstandings which radical ele
ments may have fostered in the ranks
of labor organizations.
Only men who were In the service
during the World war will be admitted
a hotel being erected by the Port
land, Ore., post of the American Le
gion The post is enlarging and re
jmodeling upper floors of its large club
house to accommodate 70 men.
Idaho American Legion members
opened their state service and mem
bership campaign with prayers in al
"most every church in the state.
Store window posters and street car
signs aided Summit post of the Amer
ican Legion at Akron, O., during a
membership campaign.
The Choice.
"Fifty dollars a week!"
The Old Man snorted.
"You've got a nerve, talking about
marrying my daughter on fifty a
week! Why, that wouldn't pay her
stieet car fare!"
"Humph!" grunted the Young
Chump. "It she doesn't hang around
home anj more'n that I can't use her!"
Richmond Times and Dispatch.
Covering the Distance.
"Did jour show have a long run?"
"No," replied Mr. Stormington
Barnes. "We didn't have any run
worth mentioning. But we had some
nice long walks."
Better Thrtiip
to ion and strengthen
tha organs of digestion and
elimination, improve appetite,
stop sick headaches, relieve bil
iousness, correct constipation.
They act promptly, pleasantly,
mtidly, yot thoroughly.
Tomorrow Alright
"**F
rs--
A*4 *Z'?*s
&%&&
So*
Get a
25c Box
C. A. Jack Drug Co.
Your
Drutfiat
Druggist.
30x3**StandardNon-SkidTire
pacity of 16,000 tires and 20,000 tubes, this plant permits refined pro-
duction on a quantity basis.
All materials used are the best obtainable. The quality is uniform.
It is the best fabric tire ever offered to the car owner at any price.
Firestone Cord Tires
Tire repair men, who judge values best, class these tires as having the
sturdiest carcass made. Forty-seven high-grade car manufacturers use
them as standard equipment They are the quality choice of cord users.
GATHERS IN THE RECRUITS
Captain of Wives' and Sisters' Team
Obtains Many Kansas Auxiliary
Members.
Wives and sisters defeated mothers
of American Legion members in ob-'
talning recruits
for the Legion's
Women's auxili-
ary in Pratt, Kan.
Mrs. Myron Gla
ser, captain of
the wives and sis-
s, unassisted,
persuaded 28'
women to sign on'
the dotted line.
Mrs. Glaser Is
a charter member
of Pratt unit of'
the auxiliary which was founded last
January. It has a membership of 67'
and promises to be one of the most
active in the state of Kansas.
English Electric House.
Seventy-three ill-electric houses
have been built for the workers in
a large English electric-power plant,
says Popular Mechanics Magazine. The
equipment includes, heating and cook
ing stoves, laundry apparatus and
other common household articles.
Emergencies are provided for by one
chimnej, so that coal stoves may be
used if uecebsaiy.
LUCKY
STRIKE
'ITS TOASTED"
Cigarette
No cigarette has
the same delicious
flavor as Lucky
Strike. Because
Lucky Strike is the
toasted cigarette.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
DR. D. A. McRAE
Dentist
Office in Odd Fellows Block
Princeton, Minnesota
DR. NEIL A. STACEY
Dentist
Over Jack's Drug Store. Phone 212
Princeton, Minnesota
ELVERO L. MCMILLAN
Lawyer
Office in Townsend Building
Princeton, Minnesota
W. C. DOANE
Lawyer
County Attorney. I. O. O. F. Blk.
Princeton, Minnesota
EVAN H. PETERSON
Attorney
Office in Odd Fellows Block
Princeton, Minnesota
4^
GEORGE PRENTICE ROSS
Undertaker and State Licensed
Embalmer
Disinfecting a Specialty. Phone 30
Princeton, Minnesota
This new low price
is made possible
by strictest econ
omies and special
ized production.
Plant No. 2 was
erected for the sole
purpose of making
30x3H-inch Non
Skid fabric tires.
With a daily ca-
New Price $24.50
46.30 54.90
it it
it
NORT SID E AUT O O
PRESCOTT & JONES, Proprietors
ii
Minnesota
ymMawtxAMaG^
Ettttaaaoio^^
Our Policy
has always been to keep the assets of our
institution thoroughly liquid. Our mem
bership in the Federal Reserve System
accomplishes this aim to a degree previously
impossible. In the Federal Reserve Bank
we have an unfailing reservoir of cash
obtainable in exchange for commercial
paper which we hold.
First National Bank
Princeton, Minn.
Mo Much Have
You Saved?
You remember last January you .resolved to
save money.
July first marks the half-way point of the
year, and if you have fallen behind in what you
planned to save, why not make up for lost time by
either opening an account at the Princeton State
Bank or making a substantial deposit on the one
you already have.
How much money are you going to save be
tween now and December 31st?
THE PRINCETON
STATE BANK
57r Interest Paid on Certificates of Deposit
FARM LOANS INSURANCE
BankyourMoney A/QW
Then, some dauvybayM
HAVEN'T YOU AND YOUR WIFE OFTEN TALKED ABOUT
"BUYING A HOME?" WELL, IT CAN BE DONE. IT RESTS
ENTIRELY WITH YOU.
THE FIRST THING IS TO COME IN AND START A BANK
ACCOUNT. THEN REGULARLY ADD AS MUCH AS YOU CAN
SPARE. KEEP THIS UP AND IT WON'T BE LONG UNTIL YOU
CAN BUY THAT HOME. AND YOU CAN BUY IT CHEAPER
FOR CASH.
YOU WILL RECEIVE 5 PER CENT INTEREST.
Security State Bank
MmmmmmmaBammmmamam
R. D. N. SPRINGER, Oph. D.
OPTOMETRIST
of Dr. Kline's Sanatorium, Anoka Will be t*
Princeton, Sunday, July 2 4
(UNTIL 6PM)
At MERCHANTS HOTEL
Byu Examined and Glasses Fitted
"If your credit is good at the bank, it is
good with me."

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