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The Princeton union. (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, October 13, 1921, Image 2

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1921-10-13/ed-1/seq-2/

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AG E TW O 'gpsr*
1,500 IN JUNIOR
STOCKJMTESTS
Calves, Pigs and Lambs Fed by Boys
and Girls Enter Final Live-
stock Show, Nov. 16.
PRIZES AMOUNT TO $9,000.00
Princeton Girl, Ella Neumann, to Ex-
hibit Prize Ayrshire Calf at
Show in South St. Paul.
Fifteen hundred boys and girls on
Minnesota farms have been feeding
baby beef and dairy calves, hogs and
sheep this summer in competition for
junior livestock show honors, accord
ing to W. A. McKerrow, secretary of
the Minnesota Livestock Breeders' as
sociation. The climax of their work
will come on November 17, when judg
ing will begin at the fourth annual
show at South St. Paul. The show
opens on November 16. The best ani
mals raised by the boys and girls of
each county in six to eight months of
careful feeding have been selected
through local competition to enter the
final event of the year at the junior
livestock show, November 18, the last
day of the show, will be devoted to an
auction sale of beef calves, hogs and
sheep. Nearly $9,000 will be spent for
prizes and the expenses of the contes
tants.
In 1916 the Minnesota Livestock
Breeders' association decided to devote
the major portion of its income to pro
moting the worx of boys' and girls'
clubs and competitive junior shows.
TheTe were only 35 animals at the
first state show at the 1920 show
there were 120 beef calves alone, while
two boys from each of 15 counties ex
hibited dairy calves, and 40 pigs from
40 counties and 40 lambs from 20 coun
ties were entered. The 1921 show
will be the climax of years of work by
stockmen, club leaders, county agents
and the livestock breeders' association.
Ella Neumann, who v/on first place
in the calf contest at our county fair,
is to exhibit her prize Ayrshire at the
show in South St. Paul.
CALL FOR BUREAU'S AID.
Federal Investigators Ask Federation
to Furnish Price Records for
Seven Years.
St. Paul, Oct. 13.Congress has
called on the county farm bureaus of
Minnesota to help in its nationwide
investigation of agricultural condi
tions. Nearly every county farm bu
reau in the state has been asked to
compile a detailed record of the prices
farmers have had to pay for the neces
sities of life for the last seven years.
For comparison, the county bureaus
have been asked to prepare a similar
record of the. prices farmers have re
ceived for their crops each year since
1913.
The American Farm Burer.u federa
tion undertook this national price sur
vey at the request of the joint congres
sional investigating commission, made
up of both the members of the house
and senate, appointed to investigate
the cause of the farmers' critical eco
nomic condition and to devise reme
dies. The figures, when compiled and
presented to the congressmen, will
show the results of the most extensive
statistical inquiry ever undertaken by
a farmers' organization, according to
farm bureau officers. The congres
sional commission has asked for rec
ords showing the price actually paid
by farmers for food, clothing, house
furnishings, tools and machinery, fer
tilizers and spraying material, seed,
feed, building material, fuel and light.
MONTHLY FARM PAY IS $34.
Potato Pickers Receiving on an Ave
rage $2.50 per Day Co
Picked at 5 Cents.
St. Paul, Oct. 13.Average monthly
wages being paid farm laborers have
declined 16 per cent since the begin
ning of 1921 harvest season, according
Tin
4
O seal the
delicious Burley
flavor Once you've
enjoyed the
toastedflavor you.will al
ways want it
to figures compiled today by the Min
nesota Farm Bureau federation. The
federation's figures are based on re
ports sent in by county farm bureaus
in the fifth statewide farm labor sur
vey conducted by the organization this
year. The returns showing wages be
ing paid in each county for various
classes of work indicate the following
average rates of pay for farm labor in
Minnesota:
General work$34 a month, for per^
manent help, and $1.98 a day.
Corn picking4% to 5 cents a bush
el when unloading is done by hand,
and 3.8 a bushel when unloading is
done by elevator.
Potato Picking4.8 cents a bushel
and $2.50 a day.
Two months ago a similar survey by
the federation showed that farmers
were paying an average of $41 a
month for general farm work, and $45
for harvesting. In at least one-third
of the counties in Minnesota, federa
tion officers said, farmers now are
paying less than $34 average of the
first 40 counties to report in the latest
survey, 16 declared $30. to be the pre
vailing monthly wage, while four oth
ers set it as low as $25.
Minnesota's Famous Butter.
The rich state of Minnesota is
known in many parts of the effete
east as the land that produces the
finest creamery butter that ever
tickled the taste of the New York and
Bostonian epicure. Minnesota's co
operative creamery product commands
a premium price in the New York
market.
For the past two decades Minnesota
butter has been awarded many of the
best prizes for quality. Minnesota
carried off the grand prize for butter
at the Louisiana Purchase exposition.
Two cups awarded by the international
dairy show have found a resting place
in this state, Minnesota buttermakers
have won a dozen annual prize ban
ners offered by the National Creamery
Buttermakers' association.
We hope to win honors again in the
coming national dairy show on the
state fair grounds October 8 to 15.
Minnesota as a dairy state is attract
ing more attention each year. Our
cheese is already famous. Our butter
is in the premium class. The reason
for this fortunate situation is first,
the excellent quality of pasturage and
the care taken of the thoroughbred
stock. Secondly, Minnesota farmers
bring the finest quality of raw ma
terial to cheese factories and to the
cheesemakers and co-operative cream
healthy milkers. Thirdly, Minnesota
eheesmakers and co-operative cream
ery 'buttermakers understand the
That New Stove
Now's the time to pick it
outand if you burn soft
coal, take our tip and choose
the Stewart Hot Blast Oak.
You'llfindthis the cleanest and
most satisfactory of all soft coal
heaters. It burns wood too.
STOVES .nd RANGES
are noted for their perfect oper
ation and extreme durability.
Built to work right and do work
right. They give you big value
for your money.
"We can supply just the model
that will please you best.
EvensHardware Co,
Princeton, Minn.
AUCTION!
On farm of G. Postma, the old M. C. Thorring place, 6 miles
north and three-quarters of a mile west of Princeton, 1 south
and three-quarters of a mile west of cheese factory, about 10
miles south of Milaca, 2 Vi miles south and 2 miles east of Pease.
Wednesday, October 26
BEGINNING AT 1 P. M.
The Following Property Will Then be Offered for Sale:
8 Milk Cows, high grade Holsteins
2 Heifers, coming two years old, in calf
5 Heifer Calves, from 6 months to 1 year old
1 Grade Bull, 6 months old:
1 Registered Herd Bull, 3 years old
techhic of their art as thoroughly as
Ignace Jan Paderewski understands
music. ??#r^'3lfe*
With good land/ good' grass/ good
silage, good cows, good cream and
good buttermakers, it is not surpris
ing that Minnesota produces the best
butter in the world.Fairmont Daily
Sentinel.
An Egg-Producing Mash.
As a result of eight years* feeding
tests at the United States department
of agriculture poultry yards at Belts
ville, Md., a mash feed has been com
pounded which gives uniform high
egg production. This mash, which has
been tested for three years, is made
of 4 per cent bran, 4 per cent mid
dlings, 26 per cent meat scrap, and 66
per cent corn meal. In the experi
ments the hens were allowed to select
their own mash ingredients. This is
the proportion of those different feeds
which they ate during the year. Sev
eral pens of 30 hens each, both of
Leghorns and Rhode Island Reds, have
averaged from 140 to 155 eggs apiece
while this mash was fed. While the
mash seems to be especially adapted for
Leghorns, it has given very good re
sults with Reds. Wyandottes and
Plymouth Rocks were found to get too
fat on the ration and a mash some
what lower in meat scrap has given
better results with these breeds. Both
the Wyandottes and Plymouth Rocks
at Beltsville are large standard sized
fowls. The tendency to become over
fat on this mash probably would not
be found in a smaller type of Plym
outh Rocks, such as is often found on
commercial poultry farms.
USUAL TERMS OF SALE
G. POSTMA, Owner
Potato Yield in Beltrami County.
Potato picking in Beltrami county is
progressing rapidly and will be fin
ished in two or three days if weather
conditions permit, according to Coun
ty Agent Dvoracek. An average yield*
of about 200 bushels per acre is ex
pected for the county. Green Moun
tains, Russets and Cobblers are among
the most common varieties raised.
Farmers are unwise if they sell at
this time, Mr. Dvoracek pointed out,
as the price is almost sure to advance
because of the shortage for the coun
try as a whole. The country will be
about 50 or 60 million bushels short of
the normal consumption and this
means that prices are bound to rise,
he declared.Bemidji Sentinel.
200 Creameries Join.
More than a third of the co-opera
tive creameries of the state have al
ready taken membership in the Minne
sota Co-operative Creameries associa
tion, inc., according to A. J. McGuire
in charge of organization. The asso-
^^.--,__Jlp now
to begin operation, says Mr. McGuire,
-but itris being organised and built to
serve alUthe ^creameries, and all will
be given an opportunity to join before
active oper#nb are started* The di
rectors will 'meet October 14 to lay
Ving
First
Next And Last
PH
THISUNIT WALL
MATERIAL TAKES
WJlEAPERTOPERFECnOM
plans for organizing the different dis
tricts. District' consisting of Chis
ago Isanti, Pine, Mille Lacs and Kan
abec counties, has had sufficient mem
bership for some time to begin work.
Ca* lot shipments will be the first
project undertaken.
Ladies' and Misses' dress illustrated is Designer style No. 3375
Girls' frock is Designer style No. 3386
Autumn Fabrics are as
Varied as Autumn Leaves
ELVETS, brocades, serge, tricotine and home
spunour Piece-Goods Department is display
the very fabrics that Paris and Fifth Avenue
have sponsored.
In addition to their exceptionally attractive prices,
you can also avail yourself of a wonderful new saving
The Belrobea patented picture-guide to dressmak
ing enclosed with every new Designer Pattern that
saves you $6, $8, $10 or more on the material alone
for every frock you make and absolutely assures the
success of everything you make.
it saves to 1% yards of material50c to
$10.00because of its professional, individual
layout chart.
it guides you in putting your garment together
so that you attain the elusive fit, drape and
finish of an expert.
it gives you Paris' own touch in finish-those
all-important things upon which the success
of your gown depends.
Farmers Co-operative Co.
Princeton, Minnesota
You can leave SHEETROCK in its own
attractive finish of soft mist gray. Or you
can have it painted, papered or paneled. It
takes any decorative treatment.
SHEETROCK, being a sheet of pure
gypsum rock, encased in a heavy protective
covering, is fireproof and cannot warp, shrink
or buckle. It resists heat, cold and sound
Naturally then, the use of SHEETROCK
will not1
only add to the beauty, safety and
comfort of your home it also assures lasting
economy-on alterations and repairs as well
as for new construction.
Let us show you how easily SHEET
ROCK can be sawed and nailed how quickly
it can be put up. Drop in and see us today.
Princeton, Minnesota
I
asa.
Oiur Policy
has always been to keep the assets of our
institution thoroughly liquid. Our mem
bership in the Federal Reserve System
accomplishes this aim to a degree previously
impossible. In the Federal Reserve Bank
we have an unfailing reservoir of cash
obtainable in exchange for commercial
paper which we hold.
First National Bank
Princeton, Minn.
with S
*omxouMjmMMM*WKM&
Blood Tells!
The dictionary defines thrift as having
to do with the management of ones resources.
A connection with the Princeton State Bank
directly promotes thrift because it co-oper
ates helpfully with depositors.
The thrifty individual is a community
asset. The number of people in Princeton
who have banking accounts is increasing
steadily. Build your account here and take
advantage of the helpful co-operation which
we are in a* position to offer you.
THE PRINCETON
STATE BANK
5% Interest Paid on Certificates of Deposit
FARM LOANS INSURANCE
ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
^yotLr*
Business
FOR YOUR BANKING BUSINESS WE OFFER YOU THE
SAFETY AND SERVICES OF OUR BANK.
OUR DIRECTORS
0
N
USIN
1
SOUND, CONSERVATIVE BANKING
S AND OFFICERS ARE MEN OF KNOWN
CHARACTER ANEDSFINANCIAL ABILITY WHO CONDUCT OUR
PA METHODS.
WE SHALL, AT ANY TIME, BE GLAD TO ADVISE WITH
YOU ON FINANCIAL MATTERS AND
INVESTMENTS-CON"N
FIDENTIALLY AND WITHOUT CHARGE.
YOU WILL RECEIVE 5 PER CENT INTEREST.
SECURITY STATE BANK
PRINCETON, MINNESOTA
obooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
R. D. N. SPRINGER, Oph. D.
OPTOMETRIST
f Dr. Kline'a Sanatorium, Anoka Will b a
Princeton, Sunday, Oct. 16
(UNTIL 6 P. M.)
At MERCHANTS HOTEL
Byes Bxamimrf and Glaaaea Flttai
"If your credit is good at the bank, it is
good with me."
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