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The Princeton union. (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, December 29, 1921, Image 2

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1921-12-29/ed-1/seq-2/

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PAGE TWO
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AVOID CROWDING
ST. PAUL MARKET
Under Former Shipping Arrangements
South St. Paul Livestock Market
Glutted on Wednesday.
PRICES FORCED TOO LOWSaturday
Sixty Carloads Shifted to Other Mar-
ket Days by Combined Action
of Farmers and Roads.
St. Paul, Dee. 29.Losses amount
ing at times to $2,000 a day, suffered
by northwest livestock shippers, may
be wiped out in time as a result of a
joint investigation undertaken by
farmers, railroad officials, packers
and stockyard operators, the Minne
sota Farm Bureau federation said to
day.
The investigation showed that be
cause of improper arrangement of
shipments, the South St. Paul market
is glutted on some days and under
supplied on others. Records covering
1920 and the first six months of 1921
show that shipments reaching the
market on Wednesday were from 30
to 55 per cent larger than arrivals on
Tuesday and Thursday. Price records
for the same period show that hogs
brought an average of five cents a
pound less on Wednesday, due proba
bly to the large supply. The differ
ence between total prices received by
shippers for hogs on the market on
Tuesday and Thursday, and prices re
ceived by those whose hogs were on
the market Wednesday, has amounted
to as high as $2,000, according to the
investigation department of the state
farm bureau federation.
As a result of tiie investigation,
railroads have changed stock train
schedules so that 50 to 60 cars of
stock which formerly arrived on Wed
nesday now reach the market on
Thursday. Since these changes were
made, 17.6 per cent of all stock arriv
ing each week has reached the market
on Tuesday, 20.4 per cent on Wednes
day, and 17 per cent on Thursday.
HOWARD TO SPEAK.
Delegates to Federation Convention
Face Three Days of Hardwork,
Also Night Sessions.
St. Paul, Dec. 29.How representa
tives of farming districts changed the
course of legislation in the last session
of congress and forced passage of
agricultural laws will "be told by
James R. Howard, president of the
American Farm Bureau federation,
when he addresses the third annual
state convention of the Minnesota
federation in St. Paul next week.
Mr. Howard is to speak at the first
day's session of the convention, in the
auditorium of the College of Agricul
ture. He has chosen the Minnesota
convention for the presentation of an
official statement on the farm bureau
federation's attitude toward the agri
cultural bloc, the work of other blocs,
and a farmers' legislative program for
1922.
Congressman Sydney Anderson,
chairman of the joint congressional
committee investigating agricultural
conditions, is to speak on the results
of the inquiry.
January 3, the opening day of the
convention, is "Farm Bureau Federa
tion Day" of Farmers' and Home Mak
ers' week at University farm. Con
vention delegates face three days of
'continuous hard work, according to
announcements received by the county
farm bureau. Two night sessions
have been scheduled, one to thresh out
a state agricultural program for 1922,
and another to devote its whole at
tention to the farm credit situation.
In the Good Old Days.
Odd, what a queer jumble of unim
portant things stick in the memory!
In winter my mother used to hang
about my nock a r-cd flannel bag of
asafetida to ward off infection. She
^believed in this as firmly as in the ad
visability of seeing the new moon over
her right shoulder. The pervasive
aroma of forty such amulets in an
overcrowded school room I recall to
this day, but not with poignant regret
for the passing of this superstition.
Much as I enjoyed watching my ma
ternal grandmother roll into her back
yard every spring a hugh iron pot in
which she concocted soft soap from the
winter's accumulation of fat, my recol.
lection of the product is not so agree
ablethe stuff was sometimes intro
duced into my ablutionsthat I should
care to impose its manufacture or use
upon any child of these times. This
grandmother was a Virginian, thor
oughly skilled in the household arts,
but I am constrained to think that in
these days she would be very quick to
accommodate herself to the changed
conditions.Meredith Nicholson in
Harper's.
$5 Portrait Free
In order to be doing something
during these dull times, we will make
you a 14x20 oval convex 5.00 portrait
FREE. We want you to show it to
your friends and advertise our work.
All we ask of yousend us 95c to pay
for postage and boxing and we will
send the portrait prepaid, free. Mail
your photos, with 95c. Give us a trial.
No frame catchbuy your frame
where you please. We copy anything
and everything. Money back if not
pleased.
PALM ART CO.,
Hastings, Neb
am
-&&&$,%
PEASE
H. Toussaint transacted business at
the county seat Saturday.
Wm. Nagel of Ogilvie spent Monday
with home folks and Pease friends.
Jake Baas, who has been visiting
relatives and friends in Iowa for sev
eral weeks, arrived home on Thursday
evening.
Agent Murphy went to St. Paul
and spent Christmas at the
home of his mother.
Ed. DeWitt of Grundy Center, Iowa,
came up last week and is spending his
holiday vacation at the D. Gideon
home.
Mrs. P. Toussaint and children of
Ogilvie came down Christmas and
spent the day at the home of Mr. and
Mrs. J. Toussaint.
Mrs. John Baas, who has been con
fined to her home with illness, is re
covering.
Ed. Talen of Milaca attended the
young people's program which was
given Friday evening.
Guy Schutte, principal of the high
school at Friendship, Wis., arrived
home Saturday evening to spend the
holidays with his mother, Mrs. D.
Schutte, and family.
J. A. Jetsinga autced to Milaca
Wednesday on business.
L. Landaal, teacher in the Riverside
parochial school, left Saturday morn
ing for Baldwin, Wis., where he will
spend his vacation with home folks
and friends.
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Hubers of
Orange City, Iowa, who came to at
tend the funeral of the former's moth
er, returned to their home Wednesday.
Mr. and Mrs. Garritt Van Sloten of
Milaca spent Christmas day at the
home of Mrs. Van Sloten's parents,
Mr. and Mrs. H. Weyschede.
The pupils of the Pease and River
side Christian school rendered their
annual Christmas program to a large
and appreciative audience Thursday
afternoon and, as usual, each pupil de
livered his part very well, showing the
excellent training which their respec
tive teachers had imparted to them.
Dr. Kling of Milaca was summoned
to the W. F. Groenveld home Friday
to attend Frederick, who was suffering
with inflammatory rheumatism, but
who at present is nicely recovering.
Mr. Byker of Hancock was in town
several days last week and while here
closed a deal whereby he became the
owner of the B. Ykema farm. Mr.
Byker and family expect to move here
in March.
Mrs. R. Roelefs of Prinsburg ar
rived Thursday evening for an ex
tended visit with her daughters, Miss
Agnes Roelefs, Mrs. John Brink and
Mrs. W. F. Groenveld.
Mr. Garrison of Milaca attended the
Christmas program here Friday even
ing and favored the audience with
several solos, which were highly ap
preciated.
S. Jongejeugd and friend of South
Dakota returned to their home Thurs
day after visiting at the home of John
Jonjejeugd and Jacob Jongejeugd,
who are uncles of the former.
The Young Ladies' Sewing society
tendered their ex-president, Mrs. R.
Pettinga, a pleasant surprise last
Wednesday afternoon, when they con
gregated at her home to do honor to
her son, Cornelius Wesley, who was
the recepient of many a pretty and
useful gift.
Nick Van Sloten and sister, Madge,
left Tuesday morning for an extended
visit with freinds in Chicago.
Miss Alice Landaal, who has been
visiting at the home of her sister, Mrs.
R. Pettinga, for several weeks, left for
her home in Baldwin, Wis., Wednes
day,
Mr. and Mrs. John H. Hubers and
son, Bert, of Hull, Iowa, departed for
their home Tuesday, after spending
two weeks with relatives and friends
in this community.
L. Slaghter was a Milaca business
caller on Tuesday.
Claus Dykstra of Sheldon, Iowa, ar
rived Tuesday evening to transact
business and visit for a few days with
II rrnqy""iJ"
old friends. Mr. Dykstra was former
ly a resident of this vicinity.
MILO, ROUTE 1
i
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Groustra en
tertained the Milo Mutual Farmers'
club at their home on Tuesday evening
of last week. A large crowd, about
60 in number, attended. After 9
o'clock cards were played at eight ta
bles until midnight, when lunch was
served. Leslie Cone and Bertha
Deuel won first prizes, and Helmet
Totzke and Mary Smith Teceived the
boobies. The club will be entertained
at the Nels Sederquist home on Fri
day evening, January 13. This will
be the seventh annual meeting and
new officers will be elected. All those
who are interested should attend.
Miss Anna Munsch returned to her
home in Princeton on Wednesday af
ter spending three weeks with her sis
ter, Mrs. John Smith.
Eleazer Northway returned to his
home at Brook Park last Wednesday
after a visit at the home of his grand
parents, Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Northway.
Mrs. Norman Marshall and daugh
ters, Avis and Avonne, came up from
Minneapolis to spend Christmas with
their mother and grandmother, Mrs.
Robt. Ayers.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Deuel and
daughter, Edna, returned to their home
at St. Cloud on Wednesday of last
week after a short visit at the I. W.
Deuel and Herman Axt homes.
Calvin Pitman departed for his Da
kota home Friday morning after
spending a fortnight with his grand
parents, Mr. and Mrs. M. E. North
way.
Robert, the little son of Mr. and
Mrs. Herman Barnick, fell on the floor
Thursday afternoon and broke his
arm. The little fellow was imediately
taken to Milaca, where the fracture
was reduced "by Dr. Kling and he is
getting along nicely.
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Strombeck and
Mr. and Mrs. George Bemis were en
tertained at supper Christmas eve at
the Nels Anderson home.
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Johnson and
family, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Bemis, Mr.
and Mrs. Herman Axt and daugh
ter and Grandma Axt, Mr. and
Mrs. I. W. Deuel and family, A. G.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
DR. D. A. McRAE
Dentist
Office in Odd Fellows Block
Princeton, Minnesota
DR. NEIL A. STACEY
Dentist
Over Jack's Drug Store. Phone 212
Princeton, Minnesota
ELYERO L. MCMILLAN
Lawyer
Office in Townsend Building
Princeton, Minnesota
W. C.DOANE
Lawyer
County Attorney. I. O. O. F. Blk.
Princeton, Minnesota
EVAN H. PETERSON
Attorney
Office in Odd Fellows Block
Princeton, Minnesota
GEORGE PRENTICE ROSS
Undertaker and State Licensed
Embalmer
Disinfecting a Specialty. Phone 30
Princeton, Minnesota
National Mazda
The Best Lamp Made.
For sale at
Olson's Electric Shop
Smith's Meat Market
We furnish the best of everything in fresh and salt
MEATS, POULTRY, FISH, ETC.
Prices the lowest compared with quality.
We buy Cattle and Hogs and pay
highest market prices.
The old-established Meat Market on Main Street.
HIDES AND FURS
We pay top prices for Muskrat,
Mink, Skunk etc. We also want Cattle
and Horse hides.
Princeton, Minn.
Hides are low, why not get a good robe or coat
made? Robes, tanning and making complete $16.50 to
$19.50. Coats, tanning and making complete $22*50
to $28.00.
Townsend Produce Co.
Phone 322 Princeton, Minn.
jc-"-1
)it!?MtopL^'- ^"~.3' ffifr -ifi&fo
THE PRINCETON UNION: THURSDAY, DECEMBER 29,1921
Bemis, sons and daughter, and Dewey
Bimis were entertained on Christmas
day and evening at the home of Axt
Bros.
Guests at the Myron Northway
home on Christmas day were Mr. and
Mrs. John Aarseth and son, Roy, Mr.
and Mrs. Jergon Olson and daughter,
Selma, and Mr. and Mrs. Frank El
dred and baby.
The Nels Johnson and Roy Atkin
son families spent Christmas at the
Britton home.
Mrs. I. W. Deuel is confined to her
bed with rheumatism.
Mias Stella Sederquist, accompanied
by her friend, Miss Blanche Acker
man, came up from Minneapolis Sat
urday to spend the holidays at home.
Percy Deuel, accompanied by the
Bemis brothers, autoed to Minneap
olis Tuesday for a short stay.
The Nels Sederquist family and Miss
Ackerman spent Christmas at the O.
B. Kessler home.
u^p^^^^^^J^^
"T
DISTRICT THREE
Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Gustafson,
daughter, Gladys, son, Leslie, and
Miss Vivian Bockoven were enter
tained at a 6 o'clock dinner Christmas
eve at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Chas. Hammel.
Mr. and Mrs. Gens entertained the
Walter Mark family Christmas day.
We Sell at Right Prices
Lumber, Lath,
Posts, Shingles,
Sash, Doors, Etc.
J&
Wood and Coal,
Cement, Lime,
Plaster, Roofing,
Building Tile,
Brick, Etc., Etc,
Price, Quality and Service
See our big stock.
Call and see our big reduction
in Meat Prices
Highest market prices paid for
The Gustafson family entertained
Mr. and Mrs. L. D. Bockoven and
daughter, Vivian, Mr. and Mrs. Wal
ter Jensen and baroy,
RUQD LUMBER CO.
J. V. MORGAN, Manager Princeton, Minn.
..js.wsw5raMaBaes
The Leader Meat Market
Cash and Carry Plan
Veal, Cream,
Chickens, Eggs
and Produce
Bring in your hides and have them made into
robes, overcoats and leather.
CALVIN OLSON
Princeton, Minn.
We Are
Equipped
To do repairing on all makes of cars.
First-class workmen and satisfaction
guaranteed.
Vulcanizing and tire repairing.
Prices reasonable.
North Side Auto Co
PRESCOTT & JONES Props.
Also Agents for Firestone Tires
?/V yig-'-A^-IA
Chas. Moody,
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Hammel and baby,
Oscar Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. Falk and
son, and Mr. and Mrs. Henry Balfanz
and children at a big turkey dinner
Christmas day.
Mr. and Mrs. Gens and children
spent Monday afternoon at the R.
Manke home.
Food for the Rector's Thought.
The rector who sets down rules re
specting the dress of brides probe bly
hasn't stopped to think how many jus
tices of the peace there are.New
York Post.
*'A Shine pg
In EveryH
Get a Can
TO-DAY MIJl
From Your
Hardware
or Grocery BealerA
We
Would Be Pleased
To
Have You Drop In
When in need of
anything in the
Building
Line
We can supply
everything needed.
Remember
Our sole object is to
keep the fact before you,
expecting that when in
need of anything in our
line, you will give us a
call. &
iifrfyf e^
On The Farm
O In Town
GWJB.
your*
i
iglSllSllHllSpreilHllH^^
a., 'f-K^.'^sV, .iA
This Bank endeavors to be un
usually helpful to the farmer.
It is our suggestion that on
the frequent trips to town you
come in to visit us. We highly
value our business relationship
with the farmers of this vicinity.
Make use of our banking facili
ties and business counsel to solve
your problems.
THE PRINCETON
STATE BANK
5'/' Interest Paid on Certificates of Deposit
FARM LOANS INSURANCE
0O0000O0O0OOOOCM3K3000OO0OOOO000O0O00OOOOCMOOOOOCX)00CX
WIFE. a. ^s
BANK BOO
i 'art*'^~-""*i*~-'--*J--J
.,*r&.<A
W
N
'U $
Si-
for* PRESENT.
BEFORE A MAN MARRIES HE OUGHT TO SAVE MONEY.
AFTER HE MARRIES HE MUST SAVE MONEY.
THE BEST WAY TO SAVE MONEY IS TO GIVE YOUR
WIFE A BANK ACCOUNT IN OUR BANK. SHE WILL HELP
YOU GET AHEAD, BECAUSE WOMEN ARE BETTER MANA-
GERS THAN MEN.
TRY IT. YOU WILL FIND THAT WE ARE RIGHT.
YOU WILL RECEIVE 5 PER CENT INTEREST.
SECURITY STATE BANK
PRINCETON, MINNESOTA
I R. D. N. SPRINGER, Oph. D.
OPTOMETRIST
W Dr. Kline's Sanatorium, Aa*ka i
Princeton, Sunday, Jan. 15
(UNTIL 8 P.
At MERCHANTS HOTBL
mym Examln-d and Glasses F1tt*s
"If your credit is good at the bank, it
good with mc"
ji i ,t^'
i i
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