OCR Interpretation


The Princeton union. (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, January 05, 1922, Image 8

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1922-01-05/ed-1/seq-8/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 8

mencan
Leqion
Corner
Many Attend Legion Dance.
Over 200 couples danced at the le
gion hall on Monday night and en
joyment reigned supreme. The boys
cleared about $125, and they need it.
A first-class luncheon was served by
the ladies of the legion auxiliary. Le
gion dances are at all times popular
events.
During the last year Uncle Sam has
courteously been loaning hundreds of
his rifles and equipment to Minnesota
legion posts for use on patriotic oc
casions. His only stipulation is that
each post, on January 1, answer roll
call for filling out and returning form
No. 110, sent each post direct from
7th corps headquarters, Fort Crook,
Neb. To show that they appreciate
Uncle Sam's courtesy, the Gopher boys
are mailing this form without delay.
On the mailing list of the Minne
sota legion news service is a bright
little publication which proves the
truth of the motto, "A man may be
down but he's never out." It is the
"Aberdeen Bugle," published weekly
by disabled service men receiving
treatment in the Aberdeen hospital,
St. Paul. And it's not a bit down
hearted either.
Still another Minnesota legion post
was added to the Gopher roll call last
week. Post No. 489 of Underwood is
the newcomer. In addition, former
service men of Cushing, Plato and
Jenkins, in Morrison, McLcod and
Crow Wing counties, have asked for
charter application blanks with which
to organize. That will make 492 Min
nesota legion posts. "Over the top
for 500" says State Commander Van
Dyke.
Minnesota's first American legion
post, Theodore Peters post No. 1 of
Minneapolis, is first also in many le
gion endeavors. A half-page picture
in the American Legion Weekly shows
a billboard advertisement used by
Peterson post in announcing its
dances and vaudeville shows at Ken
wood armory, and the Legion Weekly
editor says: "Try this on your bill
boards." Again, on New Year's eve,
the largest gathering in Minneapolis
was under auspices of Peterson post.
A spotlight thrown on Father Time at
the stroke of midnight was the signal
for the legion jubilee to let loose its
big demonstration.
Endless were the efforts and count
less the deeds of members of the
American legion and its auxiliary to
bring Christmas cheer to their sick
and unemployed comrades. To tell the
whole story would be impossible. The
Bearcat post of Minneapolis bought
and distributed 165 bushel baskets of
food for the poor and needy. East St.
Paul legion post and its auxiliary
feasted and entertained 585 needy
school children of the community, and
Legionaire Chick Olson, impersonat
ing Santa Clause, came down a real
chimney and loaded the little tots'
arms with gifts, while their eyes al
most popped out of their heads with
~x wonder and delight. Ramsey county
legionaires fed and entertained more
than 500 hungry and unemployed bud
dies, and with the legion auxiliary,
visited disabled comrades in hospital
and distributed hundreds of presents
from the legion auxiliary units of the
state, in addition to supplying Christ
mas baskets of good things to 360
needy families. Disabled veterans in
Minneapolis hospitals were remem
bered by Hennepin county legionaires
1
Princeton,
and auxiliary members. If in all Min
nesota there was one lonely or hungry
buddy on Christmas day, 1921, it was
only because his legion comrades were
without knowledge of his plight. They
were eager and anxious to help.
Legionaires of Minnesota's first dis
trict met at Rochester January 3 to
honor National Commander Hanford
MacNider of Mason City, la., the prin
cipal speaker, who said in part: "The
strength of the legion is in your posts
and the strength of your posts is in
your members. Your national officers
are but your employesyour servants.
Send us your bricks or your bouquets,
but, most of all, your suggestions for
real constructive progress. Pay your
New Year dues right now and get that
other lad into the legion. The inspira
tion of having you behind us will help
your national officers to deliver the
goods. May the New Year hold much
happiness for all of us and for our
country."
"Get out the Gopher gang! Over
the top for 1922! Let's go!" That's
the slogan of 35,000 Minnesota legion
aires who not only believe in the
American legion and its ideals, but are
ready to tell the world that there's
no state like Minnesota, either in a
business or patriotic sense. To say
that Gopher legionaires are proud of
the Gopher state is putting it mildly
and they're out to prove that in
legion membership.
"Do you know that in 1921 the
American legion of Minnesota fed
5,800 former service men, lodged over
1,200, cared for over 590 families, and
gave employment to more than 1,400.
On January 1, 1922, there are over 3,-
500 former service men out of work in
the Gopher state, many of them hun
gry, many families in need of help and
assistance. Who will 'do the Work in
1922? The American legion's creed
is: 'Be thy brother's keeper.' Join
the American legion, pay your dues
for 1922 now, help your buddies."
Stafford King
99 LICENSES ARE
ISSUED FOR 1921
(Continued from page one)
Malinda M. Mayer, Andrew Oscar
Peterson and Annie Bergquist, Wil
liam Loren Lakie and Fay Etta Hay,
Iver A. Kanten and Hilda M. Johan
son, Earl Douglas Edmunds and Lulu
Henrietta Olson, Otto Henry Dalchow
and Wanda Hamann.
OctoberHarold A. Dahl and Edith
T. Olson, David Gunberg and Brita
Ness, John E. Medin and Doretha M.
Lampert, Walter W. Holm and Maude
L. Thomas, Albert H. Swanke and
Hazel B. Bennett, Edwin W. Strom
berg and Mildred L. Barrett, Edmund
J. Grams and Cecelia Deglman, David
Lorian Cunningham and Hazel Ann
Rowland, Otto J. Oelschlager and Leila
C. Heitman, Harry W. Ottos and
Edythe L. Nelson, Wes. A. Brown and
Dora Frazier, Julius E. Magnuson and
Helen E. Bruflodt, Walter Strombeck
and Edith Anderson, James W. Baker
and Alice Johnson, John Paul Tomp
kins and Hattie Belle Thompson.
NovemberJay L. Gerrish and
Edith Blesi, Leonard L. Birkeland and
Lorence E. Nonson, Garret W. Van
Slooten and Johanna F. Weyschede,
Einar Steffans Anderson and Annie
Jensine Nelson, Anton G. Gerth and
Martha L. Milbrandt.
DecemberJohn Lind Ellenbaum
and Martha Augusta Zeroth, Oscar
Dahlstrom and Olga Anderson, Har
old N. Dunn and Clara Barhaug, Gor
don E. Robideau and Louetta Libby,
Ray H. McArthur and Ethel L. Moore,
Erick William Broberg and Sophye
Mollan.
Personal Property Tax List for 1921
(Continued from page 6)
TOWNSHIP OF GREENBUSH.
District No. 1, Bate 91.3 Mills
Assessed
Name of Person, Value Money
Firm or Personal and
Corporation Properly Credits
Edmison/ Eldert, 155.
Libby, Fred 250
Libby, F. 54
District No. 2, Rate 47.9 Mills
Albright, S 311
Bracken. 0 135 250
Buck, W. 136
Buck, O. 190
Classen Bros 389
Esler, Mrs. A 193
Fargruson, T. 0 218
Heckler. Wm 219
Knolle, Charles W. 80
Lamb, G. 221
McBroom, H. 324
McBroom, Harley 150
Metz, A. & Son 345
McBroom, Guy 137
Olson, Erick 95
Olson, Charles 46 300
Olson, Ester 30
Papenhausen, Henry Sr... 113
Reiman, Otto 63
Shoop, W. 266
Stanghor, F. A 414
Thronson, 263
Talberg, Peter 415
Walker, F. S 60
Walker, Wm. 127
Wahl, Andrew 299
Reiman, Ashaw 261
Classen, Henry 725
District No. 4, Rate 60.7 Mills.
Allison, J. E 229
Anderson, Dan 305 1000
Anderson, John 356
Bahlman, D. 290
Brabander, John 470 100
Betzler, Anton 274
Deglman, George 299
Deglman, John A'4, 169
Deglman, Joe 326
Ege, Jacob 219
Forster, 350
Fylstra, 208
Forster, Henry 246
Garrison, Lewis E 290
Gennow, Mrs. 417 150
Gustafson, Mrs. Aug. 180
Hartman, George 315
Hartman, Wm 558
Heruth, Alfred 80
Heruth, Wm. Sr 153
Hanson, Sydney 54
Homme, Mrs. 192
Jones, Luther 376
Johnson, Nels 162
Jacobson, 72
Jensen, James 122
Lindstrom, Ed 130
Lindstrom, Aug 500
Lindstrom, Arvie 154
Lindquist, Claus 226
Leander, Mandy 332
Moore, J. E 260
Mathison, M. A 158
Mellet, Martin 216
Nelson, O. 157
Nelson, Antone 240
Osborne, Tom 55
Osborne, Wm
A War for Women to Make.
The women of New York have it in
their power to break the profiteering
that has followed the strike of the
meat packing employes. They have
only to put their households on a war
basis again.
During the war the women, patri
otically anxious to make sure of a
full supply of food for the soldiers,
cut down their purchases of meat as
well as of white flour and butter. Now
we have another, an economic war.
The meat is not needed abroad. If
the householders do not buy it, if the
restaurant patrons will not order it,
then the meat will pile up in the pack
ing houses. Very quickly the law of
supply and demand will adjust the
k*-\\ t S^^^Ml^^^^J^t^S^^M
Amt.
of
Tax.
14.15 22.83
4.93
14.90
7.22 6.52
9.10
18.63
9.24
10.44
10.49
3.83
10.69 15.52
7.19
16.53
6.57 4.55 3.10 1.44 5.41
3.02
12.74
19.8b 12.59
21.61
2.87 6.09
14.32 12.50
2.17
30 9
Olson, Peter no
Pinz, Aug. 153
Peterson, Honos 419
Pinz, Charles 99
Peterson, Beret 244
Rehaume, Mrs. Adelie 274
Ross, R. A 69
Raiche, C. A 246
Raiche, Oliver 374
Reiman, Bertha 195
Shaw, R. S 274 500
Seifert, Joseph 243
Stello, Henry 386 2000
Sandburg, Charlie 137
Skrentny, Wm. ,108
Shrode, 168
Swanson, Otto 10
Thomas, Ludwig 181 150
Topper, John 90
Teutz, John 351
Uglem, Karen 50
Uglem, Oscar 543
Vance, W. 178
Wesloh, F. 423
Wolf, Frank 323
Wetsel. J. 374
Wetsel, Roy 236
Wallace, F. E 424
Youngmark, P. 231
Erstad, J. A 1
Anderson, Pete 4000
Uglem, Ole 389
District No. 5, Rate 48.5 Mills.
Abrahamson, P. 188
Anderson, Gilbert 495
Abrahamson, A 468
Anderson, Edward 388
Appel, 368
Bedard, John 352
Brallard, Simon 253
Betzler, Frank A 57
Burke, P. 115
Bisodean, Louis 156
Christensen, George 314
Davis, A. 182
J*
13.90
21.51 21.61 17.57
28.83 16.63 18.15 10.26 19.79 13.29
21.25 12.63 14.93 17.60
25.76
7.89
19.12
33.88
4.86
9.29 3.28
11.65
22.82
9.83 4.37 7.40
7.89 1.56 9.35
13.71
20.15 15.78
9.60
13.11
9.53
14.57
3.34
18.76
6.68 9.29
25.44
6.01
14.81
16.63
4.19
14.93
22.70 11.83 18.13
14.75
29.43
8.31 6.56
10.20
.61
11.44
5.46
21.31
3.04
32,96 10.81
25.67 19.60
22.70 14.32 25.73 14.02
.07
12.0*
1.17 9.12i
24.0i 22.70 18.82 17.85, n.o 12.28'
2.76', 5.58/ 7.5-i'
15.28
8.85
Name of Person,
Firm or
^k
Corporation
'f Dagenais, R.
Divine, James
Falkstram, Gus
Fradette, Napoleon
Grow, John
Grow, A. E
Grow, Edwin
Grow, L.
Grow, Neil
Gilberteon, Ed
Gilbertson. Otto
Johnson, E. S
Johnson, Martin E.
Johnson, J. E
Johnson, Wm.
Johnson, Joseph
Johnson, S
Jones, B. O
Knudson, Nick
Larson, Louis
Larson, Nels
Larson, Andrew
Larson, Gortford
Littlehog. Pete
Miller, H. A
Malotte, Joe
Nelson, Nels
Nelson, J.
Nekola, Albert
Rocheford, Louis
Robideau, Nels
Rusness, Lewis
Renbock Bros
Schraple. Leo
Stay, Ed
Stay, Arthur
Stay, Hans
Sager, Henry
Shirkey, L. P.
Shirkey, Frank
Swartz, Emil
Skogen, John
Thompson, T. W
Valker, Clemens
Walker, Norman
Wilhelm, A.
Zimpel, Emil
Stay, Berger
situation.
Since the war meat has not Teceded
in price as other foods have. The
dealers have blamed it on the public
demand for the best cuts, or on con
ditions in the west, or, as now, on
"natural economic developments." The
present strike has been made an ex
cuse for sending meat up from 20 to
40 per cent.
If the consumers will give the whole
meat industrypackers, wholesalers,
retailers and strikersa lesson in
"natural economic developments" by
I Our Big Clearance Sale Open Saturday]
Entire stock, with few exceptions on Sale. All the Dry Goods, all the
Shoes, Groceries, commences
Saturday Morning, January 7, and For 7 Days
This will also include White Goods Sale, when a lot of New White Goods will be placed on sale
Sale Open Promptly at 9 oXlock Saturday Morning.
A. E,. ALLEN S CO.
Assessed
Value Money
'Personal and
Property Credits
86
240 141
381
-224
573 145 207
7
248
89
247
27
349 252
51
486 148
243
25 78
242
$ 255
55
209 191
222
210 270
567 296 50S
360
203
64
200
219 568
398
23
161
202 476 160
57
274
467
District No. 7, Rate 46.4 Mills.
Anderson, Levine 94
Bemis, Harry 204
Bonn, Fred 120
Bemis, A. 737
Barnick, A. 280
Bemis, Eugent 522
Beer, 70
Beden, Frank 101
Bracken, James 94
Cook, 258
Derz, Onezime 222
Frescholtz, Wm 279
Guderian, Bro 479
Hounder, Joseph 80
Johnson, O. W 180
Knudson, Simon 80
Knudson Bros 1451
Lind, Arthur 282
Mahler, J. 180
Lind Bros 100
Normandin. Louis W 741
Peterson, C. A 510
Reibestein, Frank 188
Roos, J. Mv 44
Seifeld, A. 273
Schram, O. E 151
Sandquist, Mathilda 379
Wolf Bros 372
West Branch Corp. Cream
ery Skimming Station.. 20
Beden, John O
District 10, Rate 51.5 Mills.
Beto, Jaben 96
Bauman, Aug 318
Cordes, Aug 214
Dejarlais, Albert 185
Dejarlais, Norbert 209
Erickson, Gust 307
Edmison. Frank 220
Eaton, G. A 694
Grow, Thomas 97
Granwood, Emery 249
Harlson, Albert 106
Johnson, Erick 272
Kettelhodt, W. F. 289
Kanely, Kenneth 229
Mortimer, 251
Raiche, David 161
Robideau, Lewis 340
Rocheford, Albert 2
Seifert, Guy 108
Scott, W. A 376
Saxon, Ed 397
Trunk, W. A 270
Varley & Co 602
Wilhelm, Bertha 590
Bauemann, W. E 247
Heruth, Wm. Jr. 214
District No. 35, Rate 53.2 Mills.
128
237 223
218 343
255 439 359
245
230 265 321 164
298
28
236
Benson, Nels
Brinkman, Henry
Erickmon, Charles
Erickson, Wm
Erickson, Oscar
Ekstrom, Aug
Engman, Able
Gramer, Frank
Johnson, Ludwic
Johnson, L.
Johnson, Aug
Levau, John
Peterson, Charles
Peterson, John W
Stark, Florence
Stark, Gus
Johnson, Martin E
Amt.
of
Tax.
4.17
11.64
6.84
31.08 10.86 27.80
7.03
10.04
.34
12.03
4.32
11.98
1.31
27.73 12.23
2.47
22.57
7.18
11.79
1.21
3.78
11.74 12.37
2.67
10.14
9.27
10.77 10.19 13.10
27.50 14.36
24.64 17.46
9.85 3.10
9.70
10.63
27.55 19.31
1.12
7.81 9.80
23.09
9.71 2.76
13.28
22.65
5.40
3600
650
1800
4.36 9.47 5.57
490 35.66 12.99
24.22
3.25 6.19 4.36
11.92
10.30 12.95
22.23
3.71 8.35
3.71
71.83
13.08
8.35
4.64
34.53
23.66
8.72
2.04
12.67
7.01
17.59
17.26
500
1500
.93 .83
4.94
16.37 11.03
9.53
10.76
16.11 11.33 35.75
5.00
12.82
5.46
14.83 14.88
11.79
12.93
8.29
17.51
.25
5.56
19.37
20.45 13.91
31.00
20.09 12.72 11.03
100
275
50
6.81
12.61
11.86 11.60 18.25
13.57
23.36 19.10 13.04 12.24 14.10
17.07
8.72
15.86
1.49
12.56
5.40 1800
And what applies to New York
would apply to other parts of the
country where the profiteers are prac
ticing their work of extortion.
Vanishing Languages.
Nowhere in America has there been
such a diversity of Indian languages
as in California. But these languages
are now rapidly disappearing. Several
of them are known only by five or
six, and others only by twenty or
thirty living persons, and hardly a
year passes without some dialect, or
ev*n
cutting down their orders as suddenly through the death qf the last indi
and drastically as the meat men have
put up the prices, then the consumers
will bring the profiteers to their knees.
New York Herald.
language, ceasing to exist
vidual able to speak It. Efforts are
being made to record all these lan
guages for the sake of the light they
throw on the ancient history of the
Pacific coast.Washington Star.
Behind a Prisoner's Amnesty.
Since the release of Debs close
friends of the socialist leader have in
timated to the press that he will head
a campaign for "general amnesty for
all political prisoners." There is about
as much sense to such a campaign as
there would be to a petition for abol
ishment of a green moon in the uni
verse. In the first place, there being
no such thing in the United States as
"political prisoners," the campaign
managers can start to work on their
project with assurances now that
when the campaign is ended they will
find that there are no political prison
ers in thef United States. If Debs'
friends speak the truth they can com
pliment themselves on originating a
senseless but, nevertheless, a new
manner of conducting a successful
campaign.
As a matter of fact all the loose
talk about political prisoners is noth
ing more or less than tommyrot propa
ganda to make heroes and martyrs out
of criminals. By hiding the facts that
certain individuals have committed
treason to the United States and vio
lated other laws, followers of these
men seek to "bore within" the sympa
thies of public opinion by making it
appear that these men were jailed
because of their political theories. For
instance, a certain element in the coun
try would have it appear that the
two Italians, Sacco and Vancetti, are
locked up in a Massachusetts jail be
cause they are of the I. W. W. faith.
The facts of the case are they are con
victed murderers. A. C. Townley is in
a Minnesota jail not because of his
political beliefs, but because he violat
ed the established laws of the United
States. It was the same with Debs.
The United States' imprisons no
man because of his political opinions.
But whenever any man allows his
passions to lead him into a positive
violation of our laws he can expect
that the machinery of the law will be
put in motion against him. The idea
that seems to prevail among the
theorists that an actual crime against
law is any less a crime because of the
peculiar opinions of the man who
commits it is a childish excuse that
sounds very much as if their con
science accused them of that guilt,
but pleaded for clemency on the
ground that they are not mentally or
MORE
MONEY"
If You Ship Us Your
HIDES-FURSrFoTFIRSeh,r"
M-B-1
Special Information
DEAL MEAT vflfe U LM6EST a* HUES!
-r~ *$g* WE WEST.
sEnlMHk
Wtheforptlct list, tags oi fall information
O.BERGMAN S OD.
ST. PAUL -IAWN
physically sound.
We believe Debs is honest in hi&
convictions. He hates war as we all.
do. But this gives none of us the
right in a time of war to preach sedi
tion. Our thinking must be kept clear
on this point.Minneapolis Journal.
Quit This
Hard Work
ITthe
takes twice as long to elean
barn with a wheelbarrow
as with an easy-running car
rier. The wheelbarrow way is
the sloppy way, the back-break
ing, leg tiring, temper tryir:g
way.
It is hard work the old wax*.
Manure Carrier
makes the long job a short job,
the hard job an easy task. It
takes the backache out of barn
cleaning.
Easy to load. Easy to raise to
the track. Easy to shove it along
Easy to dump it in the yard.
Jamesway carriers are built to
last a lifetime, and to give will
ing, continuous, satisfactory ser
vice every day they are in use.
Easy to erect. No repairs. No
upkeep.
Easy Payment Plan
For a short time only, you
can buy Jamesway equipment,
spreading payment over twelve
months' time. For full informa
tion, call or telophone.
L. E. Bergman
GO TO THE
Rum River Lumber Co.
LONG SIDING, MINN.
FOR
ALL KINDS OF
BUILDING MATERIAL
We also carry a high-grade line of Builders' and Shelf
Hardware, Paint, Oil and Grease. Also some cheap Paint.
Liberal terms to responsible parties.
Princeton, Minn.
Rum River Lumber Co.
JOHN BRUFLODT, Manager
ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
Minnesota

xml | txt