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The Princeton union. (Princeton, Minn.) 1876-1976, January 12, 1922, Image 2

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016758/1922-01-12/ed-1/seq-2/

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MARKETING IS
REAUEYNOTE
Program Adopted by Delegates to
State Convention of Farm
Bureau Federation.
BUREAUS IN 74 COUNTIES
Minnesota Federation Demands More
of Consumers' Dollar Backs
Credit Plan.
"The foremost problem affecting
agriculture today is marketing and
distribution of farm products," says
the 1922 agricultural program adopt
ed by the third annual convention of
the Minnesota Farm Bureau federa
tion in St. Paul. The program, which
lays out lines of activity to be fol
lowed this year by the federation, is
a series of statements which definitely
pledge the organization to support
these principles and projects:
An adjustment of farm business to
market demands, with a reduction of
the spread between farm prices and
prices paid by consumers.
Rigid retrenchment by farmers in
purchases of machinery, building ma
terial, and so forth, until a reasonable
price readjustment is established.
A statewide campaign for passage
of the Christianson rural credits
amendment to the state constitution
in the next general election, backed
by the full strength of the farm bu
reau.
Control of the federal reserve sys
tem by representatives of basic pro
ductive industries, including agricul
ture.
Revision of credit laws to give far
mers 12, 24 and 36 months credit.
Continuation of the agricultural
loan agency of the war finance cor
poration until a permanent agency is
established to take its place.
Full support for the U. S. Grain
Growers, Inc., the National Livestock
Producers association, the Minnesota
Co-operative Creameries association,
Inc., and the Central Co-operative
Commission association, and similar
organizations.
Extension of cost of production in
vestigations.
Consideration of a collective buying
program for 1923, when co-operative
marketing has been fully established.
Legislation that will reflect a price
based on true milling value, not
technicalities.
Repeal of that phase of the Esch
Cummins act which guarantees a re
turn on the railroads' valuation.
Railroad labor and railroad corpora
tions should both share in price reduc
tions as a means to restore reasonable
freight rates, the program says, call
ing on congress, all railroad commis
sions and the railway labor board for
prompt relief.
The platform also calls for:
Early and favorable action on the
fV
A Waterloo Boy Kerosene Engine is a
mighty handy thing to have around the farm. It
Teheves you of lots of work. It speeds up jobs that
would otherwise take lots of you time. It saves
help. You can put the hired man at doing some
thing else besides turning the crank.
A Waterloo Boy works for the women
folks, too. Its operation is very simple. They
can easily understand it.
Many farmers centralize their power.
The Waterloo Bo five or seven horse-power
engine is ideal for such a plan. In the same house
with the engine you can set up a corn shelter, feed
grinder, a grindstone and a drill press. In another
house close by, with suitable line-shaft connections,
your wife can operate her cream separator, churn,
washing machine, etc.
If either house is handy to the well, you
can hook on a pump jack, and perhaps a wood saw.
The big advantage of the power-house
plan is that it enables you to do several jobs at
once. While you are grinding feed, put the pump
St. Lawrence waterway project.
An adequate mileage of serviceable
roads, rather than construction of a
few perfect miles, and tonnage limita
tion.
Changes in education policy to give
the greatest possible aid to rural
schools.
An increase in inheritance taxes, op
position to repeal of the excess profits
tax and opposition to any general
sales tax.
Tariff protection for all or for none,
with agriculture on a basis of equality
with other industries.
Recognition of county farm bureaus
and township units as potent factors
in furthering farm prosperity.
Legislation requiring county com
missioners to make appropriations for
county agent work in evciy county
where the farm buieau has 200 or
more members.
Passage of a truth in fabric law.
Lower freight rates in coarse forest
products to help northern Minnesota
farmers.
Fuller use of the provisions of
Jhe
Bessette act.
The Minnesota Farm Bureau feder
ation delegates, as elected representa
tives of 74 county farm bureaus, ex
pressed emphatic approval of the agri
culture bloc in congress.
J. F. REED CHOSEN.
Lac Qui Parle County Farmer Elected
President of Farm Bureau
Federation.
St. Paul, Jan. 12.^J. F. Reed, Lac
Qui Parle county farmer, is the newagencies
president of the Minnesota Farm Bu
reau federation.
Ho was elected on the fii"=t ballot in
the third annual convention of the fed
eration in tre state cap'tol here. F.
E. Lanicrs ol Lak^viHe, Dakota coun
ty, was elected vice president. V. E
Anderson of Wheaton, treasurer of the
state federation, was re-elected with
out opposition.
New members of the executive board
of the federation are M. Warner of
Warren, Marshall county, elected for
a term of three years, and Mrs. E. V.
Ripley of Park Rapids, Hubbard coun
ty, for one year. Thomas E. Cashman
of Owatonna was re-elected to the
board for a three year term, and J.
Pyle of Madison, Lac qui Parle county,
J. J. Jacobson of Bolus, Morrison
county, and George Freeman of Zum
brota, Goodhue county, also were re
elected. Mr. Jacobson and Mr. Free
man are to serve two year terms, and
Mr. Pyle a one year term the terms
of these three directors were decided
by lot.
The new president of the Minnesota
Farm Bureau federation is 58 years
old he was born in Marshall county,
Iowa, and came to Minnesota in 1893.
He owns and actually runs two farms
Lac qui Parle county, one of 368
acres, and the other a half section
The western line of the farm on which
he lives forms the western boundary
of the state. Because the postoffice
at Gary, just over the line in South
Dakota, serves two Minnesota town-
Let a Waterlo Boy Hel You Wit
You Far Wor
Come into the store next time
THE TRADE-MARK QF QUALITY
engines over and let us show you why they're money-makers.
Evens Hardware Co.
Pronceton, Minnesota
ships, Mr. Reed's mailing address
Gary, S. D.
"Any farmer would be unresponsive
indeed if he did not appreciate the
honor you have conferred on me," Mr.
Reed said in his speech to the dele
gates, Accepting the presidency. I
believe we are entering a period of
great importance for the farm bureau
of this state. I am willing to devote
what poor ability I may have to fur
ther the organization. I beg of you
your earnest co-operation and help. I
expect every director and every farm
bureau member present to go home
with the idea of a more solid organiza
tion.
"Agriculture is passing through its
greatest crisis. If we are going to lift
the pall of gloom that is over the
farmers now, we must bring to this
work stout hearts, clear heads and
willing hands. It is a peculiar condi
tion of affairs that the farmer always
has been subject to conditions over
which he has had no control. He has
had to haul his crops to market and
humbly ask how much they were
worth he has had to go to the store
and respectfully ask how much he
must pay for the goods he had to buy.
That condition is unthinkable. It is a
challenge to the American spirit of fair
play. Our state stands out in bold re
lief in co-operative marketing orga
nizations, the farmer will be in the
same position as the manufacturer.
The manufacturer would look upon an
attempt by anyone else to set the price
of his products as audacious. During
the last few years, nonproductive
have governed the price of
the farmers' products.
"I must have the co-operation of
every farm bureau member. We must
work in harmony. There are some
powerful and insidious forces at work
to break down co-operation among
farmers. There are influences at
work today throughout the country to
tear down -n agency that is the fn
dation of the farm bureau. I Tei
to the county agents. I: is afire +ime
to go to the farmer and tell him his
taxes are too high. I know mine are
high, awfully high. But I believe the
farmers will demand the office of
county agent shall be maintained. I
want you to go home and serve notice
on your county commissioners that
when they try to move the county
agent out of your county, they might
as well try to move out the court
house. Looking from my own barn
door, I can see where the county agent
has been helpful to me. Looking
across my line fences I can see where
he has been helpful to my neighbor,
to my county, and to the state. I
pledge to the utmost my poor ability
to carry on the work of the farm bu-
reau."
At the close of Mr. Reed's talk, the
delegates rose spontaneously and
pledged their united support to the
new president of the Minnesota feder
ation.
Two Kinds.
There are two kinds of friends,
those we need and those who need us.
jack in gear and fill the tank, or run the washing
machine. Shell corn for the chickens while you're
separating the milk. Doing two or three jobs at the
same time costs you no more than doing one. The
throttling governor on the Waterloo Boy holds the
engine at the correct speed under all loads. The
engine is very economical in its use of fuel.
Waterloo Boy Kerosene Engines are
made in a variety of sizes. They fill all your smell
and medium powered belt requirements. Sizes aro
two, three, five, seven, nine, and fourteen horse
power, both stationary and portable.
If the power-house idea does not appeal
to you, get a portable outfit It is easily moved to
any place you want to use it. The two, three,
and five H. P. sizes are mounted on hand trucks.
The larger sizes are handled with a team.
You get the best when you buy a
Waterloo Boy. Its manufacturers are in close
touch with farm conditions, and give you just
what you want in an engine. And they havo
been building engines for twenty-six years. They
know how to build them right.
you're in town. Look these
MADE FAMOUS BY GOOD IMPLEMENTS
gooooooooQooooooooooooooqoooooooooooocwoooooooooooooo
Specials
101b. pail dark syrup 39c
Good brooms, 5 sewed 50c
6 bars Lenox soap for 25c
White Naphtha soap, per bar 7c
2 large cans pink salmon 25c
2 large cans condensed milk for 25c
Large package sea foam washing powder 30c
Large package oat meal 25c
Large oval can sardines in tomato sauce |5c
10 pound pail fancy salt herring $1,25
10 pound pail fancy spiced herring $1,75
Fancy sweet corn, can |0c
Fancy Garden new peas, can |0c
Fancy comb honey 25c
Large can good tomatoes, can |5c
Broken rice, pound 5
Large tumblers assorted jams and jellies, each|Qc
3 jars prepared mustard for 25c
Sardines in oil, can 5c
Hamburger steak, can 5c
16 oz. bottle fancy catsup,bottle 25c
Youths' one-buckle arctics, sizes II to 2, pr. $|,39
Boys' one-buckle arctics, sizes 3 to 6 $1.69
Men's one-buckle arctics, 7 to 12 $2i25
Men's four-buckle arctics, special $2.98
Youths' low heavy rubbers, sizes to 2 $1,39
Boys' heavy low rubbers, 3 to 6, special $1,69
Men's heavy lumbermen's rubbers $2.19
Men's heavy all rubber snag proof, two
buckle rubbers, special $2.39
Men's ten in. top Goodyear rubbers, special $3.39
Youths' ten in. top, to 2, special $2.39
Boys' ten in. top rubbers, 3 to 6, special...$2.69
Ladies' fleece lined rubbers, English toe,
French, Cuban and military heel $ |.j9
Children's fleece lined rubbers, special 89c
Misses one-buckle arctics, special $1.39
Children's one-buckle arctics, 1 to 10 89c
Men's heavy fleece lined union suits,
special, each $|.25
Men's heavy muleskin chopper mittens,
special, pair 39c
ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooocoooooooooo
We Sell at Right Prices
Lumber, Lath,
Posts, Shingles,
Sash, Doors, Etc.
Wood and Coal,
Cement, Lime,
Plaster, Roofing,
Building Tile,
Brick, Etc., Etc,
RUDD LUMBER CO.
J. V. MORGAN, Manager Princeton, Minn.
The Leader Meat Market
Cash and Carry Plan
Price, Quality and Service
See our big stock.
Call and see our big reduction
in Meat Prices
Highest market prices paid for
Veal, Cream,
Chickens, Eggs
and Produce
Bring in your hides and have them made into
robes, overcoats and leather.
CALVIN OLSON
Princeton, Minn.
If
We
Would Be Pleased
To
Hav Yo Dro In
When in need of
anything in the
Building
Line
W can supply
everything needed*
Remember
Our sole object is to
keep the fact before you,,
expecting that when in
need of anything in our
line, you will give us a
call*
O The Farm
O In Town
a***
This Bank endeavors to be un
usually helpful to the farmer.
It is our suggestion that on
the frequent trips to town you
come in to visit us. We highly
value our business relationship
with the farmers of this vicinity.
Make use of our banking facili
ties and business counsel to solve
your problems.
THE PRINCETON
STATE BANK
5% Interest Paid on Certificates of Deposit
FARM LOANS INSURANCE
2000000O0OOOOOO00OO0OO0O0OO0OOOOOOOO0OOOOOOOOOOO0009
GIVE
WIFE. BANK BOOI
fc*O.Jr..fr
MMIIMHll51B1IHi1Slia^
TA
Sfl^
f
1?
PRESENT.
BEFORE A MAN MARRIES HE OUGHT TO SAVE MONEY
AFTER HE MARRIES HE MUST SAVE MONEY.
THE BEST WAY TO SAVE MONEY IS TO GIVE YOUR
WIFE A BANK ACCOUNT IN OUR BANK. SHE WILL HELP
YOU GET AHEAD, BECAUSE WOMEN ARE BETTER MANA-
GERS THAN MEN.
TRYJT. YOU WILL FIND THAT WE ARE RIGHT.
YOU WILL.RECEIVE[5 PER CENT INTEREST.
SECURITY STATE BANK
PRINCETON, MINNESOTA
1 R. D. N.SPRINGER, Oph. D.
OPTOMETRIST
of Dr. Kline's Sanatorium, Aneka Wlilfeet*
Princeton, Sunday, Jan. 15
lUNTIL 6PM)
At MERCHANTS BOTH
By Rxaarimi n4 GIMMS Flftaat
"If your credit is good at the bank, it it
good with me."
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