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The Appeal. (Saint Paul, Minn. ;) 1889-19??, November 12, 1904, Image 4

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ST. PAUL OFFICE,
.No. 110 Union Blk. 4th & Ceddr,
J. 0. ADAMS, Manager.
MINNEAPOLIS OFFJCE,
Guaranty Loan Bid??. Room 1020
HAficVEY 8. 6URK, Manager.
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SATURDAY. NOVEMBER 12. 1904.
THE SPIRIT OF CASTE.
We quote from the pastoral letter of
the. bishops of the Episcopal church
the following sentences which deserve
special attention:
However otherwise we may classify
Tinman society, that classification is
universal which divides it into those
who believe in the spirit of caste and
those who do not.
Journey where you will, the peoples
that are in the thickest darkness to
day are those in which most abso
lutely' the spirit of caste rules.
Touching the race problem the let
ter after referring to the appointment
of a joint commission to investigate
the question says:
ff'- by giving them (the negroes)
freedom we have only given them the
power 'to work mischief, and if lynch
ing has come to be defended as a nec
essary protection to families, then
surely we are face to face with a situ
ation at. once desperate and dishonor
ing. We may not ignore our social
situation, and if the church can have
nothing to say about it then- she sim
ply, disowns her duty and her master.
There, you have it, and we defy
tlte most censorious critic to show
that the good fathers of the church
v.'ere laboring under undue excite
ment, or indulging in intemperate lan
guage. But we must dissent from
some of their conclusions our own
opinion being that the spirit of caste
rules as absolutely among enlightened
nations as among the most barbarous,
In the United States as much as in the
Fiji Islands. The historian, Macau
ley, argued very ingeniously to show
that at one period, the church did
nuich" to destroy the limitations of
caste but it can readily be shown
that at many periods, the church has
been the most efficient promoter of
caste. As to the, Afro-American, the
good bishops may truthfully say: "We
hid as it were our faces from him he
was despised and we esteemed him
not." The spirit of caste dominates
the nastoral letter.
Tr|E OLD FLAG STILL WAVES.
The Old Flag waves in triumph.
The country is safe we are redeem
ed. Parker and Anarchy are defeat
ed and all classes can breathe free
ly "again.
The conspiracy of /the Southern
Democrats and their Northern allies,
led' by their paid advoeates, Tillman,
the "hell scatterer Heflin, the red
flasr. anarchist Vardaman, and Jeff
D^vjis. the school tax segregators,
P^-sn, the bov orator Hill of New
York, Tom Taggert and the rest of
the motley crew can now count the
copt. of their nefarious campaign and
o^template with mingled feelings of
chagiin and shameif they possess
IT'S ALL OVER NOW.
Ended. The most roaring farce,
the exuberant display of idiocy, grand-1
est exhibit of ignorance, fraud, impu
dence and scullduggery that was ever
paraded before the astonished gaze of
the world has at last come to an end,
and Parker, the man who makes al
legations, he cannot prove has been
relegated to the rear. He went out
shearing and came back shorn.
The leaders who engineered the los
ing race hatred campaign, will hence
forth be infinitesimal elements in
American politics, only able like
Bunyan's giant, to make grimaces at
passers by.
The election of Roosevelt, the
Christian soldier, statesman and man
of the people is the new edict of
emancipationhe will deliver the
country from the curse of caste.
Mobocracy Rotteneggeracy, Ballot
box stuffingocracy, Taggert, Davis,
Tillman. Vardaman, Bryan, Heflin,
Parker, Jeff Davis of Arkansas et al
exeunt omnes(The curtain falls).
The overwhelming and unprece-'
dented plurality of President Roose-1
velt is a pleasing evidence of his
popularity as a man and incontro-1
vertible argument that his views of
fairness and right are sustained by a
large majority of the people of the
United States. His election in such
a decided manner has filled us with
new hope that the deplorable condi
tion of the class of citizens which
we represent will be greatly improv
ed and, that the spirit of justice and
i' fairness for all men of which he is
the embodiment, will grow broader
and stronger among the people, and
they will hold up his hands and en-1
courage him and sustain him in his
good work. Roosevelt is all right
the people have said so in unmistak
able terms.
The U. S. Supreme Court recently
rendered a decision, the immediate
effect of which will be to compel the
state of North Carolina to pay $27.-
000 of her bonds which she repudi
ated during the 70's. It is almost ab
solutely certain that the remote ef
fects will be of far greater conse
quence for millions of such bonds
are in existence. Arkansas repudi
ated the Holford bonds upon the
ground that she never derived any
advantage from their sale Missis
sippi repudiated bonds due to the
Rothchilds, because, so Gov. McNutt
said, those parties were holding a
mortgage over the Holy Sepulchre,
and other states repudiated because
that was more convenient than to
pay them.
have created, were the people fools T^X -~4*-1ISeeretar Republican National Commi ttee.'fA^j^CiMt^^tri
HON. GEORGE B. CORTELYOU
Chairman Republican National Committee
enough to follow their revolutionary boring to dispel the clouds of ignor-
and anarchistic lead. ance from the minds of their north-
The strong common sense of the I ern countrymen,- have not met with
common people has averted the ca- very flattering success. Bishop
lamity. While many were deceived Brown's own co-religionists up North
and misled the great body was open I gave him the grand bounce, Bishop
to reason, saw the danger to our Sharp had to submit to a little social
country and its benign institutions equality with Booker T. Washington,
and built up an impregnable citadel 1 and Tillman merely excited the deri-
with their votes against the enemies sion of the stock-yard hoodlums,
of liberty law and order.
With their votes they rebuked the
Southern Caste Combine and smash
ed the most dangerous and formid
able conspiracy since the slave hold
ers' rebellion.
The kind hearted Southern mission
aries, Tillman, Heflin and Bishops Democracy is '"harmonious and reso-
Sharp and Brown, who have been la-' lute." Its various factions are har-
Hearst have formed a political trium
virate* which proposes to down the
Hill-Parker-Belmont combine, scoop
up the populists and bury the Demo
cratic party. Bryan and Watson will
furn-ish the brains" and Hearst the
money 'qf the new concern.
&*- anythe wreck and ruin they would- z^f^'^i^*--^*. HON. ELMER. DOVER^^^%^%^^^^ tweeh November 15 and' 20. lte-1^:^" FRANK O. LOWDEN.
"4S: v^-1'
A Collection of a Few of the Events
Occurring Among the Afro-Ameri
cans of the Capita! of This Great
and Glorious Nation for Our Many
Readers.
Washington D. C., No'v. 10.
Booker Washington. Jr., the eldest
son of Booker T. Washington, has
filed an application for appointment
as paymaster in the army.
The application was filed several
days ago. and was dated New Haven.
The applicant describes himself as
HON. CHARLES W. FAIRBANKS
Vice President of United States.
T. Washington, and there are* others
from prominent residents of New Ha
ven. The application has been order
ed put on the suspended file, to be ta
ken up November 15.
There is an impression about the
War Department that young. Wash
ington has a most excellent chance of
getting the appointment. There are
Uncle Grover proclaims that the at present only one actual and two
prospective vacancies in the grade of
paymaster.
John R. Lynch, now a captain, is
the only Afro-American paymaster
in the army at present. He was at
one time assistant auditor- for the
Navy Department Capt. Lynch ,is
reported to have experienced some
trouble with the men, because of his
color, in the discharge of his duties
both during the Spanish war and in
the Philippines.
The S. Coleridge-Taylor Choral so
ciety is progressing finely in its prep
arations for the musical festival tb be
given in Convention hall the 16th and
17th instants. The rehearsals of
'Hiawatha" are satisfactory, and it is
believed this trilogy will bev
twenty-three years old, and a student sociated.
at the Massachusetts Institute of I "Gen. Davis, the judge advocate
Technology. The first indorsement general, sent the papers in the case
It is raid that Bryan. Watson and on the application is that of Booker to -the President because Smith had
sung ev
en better than in former perform
ances. The three choral ballads that
have bee composed by Mr. Ccheridge
Taylor and dedicated to this society
hav,e been' in active rehearsal and,
with the assistance of the author' will
be given in splendid style. The Ma
rine Band Orchestra will give to the
accompaniment of "Hiawatha" a body
and volume that has heretofore been
lacking, and the soloists engaged are
the best that could be secured. The
reservation of seats by the guaran
tors has been very liberal and every
thing' points to a brilliant, result,
The Washington Post in a' recent
issue said:
"It was learned unofficially. at .the
War Department that Private John
T. Smith.. stationed at Fort Mott, at
Salem, Mass., who recently attracted
attention by marrying an Afro-Anieri-.
can woman, will be discharged from
the ariny "for the good of the ser
vice.? "The .order will be issued, it is
stated, after election, some time be
twee Novembe 1 5 and 20
department has decided
no.
appealed personally to Mr. Roosevelt.
The President returned the matter to
Gen. Davis without remarks. Under
the law, Gen. Davis is allowed %o hold
a matter of this sort without action
for only ten days. This period is up
but a special dispensation was grant
ed, allowing the matter to rest ten
days more."
From Columbus, i Ohio, comes the
following information:
-^%'i^-%^,
HON. HARRY S. NEW
Member Republican National Executive Committee.
to enter into the question of the right Randolph Franklin Fortune, a mes-
i of a soldier to marry an Afro-Ameri
can woman if he so desires as far as
army regulations are concerned.
Smith will be put out of the army
simply because he is considered guil
ty of an action which has brought to
l#im an unenviable notoriety and
caused trouble among his comrades
and the citizens with whom he is as-
"It has just leaked out here that for human liberty.
Illinois^*CQL.
xposu
Membe RfJPbM
senger in the War Department at
Washington, D. C, and Miss Dickie
Joyce, a teacher in the public schools
of Columbus, Ohio, were secretly
married this summer at Falls Church,
Va., by Rev. G. S. Somerville, rector
of the Episcopal church at Falls
Church. Miss Joyce visited in Wash
ington the past summer for a couple
of weeks and met Mr. Fortune for the
first time. It was evidently a case
of love at first sight, for before she
returned home she was married to
Fortune. Every precaution was taken
to keep the marriage a secret, and
not even the nearest friends and as
sociates of the bride nor her relatives
were aware that they were married.
Rev. Somerville, when communicated
with about the matter, stated that he
had been enjoined by both parties to
keep the marriage an absolute secret,
and for that reason he had not made
it public.
"It is against the rule of the Co
lumbus board of education to allow a
married woman to teach, and the
news of this secret marriage will
compel the brfde to resign her posi
tion as a teacher in the public schools
of the dtv. The news of the secret
marriage has created quite a sensa
tion. Miss Joyce is a member of one
of the oldest families in Columbus,
and has been a teacher in the public
schools for some six or seven years.
The groom is unknown here."
Prof. William H. H. Hart, the Afro
American lawyer arrested some time
ago at Elkton, Md., under the Mary
land "Jim Crow" law, and whose case
is now in the courts of that state, ad^
dressed a large assemblage of Afro
American people at Lincoln Temple,
Eleventh and streets northwest.
He declared that he had found, in the
interstate commerce act, the method
by which he,would break down the
barriers raised against Afro-Americans
by state laws providing for separate
accommodations on railroad trains for
the white and colored races.
"There is no sense in depending
for redress," said the speaker, "upon
the fourteenth amendment to the Con
stitution. The Supreme Court of the
United States doesn't like it, and the
white people, of this country do not.
Some day the amendment will come
into its heritage and grow, for it is
the magna charta of modern times.
We must consider the interstate com
merce law. Everything goes down
before thatreligion, morality, state
authority, race, and color. I tell you
here, now, that you have found the
man who will free you from this con
temptible, this so-called 'Jim Crow'
law.
"The 'Jim Crow' law is but a svm
tom of a deeper malady pervading
theentire body politic, prejudicing the
rights of American citizens. I have
seen here at the National Capital a
desire to refuse equal rights to Amer
ican citizens of colorin the theaters,
hotels, places of amusement, and
comfort. It has been an easy step to
the 'Jim Crow' law. This law has
not received the organized resistance
which the 90,000 Afro-American peo
ple of the District could make against
it with organization and competent
leadership."
Chas. E. Hall.
Pitchfork Tillman has the gall to
charge that the Republican party in
tends to repeal the Thirteenth, Four
teenth and Fifteenth Amendments to
the Constitution. The Afro-American
voters are willing to take chances
with' the party which has always stood
can
Natiojwl,
iKV
.^V/JO*
CO Tskege^a
TUSKEGEE l^21?fp|^
-lad an a Mistrial Mb'&jfa
TUSKEGEE ALABAMA^^ (^^|||5|-
(INCORPORATED) 1'{*
Organized July 4, 1881, by the State Legis
lature as The Tuskegee State Normal Scliool.
Exempt from taxation.
BOOKER T. WASHINGTON, Principal.
WARREN LOGAN, Treasurer.
LOCATION
In the Black' Belt of Alabama where the
blacks outnumber the whites three to one.
ENROLLMENT AND FACULTY
Enrollment last year 1,253 mates. 8j
females, 371. Average attendance. 1,105.-
Instructors, 83.
COURSE OP STUDY
Emrlish education combined with Industrial
trailing 28 industries in constant operation.
VALUE OF PROPERTY
Prooerty consisting' of 2.267 acres of land.
50 buildings almost wholly built with student
labor, to valued at $350,000, and no mortgage.
NEEDS
$50 annually for the education of each stu
dent ($200 enables one to finish the course,
%l,Oo6creates permanent scholarship.
Students**-1I* pay their own board in cash
Money in any amount for current expenses
B^es^e'work done by graduates as class
room and industrial leade. thousands are
reached through the Negro
Confer-an
Teuskegeeis40mileSTuskeg^e 6
east of Montgomery
136 miles west of Atlanta-on the Western Kaii
a ie beautiful old Sontnern
town, and is an ideal place for study. en
mate is at all times mild and uniform, turn,
making the place an excellent winter resort.
SCOTIA SEMINARY
CONCORD, N. C.
This well known school, established foj
the higher education of girls will open
for the next term October 1. Every effort
will be made to provide for the comfort,
health and thorough instruction of stu
dents. Expense for board, light, fuel,
washing. $45, for term of eight months.
Address -._,..-.
Rev. D. J. Satterfield, D. D.,
Concord, N: C.
AVERY COLLEGE
TRADES SCHOOL
ALLEGHENY, P. A.
A Practical, Literary and Industrial
Trades School for Afro-American Boys and
Girls. Unusual advantages for Girls and 4
separate building. Address,
JOSEPH D. MAHONr-Y: Principal.
Allegheny, Pa.
^^orristownNormalCollege
FOUNDED IN 1881,,
Fourteen teachers. Elegant an 3 commodi
ous buildings. Climate unsurpassed. Depart*
ments: College Preparatory Normal, Eng
li3h. Music Shorthand, Typewriting and -JO-
dustrial Training.
FIFTY DOLLARS IN ADVANCE
Will pay for board, room, light, fuel, tuition
and incidentals for the entire year. Board
16.00 per montl tuition S2.00 per term.
Thorough work done in each department
Send for circula.' to the president,
BEV. JUDSON 8. HILL, D. D.,
MaIstown- T"~n
Newtngland
CONSERVATORY
OF MUSIC
BOSTON, Mass.
All the Advantages of tbe finest and moBt completely
equipped Conservatory building in tbe world, the at
mosphere of a recognized center of Art and "Music and
association with the masters in the Profession are
offered students at the Now England Conservatory of
Music. Thorough work in nil departments of music.
Courses can be arranged In Elocution and Oratory.
GEORGE W. CHADW1CK. Musical Director.
All particular and year book will be sent on application.
u'AMMDH THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
AIMS AND METHODS
The aim of this school is to do prac
tical work in helping men towards suc
cess in the ministry. Its course of study
is broad and practical its ideas are high
its work is thorough its methods are
fresh, systematic, clear and simple.
COURSE OF STUDY
The regular course of study occupies
three years, and covers the lines of work
in ther several departments of theological
Instruction usually pursued in the lead
ing theological seminaries of the country.
EXPENSES AND AID
Tuition and room -rent are free. The
apartments for students are plainly fun
nished. Good board can be had for
seven dollars per month. Buildings heat
ed by steam.
Aid from loans without Interest, and
gifts of friends, are granted to deserv
ing students whe do their utmost in the
line of self-help. No young man with
1 grace, gifts, and energy, need be deprived
of the advantages now opened to him
in this Seminary. For further particulars
address
h. G. ADKINSON, D.,
Pres. Gammon Theological Seminary,
ATLANTA, GEORGIA-
BISHOP COLLEGE,
MARSHALL, TEXAS,
OFFERS EVERY ADVANTAGE
TO STUDENTS.
For beauHr of situation, commodious-
nesR of buildings and completeness of
OHtfit, this institution is unsurpassed
by any school for colored people west of
the Mississippi. Special courses for
prenchers and teachers. LARGE AND
EXPERIENC ED FACULTY. Five
large brick buildings, also steam plant
laundry. A new brick dining hall and
dormitory now building. Chemical,
physical, biological laboratories.
Courses in carpentry, printing, black
stn(thing, sewing, dressmaking, house
keeping, cooking, nursing. COLLEGB
GRADUATES MAY APPLY *OR
PERMANENT CERTIFICATES.
Students can make part of ezpenens by
work. For particnlars and cata'ogue
address ARTHUR B. CHAFFEE. Pre dent.
TILLOTSON COLLCP,
AUSTIN, TTE^CAS,
Tbe Oldest and Best School in Tezaa for
Colored Students. Faculty mostly gradu
ates of well known colleges in the north.
Reputation unsurpassed. Manual train
ing a part of the regular course. Music a
special feature of the school. Special ad
vantages for earnest students seeking to
help themselves. Send for catalogue and
circalar to
REV. MARSHALL R. GAINES, A.M.,
PRESIDENT,
Austin, T3B:A.
SAMUEL HUSTQS COLLEGE,
A Christian School &&* Faouit,
Progressive in'arl departments, best Method*
Of Instruction, Health of Students carefully
looked after Students taught to do manual
labor as well as think. Fo^ catalogue and
other Information, write to the president,
R. S LOVIQIGGOdD. AUSTIN, TBXAO
4
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