OCR Interpretation


The Appeal. (Saint Paul, Minn. ;) 1889-19??, March 10, 1906, Image 2

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016810/1906-03-10/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

W1
5""^-''"^
THE APPEAL,
A WIOHALAfBO-AM~EBiCAN~iiSWSPAPh
PUBLISHED WEEKLY BY
AUAMS BROS. EDITORS AND PUBLISHERS
49 E. 4th St., St. Paul, ninn.
\o.
S T. PAUL OFFICE,
110 Union 131k. 4th & Cedai
J. 0 ADAMS, Manager.
MINNEAPOLIS OFFICE,
Guaranty Loan Bldt?. Room 1020
HAKVtY b. BURK, Manager.
CHICAGO OFFICE.
323-5 Dearborn St., Suite blO,
C. F. ADAMS, Manager.
TERMS, STRICTLY IN ADVANCE:
SJNGLC COPV, ONE YEAR
SINGLE COPY, six MONTHS...
SINGLE COPY, THREE MONTHS
The date on the address label shows when
subscription expires. Renewals should be
made two weeks prior to expiration, so that
no paper may be missed, as the paper stops I
when lime is out.
Jt occasionally happens that papers sent tosub
scribers are lost or stolen. In case you do
not receive any number when due, inform us
by postal card at the expiration of five days
from that date, and .we will cheerfully for
ward a duplicate of the missing number
ComrcuJnirations to receive attentions must be
news.\, upon important subjects, plainly
written only upon one side of the paper:
must reavh us Tuesdays if possible, anyway
not later than Wednesdays, and bear the sig
nature of thf! author. No manuscript, re
turned, unless stamps are sent for postage.
We do not hold ourselves responsible for the
views of our correspondents.
Soliciting ngents wanted everywhere. Write
for K-rms. Sample copies free.
In every letter that you write us never fail to
give your full name and address, plainly
written, post, office, county and state. Busi
ness letters of all kinds must, he written on
.seimvaie sheets from letterseontaiuinsr news
rv matter for publication.
PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT.
Treat each man according to
his wofth as a man. Distrust
all who would have any one
class placed before any other.
Other republics have fallen be
i a use the unscrupulous have
Hubsiitiited loyalty to class for
loyalty o the people as a whole.
-President Roosevelt's speech
fit Little Rock. Ark.
SATURDAY. MARCH 1 1908.
A rOOL AND HIS FOOLISHNESS.
It is often assumed as an unanswer
able argument that the old slaveholder
and his descendents of the present day
are the men who know most about
the Afro-American but it can readily
he shown that these are the people
who art most profoundly ignorant of
his nature except in a state of slave/y.
They knov. nc thing about him, are
(eni-ivl'v and wonderfully ignorant oi
h*s .-'tliiisj: pud capacities in a state of
freedom, snd ttiey carefully cultivate
their prrfound ignorance.
Fo instance. Senator Tillman grave
ly .'ssures the Senate that the Afro
Amorie.vi i? well satisfied nuth the
7ira Crow legislation of ihe South, at
the ve-y time when the A. M. E. Gen
eral Conference boycotts Atlanta,
Georgia, and the Afro-Americans an*
forming national organizations for the
express purpose of fighting those laws.
So Vardaman and Jeff Davis parade
their ignorance by declaring that the
Afro-American is not susceptible to
higher education, when, the race has
demonstrated to all the rest cf the uni
verse that it can produce orators,
poets, inventors, etc., of high rank.
When a chemist undertakes to dis
cover the nature of a new substance.
he investigates its behavior under all
possible conditions: he subjects it to
intense heat, then to intense cold, to
the action of various acids, alkalis and
reagents before he pretends to know
anything about it.
k$M^S%H&rj*MS ^*&v
w^y'-ywf^f^^/ J*'&
i slavery
$2.00
1.10
.60
When subscriptions are by any moans allowed
to iua without prepayment, the terms are
feU'cncs for each III weeks unci 5 cents for
eutiodil week, or at the rate of &!,40 per
year.
Remittances should be made by Express
Money Order, Post Office Money Ordet. Ke
istori Letter or Bank Draft. Postage i practice, not the exception,
do so at their own risk.
rtarrloge and death notices 10 lines or less 81.
.Kara additional line 10 cents. Payment
.strictly in advance, and to be announced at
all must come in season to oe news.
Aitve-tisinff rates, lft cents per agate line, each
insertion. There are fourteen agate lines
in an inch, and about seven words in an
agate line. No single advertisements less
inan#l. No discount allowed on less than
MarnpN will be received the same as cash for tore to make narl: nt" thpiv nnnnrl
the {iiu-tional parts of a dollar. Only one I,
cam ami two cent stamps taken. hy labor not. connected with their of-
Siiverhetnev be sent through the mail. flcial duties. Th ins was necessary
lt is.rthno.si, sine to wear a hole through the cause in many cases the churches
cavineipr,- and be lost or else it mav be sto- i 1 J. i.-
ton. Arsons who send silver to us in letters
three niontbs contract. Cash must accom- 'the Chicago University made money
pany all orders from parties unknown to us. i
Further particulars on appl'cation. I writing Latin. Greek and Hebr elw texte-
Reading notce .T cents per line, each insertion,
Nodlsoount."
matter is setfoin brevier typeabout, six
words to the line. All head-lines count
double.
o^
the single condition of ignorance and ?s' J*
"Thongh thou should'st brav a. fool' \*r,
in a mortar yet will his foolishness !vi "J.
i not depart from, him."Proverbs
XXVI [-22.
THIS IS NOT GRAFT.
Dr. Charles Edmund Hewitt is in
tensely flabbergasted because he has
discovered that many Christian pas
tors who are poorly paid by their
churches are eking out their support
by selling books, typewriters, life in
suiance and mining stocks. "Graft,"
he says, "is as prevalent in the pulpit
as in any other walk in life and more
reprehensible."
it is scarcely necessary to state that
the Doctor is one of the wise men con
nected with the University of Chicago
who ea-e astonishing the world by their
soarings and roarings. In the early
times in this country it was the usual
n0}
AV3i
for^s
a
min
"PP
business of teaching and manv like !1
Telmage. made money by selling ser
mons"or theological works. Some very
eminent ministers make money by
writing novels. The honored head of
i" Hewitt talks exacty lik
time or space. Readin i a man who has not investigated the
subject he imagines he knows so' much
about.
THE GEORGIA CRACKERS.
The Georgia folks are greatly dis
quieted by another alarming symptom.
the emigration of the population of the
state to the West. Such a number of
citizens are going west to grow up
with the country that even the scramble
of Hoke Smith and Clark Howell foi
the office of governor no longer fas
cinates the citizens, who seem to be
wondering whether or not, anybody
will be left to be governed.
A prominent citizen of the state
views the matter thus:
'"With till- the southeastern Unas
working together to put an end to this
sort of emigration and the governor,
state officials and citizens generally
back of the movement, they will have
little opportunity to do this sort of
business without being caught up with.
Once they are forced to pay the tax of
$500 in each county for the privilege
cf acting as emigration agents. I feel
sure they will be discouraged and
Georgia will be left to Georgians, as it
should be and has been this long time.
Mow the Georgians are trying stren
uously to attract immigration from
other states and countries. Suppose
thai each of these states and countries
enacts the Georgia law and makes
every Georgia emi
tax of .$."500, in ev
be operates, then whatcountv
What's sauce for the goose is sauce
for the gander,is it not, Georgia folks?
Jr-soph 7MedUl
3
BISHOP H. M. TURNER.
The Southerner assumes to know all SCHOLASTIC TITLES
about the nature of a human bein.
whom he has never known except in s44 wir^ ^n
0i
pan
's1-
etirely support th ebe
abt
am! going back a little further, Paul
was a tentniaker and John Eunvan a ,asf
tinker Many ministers follow the
^5PP^
S
-i law an mai- S rf ?u
Patterson, the million
aire, who recently resigned his office
of Commissioner of Public Works of
Chicago, has the right ideas. He be
lieves in the equality of all. In a re
cent interview he said:
'Why should not all men be equal?
Here am I living at the Holland House,
going to the opera and the like be
cause my grandfather worked hard
for sixty years or* his life and left a
fo line. Now. again, I have a groom
who looks after my ponies, who touch
es his hat to me and cnlls me 'sir,' yet
ho can play polo infinitely better
dri or play because. he was born
poc:\ What right have we to deprive
others of pleasures which we gain on
ly through inheritance?"
't^i
8 e?,h
ma n,J
a
nlte
of graft
ots ourspecietsh institutionUs coni-
V?
tJt*le3f
t(?X**
olasr
1
a
ee
am
S
i
2
3ust
few dollars to the Blankton College
or the Fol de rol University, and the
thing is done.
But it is. of course, cheaper just to
assume the title and lay by your mon
ey for a rainy day. The latter is a
common and popular practice and ae
counts for the fact that so many of our
th
rbound
tl sh
o.
seoon 7
ay
Wl1
n?
S -If
&potte
HON
th
The Great Champion of the Rights of!
the Afro-American Citizen.
Poultry Bigand Low seems to be the
cause of great hilarity throughout the
United States He struck out to make
do
a 8
than I can and knows infinitely more confirms the opinion. He sojourned I
fbout)
his mark as a great something or other determine the value of the worthless-
and has fizzled out to a fazzle We ness of soil fertilizers says the A'mei:-
rarefy pick up a newspaper that does not i ican Illustrated Magazine. While the-
indulge in mirth when it mentions his I use of bacteria for inoculation may
name. Of course, this ison unseemly, ultimatelty do. awav with all need
but Secretary
Taftt
li
31 a law ana makes pCor old fellow, let no one molest him -nh v. i m^ i
ligration agent pay a
vIoSs hi wear rery in whirl/ hillhe to the poor housve
Mr. Poulthey Bigelow's oratorical
flights at Boston University convinced I
horses than I do yet We cannot upon the Isthmus about two days and
learned all about the situation."' Then
he came home and rushed into print
to tell what he knewmost of which
was not so.
At the age of 80, Mrs. Ann E. Grid
ley, mother of the famous captain to
whom Admiral Dewey gave the order,
'You may begin firing when you get
ready, Gridley," and grandmother of
Lieut. John P. V. Gridley, killed two
years ago by the explosion on the bat
tleship 'Missouri, is' regularly at work
as a clerk in the land office, a sub
division of the department of the in
terior, at Washington.
Mrs. Gridley has workedfor the gov
ernment, almost "continuously, for
thirty years. Her salary is '$900 a
year.
::v
Mrs. Gridley came to Washington
from Michigan shortly after the war.
Her husband was Frank Gridley of
Hillsdale, Mich. He 'had/ been en
gaged in mercantile pursuits' before
the war, but he. became a confirmed
invalid and Mrs. Gridley sought
ployment and supported, both for
years.
She has one son, Lucius E. Gridley,
for years an employe of the treasury
department, with whom she lives.
Mrs. Gridley -has a-'pension of $20
a month, granted her on account oi
her service's as nurse during the civil
war Rooseveltt has
a personal interest in Mrs. Gridley,
a haPresident recommended tha congresstake
pass a bill increasing her pension to
$100 a month, which would enable her
to resign from office and take a few
years* rest.
The prize money to. which Capt.
Gridleys was entitledbay,aamountinf as result thet
in Manil a
ca
ture
"D. D's." deal so largely in -double -su- nearly $10,000, went, with the insur-
perlatives and past tenses and utterly I ance and pension, to his widow, who
disregard the rule that the verb and i resides in Erie Pa. The latter also
its subject must agree in number. The i received the insurance, etc. after the
spectacle of an ignorant ranter posing I death of her son, the young-lieutenant
as a D. D. is not an.inspiring one. I wu
In the South, there are many plant
ers who never suffer from scarcity of
labor. They can get all the labor they
need, without the least trouble. There
is another class, much larger, which is
always short and filling the newspa
pers with its bowlings about the unre
liability of Afro-American labor. Why
is this? The reasons are purely per
sonal. The planters of the first class
treat their laborersver decently, recogniz,
ing that they have some
righthowlingdejismokin
1
no
was killed on the Missouri.
Capt. Gridley's remains were cre
mated in Manila, and no monument
has been erected to commemorate him
or his bravery in the national ceme
tery at Arlington, though there is also
a bill for this purpose pigeonholed
somewhere in some capitol committee
room.
opposite, a/.d mg man seated in a restaurant sadly
which to
a white manl is to respect th
S
afraid that I and my brother,Charl'es
will never be the friends Ave were
again. You see, is this way! A
while ago brother Charles was pre
sented with a son and heir, andr like
the good fellow he 'is, he named the
precious infant after mehis bachelor
brother. I was away out West at the
time, but the joyful news was duly
telegraphed to me, and-I sent a cup
and shovel and spQon arid the rest
of the outfit that ujicles are supposed
to supply to their nieces and nephews,
and supposed that all was well.
The other day I arrived back ire
i town, and, as in duty bound, went up
to see the wonderfrij1
the
tov
wa
^veY\lZ
poor
The Washington Post says: "Gov.
Vardaman declares that the Negro race
is not improving. The Afro-Americans
have not replied, but the chances are
that they think, about that way of Gov.
Vardaman.
The conjecture of the Pr.st is very
pertinent. It has correctly divined the
opinion of the Afro-American as to old
man Vardaman. The old fellow is in
flated with gas and afflicted with a big
head.
flfact,
i
Hero's 80-Year-Old Mother
Works as Department Clerk
I am afraid," said a perplexed"I look-
and always a cigar after luncheon am
B?c0Jl
wor
baby. Now that
child, in spite of t.Ke fact that it was
named Rafter!- nre^toofeed ^ust *ifke
every other babyr-f ever saw. Of
course, I tried to be^ratefested and' all
that sort of thing, and when they
would ask me if I did not think it:
looked like some one I 'would say yes,
mrtiT I had declared that the blooming
bit of pink flesh looked like evers'body
Elaborate tests have been made at
many of the stations, particularly in
the East and. the South,, in order to
poultry spen upon commercial fertilizersf
acted .fust right fertilization, yet amounts are
SAVB MOJfEy FOrR FAltMEItS
,large
a'u
abandoned In
sa1
1
n* I
something like $30,000,000 is an
nually paid out by jtihe farmers of the
United States for fertilizers.
It is unquestionably true that much
rrar
ha been pr|icticed upon the
farmers in this direction. In New Jer
sey the station showed the farmers
that by clubbing-together and purchas
ing the raw material of which the fer
tilizers are composjed they could save
from 25 to 45 per jei^t. The estimated:
saving in cost to' the farmers of the
state by this oite" feature alone is
from $75,000 to $1O0VOOO per year. This
station has also j4emonstrated the
ec ial food needs1
TH3 APPEAL that he needed a mother showing the farmer what' particular
to give him a good spanking, and his
article-upon the Isthmus of Panama
of .certain plants,
"Which of ytro by taking thought caa
add one cubit unto his stature?" is a
question contained in Christ's sermon
ion the Mount which has generally
been regarded as unanswerable, says
the New York Tribune. The Hebrew
cubit was equal to about twenty-two,
i inches, and the problem involved in
1 making such a gain as that was
enough to discourage any one. But
Uere are two men in Colorado to-day
who by taking thought have contrived
a machine by which, they declare, a
gratifying number of inclies may be
added to the height of any person who
will be satisfied with something less
tnan a foot. The originators of this
method are Professors David B. Cropp,
foi mer physical director of the State
University of Colorado, and Fordyce
P. Cleaves of Denver^.''.
In using this body extending ma
'chine, the patient^lies down upon the
framework and is securely fastened
to it by straps around the- head and
feet. -Mt his right hand there is a
lever by which he extends the ma-
f^The Way to Entertain.
How* shall we .entertain? asks a
writer. Joyously! Pleasure is, con
tagious. Remember, hostess, every
house has its climate some are in the
torrid, some in the. temperate, some
in the frigid zone^ Remember, more
over, that you create the climate of
your house. More importanti than
the style of your dress, the ordering
if your banquet, the setting of your
able, is the mood in which the ap-
MACHINE TO ST*RETCH BOD^K
"My work is very pleasant here,"
said Mrs. Gridley. "I have little -writ
ing now to do, and spend most of my
time arranging documents alphabeti
cally and numerically. Long practice
has given me quite a bit of skill in
this line.
"Everybody is very considerate and
Ann
GoriclLey'
BEST THIJVG A*BOVT 3ABX
*tltMtltHIH|| t.
kind. Sdmetimes I think it would be
restful if I could afford to go and pay
a few visits, and see my relatives and
friends. That is where that increase
of pension would come in handy. But
I am more anxious that they build a
suitable monument to my son in Ar
lington. That is really a grief to me."
from his great-grandfather t& the Em
peror Napoleon
"Dming the solemn ceremonies of
inspection the ehiTd was held by a
plump, red-cheeked Irish lass with
blue eyes that made you-
think of
shining lakes, amid quiet landscapes.
Oh, she was a. peach, that nurse But
of course, I had to pretend to be- in-
terested only to the baby. Well, I
thought I had said about all that was
required off me regarding the kid'.
Goodness knows I lied as they led me
on, and appeared to like it. But
brother Charles was evidently not
satisfied, and, following me to the
door, he whispered to me iir an awe
struck voiceit is Charles' first, yoir
know'John,, that is a most remark
able baby. It is extraordinary. It is
not, as you seem to think, like other
bahies. Nbwy-honestly, dbn^t you see
anything remarkable about it?'
"'Why, yes,' I answered.. 'I think
that baby has the prettiest nurse I'
ever saw in my life.' Then I ran down
the steps, and Charleswell, I ani
afraid lie will never forgive nue."
New York Press.
type of fertilizer wa& needed for a
given crop-.
Instead oi purchasing manures front
New York and' Philadelphia for fertil
izing sweet potato ground, as- had been
the custom, the station advised a Com
bination of various fertilizers as like
ly to give the precise food the sweet
potato needed to bring about the most
satisfactory results. More than 20,000'
acres of ground in New Jersey are
given up to the cultivation of the
sweet, potato,, and the cost of produc
tion has thus been lessened by from.
$5 to $10 per acre, making an annual
saving of nearly or quite $200,000.
In this station, as in many other
stations the information* given the
farmers in the way of methods of pre
venting insect pests- results in a sav
ing of thousands of dollars a year.
Without the aid of the stations, orch
ards and vegetable tracts as well,, in*
deed, in some cases entire field erop
areas would be destroyed. It is this
constant searching for the negative
advantages, so to' call them, that
marks one of the most significant func
tions of the stations.
ehine and' thus submits his body to
whatever extreme of stretching he de
sires, using the lever to apply more
power or relieve the strain at will.
The machine extends like a dining
table, from the middle both ways, and
by means of the straps around head
and feet the pressufe is applied evenly
along the body.
The user submits himself to what
ever stretching force he wishes and
takes the exercise as often as he
pleases and for as long. The best re
sults have been attained when the
pressure is applied daily for periods
of thirty minutes at a time. The idea
is that the patient shall have a ma
chine in his room and take the stretch
ing each night, before retiring. The
construction of the machine is calcu
Iated to draw out the spine and hold
it extended sufficiently long for nature
to start building, to conform with
the new situation. Persisting in the
exercise for tLree months is deemed
sufficient to bring results. Some per
sons have their height increased two i
to three inches, the inventors declare.
pointed hour of entertainment finds
you. When the door bell peals "to the
ring of the first arrival put aside all
thoughts of how you look, how your
drawing room looks, how good, bad
or indifferent the dinner may prove
banish every care, meet your guest
with nothing, on your mind save the
anticipation of passing and helping
him to pass a delightful hour. If you
can do this the battle is already, jialf
won.
fi /'V'"
TUSKEGEE
Hurma i and Industria Institut
TUSKEGEE ALABAMA.
(INCORPORVKTBD)
Organized July 4, 1881-, by the State Leans,
latttre as 'Bhe-Tuskegee- State Normal School.
Exempt front' taxation:
BQO-KER OT. WASHsCN.Ga?ON, PViocipal.
WARRfflt LOG-AN, T?tasucer.
LOCATION
In the Black Belt of Alabanna- where the
blacks outnumber the whites three to one.
ENROLLWENT AND FACULTY
EWotliment last yean r,2S3 males. 883
fetnales 371. Average attendance-, 1,105.~
Instructors, 33
COimSE OF STUDY
Eng-Ksh1
education combined with industrial
tsaiiiittg 2S industries i constant operation.
VALUE OF PROPERTY
Property consisting- of 2.267.acres of land.
50 buildings almost wholly built with student
hibor, is va-liiedi at-j$350,000, and no mortgage.
NEEDS
$S0annuaUy fbrthe education of each stu.
dent ($200 enables-one to finish course
?l,000,create3permauentscholarshipthe
building?.
38*
5$
COLLEGES XTC BSHOQLS.
Rnowlcs P-uildinx Bov3' Hall. Slone Han Girls' Half %foei fVtn
ATLANTA UNIVERSITY, Atlanta- Ga.
\n unsectarian Christian Institution, devoted ^especially to advanced education. College, NE,
taal, College Preparatory and Eng- ish'H gh School courses, with Indusf' -i Training Superf i
advantages in Rousic and Printing Ath etic ivr boys Physical cu^*ute.for .gi is Home he
nd tiaining, Aid given to needy and deservif^ students. Term begins the first VVerinc^diS
ia October. For catalogue a jd
information,"address
President HORACE BUMSTEAD. D.D.
Student
pay their own board in cash and labor.)*
Money in. any. amount for current expenses
and:
Besides the work dbneby graduates r.s 'lass
roomand: industrial leaders, thousands ^ja
reached- through the Tuekegee Negro Confer
ence.
Tusleegeeis40miles east of Montgomery and
136 mties west of Atlanta-on the Western Rail
roa^ z. Alabama.
Ttifekejree is a quiet-, beautiful old Southern
towa, and is an- ideal place for study. Th cli
mate is at all times mild and uniform, thus
making: the place an excellent winter resort.
SCOTIA SEMINARY
CONCORD, N. C.
This well known school, established for
the higher education of girls wili open
for the next term October 1. Every effort
will be mad to provide for tn comfort,
health and thorough instruction of stu
dents. Expense, for board, light, fuel,
washing. $45, for term of eight months.
Address
Rev. D. J. Satterfield, D. D.,
Concord, N. C.
AVERY COLLEGE
TRADES SCHOOL
ALLEGHENY, A.
A Practical, Iaterary -it-d Industrial
Trades School for Afro-American Boys anq
Girls. Unusual advantages fo Girls and 4
separate building-.
Address,r
JOSE PH D- MAHOS:T. I?J
v'.ri-pal.
Allegheny, Pa.
iiCollege
FOUNDED IN 1881.
Fourteen teachers. Elegant anl commodi
ous buildings. Climate unsurpassed. Depart*
meats: College Preparatory Normal, Erg
lah. Music, Shorthand, Typewriting and _o-
dustrlal Training.
FIFTY DOLLARS lit ADVANCE
Will pay for board, room, light, fuel, tuition
and Incidentals for the entire year. Board
86.00 per montl. tuliion 82.00 per term.
Thorough work done in each dspartrr^nt
Snud for ciroula to the president,
&JSV. 1 UDSON K. HILL, D.
Mv8tOWD-
jVewEnglancf
CONSERVATO RY
OF MUSIC
BOSTON, Mass.
411 theadvnntages of '.he flnwt and mnt completely,
equipped Conservatory building in the world, the t'
mosptierc of a recognized center of Art and Music andi
association with the masters in the Profession are
offered-students nt the New England Conservatory of.
luisic. Thorough work in nil departments of music.
Con-ree, can be arranged In Elocutiou and Oratory.
OGORGE W. CHADWICK. Musical Director..
MlparUcv'.ati and year took will be sent on application.
Virginia Nornial Colleglie
Jflstfttie.
PETERSBURG, VA.
"partmeats- Normal anf CoX
?hue Special attention to'Voca-T air
Instrumental MusicTheoreticaf Agr,
culture, Sewing and^ookJner.
Healthy Location heated by stewa
Hsrhted by "-'^ctricity: room, txtatb
tuition, light atni heat, 5(30.
For Catalog and PartU"-*?.--s
write to J. H. JOHNSTOX.
PreeiditDi.
tAMMQN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
AIMS AOSD METHODS
The. aim of this school is to do prac
tical work in helping men towards suc
cess in1
the ministlry. Itscourse of study
is broad and practical its ideas are high
its- work is thorough its methods are
fl*esh. systematic, clear and' simple.
CCU&S1& O STUTDY
The regular course of study occupies
three years, and covers the lines of work
ih the several departments of theological
instruction usually pursued- in tn lead
ing theological seminaries of the country.
EXPENSES AND* AID
TuitSon- and room rent are free. The
apartments for students are plainly fur
nished! Good board can be had for
seven dollars per month. Buildings heat
ed by steam.
Aid! from loans without interest, and
gifts of friends, are grant ed to deserv
ing- students whe do their utmost in the
line of self-help. N young- man with
grace, gifts, and' enei'gy. need be deprived"
of the advaiv ages now opened to him
in this- Seminary. For further particulars*
address
ii.'G. ADKINSON Di Dl,
Pres. Gammon. Theological Seminary^
ATLANTA, GEORGIA*
BBAINERD INSTITUTE
CHESTER, S.
A normal .:nd industrial school with a
English education, and lay a solid foiin
rlation for success and usefulness in every
vocation of life. Board and biiarrfing hall
graded course of study, designer! to frive
a thorough, symmetrical and complete
HOWARD UNIVERSITY
MEDICAL DEPARTMENT
(Including Medical, Dental and
Pharmaceutic Colleges)
iNCOr.POBATKD 1867
Thirty-eighth session will begin Oc
tober 2, 1905, and continue eight
months. Students matriculate for Day
Instruction.
4-Years' Graded Course in Medicine.
3-Years' Graded Course in Dental
Surgery.
3-Years* Graded Course in Pharmacy.
Instruction is given by didactic lec
tures, quizzes, clinics and practical lab
oratory demonstrations. Well-equip
ped laboratories in all departments.
Unexcelled hospital facilities. All
students must register before October
14, 1905. For further information or
catalogue, apply to J. SHADD. A.
M., M. D., Secy, 901 Street. N. W.
Washington, D. C.
TILLOTSON COLLEGE,
AUSTIN, -TTE,X.f\&,
The OldeBt and Best School r. ?ezas for
Colored Students. Faculty nr ---iy
i I.
gradu-
ates of well known colleges i... north.
Reputation unsurpassed. Manual train
ing a part of the regular course. Music a.
special feature of the school. Special ad
vantages for earnest students seeking to
help themselves. Send for catalogue and
circular to
REV. MARSHALL R. GAINES, A. MU*
PRESIDENT,
SAMUEL HUSTON COLLEGE,
A Christian School ftJS/ss,.,, Fa5UH
Progressive in all departments, best Method*
Of Instruction, Health of Students carefully
looked after Students taught to do manu&
labor as well as think. For catalogue audi
other information, write to the president,
R. S- LOVINGGOOD. AUSTIN, TRXA-

xml | txt