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The Appeal. (Saint Paul, Minn. ;) 1889-19??, March 24, 1906, Image 2

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016810/1906-03-24/ed-1/seq-2/

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TEE APPEAL,
A HATIOKAL AFRO-AMERICAN NEWSPAPER
PUBLISHED WEEBXY BY
AOAAIS BROS. EDITORS AND PUBLISHERS
49 B. 4th St., St. Paul, ninn.
ST. PAUL OFFICE,
No. 110 Union Blk. 4th & Cedar,
J. 0 ADAMS, Manager.
MINNEAPOLIS OFFICE,
Guaranty Loan Bldg. Room 1020
HAKVEY B. BURK, Mnoagor.
CHICAGO OFFICE,
323-5 Dearborn St., Suite 310,
C. F. ADAMS, Manager.
TERMS, STRICTLY IN ADVANCE:
SINGLE COPY, ONE YEAH S2.00
SINGLE COPY, SIX MONTHS 1.10
SINGLE COPY, THREE MONTHS 60
When subscriptions are by any means allowed
to run without prepayment, the terms are
i0 cents for each 13 weeks and 5 cents for
each odd week, or at the rate of &i,40 per
year.
Remittances should be made by Express
Money Order, Post Office Money Order, Ke
gistered Letter or Bank Draft. Postage
stamps will be received the same as cash for
the fractional parts of a dollar. Only one
cent and two cent stamps taken.
Sliver should never be sent through the mail.
It is almost sure to wear a hole through the
envelope and be lost or else it may be sto
len. Persons who send silver to us in letters
do so at their own risk.
flsrriage and death notices 10 lines or less 81.
Each additional line 10 cents. Payment
strictly in advance, and to be announced at
'all must come in season to he news.
Advertising: rates, 15 cents per agate line,each
Insertion. There are fourteen agate lines
in an inch, and about seven words in an
agate line. No single advertisements less
than $1. No discount allowed on less than
three months contract. Cash must accom
pany all orders from parties unknown to us.
Further particulars on application.
Reading: notices 25 cents per line, each insertion.
No discounts for time or space. Reading
matter is set in brevier typeabout six
words to the line. All head-lines count
double.
The date on the address label shows when
subscription expires. Renewals should be
made two weeks prior to expiration, .so that
no paper may be missed, as the paper stops
when time is out.
It occasionally happens that papers senttosub
soribers are lost or stolen. In case you do
not receive any number when due, inform us
by postal card at the expiration of ti ve days
from that date, and we will cheerfully for
ward a duplicate of the missing number
Communications to receive attentions must be
newsy, upon important subject's, plainly
written only upon one side of the paper
must reach us Tuesdays if possible, anyway
not later than Wednesdays, and bear the sig
nature of the author. No manuscript re
turned, unless stamps are sent for postage.
,We do not hold ourselves responsible for the
views of our correspondents.
Soliciting agents wanted everywhere. "Write
for terms. Sample copies free.
in every letter that you write us never fail to
give your full name and address, plainly
written, post office, county and state. Busi
ness letters of all kinds must be written on
separate sheets from letters containing news
or matter f&r publication.
PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT.
Treat each man according to
his worth as a man. Distrust
all who would have any one
class placed before any other.
Other republics have fallen be
cause the unscrupulous have
substituted loyalty to class for
loyalty to the people as a whole.
President Roosevelt's speech
at Little Rock,.Ark.
SATURDAY. MARH 24. 1906.
DRIFTING TO TH E TOWNS.
Whenever Caucasians criticise the
Afro-American it implies a comparison
with the action 6f their own race un
der similar circumstances. The re
sult of a fair comparison shows that in
the majority of cases there is a great
resemblance between the two races.
To cite one instance, there has been
much criticism of the Afro-American
for his tendency to drift to the towns
and cities. This however, is not pecu
liar to the Afro-American for official
statistics show conclusively, that the
same tendency exists among the
Caucasian race, even in the North and
the same reasons exist in both of the
cases.
Among these reasons are the absence
vl church and school privileges in the
country, at all comparable to those
that are found in the towns. This is
specially the case among the Afro
Americans of the South, who are, uni
versally compelled, to resort to the
towns to secure suitable educational
and religious advantages.
Again under the farming system of
the South, it is almost impossible for
the laborer to make any progress for
at the end of the year, he usually finds
himsolf destitute and in debt. Event
ually, he becomes discouraged and
"drifts to the town."
Were Caucasian laborers substituted
for the Afro-Americans, the drifting
would be even mora general'. Again
^fiiinl'
Vft^y^ w'&yfc
BISHOP W. B. DERRICK.
He notices that the owner of the big
plantation does not live on the farm,
but has his town residence where his
family can enjoy educational, social
and religious advantages. So, so soon
as he is able he imitates the white man
and locates his family in town, for the
very same reasons.
Under this regime, both the white
boy and the black boy are town-reared
and know very little about farming.
Their aspirations are not in that direc
tion, but they wish to be merchants,
lawyers or physicians.
In the case of-the Afro-American the
change is a great improvement for
Afro-American professional men have
been decidedly successful and usually
acquire a fair amount of town property.
It is ridiculously absurd to contend
that the farming Afro-American of the
South makes a better showing than his
brother in the town, who has a good
profession or trade.. As a rule the
town man makes the better showing
and reflects more credit-upon his race.
BISHOP TURNER.
The Washington Star has this to
say about Bishop Turner:
"Some of the Afro-American news
papers declare that Bishop Turner pos
sesses but small influence with his peo
ple, and should not be taken too seri
ously. Friends of the Afro-Americans
would be glad to believe this. But the
fact remains that he holds an office
which suggests influence and respect,
and the office, if not the man, counts.
How comes it. that he remains unshak
en in his place if he has few supporters
among his own people? Such deliver
ances as he occasionally indulges in on
public questions would be likely to
bring a weak man to book."
This was probably written before
Bishop Turner sent ah article to tho
newspapers denying that he used the
language attributed to him. The reas
on that he remains unshaken in his
place is that it requires a certain
course of procedure and the assembling
of the general conference to shake him.
Andy Johnson was not impeached the
next morning after he committed the
offences charged against him nor can
Bishop Turner be. And, again, the
"Bishop can be impeached only for
malfeasance in office or moral delin
quency. Neither of these is implied in
what, he said in the Georgia conven
tion.
BOYCOTT FOR BOYCOTT.
"The American trade with China is
practically gone," said R. P. Schwerin,
vice president of the Pacific Mail
Steam company yesterday, "and there
is likely to be greater trouble this
summer. I wouldn't give a cent for
the life of any Caucasian missionary
this summer who doesn't get out of the
interior. The boycott is back of it."
Mr Schwerin goes on to relate how
the unpleasant relations between
China-and the United States originat
ed, as follows:
"The labor leaders of.San Francisco
began an agitation against Chinese
made goods. Housewives were asked
to boycott all grocers who carried
Chinese brushes. Smokers were ask
ed to boycott tobacco dealers who sold
cigars rolled by Chinese. The coast
was placarded with posters advising
workmen not to buy overalls made by
a certain firm because, it was said.
Chinese were employed in their manu
facture."
Those labor leaders didn't know the
thing was loaded but we all know it
now and we are losing an immense
amount of valuable trade. The China
man contemplates our hysterics with
a "smile that is childlike and bland."
One of the Incorporators of the Constitution League.
\^U
DR
TRAINED MEN NEEDED.
The Baptist Truth, organ of the
Georgia Baptists, says:
All over Georgia there are churches
without pastors and] schools without
teachers, and among these vacancies
are some of the best positions in these
professions. The rank and file of fut
ure leaders are not tarrying long!
enough over their books to get the
requisite amount of training to enable
them to hold their own with credit to
themselves and with satisfaction to the
people.
We presume that no one will deny
that the educational progress of the
Afro-American largely depends upon
his churches and schools and it is cer
tain that he cannot conduct business
enterprises without the aid of duly
qualified men.
We knew of one case down South in
which nearly two hundred Afro-Ameri
cans, some of whom had large means,
attempted to carry on a general store.
Among the promoters were many well
known who were well versed in poli
tics at least the result showed that
they knew more about politics than
business, for the concern has just gone
into the hands of a receiver and the
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MAJOR ALLEN ALLENSWORTH
Chaplain 24th InfantryNominated by
President Roosevelt for Retirement as
Lieutenant Colonel.
stockholders have been called upon to
meet a very large indebtedness.
Well-trained men often fail in at
tempting to carry on business and
amateurs who rush into such enter
prises learn in a short time that "a.
fool and his money are soon parted."
Dixon is an adroit rabble-rouser of
the Dennis Kearney type and the tone
of his work is anarchistic. Perhaps
it is from the inspiration derived from
Dixon's writings that the Daughters
of the Confederacy are impelled to
contemplate erecting a monument to
Wurtz, the Atfdersonville butcher.
NoCount Boni Castelaine sniffs at
the $40,000 per annum, said to have
been tendered him by his wife. Boni
should remember the old saying, "beg
gars must not be choosers."
Four Southern senators voted against
the Pure Food Bill. The action was
not phenominal as anything pure is
highly objectionable in the South.
WESLEY
ALLE
Stf-
N
A
*j"' Famous Chicago Physician.
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'*ffifcSHOTf*AMOfiG.. THE MIJVISTE'RS
There was a cfcurcii trial in this
burg not many days ago, a case where
the scandal and its history were kept
beautifully smothered, and where the
"vultures of the press," as'one aged
minister called them, were baffled from
\lpha to Omega, and from A to Izzard.
The trial caine off,, and the verdict
was deferred for a toonth or two.'
So much for thes
trial. What hap
pened during the first session thereof
is what concerns this story.
Numerous reporters came to the
trialand got. nothing, which is the
reason no newspaper printed more
than a casual mention of the case.
When the eager scribes gathered at
the church they were received with
great courtesy, and also with the in
formation that the proceedings were
strictly secret. They were then herd
ed into an anteroom and told that they
would be-xgiven a little information
later.
Gathered in this anteroom, the boys
chatted, laughed and formulated imag
inary narratives. This soon palled up
on them, and they began to figure out
some method of getting at least an
inkling of, the doings.
Their anteroom was behind another
anteroom, and this rpdin, in-turn, was
separated from the auditorium of the
church by a big double door, the kind
of door where yolk,push-both halves
and emerge in the^ii^dle. The boys
It is stated of our late coruscating
ambassador at the court of St. James,
the Hon. Joseph H.^Ohoate, that when
he was a little chap he and his sis
ter had been forbidden by parenra!
authority to go in swimming, or even
to wade on the shore. Nevertheless,
the pair soon made their way to the
beach, and naturally were exposed to
the devices of Satan.
"You might at least take Off your
shoes and stockings," suggested the
tempter, well aware to what this
would lead. "Nobody will see us,"
said the acquiescent "Joe" to his sis
ter. "God will see us," was the reply.
"But he won't tell," returned the
sharp and precocious infant, who was
already tasting the sweets of foi-ensic
victory. As no effective response
served to suggest itself, transgression
soon followed, and its results were
finally emphasized, by the plastic
hand of their moth%r.
In one of his rambles the impend
ing ambassador fell in with a little
girl who was weeping bitterly. "What
The good-natured, philosophic Ger
man dachshund has always been re
garded as more or less of a joke in
this country. Even in the Fatherland
he is a staple for jesting. His elon
gated body, his crooked legs, his ani
mated tail, his resemblance to a sau
sagewho could fail to make some
sort of joke about a dachshund?
But the dachshu|L|t has a very seri
ous side, and a jv|p)i in life.
CHO^T:E JJSf CHILDHOOD DA^S
DACHSHUND A GOOD FIGHTE1R
]t
"Dachshund" mfahs "badger-dog.''
Now, the badger,is an animal that,
generally speaking heeds neither
game laws nor sympathy, because he
is able to take safe 'of himself and
fight his own battles. Naturalists
place hiin as a link* between the bear
family and the weasjpls. He has about
all the strenuous [characteristics of
both, with some-of.'His own in addition.
Badger-baiting was formerly a bar
barous rustic sport that drew trade to
country inns and taverns. A badger
was placed in a barrel and the man
whose dog could bring him out got- a
prize. A single dog seldom did it. A
full pack mightsometimes. The
Sunlight is nature's most health
giving scavenger. A house without
sunlight is unhealthy and unsafe for
human occupancy and it is necessary
not only to have some sunlight, but
to have as much of it as possible. It
is, of course, not feasible to admit
the direct rays of the sun to every
room of a house the typical plan of
|all houses is square or rectangular,
and at least one side of the house is
entirely beyond the reach of the sun.
The other three sides, however, can
receive more or less direct sunlight
and the problem of the plan is thus
reduced to arranging the various
rooms so that the amount of sunlight
is adjusted to their uses, and it must
be sunlight, for mere light itself is
not sufficient the rays of the sun
have curative and cleansing proper
ties that nothing else has.
The following incident, illustrating
the rough humor of the late "Luke"
Poland, then a congressman from Ver
mont, was related,to me a number of
years ago by our family physician,
says a writer in an eastern publica
tion.
I had been ill a number of days with
tonsilitis, and had reached the rest
less stage of convalescence, when the
doctor called one morning and found
me propped against the pillows and
deeply interested in a paper-covered
volume of the yellow variety. My
mother attempted, to apologize for the
cheap character of my literature, but
was interrupted by the doctor, who
laughingly exclaimed: "Oh, let him
read anything he wants to, if it will
only keep him qaiet."
"And, do you know," he continued.
"I read some nretty cheap looking
REALLY A HUMAN BEING.
A Story Showing.How Much Depends
on the Point of View.
The storx is told in China that years
ago a missionary made his appearance
upon a platform there and that the na
tive orator who introducedjiim closed
with these words:-
"When I have finished a gentleman
from the West is going to address you.
He is not a foreign demon. His ap
pearance and his^" clothing may seem
strange to you, hut look carefully at
him. He has tw,o arms and two- legs,t
SVJtLIGHT AftD THE HOVSE
'BOOKS HAD VOVBLE VSE
r*J
silently sneaked forward into this
room, and one of the most daring knelt
by the door, his eyes glued to the
crack, his ears extended to their great
est length. The others grouped beside
nd behind him, and waited for Kim
give out such information as his
coign of vantage might secure.
Among the crowd was one young
man who didn't particularly care
whether any paper got ^anything or
not. In fact, he would far rather iiave
scored a blank for this particular case,
and thus have gained some other and
more pleasing assignment from his
city* editor. This young man cogitat
ed for one moment, and then, quick as
some huge cat, gave the kneeling spy
at the door a tremendous shove.
The kneeling victim shot-straight
through the suddenly opening doors,
landing on hands and knees far out
in the auditorium. Another reporter,
who had been leaning against the
doors, fell headlong against him,
bringing up squarely upon his stom
ach. Two others, unable to regain
their balance, sat down heavily in the
doorway. The remainder of the tribe,
scrambling madly, fled out into the
street, leaving the fallen ones to re
ceive the wrath of the assembled min
isters.
It might be just as well to draw the
veil of silence and of charity over the
subsequent proceedings. Chicago
Journal. is the matter, Molly? Can I do any
thing for you?" was the sympathetic
query. With many sobs came the re
ply "My mamma has gone to hea-
ven." "Perhaps she hasn't," was the
comforting comment, which abruptly
stopped the sobs and left the victim in
a maze of thought.
Another experience revealed'to our
hero a cottage with a sunny garden
all abloom and a piazza dominated by
an elderly maiden of forbidding as
pect. "May I have a few of those
lovely flowers?" "No, no, little boy,"
came the churlish reply. "They are
put there to look at, not to touch."
"That's why you are put there, I sup-
pose," said the quick and impenitent
youth, as he scampered down the
street.
"My child, my child, what dirty
hands!" said the mother one day as
he came in with hands that suggested
a four paws' menagerie. "Go and
wash them at once." "Why, ma,"trailing
was the aggrieved response, "I have
washed them already. You must be
getting color blind."
badger is a tremendous burrower, and
the jolly" dachshund of the jokes has
been trained for centuries in Germany
to go into his burrows like a ferreH
after rats and drive the badger out or
fight him. In some German and Aus
trian cities there were formerly badg
er-baiting tourneys in which crack
dachshunds entered a pit with an able
bodied badger and fought for points.
It is said that such contests are still
held in Vienna. For spirit, endurance
and agility the. dachshund has no peer
in this work, and a bulldog pitted
against a badger would probably find
himself cutting a poor figure.
So, to make the jokes about the
dachshund if you will, but give him
credit for his prowess, and for that
gentleness, characteristic also of the
best bulldogs, that makes either an af
fectionate companion to man and a
loyal playmate to children. Give the
dachshund credit, too, for intelligence.
He has it in large degree. Few dogs
are keener, and probably his acumen
is such that he even sees a good many
of the dachshund jokes.
It is generally admitted that a
southern exposure is the best for all
houses and should be obtained when
ever possible. It is immaterial wheth
er the entrance is placed on this side
or not, so long as the rooms most in
use open onto the house.
In dwellings of average size the en
trance front will also be" the front on
which any important room opens,
but in large country houses, the old
distinction bf a front and back to a
house has disappeared and instead we
have the entrance front and the gar
den front the service and servants'
quarters, so long regarded as charac
teristic of the "back" of a house, may
be relegated to a side end or placed
in a wing that abuts directly on the
entrance front. In such cases it must
be well screened, and its purpose
thoroughly subordinated.American
Homes and Gardens.
stuff myself, especially on a train. I
hardly ever come home from a trip
that I don't bring a cheap novel with
me, and sometimes I am so ashamed
of the blood and thunder stories that
I tear off the covers before taking the
books into the house.
"I remember once when going from
Rutland to Burlington, Vt., I noticed
Congressman Luke Poland sitting a
few seats in front of me with a novel
he had purchased of the train boy. At
the next stop I left my seat, and, stop
ping beside him, said: "Good morning,
Mr. Poland. I see you have my bad
habit of reading cheap literature on
the train.'
'Yes,' he replied, 'I confess I do
read some worthless trash on the
train but it passes the time, you
know, and, besides, some fool
doesn't come and talk to you.'"
two ears and two eyes, a nose (though
a long one), and a mouth I assure you
his teeth are made of hone, just like
yours. He is reaily a human heing,
and I hope you will regard him as
such."
What She Wanted.
"I shall make, you love me yet," de
clared Mr. Stinjay, determinedly. "I
shall leave no stone unturned."
"Ah, that sounds like," exclaimed the
fair girl. "If the stone weighs not less
than a carat and is pure white you may
interest me/'.^
j^fl.
.^tM/ f-^VSKtS*-
Knowles ^-uildin^. Bovs'
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SCOTIA SEMINARY
CONCORD, N. C.
This well known school, established for
the higher education of girls, wili open
for the next term October 1. Every effort
will be made to provide for the comfort,
health and thorough instruction of stu
dents. Expense for board, light, fuel,
washing, $45, for term of eight months.
Address
Rev. O. 4. Satterfield, D. D.,
Concord, N. C.
AVERY COLLEGE
TRADES SCHOOL
ALLEGHENY, P. A.
A Practical, Literary and Industrial
Trades School for Afro-American Boys and
Girls. Unusual advantages for Girls and a
separate building. Address,
JOSEPH D. MAHONBYJ Priacipal,
Alleg-heny, Pa.
lorristownNonalCoiieKe
FOUNDED I N 1881.
Fourteen teachers. Elegant an 3 commodi
ous buildings. Climate unsurpassed. Depart
ments: College Preparatory Normal, Eng-'
ilah, Music, Shorthand., Typewriting and Jo?
dustrial Training.
FIFTY DOLLARS IN ADVANCE
Will pay for board, room, light, fuel, tuition
and Incidentals for the entire year. Board
16.00 per month tuition. 12.00 per term
Thorough work done in each department
Send for circular to the president,
KEV. UOSON 8. HIIX, D. D.,
M*
CDJaLEGES &NB ECHflCLB
ATLANTA UNIVERSITY, Atlanta. Ga.
An unsectarian Christian Institution, devoted especially to advanced education. College, No
tvai, College Preparatory and English High School courses, with Industrial Training. Superior
Advantages in Music and Printing. Athletic for boys. Physical cut*are for girls Home 0%
nd training. Aid given to needy and descrvftlg students. Term begins the first Wednesday
is October. For catalogue ausd information, address
President HORACE BUMSTEAD. D.B.
BcSofC^JI^S taflVhS^f^U801'?t{^^10j
lon
im&SS^tS^^^^^^^?^ b0 2
rd
TUSKEGEE
Normal aM Industrial Institute
TUSKEGEE ALABAMA.
(INCORPORATED)
Organized July 4, 1881, by the State Legi.
lature as The Tuskegee State Normal School.
Exempt from taxation.
BOOKER T. WASHINGTON, Principal.
WARREN LOGAN, Treasurer.
LOCATION
In the Black Belt of Alabama where the
blacks outnumber the whites three to one.
ENROLLMENT AN FACULTY
Enrollment last year 1,253 males. 882*
females, 371. Average attendance. 1,105
Instructors, 88.
COURSE O STUDY
English education combined with industrial
28 industries in constant operation-.
VALUE O PROPERTY
Property consisting of 2.267 acres of land.
SO buildings almost wholly b'uilt with student
labor, is valued at $350,000, and no mortgage.
NEEDS
$50 annually for the education of each stu.
dent ($200 enables one to finish the course
$1,000 creates permanent scholarship. Students
pay their own board in cash and labor.)
Money in any amount for current expenses
and building.
Besides tne work done by graduates as Hass
room and industrial leaders, thousands ^_"3
reached through the Tuskegee Negro Confer
ence.
Tuskegee is 40 miles east of Montgomery and
136 miles west of Atlanta, on the WesternRail
roa^ or. Alabama.
Tuskegee is a quiet, beautiful old Southern
town, and is an ideal place for study. The cli
mate is at all times mild and uniform, thus
making the place aa excellent winter resort.
and matav/n for little girls and another for little boys from 6 ioi5 veare Term bsarins1M*
^londayinSeptembei. Bend ibr catalogue to ft^SS^^e^KSaSg
.*""n.
^JNewEnjIand
CONSERVATORY^
^_ OF MUSIC
BOSTON, Mass.
All the advantages of the finest and most completely
equipped Conservatory building in the world, tbe at
mosphere of a recognized center of Art andMusic and
association with the masters In tbe Profession are
offered students at the Now England Conservatory of
Kuslc. Thorough work in all departments of music.
Courses can be arranged in Elocutiou and Oratory.
GEORGE W. CHADWICK. Musical Director.
All particulars and year boot will be sent on application.
WIX, TRAINS VIA WASHINGTON
Virginia Normal OoIJegfete
Institute.
PETERSBURG, VA.
TJepartments-Normal aad Colle
giate Special attention to Vocal an*
Instrumental Mnsic/Theoretical Ago
culture, Sewing andnoking.
Healthy Location heated by stea(
lighted by *'ctrictty: room, boarv
tuition, light ana heat, $60.
For Catalog and Partlcr^ars
write to J. H. JOHNSTON,
President
JW* a fttrni*ed room. Separate home
uAgricultural.
11
Mechanical. Normal and Common
School Fiity-five Dollars a Year 0
OAMMON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY
ATLANTA, GEORGIA
AIMS AND METHODS
The aim of this school is to do prac
tical work in helping men towards suc
cess in the ministry. Its course of study
is broad and practical its ideas are high
its work is thorough its methods are
diesh, systematic, clear and simple.
COURSE O STUDY
The regular course of study occupies,
three years, and covers the lines of work
in the several departments of theological
Instruction usually pursued in the lead
ing theological seminaries of the country.
EXPENSES AND AID
Tuition and room rent are free. The
apartments for students are plainly fur
nished. Good board can be had for
seven .dollars per month. Buildings heat
ed by steam.
Aid from loans without interest, and
gifts of friends, are granted to deserv
ing students who do their utmost in the
line of self-help. No young man with
grace, gifts, and energy, need be deprived
of the advantages now opened to him
in this Semhrary. For further particular*
address
G. ADKINSON, D. D.,
Pres. Gammon. Theological Seminary,
ATLANTA, GEORGIA.
BRAINERD INST1T0T
CHESTER, S.
A normal and industrial school with a
English education, and lay a solid foun
dation for success and usefulness in every
vocation of life. Board and boarding hall
graded course of study, deslgn&i to give
a thorough, symmetrical and complete
HOWARD UNIVERSITY
MEDICAL DEPARTMENT
(Including Medical, Dental and
Pharmaceutic Colleges)
INCORPORATED 1867
Thirty-eighth session will begin Oc
tober 2, 1005, and continue eight
months. Students matriculate for Day
Instruction.
4-Years' Graded Course in Medicine.
3-Years' Graded Course in Dental
Surgery.
3-Years' Graded Course in Pharmacy.
Instruction is given by didactic lec
tures, quizzes, clinics and practical lab
oratory demonstrations. Well-equi p
ped laboratories in all departments,
unexcelled hospital facilities. All
students mut register before October
14, 1905. Fo further information or
catalogue, apply to F. J. SHADD. A,
M., M. D., Sec'y, 901 Street, N. W..
Washingto n, D. C.
TILLOTSON COLLEGE,
AUSTIN, TE^CflaS.
The Oldest and Best School Texas for
Colored Students. Faculty IT ^ly gradu
ates of well known colleges it. north.
Bepntation unsurpassed. Manual train
ing apart of the regular coarse. Music a
special feature of the school. Special ad
vantages io earnest-stadeats seeking to
help themselves. Send for catalogue and
circular to
REV. MARSHALL R. GAINES, A.M.,
SAMUEL HUSTON COLLEGE,
A Christian School
Able and
Experienced Facult)
Progressive in all departments, best Methods
Of Instruction, Health of Students carefullt
looked after Students taught to do manual
labor as well as think. For catalogue and
other Information, write to tbe president,
R. S LOVINGGOOD, AUSTIN, TBXA9-
1 S
Model.-Rome.
"4
I
9
*y-.

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