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The Appeal. (Saint Paul, Minn. ;) 1889-19??, November 16, 1912, Image 2

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016810/1912-11-16/ed-1/seq-2/

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THE APPEAL
ft NationalAfro-American Newspaper
1
PDBLKIXS WIIKLT I
IDAMS BROS. EDITORS AND PUBLISHERS
49 B. 4th SttMt, St. FacaJ, M3ma.
ST. PAUL OFFICE
J- Q. ADAMS. Manager.
No. 236 Union Block, 49 E. 4th St.
MINNEAPOLIS OFFICE
JASPER GIBBS. Manager.
Metropolitan Bldg., Room 1020.
CHICAGO OFFICE
C. F. ADAMS. Manager.
443 S. Dearborn St., Suits 660.
TERMS STRICTLY IN ADVANCE
SINGLE COPY, ONE YEAItoa*.... .$2.00
SINGLE COPY, SIX MONTHS 1.10
SINGLE COPY, THREE MONTHS.. .60
When subscriptions are by any means al
lowed to run without prepayment, the
terms are 60 cents for each 13 weeks
and 5 cents for each odd week, or at the
rate of $2.40 te year.
Remittances should be made by Express
Money Order, Post Office Money Order,
Registered Letter or Bank Draft. Post
age Stamps will be received the same as
cash for the fractional parts of a dollar.
Only one cent and two cent stamps
taken.
silver should never be sent through the
mail. It is almost sure to wear a hole
through the envelope and be lost or
else it may be stolen. Persons who
sent silver to us in letters do so at their
own risk.
Marriage and death notices 10 lines or less
SI. Each additional line 10 cents. Pay
ment strictly in advance, and to be an
nounced at all must come in season tc
news.
Advertising rates, 15 cents per agate line,
each insertion. There are fourteen
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words in an agate line. No single ad
vertisements less than $1. No discount
allowed on less than three months con
tract. Cash must accompany all orders
from parties unknown to us. Further
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due. inform us by postal card at the
expiration of five days from that date,
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must be newsy, upon important subjects,
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paper must reach us Tuesdays if pos
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ters containing news or matter for pub
lication. Entered as second class matter
June 6, 1885 at the postofflce at St. Paul,
Minn., under act of Congress, March 3,
1879.
SATURDAY NOVEMBER 16, 1912.
There come times when Burns' "A
man's a man for a' that and a' that" is
verified. One of these was during the
recent railroad collision on the Yazoo &
Mississippi Valley railroad near Montz,
La., when a through freight train
crashed into the rear of an excursion
of ten coaches killing fifteen persons
and injuring ninety-two. The press
dispatches state that the two rear
coaches which were telescoped by the
freight engine, caught fire immedi
ately. Passengers who had escaped
injury rushed into the wrecked
coaches and dragged dead and injured
from the flames. Several of the occu
pants of the front coaches who
escaped injury were burned in their
efforts to save those less fortunate.
White men risked their lives to save
blacks from the rapidly spreading
flames, and black men rushed into the
steam and flames to rescue white per
sons as well as members of their own
race.
If Diogenes were only in Chicago
now, he would not need a lantern to
help him in his search for an honest
man. A resident of Chicago, seeking
to ease his conscience, sent Secretary
MacVeagh of the treasury department
a two-cent postage stamp which he
was tempted to use unlawfully.
Through error the postoffice had not
cancelled the stamp and the Chicago
an sent it to Mr. MacVeagh with this
note:
"My conscience would not let me
keep this stamp, though I had torn it
off with the intention of using it
again.
Unfortunately we do not know his
name and cannot tell who this perfect
paragon of perfection is.
Talking about the morals of Chi
cago, how about the rites of a new
cult that held its weird oriental-like
ceremonies at the residence of Dr. W.
L. D. Lawrence in the most exclusive
section of Michigan avenue? A wom
an who was present on the occasion
of an initiation says that the new stu
dentsall white womenwore no
clothing.
R.ev.5
,5*1, Cr3*
The quarter of a century past
You've spent in wedded bliss
And, to celebrate so great event
Is, surely, not amiss.
too
That's the fate of those who're
right,
And those who are always
Pounding wrong with all their
might.
You've lived a pure and upright life,
In your daily walk below
Your peace, calling and election's
sure,
When from earth you are called
to go.
But, while you're
sphere,
It cannot be denied
That you must
wear
W. D. CARTER
M.BODDY
VALDO TURNER
3 Mrs. McDonald
Celebrate Their "Silver Wed
ding" Anniversary
a
High Esteem in Which The Happy Couqle
are Held hy the People of the Twin Ci-
ties Shown by Their Presence and the
Presents
Rev. E. Harvey McDonald, D. D., G. Hood, H. I. Wlilliams, B. Stevens,
arrived in the city of St. Paul on the G. W. Wills, J. B. Johnson, H. High,
last day of December or, to be more
explicit, on the last night of Decem
ber, 1909.
He was met at the train by some
of the officers and members and es
corted to Pilgrim Baptist Church, to
the pastorate of which he had been
called, watch meeting being in prog
ress at the time.
His wife followed him to the city
later. Since his advent in our midst
he has held a steadfast course, hewing
to the line and letting the chips fall
where they would.
His road has been rugged at times,
because he was not in accord with all
of his members, as a few of them were
unaccustomed to a man of his calibre
and did not understand him.
However, he, though greatly dis
couraged at times held to the even
tenor of his way and daily gained
friends both within and without his
congregation, until now he has made
for himself a place in the hearts of
the good people of the Twin Cities
second to none in this community.
He has been married for a quarter of
a century and following the usual cus
tom, he and his estimable better half
concluded to celebrate their silver
wedding or twenty-fifth anniversary of
their marriage and invitations were
issued for the event, and the responses
gave ample evidence of the high ro
gard in which he is held, over three
hundred persons being present during
the evening.
The cozy and well appointed resi
dence was very tastefully decorated
with sniilax, evergreens and cut flow
ers.
The guests on arriving were met at
the door by Mesdames W. T. Francis
and J. W. Kelly and passed down the
receiving line which comprised: Mes
dames Valdo Turner, J. Q. Adams, E.
DeBaptiste, G. W. James, J. H. Hick
man, P. B. Simpson, Lee Coleman, W.
IS ft
REV. E. H. MCDONALD. Mrs. E. H. McDONALD.
presentee
to
1Rev anbflfcre.]- Ifoawe^ ADclDonalb
witb
Scvcntv^five Silver dollars
at tbeix
"Silver Mebbino"
Gftursba? Evening, November 7, 1912
St. Paul, /DMnnesota
T. H. Lyles, F. D. Parker, W. V. How
ard, J. Hanley, Bert Adams, Frances
B. Preston and Mary McLeod Bethune.
The presents were received by: Mes
dames N. Coins, C. H. Spaulding, J. J.
Billups Misses Mamie Morgan and
Annie Allen.
The refreshments were served by
Mesdames Alex. Payne, O. Lobbins, J.
W. Cleary, J. Billups Messrs. O. Lob
bins, M. A. Boiling, S. L. Ransom, Bert
Adams, Homer Goins, E. C. Walker.
The ushers were: Misses Mamie
and Martha Goins Elenor Barksdale,
Mamie Fletcher, Estelle Johnson, Ma
mie Hubbard.
There was no especial ceremony
other than the reception of congratula
tions of the guests as they entered the
parlors.
The "bride" wore a handsome im
ported gown of gray silk, trimmed
with applique and lace.
The "groom" wore a Prince Albert
suit.
The ladies of the receiving commit
tee were all handsomely gowned, as
also were all the ladies present and
the scene was very brilliant and
pleasing to the eye.
The usual course of receptions fol
lowed until the arrival of Mr. J. Q.
Adams, who at once proceeded to the
presence of the host and hostess and
presented, with a few preliminary re
marks, a blue card in a silver frame
upon which was inscribed in silver
letters the following facsimile. And
in order that all might know what it
contained, he read his 'rhymes, pre
senting at the proper places the
handsome silver thread mesh bag
containing sixteen silver dollars to
Mrs. McDonald and a large blue velvet
cross bound all around with a silver
cord and upon which were fastened
seventy-five silver dollars, to Rev.
McDonald.
h'.'4
1
nnnK/-"* ^nnnnnnGBnl
nHBP^^^
B31
^^is^s^sl iHUs^^s^nnnnnH
Your needs must be supllied.
You've had ups and downs, no doubt To not give useless, silver trash,
That's the lot of mortal man, But American silver dollars.
But joys outnumbered ills, we'll trow,
As the years in cycles ran. You'll find here three for every year
Ofayour matrimonial, life
You've made friends, and made foes,
And so some friends have thought it
best
Their names this effusion "toilers"
silver mesh bag extra
An
on this mundane
eat, and drink, and
J. Q. ADAMS
WM. ALSTON
M. W. BRADSHAW
J. H. CHARLESTON
J- H. DILLINGHAM
W. B. ELLIOTT
ALFRED FORD i
W. R. HARDY
O. HOWELL
G. H. LUCAS
G. W. MOKER
C. D. MULLIGAN
ALEX. PAYNE
H. C. RICHARDSON
G. C. SLEET
F. a SIMPSON
L. M. TERRILL
C. P. TYLER
T. R. C. TAYLOR
A. S. WEBER
For your faithful, lovely wife.
The sum is not large that each one
gave,
But 'till you cross the dark river,
We hope each one remembered will be,
Not for sake of the gift, but each
giver.
The good book, somewhere, teaches
Each other's burdens we must share,
And tho' we've laid this cross upon
you,
We hope it's not too heavy to bear.
We pray that many years you'll live,
To help souls and to save them
And as you spend these dollars, pray
For the souls of those who gave
them.
MR. AND MRS.
B.
S.
J.
W,
C. ARCHER
A. BELLESEN
C. BLACK
F. T. CHANDLER
GEORGE DAVIS
W. T. FRANCIS
ORRI C. HALL
HENRY HIGH
W. A. HILYARD
E. JONES
G. B. LOWE
L. A. MELKER
W. R. MORRIS
J. W. PEYTON
B. S. SMITH
W. H. SIMPSON
R. J. SOLOMON
W. B. TANDY
F. A. WILLIAMS
P. H. ANDERSON
J. J. BILLUPS
THOS. BUSH
R. B. CHAPMAN
E. D. BAPTISTE
T. E. FRANKLIN
S. E. HALL
J- H. HICKMAN
W. V. HOWARD
.T. H. LYLES
C. H. MILLER
F. D. McCRACKEN
F. D. PARKER
Z. A. POPE
J. S. STRONG
C. SAUNDERS
MARCH SALTERS
S. W. WRIGHT
E. J. WILLIAMS
C. H. WALKER
REV. AND MRS.
T. J. CARTER
JOSEPH S- STRONG
DR. AND MRS.
A. H. LEALTAD
D. HOWARD G.,W. JAMES
J, R. WHITE,, r?,^'i\
IDA CRANE
JULIA HINSON
MATTIE B. McGHEE
G. W.CAMP
M. A. BOLLING
A. V. HALL
A. J. PRUITT*
HARRY ROBINSON
JOHN WATSON
N. P. WOLO
EDYTH LEONARD
LULA HOWARD
DELLA PETTIS
sephine Byrd.
Rev. and Mrs. McDonald fittingly
responded.
Other presents were received as
follows:
Cut glass bread tray and embroid
ered sideboard scarf, Mr. and Mrs.
Samuel Hatcher, T. R. Morgan, C. H.
Great Writer's Brilliant Idea to Com
bine Trousers and Slippers 4n
On* Qsriant.
Vn a village In the taaart of Ttouralne
there lives an old man whose pride it
is that he once had tha tumor of ma
king a pair of trousers for Balsac.
The old tailor delights to tell of his
meeting with the distinguished French
man, Harper's Weekly says.
When the tailor, got to the chateau
where Balsac was staying he found
him. He would write a spell, then
stare wildly about, and then go at it
again as If he knew that a world was
waiting for his words.
After standing near and watching
tho great man a while the tailor at
last felt that he must interrupt Bat
zae in order to get bis measure for
tho trousers. Balzac was extremely
good-natured smiled as the tailor
measured him, but spoke but one*.
"No feet," said he, as the tailor In
ished his measurements. Then ho
turned to his work.
The worthy tailor had no idea at
all what this meant, hut for some
reason he had not courage enough to
Interrupt the novelist again to ask.
However, the tailor chanced to meet
a servant on hie way out and of htm
inquired what Mens. Balzac meant hy
"No feet.,'
"Oh," responded the servant "Moos.
Balsac wants Ms trousers made with
out any openings at the bottom, ao
that he can sit and write without hav
ing to put on slippers."
REVEREND
H. P. JONES
W. T. MITCHELL
DOCTOR
MISSES
CARRIE B. MONJOY
BLANCHE WALKER
Rev. McDonald was loudly called horn, Mr. Henry J. Sharp, Chicago,
upon, and made a very appropriate Sterling silver present, Mrs. M. S.
response, as also did Mrs. McDonald- Hudson, New Bedford, Mass.
Mr. J. W. Kelly then, with a neat Cut glass and silver fruit dish, W.
speech, representing "The Allen ana H. Carter.
Kelly Club," presented a large gold Set silver tea spoons, Mrs. Nora
covered book inside of which was the Young.
figure 25 composed of thirty-three Large sterling cheese scoop, "Sun-
silver dollars, the donors being: Mr. shine Club," Providence, R. I,
and Mrs. A. B. Allen, J, W. Kelly, Silver jelly spoon, Mrs. B. A. Arm-
O. Lobbins, J. C. Broyles, R. P. strong.
Wright, Bert Adams, C. Raymond, G. Set silver tea spoons (initial)1,
A. Green, A, Allen, L. Hedge, B. and Mrs. O. Potter, J. S. Lowe, M. L.
Sears, H. M. Whitehead, S. Foster, Barksdale.
N. Goins, E. H.*Patrick, G. L. Lee, M.
A. Hickman, B^ R. Durant, W. Max
well, E. M. HVH. Hart, P. Godfrey,
O. Clayton, J. Hanley Rev. and Mrs.
D. E. Beasley Mesdames K. Meyers,
J. Billups, M. Ridgeway, E. Hardin
Miss H. Hobbsj-Messrs. L. T. Tolliver,
Chas. Shepard^ A- J. Roberts, S. Ta
bor, N. Smith.
Mrs. Charles Spaulding, represent
ing District .Nov i and friends, pre
sented a cut glass powder puff hold
er, ^containing twenty-eight silver dol
lars, the donors being: Mr. and Mrs.
Chas. Spaulding, J. B. Johnson, G. W
Wills, W. A. Ashworth, G. Bush, M. fruit dish, Mrs.Clark
Duncan, H. C. Petticord, R. Anderson, Pair embroidered pillow cases,
J.. Holmes, Chas. Salter, Jas. Ware, (brother of "bride") Mr. and Mrs. G.
C. Olliver, J. H."Xioomis, A. Robinson, W. Johnson, Harrisbug, Pa.
E. Robinson, Gr.^C. Chambers, A. Jack Silver fruit dish, Dr. and Mrs. R. T.
son, A. Jarrettrs. S. Williams, A. R. Hamilton, Dallas, Tex.
Bailey, Frank Kingry, J. E. Cloak, L. Set silver rim cut glass water coas-
Yieser,-A. Roach L. Day, H. C. Walk- ters, Dr. and Mrs. D. V. Hooper, Dal-
er, Julius McNeal, John C. Few Mes- las, Tex.
dames Catherine Peters and daught- Silver tooth pick holder, Mr. and
er, Emma Mosby ,and sonPerry, Jo- Mrs. C. L. Smith.
Booker, J. E. Johnson, G. J. Charles- Misses Mamie Hubbard, Dela Beard,
ton, Jos. Adams, Fred Green, Arthur Mamie Fletcher.
Mayo, H. Brown, H. Stephenson, E.
W. Lindsay, W. Bean, K. B. Bond,
Q. Hicks, Geo. Duckett, H. W.
Hughes, A. Cotton, R. L. Allen, H. F.
Mclntyre, W. M. Cannon, L. G. Cole
man, A. D. Bennett, O. D. Charleston,
J. H. Sherwood W. Taggins, J. A.
Vass, H. G. Bass, J. W. Milton, L. J. Glass, Miss Eunice Glass.
Thompson, C. S. Sharp, J. Jones, B.
L. White, W. C. Brown Mesdames
Anna Moffitt. C. M. Hatton and sons,
Zelia Reynolds, La Porter Messrs.
J. J. Johnson, E. W. Crancum.
Silver and decorated china cheese
dish and tray, Mrs. Florence E. Hen
ley,
N Silver and Rofskwood baking dish,
hand painted plflfce, Mr. and Mrs. M.
A. Johnson, J. E. Murphy Mesdames
Virginia Taylor Mr. B. B. G. Wright.
Sterling spoon, Mr. Nelson D. Ricks.
Sterling bon bon spoon and shoe
MADE TO DO DOUBLE DUTY HAPPY MARRIAGE RECIPE
TONE E. GIBBS
FANNIE KING
rH. I. WILLIAMS
S. L. THEOBOLD
W. F. WATKINS
MESSRS.
HENRY CRAWFORD
F. C. LISTOE
W. L. B. PLUMMER
JOHN STRONG
W. A. WEIR
H. WRIGHT
A. WINSTEAD
WM. EVANS
R. C. MINOR
S. L. RANSOM
W. M. TUR'NER
E. C. WALKER
A. WRIGHT
CLARA HOWARD
Mr.
Silver cold meat fork, Rev. and Mrs.
John F. Thomas, Chicago.
Silver salad fork, Mr. and Mrs. J. H.
Magnett, New Bedford, Mass.
Silver berry spoon, Mr. and Mrs.
Augustus Jones.
Silver salad fork, no name.
THREE APPEAL
Silver berry spoon, Misdames Firs
ton White, J. F. Smith.
Cut glass and silver fern dish, Mr.
and Mrs. J. A. Lee, J. R. Covington,
i. W. Cleary, Foster Scott, W. G.
Hood Mr. G. M. Parker.
Silver salad spoon and decorated
Battenburg dresser scarf, Mrs. Em
ma Dorsey.
Embroidered handkerchief, Mrs. E.
H. Walker.
Two silver dollars, Dr. and Mrs.
Harvey Higgins, Providence, R. I.
Silver dollar, Mrs. Samuel Dorsey.
Two silver dollars, Mrs. H. White,
Three silver dollars, Mr. and Mrs
J. J. Hirshfield.
Silver dollar, Mr. and Mrs. W. B,
Madden.
Silver dollar, Mr. and Mrs. H. C,
Peay.
Silver dollar, Mr. and Mrs.
Noninterference Policy Would Remeva
i Many Causes of Discontent
Among the Wedded.
him In the garden at work"on a novel, **ere was to It," said Mrs. Sherwood.
He was so busy that thd tailor waited But the true recipe seems to be coa
In silence. Ma^y sheets of paper. I tained in the husband's remark that
covered with fine writing, lay around I k "minded his own business, whllo
The experience of a married couple
who have lived together for 70 yean
without a quarrel possesses a practical
value which outweighs any amount of
theorizing, and the reasons for tho
happy union given by Mr. and Mrs.
Levi Sherwood, who enjoy this distinc
tion, have a wide interest. "We just
loved each other and that was all
she tended to her own affairs."
In that simple policy of noninterfer
ence is comprised all the philosophy
BOt only of happy marriage, but of
harmonious human relations in tho
broader sense. If the married adhered
to this rule, there would be little mar
ital discord, less divorce, and fewer
eases of domestic disagreement In the
police courts. The very latitude of- ac-
tion which this enlightened couple
gave to each other served to unite
them more closely and to avert th#
eonfliot of interests which causes ship
wreck. Theirs was a union without
ft dictator or boss.
Matrimony, lika everything, elan*
Bay suffer from too much regulation.
Cities and states suffer from It no less
than unhappy wives and the small bay
who is accounted incorrigible. A gen
eral application of the policy of non
interference which made this a happy
marriage might remove more serious
amuses of public discontentNew
Tork World.
THE MAN WHO DARES
I honor the man who in the con
scientious discharge of his duty dares
to stand alone the world, with ignor
ant, intolerant judgment, may con
demn, the countenances of relatives
may be averted, and the hearts of
friends grow coid, but the sense of
duty done shall be sweeter than the
applause of the world, the counten
ances of relatives or the hearts of
friends.Charles Summer.
4-**^^- Ar*
V !U
1
E.
Silver dollar, Mrs. Nellie Davis.
Silver cream and sugar set, Dr.
E. C. Morris and wife, Helena, Ark.,
President National Baptist Associa
tion.
Telegrams of congratulation were
received from, Miss Nannie Bur
roughs, Pres. Natl. Training School,
Washington, D. C, Dr. and Mrs. S. W.
Tims,-Brooklyn, JST, Y.
The silver dollars on the cross were
polished by F. H. Harm & Bro., the
jewellers and opticians, 14 E. 6th St.
Advertisement.
LOCATION.
In the Black Belt of Alabama where the
blacks outnumber the whites three to one.
ENROLLMENT AND FACULTY.
Over 1.500 students, more than 100 in
structors.
COURSE OF STUDY.
English education combined with in
dustrial training 28 industries in constant
operation.
VALUE OF PROPERTY.
land. 103 buildings almost wholly built
with student labor, is valued at $1,250,000
and no mortgage.
NEEDS.
$50 annually for the education of each
student ($200 enables one to finish the
course $1,000 creates permanent scholar
ship. Students pay their own board in
cash and labor.) Money in anyvajnount
for current expenses and building.
Besides the work done by graduates as
class room and industrial leaders,
thousands are l-eached through the Tus
kegee Negro Conference.
Tuskegee is 40 miles east of Mont
gomery and 138 miles west of Atlanta, on
the Western Railroad of Alabama.
Tuskegee is a quiet, beautiful old
Southern town, and is an ideal place for
study. The climate is at all times mild
excellent winter resort.
Vinrolti 3ttatttufr
JEFFERSON CITY, MISSOURI
Founded by the Soldiers of the 62d and 65th
Beglments of the XJ. S. Colored. Infantry.
Supported by the State of Missouri. Has
Normal, Collegiate, Agricultural, Mechanical and
Industrial Courses Buildings and equipment
unsurpassed Thirty teachers representing the
best schools of the country Students from all
sections of the country. For catalogue and fur
ther information address
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN ALLEN,
President.
Knowle. BuUdlng. Boys'HaU. StoneiHjtfL Girls' Hall. Model Home.
ATLANTA UNIVERSITY. Atlanta, Geu
Is beautifully located in the City of Atlanta, Ga. The courses of
study include H"i*h School, Normal School and College, with manual
training: and domestic science. Among- the teachers are graduates of Yale,
Harvard, Dartmouth, 8mith and Wesley. Forty-one years of successful
work have been completed. Students come from all parts of the South
Graduates are almost universally successful. For further information*
address Prssidrat. EDWARD T. WAKE, Atlanta Oa!
NewEnglatuT
CONSERVATORY
OF MUSIC
BOSTON, Mass.
All the advantages of (be fint tnd most completely
equipped Conservatory building in the world, tbe at
mosphere of a recognized center of Art and "Music and
association with tbe masters In tbe Profession are
offered students at tbe New England Conservatory of
Music. Thorough work in all departments of music.
Courses ran be arranged in Elocution and Oratory.
GEORGE W. CHAOWICK. Musical Director.
All particulars and year book ta'ff be lent on application.
I iftBI
HOWftRO UNIVERSITY
WILBUR. P. THIRKIELD, President.
Washington, D. C.
The Collegeof Arts and ScienceKEIAY MXIABR, A. M., Dean.
The Teachers' CollegeLEWIS B. MOORE, A. M., Ph.D., Dean.
The AcademyGEORGE J. CTJMMINGS, A. M. Dean.
The Commercial CollegeGEORGE W. COOK, A. M., Dean.
School of Manual Arts and Applied Science
PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS
The School of TheologyISAAC CLARK, D. D., Dean.
The School of Medicine: Medical, Dental and Pharmaceutical
CollegesEDWARD O. BAIXOCH, M. D Dean.
The School of LawBENJAMIN P. LKIGHTON, LL. D., Dean.
For Catalogue and Special Information Address Dean of Department.
Beautiful Situation, Healthful Location. The Best Moral and Spiritual*
Environmentn A Splendid Intellectual Atmosphere-,
Noted for Honest and Thorough work.
*tt1
Property consisting of 2,350 acres of S
courses i the following departments College Normal,
High School, Grammar School and Industrial.
Good water, steam heat, electric lightsF, good drainage. Expenses
very reasonable. Opportunityfor Self-help.
^fL'-X^SJJPS?11
8
Se0t *7
I011
TUSKEGEE
Normal aim Industrial institute
PRESIDE NT R. W. MeGRANAHAN. Knoxville. T*m,
TUSKEGEE, ALABAMA.
(Incorporated.)
Organized July 4, 1881, by the Stub
Legislature as The Tuskegee State Nor
mal School. Exempt from taxation.
BOOKER T. WASHINGTON, Principal.
WARREN LOGAN, Treasurer.
Information Address
GAMMON THEOLOGICAL SBNMRY
ATLANTA, GEORGIA.
AIMS AND METHODS.
The aim of this school is to do prac
tical work in helping men towards suc
cess in the ministry. Its course of stud
is broad and practical its ideas are high:
its work is thorough its methods are
fresh, systematic, clear and simple.
COURSE OF STUDY.
The regular course of study occupies
three years, and covers the lines of work
in the several departments of theologi-ai
instruction usually pursued in the lead
ing theological seminaries of the country.
EXPENSES AND AID.
Tuition and room rent are i'ree. The
apartments for students are plainly fur
nished. Good board can be had for sew*
dollars per month. Buildings heated h\
steam.
A'1 from loans without Jnterest, an6
gifts of friends, are granted to deserving
students who do their utmost in the line
of self-help. No young man with grace.
gifts, and energy, neeUdr beer deprived or
the advantages now opened to him in
THE PRESIDENT,
Gammon Theological Seminary,
Atlanta, Oeorgia.
Washington Conservatory of
Music and School of Exp refc*ion.
902 STREET, WASHINGTON, D. C.
LARGE AND COMPETENT FACULTY
DEPARTMENTS
Piano,Voiceand Violin,PianoTuning.Theory Analy
sis, Harmony, Counterpoint, Fugue,Vocol Expression,.
Wind Instruments, History of Music, Methods.
Scholarships Awarded Artiste? Recitals.
HARRIET GIBBS-MARSHALL, President.
GEORGE WILLIAM COOK, TreaBitrrr.
ABBY WILLIAMS, Secretary.
LEWIS G. GREGORY. Financial Beareter*.
ANNIE" E. GSINAGE.
ifat llttiu^rslig
This-institution of learning, established 5n 1S6S,
has industrial departments for both young men
and young women, as well as college, normal and
preparatory departments. There are also Schools
of Law, Medicine, Pharmacy and Theology.
The facilities have recency been increased.
Other improvements are being planned that will
be completed within the next two years.
Applications should be made several months or
a year in advance, for it has become impossible
during the last few years to receive all who apply.
The present enrollment is over 500.
The academic year begins on the Tbarsday
nearest the first day of October and continues for
thirty-two consecutive weeks. The charges are
moderate. Catalogues furnished upon amplication..
Address THE PRESIDENT
Shaw University, Raleigh, N. C.
AVERY COLLEGE
TRAINING SCHOOL
NORTH SIDE, PITTSBURGH, PA.
A Practical Literary and Industrial
Trades School for Afro-American Boy&
and Girls. Unusual advantages for Girls
1 and a separate building. Address
Joseph D. Mahoney, Principal.
Box. 154. North Side. Pittsburgh, Pa.
Stradgkten
up. Why do you w&sh in the hardest pos
sible way? Use PEARXINE, there's no
beriding over the tub, no ba.ck kinks, no
work to speak of, no wea.r a.i\d tear from
rubbing. Millions use PEARLINE. No
matter how or when you use PEARLINE,
or however delica.te your ha.nds or the
fetbric, it is absolutely harmless. 636
Pea.rline is right
WANTED, A SAMARITAN.
Prone in the road he lay.
Wounded and sore bestead:
Priests, Levites past that way,
And turned aside the head.
They were not hardened men
In human service slack:
His need was great: but then
His face, you see, was black.
From the New York Independent.
I
At
P^ticular
fth
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eminary
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