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The Appeal. (Saint Paul, Minn. ;) 1889-19??, December 23, 1922, Image 3

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016810/1922-12-23/ed-1/seq-3/

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ST.PAUfc
A/EEK'S RECORD OF HAPPENINGS
IN MINNESOTA'S CAPITAL^.
The "Saintly City" and Saintly City
folks-Newsy Items of Social, Re
ligious, Political and General Mat
ters Among the People.
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1922.
THE APPEAL ASKS AS A SPE-
CIAL FAVOR THAT ITS READERS
ilVE PREFERENCE TO THE AD-
VERTISERS WHO SEEK THEIR
PATRONAGE BY ADVERTISING
IN IT. SHOP IN THE APPEAL
BEFORE SHOPPING ELSEWHERE.
W E
WISH ALL
OF OUR READERS
A MERRY CHRISTMAS
Mr. Arthur Winstead is sick at his
home, 260 Main street.
The St. Paul Universal has moved
to 411 University avenue.
FOR RENT Five-room second
floor flat. Call Dale 7557.
FOR RENTNicely furnished
room, modern conveniences. Call
Dale 7955.
Mrs. E. A. Hatton, 126 W. Arch
street, who has been ill the past two
weeks is convalescent.
Mr. Samuel Williams, 906 Gaultier
St., returned Friday from a business
trip to Glendive, Mont.
Mrs. C. H. Miller, 428 Edmund
street, was hostess to the Handicraft
Art Club Thursday afternoon.
PIONEER LODGE NO. 1. F. AND A. M.,
meets first and third Monday in each month
at Masonic Hall, 688 Rondo St., at 8:00 P.
M. K. H. Turner. W. M. J. W. Thomas,
8eey., SIS W. Central.Advertisement.
FOR. CHRISTMAS
INSIST O N GETTING
CLOVER LEAF
BUTTE TlLDEN PRODUCE CO.
CHURNERS
Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Miller were
dinner guests Sunday at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. G. Mundell, 417 Rondo
street.
Early morning services will be held
at St. James A. M. 13. Church on
Christmas morning. Six o'clock is
the hour.
Household of Ruth No. 533, G. U.
O. of O. F., held their annual elec
tion of officers Monday evening at
Union Hall.
HOUSEHOLD OF RUTH NO. S53. G. U.
O. of O. F., meets the third Monday in each
month at Union Hall, corner of Aurora and
Kent Btreets at 8:00 P. M. Mrs. Delia
Williams, M. M. G. Mrs. Carrie E. Lindsay,
W. R., 426 Rondo street.Advertisement.
Mr. Charles Burke has taken
charge of the Acme Club Cafe, for
merly run by W. H. Reems, and is
doing everything possible to please
its many patrons.
Cetaur Keawi Del* M4T
to.i CIS St. Aatkaar Ava.
MRS. T. LYLES
lattsawf te
ML 1.TLB UNDnMtTAKINO CO.
If* W. r*wth M. T. rAVI.
The Frog Hop- given at Union Hall
last Thursday evening was generally,
conceded to be the most, unique danc
ing party given in the Twin Cities in
many years. The Frogs are a group
of University men.
Christmas services of St. James A.
M. E. Sunday school will be held at
the church Sunday afternoon instead
of Sunday morning at the church
school hour. Miss Bertha Lewis has
charge of the program.
At a meeting of the Board of Di
rectors of the Cannon Toilet Manu
facturing Co., the board of directors
voted a stock dividend of 20 per cent
payable December 23, to stockholders
on record, December 19.
CASE CAR SERVICEPersons de
siring motor car service for any oc
casion may get the use of an elegant
new seven-passenger Case sedan, by
calling at 528 W. Central avenue or
calling up Dale 8412. Rates reason
able.
(1ERRY
E s
STATE SAVINGS BANK
9 3 E. FOURTH. ST*
^^^K^^^W^^WRSl^^^Ei^^WI^^^I
The Oak Park Gophers,-under the
auspices of the St. Paul Universal,
will give a matinee dance New Years
day and also a dance in the evening
at Union.Hall. Elaborate plans and
preparations have been made to make
the two affairs enjoyable for every
one. Entertaining musk by Moore's
orchestra. You are inyited.
Don't fail to go over to Minne
apolis and attend the Third Anniver
sary Card Party and Dance to be
given by Minnehaha Temple No. 129,
Daughter Elks, at Elks' Hall, Sixth
and Lyndale on Wednesday evening,
December 27. Several prizes will be
given away. Card playing from 8 to
11 P. M. Dancing from 11 to 2 A.
M. Admission 50 cents.
Officers for 1923 were elected by
the St. Paul Branch of the N. A. A.
C. P. at the Forum last Sunday. The
following officers were chosen: Judge
J. W. Willis, president Mrs. Birdie
High, secretary Paul W. Crane, as
sistant secretary S. E. Hall, treas
urer Father. Theobold, Mrs. G. W.
James, Mrs. A. M. Matchett and Mrs.
L. M. Benepe were elected to the
board of directors.
You and your friends are cordially
invited, to attend the GRAND
CHRISTMAS BALL to be given at
the beautiful COLISEUM DANCING
PAVILION, Lexington and Univer
sity avenues, Tuesday evening, De
cember 26, by the Unity Club. Be
sides securing on of the finest and
largest dance floors in the North
west, several entertaining features
have been arranged in keeping with
the Christmas spirit. Music by
Moore's tenrpiece orchestral You
are invited....
U. S. Veterans Bureau Service
Upon the walls of every office of
the United States Veterans' Bureau
hangs a large placard signed by
Colonel Forbes, Director of the
United States .Veterans' Bureau,
which reads as follows:
i. The United States Veterans'
Bureau was created to serve all ex
service men and women and I insist
that all veterans get a square deal.
2. Employees will give you a cor
dial welcome" and full information
concerning your case. The law will
be administered in the broadest and
most sympathetic way possible.
3. You are entitled to informa
tion, assistance, and advice 'concern
ing the law and the bureau's require
ments. Employees will make these
plain to you.
4. You will not be given short and
unsatisfactory answers to your ques
tions, but will be properly and sym
pathetically advised.
5. The services of the bureau are
at your disposal as a tribute to your
patriotic service during the World
War ,and it is expected that you shall
always receive courteous and helpful
treatment. Any deviation from these
rules should be reported to me. .1
want you to have every benefit which
your grateful government has pro
vided. HAGENBECK-WALLACE
CIRCUS HER E DEC, 25
St. Paul, Dec. 20th.When the
winter edition of the Carl Hagenbeck
Wallace Circus opens a week's en
gagement at the St. Paul Auditorium
on Monday night, December 25th, St.
Paul circus enthusiasts will have an
opportunity to see the only three ring
indoor circus in the universe.
The circus will appear in St. Paul
under the auspices of the Osman
Shrine Temple and the same great
performance as presented on the 1922
road tour, will be offered in the Audi
torium. The Eleven Flying Wards,
the Davenport ^and Crandall riding
troupes, the ^famous Hagenbeck
trained wild animals, the. Moe Moe
Japs, the Canton Chinese, and a true
English fox hunt are but-a few of
the hundreds of_features, that will be
offered twice daily.
Among the thousands of spectators
that will witness the initial perform
ance in the city will be Governor J.
A.. Preus, and Mayor Arthur E.
Nelson. Several of the prominent
luncheon clubs of the city wilj- be the
guests during the week to children
from the Preventorium, Phalen Park,
and also the wounded soldiers from
the Aberdeen Hospital. A show will
also be staged at the government
Hospital one morning for the soldiers
that are unable to leave their wheel
chairs^
JThe reserved seat sale opened Mon
day at Dyer's, and the reservations
were unusually heavy.
GOVERNOR S REFUSE
TO ACTJ O KLU
State Executives iri Conference Silent
on Menace of American Fascisti
White Sulphur Springs, W. Va.,
DecTaunted to stand up and be
counted against the Ku Klux Klan,
the governors of a majority of Amer
ican states, "most of whom had pri
vately expressed opposition to the
Klan, remained quiescent tonight
when Gov. John M. Parker of Louisi
ana, Democrat, exclaimed:
"Why duck your heads when you
see these conditions coining and men
acing you? Let us he vigorous, out
spoken Americans, and meet the is
sues as they present themselves to
us. G6"on recprd'here and now" Sp
Governor Ben W. Olcott of Or^
gon, who at tonight's session attacked
the Ku Klux Klan nearly as bitterly
as did Gov. Parker, this afternoon,
was momentarily^ absent from the
meeting hall of the Governors' Four
teenth Annual Conference at the
Greenbrier Hotel here. Consequently
a very significant silence fell upon
the assemMaee afterGov. Parker had
challenged his fellow governors^to
arise and take issue with him.jS^-'
To the question whether anyone
wanted to discuss the subject there
was absolute silence. Silence greeted
+he reiterated inquiry of the chair
man, "Is there any governor here
who cares to inject bis ideas into this
discission?"
The silence of most of the gov
ernors on the Klan'Bissue ap*an?
pear to
giv1
4jS
mors that of them were elected:
H*most
1
'7.*
MME. HACKLEY,
SINGER, DIES
IN DETROIT
Celebrated Musician Succumbs
Home of Sister Noted as
Pageant Producer
at
Madame E. Azalia Hackley, the
greatest producer of pageants and
recognized as the race's leading
teacher of vocalism, died at the home
of her sister in Detroit, Mich., on
Wednesday, night, December 13, after
an illness which extended over a pe
riod of six years. Madame Hackley
was one of" the .most remarkable
women in the public life of our peo
ple. For many years her time was
devoted to uplift work, her efforts
being specially centered in concerts
and pageants for the financial bene
fit of schools, churches and other
classes of institutions vital to the
welfare of the race, and there are
many thriving enterprises which can
trace their present success to her aid.
Highly Educated
Madame Hackley was born in Mur
freesboro, Tenn., and was 54 years
of age at the time of her death. She
was readed and educated in Detroit,
taught in the public schools of that
city for a number of 'years -and took
a very prominent place iri social and
musical circles. Her maiden name
was Smith. She married Edward
Hackley in Denver, Colo., arid later
went to Europe, where she completed
her musical education. For several
years she made her home iri^Phila
delphia, Pa., and later she moved to
Chicago, Where she established a
studio on Calumet avenue. In her"
line as a producer she had no equal.
It was coriiiripri for her to, enter a
community, assemble 600 or 600
"green" voices, train them in folk
songs and choruses in an unbeliev
ably short time and present them in
pageant along with soloists, duos and
larger groups, all selected from
among them. Her power over these
groups was almost uncanny, and the
members of, her "classes" often
ranged in age from 3 to 70 years.
Her activities covered the entire
United States and her name and fame
has been a household word all over
this country for years.
An Author
Madame ilackley was the author
of several volumes touching on social
and musical -matters. Most promi
nent among her books was "The Col
ored Girl Beautiful," which had a
large sale, and her ''Book on Pag-
eants,'^containing a complete de
scription of her methods. She was
a beautiful woman, physically and
morally, and was one of the few tal
ented individuals in public life who
scorned the press agent method of
gaining publicity. For years Madame
Hackley taught modesty in dressing.
Despite the fact that she was abun
dantly able to patronize the best
modistes she was always plainly
though neatly clad, and "was often
referred to- as "The Lady in Gray" on
account of her predilection for that
color in both her private and profes
sional costumes.
A Composer
Madame Hackley was one of the
most accomplished pianists of her
time, and her compositions were nu
merous and of a sort which demon
strated to a great extent her sympa
thetic temperament. She was a mem
ber of the Detroit Musicial Society
and of other organizations and was
a graduate of the Denver (Colo.) In
stitute of Music. .Aside from other
relatives she is survived bjr her sis-
*r. Mrs. Marietta E. Johnson, 212R
Clinton avenue. Detroit. Mich., at
whose home and under whose loving
"are she spent her last three years.
letter from Mrs., Johnson stated
*hat "Aznlia was so lovable and sweet
her illness: her last words were:
am tired I a ingoing to sleep.'
She closed her eyes and went to her
final rest."
I STAND FOR THESE THINGS
By E. W. Gilles.
I stand for the entire Bible, thoutrh
I cannot understand or explain it in
many of its parts as I would like.
I stand the
Trinits xrimtarianfor
0
1
ua^woul^df ^ei
1
to current ru-
weight
gaspel. It i thedmessagethrfoan
in the name of God the Father, and
God the Son, and God the Holy Ghost.
that reaches the hearts and lives of
men.
stand the
Bibleddoctrines xhI
as
averagfor man woul understand
them in reading the Bible under the
direction of the Holy Ghost.
I stand for the nroperties and cour
tesies of the Christian life.
I stand for either sympathetic co
operation with others or withdrawn
from them.
Viteran Triples Pre Wet Wage
Before the war, Enosk E. Olein
was a farmhand, earning the usual
lew wages paid for that work. His
army life as corporal, Co. A, 158th
Infantry, left him with hernia and
pyorrhea. It was evident .that he
could not go back to the heavy work
of farming. He was, therefore?
called into the Fargo suboffice of the
United States Veterans' Bureau, C.
T. Hoversori, spbdistrict manager,
and advised to take training as an
electrician.
He was placed in training with the
Electric Construction Co., Grand
Forks, N. D., and after a successful
tryout period was given special train
ing in auto electrics ^w.
He also took a corresponderice
course in starting, ignition, and light
ing systems, with one of the leading
state universities to supplement his
practical work with the above firm.
Mr, Olein successfully' carried on
this }ine of training and was reha
bilitated by the Veterans^Bureau on
August 1, 1922, whereupon the firm,
which was pleased with his work,
placed him upon their own payroll at
a wage of $25 a week, which is three
times his average wage as farmhand.
In probably seventy-five per cent
of the class of disabled veterans
trained in industrial establishments
they succeed so well th$t the torn it
self employs them and there is no
need^for them to seek employment
elsewhere.^
Thfs illustrates that the practical
thorough training afforded by
the Veterans' Bureau, places these
trained veterans in a far better eco-
i^lfian they"wo'uld have
enjoyed if there had been no war.
I mploymt SinrfseSteeessful
The United States Veterans' "Bu-
reau has completed a survey of the
employment situation among reha
bilitated vocational students of the
bureau.
"The employment situation among
our rehabilitated vocational trainees
is very satisfactory,'* Colijhel Charles
R. Forbes, Director of the Bureau
stated today. "The, establishment of
the Employment Service the Vet
erans' Bureau is justified by the re
sults obtained to date. When it is
taken into consideration that approx
imately 20,980 men have been reha
bilitated, it is surprising to note that
only a negligible number of graduate
vocational students are unemployed."
The employers in business and in
dustry have evinced the fine spirit
of helpfulness and have shown a
practical appreciation of these vet
erans' war time service by giving
preference to these vocationally
trained men. These employers are
being rewarded by faithful and loyal
service on the part of the'rehabilitat
ed trainees and that their services
are satisfactory is shown by the fact
that only a very small percentage
has.failed to meet the retirements of
the position.
Many of the veterans who have
been placed in employment by the
Veterans' Bureau have obtained po
sitions which from the very, begin
ning salaries^ above the average.
For instance, in one district, four of
the men who were placed in employ
ment during the. months* of August
nnd September received salaries of
$200 per month. Two other men are
receiving $250 per month and ten
men are receiving $150 per month.
/There are :v now approximately
96*800 men in vocational training and
as these men complete their training
from month to month the Employ
ment Service will obtain positions for
them. These irieri, on the average,
are receiving more than $400,000 a
year above their pre-war wages.
They have been trained.to overcame
their vocational handicaps* imposed on
them by their"~disabilities. The train
ing-which, they receive is an assur
ance to the employers that they will
be able to carry.on successfully, in
the trade or vocation for which they
have been trained.
LE/T*S Gdt LET'S GO!
d?^E
Grand Christmas Ball
Will be given by
December 25 to January 1
AHAPPYNEWYEAR
A-----
GOPHERS
A
-AT-
UNION HALL
KENT AND AURORA STREETS
JANUARY 1,1923
Matinee 2 p. m. to 6:30 p. m.
ing 8:30 p. m. to
ENTERTAINING
Moore's Dance Orchestra
Under the Auspices of
St, Paul Universal Club
YOU ARE INVITED.
UNITY CLUB
ON _==
TUESDAY EVE'G, DEC. 26
At the beautiful
COLISEUM DANCING PAVILION
Lexington and University Avenues
MUSIC BY MOORE'S TEN-PIECE ORCHESTRA
Rtmtmbtr The Date and Don't Fail To Attend
Dancing Until Late Admission 55 Cents
A'-TKrCUI.'.-:
HAGENBECK
WALLACE
CIRCUS
LARGEST WILD ANIMAL
SHOW IH THE WORLD
CIRCIS ACTS 51 CLOWN S
HEWS ELEMtflTS
S Mies Al JUPPOMOME
^ii^g-
TIME IN
UNDER ROOF
IPEIFORMAIC ES DAILY
y^ 2:IS-:15 "C-
1,Q0MG00D RESERVED SEATS ALL
PERFORMANCES 50 CENTS
TeLOartleld IITO 1 S~l
RYAN HOTEL.
IJflLONDO PHARMACY
R. W. HERDIG, PROPRIETOR
lteittred Pharmacist
Always Prompt Always Courteous
Service with a smilePhone your wants
Fast free, furious delivery
Prescriptions Promptly and Carefully Compounded
Try our Lowney's and Allen-Qualley's Candies
RON DO AT LOUIS SAINT PAUL
A Savings Account
For Christmas
Thrift in your children should be
made an important part of
their character.
You can encourage thrift by giving
a savings account for
Christmas.
Isn't there some
child you know
that needs one?
ISavings Department
CAPITAL NATIONAL BANK
Robert at Fifth
ANNIVERSARY SHOE SALE
CONTINUES
A Year ago We started our big and successful reorganization sal|
ws are now going to give you ths sams big values as then.
Our stock l complete and up-to-date.
SHOES AND OXFORDS
Values $7 to $11
Now
$3.85
$4.85 $5.85
$6.85
and up
The Edwin Clapp High aad Low Shoes
v.h sum $1 5 $11.85 $12.85
STANLEY-REEM SHOE CO.
400 ROBERT STREET
"Wbat Is There In It For er
The early Christmas Buyer saves Time,
Money and Comfort. We save
Time, Space and Discomfort. What
__ could be fairer than that?
Genuine Cowhide Glad
stone Bag of Garland
quality and finish, full
leather lined colors,
black or mahogany
Real Cowhide Bag
__ Made in 3-piece style. It's select
jj -quality, has leather lining and three
pockets. Black or 1 /V/\
mahogany.
Garland's Special Cowhide
Brief Case, grain hide, not
split, adjust-,
^35.00
wt
Sudeten Service)
V3S
I
WILLIAM A. REEM.
20 inches'
$|Q.OO
22 inches
$OA.OO
The outstanding feature of
this" case, for women, is
the removable toilet case,
which forms- a tray, or
may be carried separately.
Pitted with toilet and
manicure articles of tor
toise shell celluloid (11
pieces.) Black cobra hide
leather, silk lining. Size
22 inch. Specially priced,
$34.75 ft,
Oenume"~Pin~ Seal BUI
Fold, Calf lined, has two
14k gold corners. Name
stamped with- &A \f\
out charge WtmUV
^^^s U^GSAGE ^HOP SL'
SIXTH AT CEDAR.,
A Small
Deposit
WIJI Hotel
Any
,m

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