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The Appeal. (Saint Paul, Minn. ;) 1889-19??, December 30, 1922, Image 3

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016810/1922-12-30/ed-1/seq-3/

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ST. PAUL
WEEK'S RECORD OF HAPPENING8
IN MINNESOTA'S CAPITAL.
The "Saintly City" and Saintly City
FolksNewsy Items of Social, Reout
ligious, Political and General Mat
ters Among the People.
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 30, 1922.
THE APPEAL ASKS AS A SPE-
CIAL FAVOR THAT ITS READERS
IVE PREFERENCE TO THE AD-
VERTISERS WHO SEEK THEIR
PATRONAGE 1*Y ADVERTISING
IN IT. SHOP IN THE APPEAL
BEFORE SHOPPING ELSEWHERE.
W E
WISH ALL
OF OUR READERS
A HAPPY NEW YEAR
Mr. Hutchinson Inge went to St.
Louis for the holidays.
The St. Paul Universal has moved
to 411 University avenue.
FOR RENT Five-room second
floor flat. Call Dale 7557.
Miss Bella Taylor went to Kansas
City, St. Louis and Chicago for the
holidays.
FOR RENTNicely furnished
room, modern conveniences. Call
Dale 7955.
Miss Minnie Tobie of 990 Gaultier
street, who has been sick the past
two weeks, is convalescing.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Follings of 418
Rondo street, entertained fifteen
guests at dinner Christmas.
Mrs. M. A. Johnson of 975 St. An
thony avenue, was hostess to the
Ideal club Wednesday afternoon.
INSIST ON GETTING
CLOVER LEAF
BUTTER
TlLDEN PRODUCE CO.
CHURNRRS
PIONEER LODGE NO. 1. AND A. M.,
meets first and third Monday in each month
at Masonic Hall, 588 Rondo St., at 8:00
M. K. H. Turner. W. M. W. Thomas.
Secy., 616 W. Central.Advertisement.
Mrs. G. Harvey of St. Albans
street, who has been visiting rela
tives in Chicago has returned to theSt.
city.
The dance given by the Unity club
at the Coliseum Tuesday evening was
the event cf the week and was well
attended.
The Christmas club held its anSt.
nual Yule party at the residence of
Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Lee, 646 W. Cen
tral avenue.
Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Johnson, 975
St. Anthony avenue, entertained at a
Yuletide dinner. Christmas covers
were laid for twelve.
Messrs. T. Crosthwaite, Raymond
Cannon and Howard Shepard went
to St. Louis for the Alpha convention
during the holidays.
MMI C*4ar Kea.i Dal* 1MT
IM.1 CIS Sft. AathMr AT*.
MRS. T. H. LYLE8
Beeaaar te
T. St 1/riiB UNDERTAKING CO.
!M W. Farth St. T. PAUL
HOUSEHOLD OF RUTH NO 563. G. U.
O. of O. F., meets the third Monday in each
month at Union Hall, corner of Aurora and
Kent streets at 8:00 P. M. Mrs. Delia
Williams, M. M. G. Mrs. Carrie E. Lindsay,
W. R., 426 Rondo street.Advertisement.
Mr. and Mrs. A. Gilbreath, Mr. and
Mrs. H. H. Pickett and Mr. and Mrs.
J. Green were the guests of Mr. and
Mrs. A. J. Jones on Christmas at
dinner.
Mr. Roy Wilkins left Friday night
for a short visit to Chicago and Co
lumbus, Ohio. He will return home
Thursday and resume his studies at
the university.
Mr. and Mrs. C. Roper, Miss Edith
Glllard. and Mr, Hammond Turner
were dinner guests Christmas at
theGovernment
home of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Lee of
W. Central avenue.
Rev. W. D. Wilkins, pastor of St.
John A. M. E. church of Kansas City,
Mo., was in the city last week visit
ing Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Williams,
906 Gaultier street, and his children,
Roy, Armeda and Earl.
H^PP
YE^R
THE
STATE SAVINGS BANK
9 3 E. FOURTH ST.
8f
CASE CAR SERVICEPersons de
siring motor car service for any oc
casion may get the use of an elegant
new seven-passenger Case sedan, by
calling at 528 W. Central avenue or
calling up Dale 8412. Rates reason
able.
There are still a number of our men
of work, and it is, to be hoped that
anyone hearing about work of any
kind will report same to Hall Bros,
barber shop, Pittsburg Bid., corner
Fifth and Wabasha Sts. They are
helping our people find jobs and
charging no fees.
The Oak Park Gophers, under the
auspices of the St. Paul Universal,
will give a matinee dance New Years
day and also a dance in the evening
at Union Hall. Elaborate plans and
preparations have been made to make
the two affairs enjoyable for every
one. Entertaining music by Moore's
orchestra. You are invited.
New Year's Greetings
As usual the Oak Park Goohers of
the class of 1916, will entertain and
serve luncheon at Union hall, Mon
day, January 1, 1923. Matinee and
night at their annual dance. Both
halls upstairs and downstairs will be
open.
You and your friends are cordially
invited to attend.
Entertaining while you eat. by
Maxin Jones, Buster Lindsay, and
Roy Weber, "And that will get it,"
"Mr. and Miss So-and-So" with
Moore's orchestra.
What's next "anesure?" Ask us.
Auspices of St. Paul Universal club.
President Cyrus L. Lewis.
OULUTH NEWS
Mrs. Marie T. Coles has been con
fined to her bed for several days.
L. B. Greer left the city last week
for an extended trip through the
Eastern cities.
Mrs. P. Shackford left the' city last
week for Marquette.. Mich., where she
will spend the holidays with friends.
Mr. and Mrs. A. Zeigler of Vir
ginia, Minn., passed through the city
Sunday en route to Oklahoma for the
winter.
Earl Wilhite's orchestra will be at
the Elks' Xmas dance at the For
esters' hall on Monday evening, De
cember 25.
The members of the Pleasure Seek
ers' club gave a surprise party on
their president, Eugene Waters, at
his residence, the occasion being his
birthday.
Emmit Wilson of Grand Rapids,
Minn., was in the city last week for
a few days as a house guest of his
cousins, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Wind
field of Park Point.
The Sunday school members of the
Mark's A. M. S. church held their
Xmas exercises Monday evening, De
cember 25. The program was in
charge of the superintendent, George
H. Adams.
The Rev. W. W. Smith, who ar
rived in the city to take charge of the
Mark's A. M. E. church and after
making his appearance in the pulpit
last Sunday both morning and even
ing, was given a ticket and paid in
full and returned to Chicago.
Soldiers' Schools In
Tuberculosis Sanitoria
The U. S. Veterans' Bureau, C. D.
Hibbard, district manager, maintains
three schools called Occupational
Therapy Centers, in tuberculosis san
atoria for the benefit of disabled sol
diers who are undergoing treatment.
The one at Nopeming, Minn., is
typical. The men are taught Eng
lish, spelling, composition, arithme
tic, community civics, basketry, weav
ing, knitting, and leather work. The
object is to occupy the mind, afford
exercise, and assist in the recovery
of health. Incidentally, the work im
proves the education of both hand
and mind.
This institution has erected a spe
cial building in which to carry on
this work. Recently the Red Cross
donated a memorial fireplace for the
soldiers' building. A splendid radio
outfit is soon to be installed. The
school already has a phonograph and
a fine collection of records. The pa
tients publish, a newsy little weekly
paper, "The Tickler." They also
have a community club organized to
carry on welfare and recreational
work for the patients. Weekly dis
cussion and debate programs are
held.
There is no question but that this
center is doing much towards the
rehabilitation of the ex-service men
who are at the sanatorium for treat
ment.
Insurance Benefits
Persons who were in the military
or naval service during the World
War may obtain death and disability
insurance from the government up to
the amount they carried in the serv
ice, maximum ten thousand dollars.
Some of the benefits of government
insurance are:
1. War term insurance may be
converted into permanent standard
forms of government insurance.
2. No chaTge is made in the pre
mium for total disability benefit in
the policy.
3. No limit is made as to age in
case of a disability.
4. No restrictions as to residence,
travel, occupation, military and naval
service.
5. Dividends are accumulated
through excess interest earnings over
three and one-half (3%%) per cent
plus any mortality savings, and paid
to all those whose insurance has been
in force more than one year.
6. In case of illness, premiums
may be waived by insured until re
covered, if proper application for
same is made.
7. No matter "what a man's dis
ability may be, or jts degree, pro
vided it is due to his military service
and he has not been declared a per
manent total, he will be accepted, on
payment of all back payments due
from date of lapse, plus five per cent
interest, compounded annually on
a twenty-year endowment, the ex
tended insurance value would take
care of all payments of premiums for
the remaining sixteen years, BUT, by
so doing, the Insured would draw only
the face value of his policy.
Something to
Think About
By F. J. WALKER
BBBJ
A SECRET SANCTUARY
TN EVERYBODY'S heart, screened
from the gaze of intimate friends,
there is a secret sanctuary to which
he or she retires when the outside
world becomes irritating and over
bearing.
You may call your sanctuary the
place of dreams, or the refuge of rest
and reflection, but whatever name you
may give it, there are times when you
like to retire to it and be alone with
your tho ?hts far from the turmoils
and haunts of men.
It is in this retreat that the soul
finds Its comforter, its better self and
its nobler faith.
It is here the beautiful flowers of
thought are watered and kept in the
sunlight, jealousy screened from in
quisitive eyes, meddling tongues and
fingers.
You may retire to it in the mid
night hour when the world is still or
when the storms are rattling the case
ment and the rains are beating against
the panes, but whenever you visit it
you find the tranquillity you crave and
the new strength to help you carry
your heavy burdens.
Courage, hope, ambition and resolu
tion are nursed back to life in this
asylum and given a new meaning.
Fear of poverty, loneliness and even
disappointment in the failure of some
long-cherished plan, lose in this sacred
spot their uncouth forms and poison*
ous stings.
Hearts that were breaking under
hard strains become normal again and
function with their customary vigor,
though perhaps with less dependence
on themselves.
To review ourselves in this sanc
tuary is to make ourselves better,
more patient, charitable and consid
erate of our fellow-beings.
If we searcn our souls, scan our
follies, frailties and shortcomings in
candor, we emerge from the solitude
with less selfishness and envy.
It is through these dear intimacies
with our ragged conscience that we
find the truth, get our bearings and
thus discover whether the path we
are plodding is taking us to the right
or wrong destination.
The impulse which prompts us to
visit our hidden sanctuary is that
which will in time make of us better
men and women, better qualified in
every way to help ourselves and to
encourage and assist others.
(Q. 121 by McClure Newapcptr Syndicate.)
VtfWWWWWWWWWWlrWW
The Friendly
TrClth Wab^bM
sWwwwvwwywwvwwvsV
THE PESSIMIST
ONE must be a pessimist, let him
keep his pessimism to himself.
It is sufficient to make one's self
unhappy without loading gloom on the
others in the world. There always are
more reasons for gladness than for*or"-
row, and if one cannot*"find happiness
for himself he's an ungrateful and un
kind individual if he tries to take the
gladness away from his fellow men.
In a big city rooming house, a life
weary man, previous to trying suicide,
penned a note in which he said:
"The world has grown corrupt. It
is no decent place to live In. One has
to be a thief, a whisky runner or in
ebriate else he is no good any more."
A poor excuse to remove himself
from this life of sunshine and gladness.
But he had even less excuse for un
loading his pessimism to disturb the
lives of thousands who. are finding this
a pretty good old world in which to
"carry on."
The man didn't succeed in removing
himself from this life, and when he re
covers it is quite probable that hell
prize his breath and the privilege of
living more than he ever did before.
But hem only do so when he engages
some of his time and attention in the
task which belongs to everyonethat
of making the world better, more beau
tiful and its Inhabitants more happy
and thankful to their God.
No one can answer the question
without a lengthy thesis as to how fast
the world is growing better. But no
one can delve into history even a little
without admitting that most people ab
hor sin and are more ashamed of sin
ning than people were not very long
ago.
Thomas Edison, while camping with
Henry Ford and H. S. Firestone re
cently, said that "Every man will re
vert to barbarism if given half a
chance." But he contended that civili
zation is gaining, though he estimated
that 15,000 years would have to pass
before man "will have reached such a
high point of civilization where he can
not, or will not want to go back to the
barbaric life."
So you see we're moving in the right
direction and following the right path.
Then let us forget our complaining
and not block traffic for others with
foolish pessimism, for there Is need of
more optimism to bring the chariot of
happiness through successfully, even
though we're engaged in a tortoise
race.
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK
O SAINT PAUL
offers exceptional facilities for the handling of
accounts of responsible firms, corporations and
individuals in its
Commercial, Women's and Savings Departments
Small depositor* receive the same courteous at-
tention and considerate service that is extended
to those carrying large balances.
THE BIG BANK FOR THE SMALL. DEPOSITOR
JACKSON STREET BETWEEN FOURTH AND FltFTH
fo-S,.
A HAPPY NEWYEAR
A
GOPHERS
A
-AT-
UNION HALL
KENT AND AURORA STREETS
JANUARY 1,1923
Matinee 2 p. in. to 6:30 p. m.
Evening 8:30 p. m. to
ENTERTAINING
Moore's Dance Orchestra
Under the Auspices of
St. Paul Universal Club
YOU ARE INVITED.
Katherine MacDonald
resifff & i AS GL& A4AiKlrC
Handsome "Katie" MacDonald, the
"movie" star, was born in Pittsburgh
in 1892. 8he received her early edu
cation there, afterward attending
Blaireville college. Her eoreen career
began, without previous stage experi
ence, in support cf Deuglae Fairbanks
in a popular production. She la five
feet, eight inches tall, weighs about
134 pounds, has light hair and large
blue eyes. She is considered oneof
the most beautiful women in America,
being known as "The American Beau-
ty."
O
A SPLENDID SERMON
By E. W. Gilies
Mr. A. preached a splendid ser
mon. He stuck to his theme so close
ly as to make it apparent that every
thing he said was relevant to it.
His illustrations and citations were
311 from the Bible or from history or
from other authentic sources, and so
appealed to the people in a real re
ligious way, rather than sounding
smart or funny or fishy.
He did not preach at all in the
way of self-praise or in condemna
ion of others, but set forth great ap
pealing principles that gripped his
audience and produced results.
Tsl. Carfiald 1170
CEDAR 1206
RONDO PHARMACY
R. W. HERDIG. PROPRIETOR
Registered Pharmacist
Always Prompt Always Courteous
Service with a smilePhone your wants
Past, free, furious delivery
Prescriptions Promptly and Carefully Compounded
Try our Lowney's and Allen-Qualley's Candies
RONDO A LOUIS SAINT PAUL
ANNIVERSARY SHOE SALE
CONTINUES
A Year ago we started our big and successful reorganization sal*f
ws are now going to give you the same big values as then.
Our stock Is complete and up-to-date.
SHOES AND OXFORDS
Values $7 to $11
RYAN HOTEL.
Now
$3.85
$4.85 $5.85 $6.85
and up
The Edwin Clapp Nigh and Low Shoes
Value man $1 S $11.85 and $12.85
STANLEY-REEM SHOE CO.
400 ROBERT STREET
FRANR A. UBEL
478 Wabasha St.
JEWELRY OPTICAL GOODS
ST. PAUL STOVE & FURNACE REPAIR WORKS
Manufacturers and Jobbers
Repairs to Fit All Makes of Stoves, Ranges and
Furnaces. We are Experts at Installing Furnaces.
STOVES STOBSB
106 E. THIRD ST. ST. PAUL. MINN.
"Say It With Flowers"
HOLM & OLSON
The Home of Flowers
SAF E MILK
Phone: Elkhurst 3163
MINNESOTA MILK CO.
FLHNIHURCO.
OH-to.12, E.ScvoiitfliSi.
MjsBSEjWJMbssa-*.
Sudden Service
WILLIAM A. REEM.
Ne Ideas in
Fixtures
are constantly appearing" and they
come here first. We want you to
share in the pleasure of seeins their
new beauty, their increased effec
tiveness. Come when you can and
see how the modern home is lighted
and made beautiful by the latest
ideas In fixtures..
Let Us Wire Your Home.
SevenCoraersElectricCo.
206 W. 3d St. Phone Cedar 8396.
Opposite Wilder Publid Bathe.
N. E. Anderson G. W Swanson
DIAMONDS WATCHES
Your Credit is Good at UbeVs
GARFIELD 2918
JtapA v^

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