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Western appeal. (Saint Paul, Minn.) 1885-18??, June 13, 1885, Image 1

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VOL. 1.
*y
WESTERN APPEAL
Published every Friday, by
D. Parker, J. T. Burgett, S E. Hardy.
Enteied at St. Paul
second class matter.
D. PARKER,
J. T. BURGETT,
E. HARDY,
II. S. GREEN,
Post-office as
EDITORS.
BUSINESS MANAGER
LOCAL. EDITOR.
TERMS.
Three Months, .60
Six 100
1 Year, 2.00
Payments for suberiptions must be
made in advance
Ad\ ertising at reasonable rates.
The management will not be responsi
ble for the opinion expressed by any of
its correspondents. Neither will they
publish any matter to satisfy personal
griev ances.
Anyone recei\ mg their paper with a
blue mark, will know their subscription
has run out, and will be ^discontinued
unless otheiwise ordered.
We congratulate the citizens of the
state of Illinois, and especially the citi
zens of Clucago, upon the passage of the
Civil Rights Bill by the Legislature of
that state.
President Cleveland has appointed
Gen. Rosencrans to the place so ably
filled by the Hon. B. K. Bruce, register
of the treasury, Where were the negro
#eml&ratie aspirants? Refrain, where,
CMjijffiere'
\m understand, that Mayor Rice has
WSttflll his orders to those of OUT com
u#fcy who prefei street-walking to
at home, and we hope he will
iafc they are located in some quaiter
aTul thete required to remain,
16 is Imped that the city authorities
$3S#s$wllnotpeiinit the lefugee knights of
hegreen4elotb,ofGhieagv-t&la^^
l5L
oaivattH|
Th
Hwi
I
iv& them to
We repubhW%lie following for the
^benefit of our many leaders, and hope
|it will seme as a amingdtoimanye of our
peopleI.n
I
worl th issue
cli
lna
oli
I of las^ e,6k speaking of the-.eolored law,
ficl.flL/i
"It ife true the law says no white man
is peimitted to marry a colored woman.
This law thus protects a licentious white
man who takes advantage of colored
women" The fmit of their passion,
and lust, cannot bear a father's name on
account of this law. By law a wronged
white woman can compel a white man
to make reparation for the wrong done.
What protection has a colored woman
thus wionged by a white man?
While we are advancing the condition
of the Negro, as it is discussed by* the
vaiious wiiters of the leading journals
of the country, let us say a word
judging fiom appearances, at this point
we can ne\ er rise to any prominence in
any community, so long as we fail to
demonstrate that we are earnest in our
desires foi advancement, by discrete
action. We do not impress those that
arc mteiested in oui ellfare, with much
favor, if we, instead of enlightening our
minds with knowledge, and employing
our hands with usefulness, continue to
ncourage the science of manly art, and
to worship the king of the green cloth,
f*l- thretard exclusionprogress of everything else we
our in the right di
rection and cause a feeling of distrust to
"prevail against us now, if we can do
nothing better, let us look with a frown
Upon the Continuation of such action,
and say to the leading journals of this
city, wh| seems to have suddenly
become possessed with a sporting mania
at oar expeuse, that they are not helping
us as a people to become men, so that
action in tt community will be looked
upon with commentation.
V*
It ought to succeed.V-WJ
tMlmSkei
This is the sentiment expresieof by
one of our morning papers. Now the
question is asked how are we to succeed
if we do not receive the encouragement
and support of our friends. Let me say
right here, that success to any enter
prise, gentlemen, is not assured merely,
by word of the mouth. And little en
couragement is given to this enterprise
when we are met with only words of
advice and jio pecuniary support. We
acknowledge that a great deal has been
done for pur people since emancipation.
But because" much has been done is no
reason whfr we should not be assisted
when we are making an effort to assist
""^musel^s* Now" let our Republican
wish to
succeedy
an
lo4ehowseesuthat
the, apd
&4*
preciate the effort we have put forth in
the past, to aid them to succeed in their
many triumphs, subscribe for the paper
give it a boom among their friends, ad
vertise with us, and demonstrate to the
public that your desire for our success is
fiom the heart and well intended..
To Our People.
It is hoped that our people will
seriously consider the future of the race,
and view from the present standpoint.
Think what will possibly become of us can
as a people, if we allow our young men
and women too, to grow up.in ignorance
and idleness, and refuse to take advan
tage of the opportunities offered, to
become educated. Put the boy at some
trade if possible, so that he may become
a man, and not vagabond, when he
grows up. Put the girl to some trade
that she too may become an ornament
to society, and not a disgrace let us
inspiie a devise for morality among our
people generally, and we will be taking
the light step tending to place us in the
right position among nations let our
papers through the country agitate this
question, so that our people will awaken
to their condition, and much good will
result. Let us as a unit demand some
legislation, tending to the establishment
of a National Agricultural School tor the
race, so that we need ask no favors of
men who are conti oiled by tiades unions
and laboi organizations, and we will be
proving to the world, that we have
indeed, the future of the race at heait
as we profess, but if we remainjsilent
and let well enough alone, we cannot
expect much will be done for us.
COLORED MASONS OF THE STATE
UNITED AT LAST.
On the first monday in June, 1885,
Pioneer Lodge severed her connection
with the Grand Lodge of Mo. In accor
dance with Masonic Law and custom,
that, where there is no Grand Lodge
the state they must belong to the one
in the neaiest state, and as the afiican
Iovv a
th
caies
Minn Pioneer)ms taken outn a warrant
mm
On monday efjcTjtul^knf the follow
ing officers wer^ unanimously elected
Geo. B. Williams, Worshipful Master,
Richaid S. Reynolds, Senior Warden,
Charles Davis, Junior Warden,
William A. Hilyard, feec'y,
Moses Martin, Treasurer.
On the second Tuesday in July, the
14th of the month, the African Grand
Lodge of Iowa will meet in St. Paul and
be the guests of Pioneer Lodge of St.
Paul, and Hilyard Lodge of Minne
apolis, and will hold their session in
Pioneer Lodge room on Jackson st.,
below 7th On the 15th there will be a
giand parade through the principal
streets of St. Paul, the Knights Templar
will be the escort of the Grand Lodge.
The new Grand Commandery of Iowa
will have charge, and, in the evening,
there wijl be an enteitainment in some
large hall, where the Grand Officers will
be installed, after which a promenade
and other amusements will be indulged
in due notice will be given, when the
piogramme is made out. We will have
something more ir^hje next issue of the
Appeal. Youis Respectfully,
J. K. H,
THE NEGRO MUST FACE
THE FUTURE.
To sit in idleness and brood over the
misfortunes of the past is both foolish
and unwise. The past is^beyond recall.
As well you might try to restore the
dried up mummy to hfe tmd beauty, as
to live over the past, and correct the
mistakes committed it is gone, buried
beyond resurrection, and is worthless as
a dream, except as an example for the
present and the future.
To look back into the fast with your face
towards the future, is to stumble through
hfe, and repeat the errors that exper
ience should have taught you to avoid.
Let the past go, for to waste time idly
wishing its return, is to blind yourself to
the realities of the present, and to fit
you for nothing but a helpless wanderer
in the future. Look ahead! if you have
seen trouble, turn your back upon
it and press forward determined to de
serve success. Some people never
recover from a misfortune once down
they remain down forever they make
no effort to gefcup, tb.ey prefer to keep
down, and appear to enjoy a scant satis
faction in telling others what they have
been, and what they might have beeja
had their good fortune continued to
smile on them. Others shake off trouble
as a duck woukbrain^ifesaakes no other
impression upo^tfaem #ten ta jnake
them a trifl^isef^ou can't keep them
down knock the^off their leet and
they are up in a twfnj^*and go ahead
as bravely as if notmnVhad stopped
them, all they- ask*is heal^iid.sjtrength
their courage" is equal to fccryj.eine
gency like the -blooded tc
distanced at the start tfceynev
the race until the homestretch is reached
In a word they do their best under all
circumstances, and in doing this they
generally do well enough. It is bad
enough for an old man, who ha,s put
forth his strength and Jailed, to become
discouraged and drift in the rushing
current of fate, with no effort to stem it,
but for a young man or one in his prime
who has brain or muscle in. perfect
order, to give up and drift with a tide
that he can easily overcome, is without
the shadow of an excuse. What if you
have lost money or faile in business?
tiirling troublesdexcuse idle
tnes
ness wrhen
extra exertion is required?
Yesterday has fled from your reach,
to-day is youis to-niorr'ow may beoEull
of sunshine to your daikened hopes.
Let the past go, rear a tombstone over it
if you please, but cease to dwell over it's
grave. The oiId is befoi you, ripened
fields await your labor, you may retrieve
all and win even more than you had
The httle vexation* of life are butftim^
axe strokes that chip and deface the
young oak, but fail to letard growth,
nature heals the wound and the young
tree grows to its full proportions, so, the
vital elements of man's life, if hope re
mains uncrushed, will heal the wounds
of the past, and out of the failure of yes
teiday, weave the glorious triumph of
to-day or to-moirow. *-& tx
FRED DOUGLAS AND WIPE.
Color line In Washington, No Room For
Negroes At Moody Meetings..* "jf
I have just reached this city hy 'fast
express fiom Washington, where I had
a delightful visit at the home of Fred
erick Douglass and wife.
Their house is just acioss the Potomac
opposite the city in Uniontown. It
stands at least one hundred feet above
tidewater, overlooking the "kingdoms
of the world" as represented by our
national capitol, commanding a perfect
vie11'/
not only of Washington's monu-
ment and the public buildings, bufe of
one of the most perfect featjhesio^and
and water scenery I evei beheld.
It is one of the stiange compensations
fi.L_Qur_figueration that this beautiful
sS##"?
-ST. PAUL MINN, a SATURDAYJUNE 13^88^, NO.^.^.
acres originally owned b|f?^^
w*~r 1 ,/i.L ,__,. Colored men doing business in this
a bitte and vindictive negro hater who
forjears used every means, lawful and
unlawful,to exclude colored people fiom
the sacred soil of Uniontown, should at
last fall into"the hands of one who, over
all others, represents all that is best and
noblest in the two races while the orig
inal owner is reduced to po\erty.
The days I spent under the roof of Mr.
and Mrs Douglass will ever remain sweet
and green in my heart and mind. Per
fect and unfeigned harmony and affection
pervade the atmosphere of their home,
and if those who worry over the so called
"strange alliance" would only avoid
throwing stones until their own homes
are equally peaceful and equally respon
sive to the great ends for which homes
are supposed to be instituted^ there
would not be much of a shower.J~ I
Mr. and Mrs. Douglass had only to es
tablish the legality of a relation which
our white citizens and "statesmen" had
already made possible and easy in fact.
Hence the task was not nearly as diffi
cult as one might at first imagine. That
they hjave conquered through clam dig
nity and kin forbearance the prejudices
at first aioused among the better and
more enlightened classes of the colored
race is evident.
Last Monday I gave a concert in the
15th St. Presbyterian (colored}~elwirdr
to a highly intelligent and appreciative
audience made up ofboth races. The ap
pointment was made for me by Mr.
Douglass, whose creed includes all races
and sects. Hence we threw open the
doors to (white people, thereby setting
an example for liberality and "Chris
tian grace" which the Evangelicalsso
calledof Washington could follow with
credit to ij^mseh^es and the Christian
church. S|
When Moody preached in that city a
few weeks since the colored" orthodox
Christians were not allowed to hear him.
In order to accomplish this theological
sleight of hand performance in a genteel
manner, it was proclaimed that it would
be necessary to admit those only who
had tickets on account of ajack of room
in the hall or church. A certain number
of tickets was then given tothe pastors of
white congregations, but none to the
shepherds ofthe colored sheep. Through
this adroitly pious"whip the devil round
the tump" method the latter was com
pletely shut out of the feast originally
prepared for all. I believe that the
eight members of the Supreme Bench
who pronounced the Civil liight&Amend
ment unconstitutional were allowed to
attond, and have not learned whether
Justice Harlow, the just judge who soli
tary and alone,dissented from the discus
won, was smuggled in or not.
The pastor of the 15th Si Presbyterian
church is Rev. Mr. Grimpie, son of
Judg& Grimpie of Carolina by a slave,
and a graduate of Prinpeton College.
Mr. Gninpie is not a finished
Jfifelar
an
and speaker I have heard in the pulpit
foi many a day, and his congregation,
consis^ng^of all shades .of color, are
gener^Iy refined and intelligent as the
average Christian church membership.
Yet t|is man an his cointnunicants
were excluded from Moody's meetings
becau|e^of their colorf ^ga jf
Oh r4shadc*B of Christ'andrlBe 'aposflls,
wherft were you on that occasion And
whicBcauseand,coilQr|%didy& vouchsafe
^pir^ouglass pointedly said ~fe me in
regarcp the-matter: "I-can^ride in
the slceet ear, eat at first claa-fhjQtel at
tend |he theater and the- circus, and
hereJolr Xngersoll lecture on ftie 'Mi^-
takesW Mosci&wifhout Mn%-aa^ JNt"
whetfjMoody tomes topreach/tbfc*gospel
of Jetkjji Christ, I am excluded because I
am n4tJ*ltogethor white."
'e not patience to discussthis sub-
4jWu#r Mav (he L6id add hie
to tfeLMoody meetingsjf He
^icTOtmstances. &
8f^ptl ftJH!J.6.c^
ChieagQ, Oorrespondence to the Mih-
neap03 Evening Spectator. 1
W^republish the above toilet our
peopj| know, in this great north-west,
the ipondition that the negro is being
subj#ed to, at the great capital of thfe
nations. Don't give"up the fight on this
queon until all persons respe.ct the
neg% for what he is worth.
he
&
Fr* pol Pai
Jf-T
gentleman,only but the peer-i
"^not *svtp&iorof any clergyman in
Washington, mis the best Bible reader
-#nd most pointed and searuhing thinker
other season. -U-**
^My time Is linn
iluable,
atarfl fc a
Tire Vindicator made its appeaaance,
as announced, last Saturday, and pre
senl&a creditable appearancegS R. F.
Eldwdge, editor and propnetor.r^St.
Pajf^Times).^ -t r- v.
kX
Western Appeal, publisned for
olored race by Parker, Burgett
rdy, made its first appearance last
y. Well sah, boys, yoah sheet
nts a commendable pearance. (St.
Times). *$? ^IffSfl
The Western Appeal is devoted to the
intdiest of the negro race4,
and should if
deserve any credit^ the wgould be editor
ofthe two wreeks
come along paper, ^The
Times'' ought to say so in a more lespect-
F&A-^-
VJ
BD
TCHE EDITOR WOULD
LIKE TO SEE.
city, tioated the same as white men
when they violate the law.
Colored men holding some woithy
position of trust. ^^SXS&SSi
pui young men having a desue to
pi^isuing some kind of respectable1
srf*
busi-
ness foi themselves. ^vsg
More of our young men wanting to
learn trades, and become independent.
The name of every man and woman
who has the interest of our paper at
heart, on our subscription list.
pvery business man doing any busi
ness at all adervtising with us.
s*
OUJR CORRESPONDENTS, A
i
To Tnc EDITOE of WE^TEKN APPEAL,
permit me a small space in the columns
of your valable Journal, it reached here*
in due time, I am induced to say that
every body is delighted with it, enclosed
you will find P. O. order the amount for
75 subscribers I can safely say that at the
time of your next issue you will have
at least three bundled subscribers.
I K. T. Springfield Ills
I
OUR NEW ORLEANS LETTER:
^^4jas^ORMANs JUNE 8thMK.EDITOB
DEAR Sia^-iuike this oppertumty to
drop you a few lines, hoping that they
may prove of interest to your readeis.
Hgg THE GREAT WORLD'S PAIR
has closed for the presentj with it$ mag
nificent and instructive display, of art,
science, manufacturing and mechanical
skill of every description, showing he
resources and advancement of the
world, and particularly our own country
and of the NEGRO. He has made a won
derful display, convincing the wrorld
that he is a man, endowed with facul
ties as other races of mankind, and just
as capable if not far outstripping them
considering the time he has had, and
also considering that not half of those
took pait in the display who could have
done so, and taking it all in all, the expo
sition could tiot have happened in a
more opportune moment, for the ad
vancement of the Negro. Well to return
to the closing everything is completely
removed from their places," where they
were arranged with great skill and tact,
and were admired by thausands of peo
ple, 4aily, from our own cotJhtry as well
as foreign lands, and the exhibitors have
nearly all gone to their distant homes,
many in hopes of returning at the. re
opening of t^e great fair next November
I^say re-openittg because there seems to
be a determined effort of the people to
have the Exposition continued for an-
i& soft your
ice is
I will close,
^oura
"^#*Sa
^Diamond-Ring, weigbs nearly 4-karat,
without flaws, and perfeet in cut very
handsome,mounting, original cost about
$600. Price, $350. #4ff% JP
Diamond King,
stone,,
FILLED-CASE WATCHES.
Open Face Filled-Case Watch, stem
winder and setter, Waltham movement,
expansion balance, plain case almost
new, original cost, $37. Price, $20.
Hunting Boss Filled Case, stem winder
and setter, Elgin full jeweled movement,
cut expansion balance, patent pinion
handsome engraved cases just like new.
original cost, $67. Price, $35.
Open Face G. W. Ladd, stem winder
and setter, Elgin full jeweled move
ment artistic engraved cases, in com
plete order, original cost, $63. Price, $31
JAS^H..BMITH.
1^
|^r. Third and Jackson Streets,
cente^
A -EIINEEPHttN
MAY 3E FORMEQ &Y*<3iLArtClfiG4VE ThfE FEW ITEMS* TAKEN FROM OClR NE
CATALOGUE SHOEING HOW
StMGNjTHE-PAWNBROKER
J& &S
3f4'Jackson St. antpjE,5elitI SI., St. Paul,
CAN SAVE YOU SOME MONEv! THE FACT IS, OUR
STOCK IS MOSTLY COMPOSED OF &&&&&&
TIN E fiE E KD. PLEDGES!
Uipa Which we have loaned^monef, and we are anxious to realize, which can
Uly be done by offering tlS2^
SPECIAL INDUCEMENTS.
DRKofflSC&&
weighs
a littlOnef of color but -per
about 2*karatf
fect in shape and cut original cost, $90.
Price, $45. "ft ?*i-fj
Diamond Ear Drops, 'peifect white
stonesJ not a blemish in either stone
good siae and elegant mountings origin
al oost, $155. Price, $90,
Diamond Stud, perfect stone, very
brilliaift weighs about l}-karat elegant
mounting original oost, $175. Price, $110.
Diamond Lace Pm, seven white stones
set in form of half-moon it is beautiful,
artisticT and-a big bargain original cost,
$160:--Price, $194.
IrpffGOLD WATCHES. 0
Hunting Gold Watch, stem winderanh
setter, Waltham jeweled movement, ex
pansion ballance Louis XIV. box cases,
very elaborately engraved, farm house
scene on one side, the other scroll -work
and place for monogram original cost,
$70. Erice,l40.
Hunting Gold Watch, stem winder and
setter, find G. M. Wheeler Elgin fnll
jeweled movement, cut expansion bal
ance, patent pinion, Louis XIV. box,
cases^ost elaborately engraved,-on one
side a locomotive, the other a palace on
the seaside, with, vessels An the distance
theabove movemeniS M^ll known as
i^Bjerthat it needs no cftinment:
ongmal price, $90. Priee, $50.
Hunting Gold Watch, key winder,
f-plate Swiss nickel movement, full jew
eled expansion, engine-turned cases in
hrst-class condition original cost, $48.
Prrce,$23. gb^ ^'J*
Hunting M-klfff^GoId Watch.^ stem
winder and setter fine f-plate Elgin
movement, tull jeweled, cut expansion
balance, prtent pinion, Louis XIV. box
cases, elegantly engraved, one side a
vase of flowers, on the other a beautiful
wreath of roses onlv used three months,
original cost, $100. Price, $66.
Open Face Gold Watch, key winder,
Springfield, Mass. full jeweled move
ment, expausion balance beautiful en
graved case complete order, original
cost, $53. Price, $29.
I^N THE'PAWNBROKER,
ST. PAUL, MINN.
*G. C^ALLEN
3W JACKSOK STREH,ie6HAw!sflOT& BLOCK,
BkH S&ENTH ST,.KXH00L-*W THEATER,
S T, PAUL, MINN.
erchanta ffotel Barber Shop.
lURKISH AND SHAMPOO,
$0
HOT AND COLD BATHS,e
%f
CARPENTER, ME
All ^kinds^of job ^ork donejm short
^t notice+^^utingnpr
Screens and doors
a Specialtyr All orders will be promptly
attended to. 474 Rosabel street.
single
5 per copy. %%2%
Advance.
**&83T
LADIES' COLD WATCHES.
Xady's Hunting 14-kart Gold Watch,
stem-winder and setter, fine Elgin full
jeweled movement, patent pinion, heavy
cases- beautifully engraved on one sida
an ancient tower, on other place for
monogram, suriounded by roses* nearly
new original cost, $70. Prfce, $38,50.
Lady's Hunting Gold Watch, stem
winder and setter, Springfield, 111. full
jeweled movement, patent pinion hand
some engraved cases one side beauti
ful vase of flowers, on the other an en
graved band, with space for monogram
ut little used original cost, $60. Price, &
$30. *t J. St H5 V^f ~*J* JzgJ
Lady's Hunting &old Watch, stem *4-zp*-.,
winder and setter, Elgin full-jeweledj^'p ^SJ^
movement beautiful engraved boxlj^^-^f^
casee as good as new original cost, $65^-^
Price. $257 a *&,.-*" A!~3SS-
Soautiftuly
rs~'
if5^*:
fef* 4^'
Lady's Hunting Gold Watch, steiu^^t:
winder and setter f-plate full-jeweledf*"
Elgin movement, cut expansion balance,42
atent pinion, Louis YTV. box cases^
engraved, with flowers ana
scroll work forming a very pretty design:
almost new: original cost, $75. Price
Lady's Hunting 18-karat Gold Watch,
P* 8. Bartlett Walthom fulf-jeweled,
patent pinion, handsome engraved
eases^ circles of black enaioel on both'
.sidesj has
beencondition
used about
K-
ttptoP originaljears,otw cost
SSJ **!n
$60. Price $49.
SILVER WATCHES:
Open-Face 3-oz Coin Silver Watch,
Jcey-winder, G. M. Wheeler Elgin move
ment, oatent pinion, cut expansion bal
ance, full-jeweleded, gold joints, engrav
ed casgs original cost, $30. Price, $15.
Open-Face 3-oz Coin Silver Watch,
stom winder and stter, Wilham EUery
Waltham full-jeweled movement, exr
pansion balance and patent pinion, gold-'
joints, engraved case in tiptop condition"?
only usecl about three months original
cost, $30. Price, $14. 'Z?*
Hunting 3-oz Coin Silver Watch/kev
winder, Appleton, Tracy & Co. Waltham
full-jeweled: movement, cut expansion
balance and patent pioion in excellent
condition original cost, $45. Price $20.
Five-ounce Coin Silver Watch, key
winder, P. S. Bartlet Waltham move
ment, full-jeweled, patent pinion, gold
jiont case, in thorough order oiieinal
cost, $30. Price $14.
Goods sent C. O. D. to any part of the United States, with privilege of
inspection. Watch Repairing, Diamond Setting, Engraving. Eyeglasses and
Spectacles to suit all sights. Money advanced on all goods of value in any sum.
Make no mistake in the name or number. $%. i
HENRY E. WEDELSTAEDT,
riNE 8TATIOMEHYr.,J
BUNK BOOKS AND OFFICE SUPPLIES
Engravings Printing and Binding a Specialty,
113 East Third Street St. Paul, Minn.
Go to the North Star Tonsorial Parlor.
The tjnly Cosmopolitan Hair cutting and
Shaving establisment in the city.
All persons just arriving in the city
should give him a call.
S. C. WALDON, Prop.
SuhscrihE
4-
v^rxtfrawintr^r. tkj*s^5'
JBW&OTj
*f+
IK
y^*.
8
Open-Face 5-oz Coin Silver Watch,
stem winder and setter, Damaskeen
Springfield, 111. movent, full-jeweled,
cut expansion balance, patent pinion,
gold joint, engiaved case only used siv
months, and just as good as new original
cost, $40. Price, $19.

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