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Western appeal. (Saint Paul, Minn.) 1885-18??, December 29, 1888, Image 2

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016811/1888-12-29/ed-1/seq-2/

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WESTEEN APPEAL.
Published Weekly, IT*
-BY THUS
Northwestern Publishing Company.
CHICAGO OFFICE,
COMO BLOCK, 325 Dearborn St.
Booms 13, 14 and 15
C. ADAMS, Manager.
SAINT PAUL OFFICE,
ROOM 27, UNION BLOCK,
COR. FOURTH AND CEDAR.
J. Q. ADAMS, Editor.
MINNEAPOLIS OFFICE,
224 HENNEPIN AYENUE.
Z. W. MITCHELL, Manager.
LOuTSYILLE OFFICE,
312 W. Jefferson Street, Room 3,
H.C. WEEDEN. Manager,
TERMS.
Single copy, per year. 52.00
Six months IJO
Three months. 60
subscriptions to be paid in advance. When *uh-
criptions arc not paid In advance or by anjr metoi
re allowed to run wlthont prepayment, the terms
will be 60 cents for each 13 weeks and 5 cents for
each odd week
Marriages and deaths to be annonnced at all must
come tn season to be news.
Marriage and death notices, fifty cents Payment
trtctly In advance.
AdTertl8ing rates, fifty cents per square of elgnt
lines solid agate eacb Insertion,
We do not hold ourselves responsible for the vlaws
f our correspondents.
Reading notices IS cents per line.
Special rates for advertisements for a longer time
than a month
A blue cross mark opposite your same denotes
that your subscription has expired. Ton will confer
favor by renewing the same.
Communications to receive attention must ba
newsy, a/o important subjects, plalnlywilttenonly
upon one side of the paper, mutt reach us not later
than Wednesdays, and bear the signature of the
author No manuscript returned
Special terms to agents who desire to place the
Pftper on sale
ENTERED AT POSTOFFJCE AS SECOND-CLASSIATTEK
AST'THE APPEAL IS FOB SALE BY.Jgg
C. VV^LDOV, 108 Fifth street, St Paul.
CHAS. LANDIIE, 111 Harrison St.,Chicago.
R. S. BRYAN, 446 S. State St., Chicago.
F. A. CHINN, 338 Thirtieth St., Chicago.
W. H. MONROE, 870 Dearborn, Chicago.
G. PUBCELL, 2646 State Street, Chicago.
W. NELSON, 179 Walnut, Street, Chicago
RKMONDE HOUSE, 323 Clark St., Chicago.
T. W. JOHNSON, 2734 State St. Chicago.
I. B. WALTERS, 282S State St. Chijago.
C. W. HUNT, 2611 State St. Chicago.
THoMAb BUCK, 75A Harrison St. Chicago
C. TRACY, 110 Harrison St. Chicago.
SATURDAY, DECEMBER, 29,1888.
The Colored families that are without
a Colored'paper are twenty years be-
hind the times.
The Negro who does not try to secure
Jfor his children at least a common
school education, is a fool.
Would it be 'wise for the Negro to at
tempt to meet force with force, and de
mand blood for blood? We say yes. An
eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth,
Bishop Turner, in the Constitution, a
white paper published in Georgia, says
that the Negroes should be placed in a
colony to themselves. This ie the same
philosopher who has found gold in the
In the southern states where the Ne
gro JB in the majority, why is it the
whites not only control all the affairs of
state but are able also to perpetrate
with impunity all manner, of outrages
upon this people?
The Negro Press is a greater factor in
the elevation of the race than most peo
ple realise. "We looked over thirty ex
changes the other week and with one
exception, iu each of them found good
and strong editorial comments upon the
violent outbreaks which have followed
the election. These exchanges were all
ublish* in the south.
THE BLOODY SOUTH.
The defeat of the Democratic ticket
has brought the race issue the South
to a head. During all the years since
the war, men have been looking wise
and talking about the Negro problem,
many and ingenious are the theories
which have been pounded thousands
are the excuses which have been
brought forward as apologies for the
abnormal condition of things. So skill
fully have the real facts been disguised
that many have been lead to believe the
future of the Negro in the South was
bright and secure. However, the over-
AV helming defeat of the Democratic
party ao completely baffled the secret
hopeB and plans of the Southern -whites,
that they, maddened with disappoint
ment, have rashly given expression to
their true feelings and let the cat out of
the bag. The article from Senator
Eustis, published in a late number of
the Forum, when read in the light of
the lyncbings, murders, and mobs that
have lollowed the election gives one
quite a reliable insight into Southern
feeling toward the Negro. The utter
ances of the Southern Press and of
prominent men, advocating the disfran
chisement of the Negro all are unmis
takeable indices to the real feelings and
malignant designs of the South. The
time to smooth over things, te take
hopeful views, and spin long theories
has past The outrage at Wehalak,
Miss,, Dec, 17th, sounds the tocsin, I
fc*
reveals the fact that the white men of
the South hate the Negro citizens with
a hatred that is implacable, malignant,
and undying. So deep and strong is
this hatred, that grave senators are lead
by it to the perpretration of deeds that
would put Jessie James to the blush.
The whole South has laid aside every
principle of justice, honor, law and con
science and has with bared arms entered
in upon a carnival of blood. Unless de
cisive steps are taken for the defensive,
within five years the whole order of
things in the South will be reversed and
the Negro will be the sufferer. On the
slightest oi excuses, the whole of a
Southern community unites to murder
Negroes. Let one white man attack a
Negro and be defeated, then a score of
white men unite to slay the victor
should his friends arise to his defense,
the press join the mob in shouting "in-
surrection" and the state is ready to
send her armed forces to the support oi
the cut-throat band. Who ever heard
of Southern courts or governors inter
posing to protect Colored citizens from
white mobs who ever heard of them"
failing to use their full powei to conquor
any Negro or body of Negroes that were
with any show of success defending
themselves against the whites' TH E
SOUTH IS DETERMINED TO TAKE THE BIGHTS
OF CITIZENSHIP FROM THE BLACKMAN, that
is the long and short of the whole mat
ter. Within tee last fey, weeks the Jud-
son Female Institute at Marion, Ga.,
was burned to the gaound, and now
comes the tidings that Lincoln Normal
Institute has shared the the same fate.
A religious Southern papea Eaid editor
ially "The North and the Negro shall
never again rule the South, ballot or no
balot, count or no count." The fervid
Crrady but a few days ago said, "Every
white youth must vow that the white
man shall rule the South." These ex
pressions are made in deadly earnest,
and are backed up by murders, outrages,
crimes and frauds that are unparalleled
in the history of man's inhumanity to
man. For any Negro to stand still and
let these Hellish thiDgs go on, without
having done his part to protect his suf
fering brother in the South, is rank
cowardice. W E ABE NOT HELPLESS THERE
IS A WAY OFSAIVATION. The Negro can
be rescued from the folds of the Hell
born anaconda that with Develish ma
lice full, seeks to destroy him. THERE
IS A 1\AY, AND A LAWPUL WAY. Let the
Negroes of free and glorious Minnesota
be the ones to take the first step. The
Times are ripe for action, let a feasable
plan once be presented and all the Ne
groes and their filends will rally to it.
Every Colored citizen of St. Paul, irre
spective of party, denomination, or oc
cupation is now invited to consider this
matter. Sunday mgbt Dec. 30th, a great
mass meeting of Colored citizens will be
held at St. James Church, corner of Ful
ler and Jay street, Rev. J. M. Hender
son, will present the issue as it is. The
pastors and congregations of the various
churches will be invited to be present,
and the pastors will be invited to preach
a series of sermons on this subject.
This is a great race question, let us unite
in its consideration, laying aside what
ever difference that may divide as on
smaller issues. ^3on't forget the date,
Dec. 30th, Sabbath night 7-30 m.
let every lover of his race be present
at St. James Church. Each and every
Colored citizen is cordially invited.
This meeting is only attended to place
the issue before every body, aud will be
followed up by ceaseless, tireless efforts,
until all the influence and strength of
the Negro and his friends in the land
have been concentrated. Go and hear'
Our Companys' "Stag" Party.
Of all the "stags,' ever given among
gentlemen of color in the Saintly city
that given by the members of Chemical
No. 1 might be taken as the criterion.
The green room of their commodious
quarters in which the banquet was held,
and the artistic setting of many colored
Roman candles combined to make a
scene f rare splendor that will not soon
b forgotten. There were present
MessrB J. I. Murray, G. W. McCoy. J.
M. Allen, B. F. Dabney, J. Burns, M. G.
Gooman, T. Delaney, C. Gooman and J.
F. Curtis. At 10:30 the escort Messrs R.
B. Randolph, C. Bro\n An
derson, J. M. Beulanior and W. R.
Godett, members of the company an
nounced that supper awaits our guests
so the merry peals of laughter and the
combined symphonies of piano and
guitar and the rich melodies for which
our amateurs are so noted, were sus
pended for the time and guests and
hosts filed into the green ^rooni. The
decorations of the banquet table were
singularly beautiful and costly, each
place having a buttonhole bouquet and
an elegant Xmas card. Upon the center
of this richly adorned festal board stood
a house of tube roses, emblazoned on
the top with red roses, representing a
house on fire and a minature chemical
engine dashing upon the scene. So sur
prised were the gue ts that they stared
in blank amazement All were then
seated at one of the most elaborate
spreads in the city's history. Six layers
were served and each was supplemented
with a course of rare old wine. The
last course was perhaps the feature of
the banquet. I consisted of Rockford
cheese, and crackers assorted nuts, as
sorted calces, fruits and cafe all Francais.
Each guest in fitting terms paid high
compliments to ihe members of the
company, oyer bumpers of sparkling
champagne. At 5 A. M, the last bumper
was drained and the jovial crowd dis
persed. Great credit is due this com
pany for their excellent record and they
have a standing second to move in the
St James Church Notes.*^
The large congregations which attend
morning services shows that the people
of St. Paul are not of the class that
linger iu the old ruts. There was a time
when you could never have a large
gathering of Colored people except at
night it is not so now, our people, or at
at least a large number of them, are com
ing to the front. ~""~J
The classes were largely attended.
Tne pastor announced that he had re
ceived a letter which stated that Rev.
"W. A Dove had been stricken with
blindness while in his pulpit at Louisi
ana, Mo. The Sunday school was well
attended and numbered many new per
sons.
The evening services were largely at
tended. There were few people present
who did not weep. The solo by Mrs.
Clay was full of pathos and well rendered.
Mrs. Mary Mason is still confined to
her home. She is being carefully at
tended by the benevolent stewardesses.
It is composed of kind hearted and
earnest christian ladies. The peace and
harmony which characterize the ork
ing together of the various committees
shows that St. Paul has many refined
and cultured ladies. The only people in
a church who are contentious and quar
relsome are those who are ignorant and
unrefined. Polite and cultured people
never quarrel, and the better class of
our people can always get along in peace
and harmony, but there is a class who
are sensitive and always miffed. There
are few or none of that kind at St. James
church.
A mass meeting of Colored citizens
will be held at St. James to-morrow
dight (Sunday.)
Mrs. Lyles, chairman of the fair com
mittee has been quite sick. He skill
and energy was greatly missed by her
associate committee.
These ladies deserve great credit, and
are fully worthy of the name they have
made both here and abroad.
"The New South."
For several years after the close of
the late warfor the Union, the Southern
States remained in a condition of pover
ty and exhaustion from which many
thought it was impossible for them to
recover. Atlanta, in 1865 a dilapitated,
half-burned town, is now the Chicago
of the South, a city of magnificent
buildings and the entire center of an
enormous trade. Birmingham bids fair
to surpass Pittsburgh in iron nianufac
turies, and to become an immense
workshop, while the continually advan
cing prices of real-estate are marvelous.
Nashv ille and Memph's are metropoli
tan cities, pushing to the front under
the guidance of alert and energetic men
of business. New Orleans has renewed
her youth and held two magnificent ex
positions. Everywhere progiess is the
watchword. A. tour of this "New
South" will repay the thoughtful and
observing traveler, and the best way to
reach it is by securing tickets over "The
Burlington," which has the best South
ern connections. Inquire of your tick
et agent or write to W. J. C. Kenyon,
Gen. Pass. Agent B. & N. R. R., St.
Paul, Minn.
Pilgrim Baptist Church.
The morning service was well attended
and the theme discussed partook of the
warmth and freshness of the beautiful
morning. Our Sabbath School is im
proving under she hand of our enthusi
astic superintendent. I is a bud of
great promise. Come in and see how we
prosper. The evening service was bet
ter attended than common. Rev.
Sheaf gave us a number of reasons whv
Christmas is a joy. spoke the word
of God from a full heart, and it went to
the heart. Our rally was a success, the
receipts passed the expectations of
many. The meeting of the trustees was
well attended, there are some difficult
questions for them to solve, thay seem
equal to the task. Theie will be another
meeting of the board Wednesday even
ing Jan. 2. Father Hickman will give a
brief outline of the history of the church
Monday evening, after which we will
have our Watcn Meeting. Sabbath
morning suvjeel "What shall I do with
Sesus?" Matt 27-22. Evening 1 Cor. 5-7.
"The Old and New Leaven."
Christmas evening, the vestry was
filled to its utmost by happy children
parents and friends, came to enjoy
toe Christmas Tree.
The exercises were f a musical and
literary nature. Among the features of
the evening, was a "Christmas Legend,"
read bb one of the young ladies, an
original poem, written for the occasian,
by Mrs. L. C. Sheafe, read by the Eider,
and the presentation of a very beactfful
music rack, by the school, to Miss L.
Griswold. Then each class was called,
and as they responded, a portion of the
well ladened tree was given to each.
Our superintendant and teaciiers are to
be congratulrted on the success of the
evening. Another step in advance, the
services f the accomplished and com
petent musician. Mrs. Webb have
been secured, she is to hold the reins of
the choir.
What! This! I
A great many people of late have been
trying to determine which would be the
most advantageous thing to do, to en
joy health and pleasure.
After careful investigation it"ha&T3eeh
ascertained thatthe most practical, is to
purehase a ticket to one of the numer
ous Winter Resorts of the South or
West via the Minneapolis & St. Louis
Ry, "Albert Lea Route," "St, Paul,
Minneapolis & St. Louis Short Line,"
which are now on sale at all principal
borate at greatly reduced rates.
Your especial attention is called to
the fact that the "Albert Lea Route" |s
the only line making Daily connections
with the Vestibuled Trains of the "Great
Bock Island Route," which run through
without change to Colorado Springs,
Pueblo and Deny*.
The solid through train service of the
St, Paul, Minneapolis & Sf,. J^ouis Short
Line is unsurpassed for parties desiring
to visit the Winter resorts of the South,
and is positively the only line running
Pullman Buffet Sleepers and First Class
Coachef through to St. Louis via Burling
ton.
For detailed information concerning
rates, routes, etc., call upon your near
est Ticket agent,or write to E.A.
Whitaker, Gen. Tkt. & Pass. Ag't,
Minneapolis. 4-*
Hi* **j, Minneapolis Matters.
Go to Altman & Co. for your winter
clothing, U&$LJ&Wellington Ave
South
^^T
A low rate of advertising will be given
for all entertainments to be given in the
city. See Mitchell for your advertising.
Mr. I H. Watkins still continues to
give entertainments at the rink and he
will have the rink every Monday night.
For the best 25 cent meals in the city
go to the Glyndon House No. 219 Third
street Squth. Mrs. George Williams,
proprietor.^
Gold and Sil\er Headed Umbrellas
paragon frames for $2.25, for the next
30 days at the Crystal 213 Nicollet ave.,
Minneapolis.
Subscribers iu this city who do not re
ceive their papers have only to drop a
caid to the manager Z. W Mftchell,
224 Hennepin Ave.
"My sore ran in the night and my soul
refused to be comforted." "Poor fel
low'of course it did. Pity he couldn't
get Salvation Oil. Only 25 cents."
The most complete clothing house in
the city may be found at nos. 31nd33
Washington Ave. South, Altman & Co.
Read their "ad" on 4th page. They are
leaders in their line.
Among our advertisers is Mr. R. H.
W, Davis a dealer in wood and coal.
He is a Colored man and ought to get
the custom of the Colored people Call
on him at 254 Fourth Ave. S.
BOUTELL BROTHERS, Nos. 207 Nic
ollet Ave. and 323 Washington Ave. S.,
have the largest line of household goods
of any establishment west of Chicago.
Goods Bold on installments.
Mr. and Mrs. Brady gave an elaborate
dinner, all the iamily and many friends
being present. Mr. and Mrs. A.
Myrick had a pretty tree with many
handsome presents for their family,
GENTLEMEN, remember that "The
Crystal" has moved from No. 253 Nicol
let Ave. to No. 213 Nicollet Ave., next
door to S. E Olson's. "THE CHRYS
TAL" is hea tquarters for Hats, Caps,
Canes, Umbrellas, Shirts, Collars, Cuffs,
and Gents' Furnishings of every de
scription.
St. Paul.
Should you need a carriage, telephone
Hermann Bros 8052.
FOR RENTFive, large handsomely
furnished rooms for from $5.00 to $10 CO
per month. Apply to Mrs. Welden
Howard, No. 181 W. Third street.
FOR RENTFurnished or unfui
nished loo ms suitable for ladies or
gentlemen, by Mrs. M. E. Walker No.
574 Fuller street. Street cars pass the
door.
Christmas and New Years, Ev
cursions.
The St. Paul, Minneapolis and Mani
toba Ry. will sell Christmas and New
Years Excursion tickets at very low
rates on December 24th, 25th and 31st
1888 and January lBt, 1889, good to re
turn up to and including January 3d,
1889. Tickets will be sold to all points
on the line. For further information
apply to St. P. M. & M. Ry. Ticket
Agents or F. I Whitney, Gen Pass, and
Frt. Agt. St. Paul, Minn.
CHICAGO.
W Should be Thankful.
A few more of the things for which
the people of Chicago have cause to be
thankful:
I. That they have the Empire Parlor
Bedstead, Company in their
midst
II. That they can obtain there so rare
an assortment of Folding Beds
in all designs.
III. That they can make such selections
from an unlimited stock of Par
lor Stoves, Ranges and Stoves.
IV. That they can buy there Furniture
and Carpets cheaper than any
where else in the world.
V. And that if they haven't the cash
to spare for immediate payment,
they can have them on time
payments without auy advance
in price.
381-383 West Madison St., Chicago.
O. I
Remember that the Young Men's
New Hiding Club will give the first
grand masquerade ball at Central Hall
Monday evening, e^ enmg. Feruary 14,
1889. All are invited to come and have
a good time.
A Profitable Business*.
Those- who take an agency for a re
liable enterprising house, learn their
business and stick to it, "get on" in the
world. People who have any ideaol
engaging in any canvassing business
will do well to write to George Stinson
& Co., Portland, Mainethe great art
and general publishers. They offer the
most exceptional advantages to those
who are sufficiently enterprising to be
willing to make a push in order to bet
ter their condition. I ost nothing to
try. Women make successful canvassers
as well as men. Full particulars will be
sent those who address the firm
full address is given above.
-s-Cf'f*
St. Augustine Hop.
Tbe Ladies of St. Augustine's Pociety
wiUgive a Grand Social Hop on New
Years eve, Dec. 31dt 1888 at the Avenue
Hall, 22nd and Wabash ave. Admission
50 cents. Good music. Committee of
arrangements, Mr. James Armstrong,
T. J. Part, A. Carrol, P. Stevens.
MrsElwa Armstrong, Mrs. R. Wilson,
Mrs, S. T, Wilson.
Boone,
Where to Get the APPEAL.
For the benefit of persons who are
not regular subscribers, the APPEAL is
on sale
at^J^
the following
weefci
place.s
every
f#W K^/
Chas. Landre, 111 Harrison street,
R. S. Bryan, 446 State street. "K
F. A. Chinn, 338 Thirtieth street.
W. H.Monroe, 370 Dearborn street.
W. Nelson, 179 Walnut street.
Remonde House, 323 Clark street--
T. W. Johnson, 2734 State street.
I. B. Walters, 2828 State street.
Thomas Buck, 75} Harrison street.
C. Tracy, 110 Harrison street.
G. W. Richardson, 6036 Halsted Btreet.
J, C. Cranshaw, 456 36th street.
John Griffith 807 Austin ave.
C. M. Hunt, 2611 State street.
Wm. Brown, 2630 State street.
II. W Nelson, 214 W. Randolph.
-Chicago Office, 325 Dearborn street.
TA GBEAT MAGAZINE
\Tho Century for 1889.'
^^3^^^
has often been
E 9
uesUo
asked, "to what does Th*
Century owe its great circu
lation?" The Christian Vnion
I once answered this by the
statement that "it has been
fairly won, not by adver
tising schemes, but by the excellence which
characterizes it in every department" In
their announcements for the coming year
the publishers state that it has always been
their desire to make The Century the one in
dispensable periodical of its class, so that
Whatever other publication might be desira
ble in the family, The Century could not be
neglected by those whowish to keep abreast
of the tunes in all matters pertaining to
culture. And the unprecedented, circula
tion of the magazine would seem to be the
response of the public to this intention.
With the November number The Century
begins its thirty-seventh
volume. Two great feat
ures of the magazine
wrhicb. are to continue
throughout the new vol
ume are already well
known to the public, the
Lincoln history and the
papers on Siberia and
the Exile System." The
first of these, written by
Messrs. Nicolay and Hay,
President Lincoln's pri
vate secretaries, contains
the inside history of the
dark days of the war, as
seen from the White
House.
THE SIBERIAK PAPEBS, __
by George Kennan, are attracting the at
tention of the civilized world. The Chi
cago Tribune says that "no other magazine
articles printed in the English language just
now touch upon a subject which so vitally
interests all thoughtful people in Europe and
America and Asia." As is already known,
copies of The Century enterinj?Russia have
these articles torn out by the customs officials
on the frontier.
DURING 1889
The Century will publish the most Im
portant art feature that has yet found
place in its pages. It is the
result of four years' work
of Mr. Timothy Cole, the
leading magazine engraver
of the world, the galleries
of Euiope, engraving from
the originals the greatest
pictures by the old masters.
A series of papers on Ire
land, its customs, land
scapes, etc, will appear, and there are to
be illustrated articles on Bible scenes,
treating especially the subjects of the Inter
national Sunday-School Lessons. George
W. Cable will write Strange, True Stone3
of Louisiana There will be novelettes
and short stories by leading writers, occa
sional articles on war subjects (supplement
alto the famous "War Papers" by General
Grant and others, which have been appear*
mg in The Century), etc etc.
The Century costs four dollars a year, and
it is published by The Century Co, of New
York, who will send a copy of the full pros.
rectus to any one on request.
t S Nichol as for 1889.
PEOPLE who have the
idea that St. Nicholas Mag
azine is only for little cml
g^dren should look over the
i -'prospectus of that maga
zine for 1889, -and they
will discover that it is for children of
all ages, "from five to eighty-hve,"
as some one recently said of it. Indeed,
while St. Nicholas is designed for girls and
boys, it might almost he called a "family
magazine," for the grown-up members of a
household will find much to interest them
in every number. ^J
The editor, Mrs. Mary Mapes Dodge,
calls the next volume art "all-round-the
world year," because it is to contain so
many illustrated papers about the world in
generalnot dry geographical papers, but
stories and sketches and tales of travel and
adventure by land and seaand all illus
trated by the be6t artists. The features
will include a serial story, "How We Made
the Farthest North," by /T^*"
Gen. A. W. Greely, the kre^LMVl''f
well-known commander of,
the Greely Expedition a
serial about Canada, by Mrs.
Catherwood, who is -writing
a serial story for The Century this year
"Indians of the Amazon," by Mrs. Frank
R. Stockton. There are many papers about
Europe, including a Christmas story of life
in Norway, by H. H. Boyesen articles on
Holland and the Dutch, byMrs. Mary Mapes
Dodge, "The Queen's Navy," hy Lieut. F.
Harrison Smith, R. N., with illustrations of
many of England's finest war ships "The
Winchester School," illustrated by Joseph
Pennell "English Railway Trams," by
Wm. H. Rideing, etc., etc. The French
papers include "Ferdinand de Lesseps and
his two Ship Canals," and there are several
Interesting contributions on German, Italian
and Russian subjects.
Under "Asia, "conies "Boys
and Girls in China," by Yan
Phou Lee (a recent gnad-
P^v^. uate of Yale) "Home Life in
the j^,,
Mr
oa
Hunt, and a numbeHr olfm pa
pers about-Japan. Under "Africa" there
is a sketch of Henry M.
Stanley, by Noah Brooks,'
and several stories about
Egypt Australia is not for-^
gotten, nor the islands of the
sea, and there are even to be
stories of under the sea.
Of coarse the bulk of the contents will
relate to American subjects, as usual. Mrs.
Burnett, the author of "Little Lord Fauntle-
roy," contributes a. story of New "Sort called
"Little BiimtElizabetht" there willbe papers
describing how the govern
ed ment offices are conducted,
papers about athletics, ama
teur photography, etc. The
V^SSSaK' I YS\ full prospectus will be sent
to any one who wishesto see
it by the publishers, Th Century Co., of
JJewYork,
The Gmphie recently said of St. NiclwUu,
the Ja% wiifcon* it to onjy half.blessed-"
ILWAY i THE HOfiTH
WEST
ftu in so short a period gained tbt repo-
Ul. From comparatively, un
known factor iiL.the commercial irorld,
it has been transformed to *n independ
ent, influential, grand ThrOUffh
Route, with magDificent depots, Sfip*
erb equipment and unsurpassed termi
nal facilities. Through careful catering
to details, it has won for itself a reputa
tion for solidity, safety, convenience and
attention to itspatronsjsecondto no rail
road in the country. Pullman sleep
ers, model of palatial comfort, dixdng
cars in which the cuisine and general ap
pointments are up to the highest stand
ard, and coaches especially built for this
route, are among the chief elements
which have contributed towardacatering
successfully to a discriminating public.
Located directly on its line, between
Minneapolis and St. Paul and
Milwaukee and Chicago ud
Duluth and Milwaukee and
Chicago, are the following thriving
cities of Wisconsin and Michigan:
New Richmond, Chippewa
Falls, Ea Claire, Ashland,
Hurley, Wis., Ironwood,
M!ch.y Bessemer, Mich,,
Stevens Point, Neenah,
Menaaha, Oshkosh. Fond
du Lac, Waukesha and Bur
lington. Wis.
For detailed .information, lowest
current rates, berths, etc.,via this route,
to any point in the South or East,
apply to nearest Ticket Agent, or address
WMS, MELUN, JAMES BARKER,
(ienl. Man. Gen Pass & T'k't A'gt.
MILWAUKEE.
ANSON* Northwestern Pas
senger Agent, No 19 Nicollet House
Block, Minneapolis, Minn.
THE ST. PAUL AND DTJLTJTH BAIL
ROAD.
THE SHORTEST LINE
IN DISTANCE
TO LAKE SUPERIOR!
AND THK
QUICKEST IN TIME BY OVER 3 HOURS.
8 TRAINS DAILY EACH WAY 3
The "Limited" runs daily, and con
sumes onlv five hours betwefrn the Twin
Cities and Duluth making but three
stops en-route.
CLOSE CONNECTION MADE IN UNIOW
DEPOT, DULUTH, WITH TRAINS
OF THE DULUTH AND IRON RANGE
RAILROAD.
AVOID OMNIBUS TEANSFBHS BT TAKINO THIS
LIME.
LOW EXCURSION RATES
WHICH INCLUDE MEALS AND BERTHS
ON STEAMERS
Are made via Duluth to all points East
reached by lake lines and their rail
connections. Tickets can be procured
going by lake, or lake and rail, and re
turning all rail if desired. Tickets
can ho purchased. Sleeping Car Ac
commodations and berths on steamer*
secured, and further information had
by calling on. or addressing the fol
lowing Ticket Agents:
G. F. MCNEILL, City Ticket Agent.
19 Nirdllet House Block, Minneapolis.
P. E. STONE, City Ticket Agent.
173 East Third Street, St. Paul.
E. L. DUDLEY, G. F. COPELAND,
Vice Pres. & Gen. Man. Ass't Supt.
A. B. PLOUGH. G. C. GILFILLan,
Gen. & T. Ag't Special Ag't Pass
Dert.
GESEKAIiOFFICE ST. PATTL.MIKW.
IMnwADt
Fast Mail Line with Vestibuled
Trains between Chicago, Milwaukee,
St. Faul and Minneapolis.
Trans-Continental Route be
tween Chicago, Council Bluffs, Oma
ha and the Pacific Coast.
Great National Route between
Chicago, KanRaeCityaud St. Joseph,
Mo.
6700 Miles Of Road reaching all
principal points in Illinois, Wiscon
sin, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri an
Dakota.
For maps, time tables, rates oi
passage and freight, etc., apply to the
nearest station agent of the CHICAGO,
MILWAUKEE S iyr. PA UL RAILWAY, or to
any Railroad Agent anywhere in the
World. BOSWELL MILLER, A. V. H. CARPBNTBB,
Gen. Manager. Gen. Pas. & Tkt. Agt.
"For information in reference to
Lands and Towns owned by the CHICA
GO, MILWAUKEE & ST. PAUL RAILWAY Co.
write to G. HAUGEN, Land Commia
ioner, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
a*-*.^
THE
St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba R'j
18 THE
DIRECTAND POPULAR LINE
TO PRINCIPAL POINTS IN
MINNESOTA, DAKOTA,
MONTANA,
ALSO TO
ST. PAUL AND MINNEAPOLIS
FPOVTLSL
SOUTH AND EAST,
THE ONLY LINE RUNNING TO THE
THREE 6BEAT CITIES OF MONTANA,
CREAT FALLS,
HELENA,
AND BUTTE.
Their "MOXTA^A EXPKESS" will be usplen-
no
_x Hi-
In
unexcelled, furnishingp-
service Nvember 1 Oth, with a tra in
f.9Vv
lpn, I
did DAY COACHES. PALACE SLEEPS, FBEE GOLO-
KIST SLEEPEBS and SVFEBB DINLNQ CABB of latest
design,
"MANITOBA-PACIFIC ROUTE" O
7 PU6ET SOUND POINTS
AFFORDS CHEAPER RATES THAN
Vt^i"r VIA ANY OTHER.
ir
Fast Time, Comfort, Courteous Attention.
I ANIH ThtoCompanyhartorwle.ln.MlB-
*-^V ^i *J neeot* 3,000,000 acres of Excellent
Farming-. Grazing- and timber Land*, at ^ew
low prlcae and on favo^abte tein u.
For Maps, and general information inquire ol
your ova Tic*t Agent,sir
4. BOOKJKALTER, F. I. WHITNEY,
Ina
LandCom'r^\ G.P,*T.A.,S|6.Pflfcf.HJn_.
W,4,*LCKAWOeit
0, T,
A. MANVEL,
1
THE SAVINGS BANK OF ST. PAOlT
Bic^Block,S.W. Corner of Fifth
and Jackson Streets.
Five per cent, interest paid on^ time
deposits. Money loaned on improved
my property. Transacts a general
banking business. Capital, $50,000.
borplus and undivided profits. $20,409
38. Open Saturdays from 6 to 7 m.
John S. Prince, President. Edward
Meier, Cashier
St. James A. M. E church, corner
Fuller and Jay streets. Sabbath ser
vices, 11:00a. m. Wednesday evening
prayer meeting, 8 m. Fridav even
ing cASS, 8:00 p. m. Rev. John M.
Henderson, Pastor, residence, 173
Char.es street. Days for pastorial visits
Monday and Tuesday. UayB at home
Wednesday and Thursday. Weddings,
funeials and the sick, promptly attend
ed to upon notice.
REAL ESTATE, LOANS
INSURANCE.
John t. Neal,
224. Hennepin Ave. Minneapolis
Room No. 1
Property for Sale in all parts of the
city. Money to Loan on City or Farm
property. Abstracts furnished and
Titles examined.
MINNEAPOLIS aid St. LOUIS
RAILWAYr
JhXZ TBI VXVOOI
Albert Lea Route
Two Through Trains Daily
IBOK IT. rAUL and JONKXAPOLM
TO CHIGAGO
Without change, connecting 'with the
fkat trains of ali lines for the
EAST AND SOUTHEAST!
The direct and only Ira* running through
etri between Minneapolis and
DES MOINES, IOWA
Via Albert Lea and Fort Dodge.
DirtctUm Yfalertown, Dakota
Solid Through Trains, 9
MHWMH
MINNEAPOLIS AND ST. LOUIS,
and thw principa cities oi the Mis
iBS^ppi Yalle connecting in
Union Depot for all points
South an 1 f-outhwest!
Many Hours Saved and the only
Line running Two Trains Daily to Kan
sas City, Leavenworth and Atchison
making connections with the Union Pa
cific and Atchison, Topeka and Sante
Fe Railways.
fiT" Close connections madein Union
Depot with all trains of the St. Paul,
Minneapolis & Manitoba Nothern Paci
fic St. Paul & Duluth Railways, from
and to all poiuts North and Northwest!
Remember the Trains of the Minne
apolis &St. Louis Railway are composed
of Comfortable Day Coaches, Magnifi
cent Pullman Sleeping Cars, Horton Re
dining Chair Cars, and our justly cele
brated Palace Dining Cars
MB"150 lbs. of Baggage Hacked Free.
Fare always as Low i Lowest! For
Time Tables. Through Tickets, etc.
call upott tt.5 nearest Ticket Agent
writ* to S. BOYD,
Otn. Tkt, and Pass. Agt.,Minneapolis
Minr
ST. PAUL.
Pioneer Lodge, No. 12.A.F.A.M. meetf
the 1st and 3rd Mondaysm each month.
LodjZ room on Jackson below Seventh.
All Master Masons in good standing are
invited to attend.
NELSON TAYLOR, W. M.
JAS. WOODPORK, Sec.
Stevens Lodge, No 113. A A M.
meets 1st Hnd 3rd Tuesdays each
month at No. 198 W. 3rd street. All
brother Masons in good standing are
always welcome.
TALBOTT BUSH, W. M.
J. F. COQUIBE, Sec.
Bethel Chapter, No. 28. R.A.M.,meet*
1st and 3rd Thursdays in each month at
ho. 188, W, 3rd street. All Royal Arch
Masons in good standing arealwavi
welcome.
J, COQTORB P.
TALBOTX Busir, Sec.
Pilgrim Commandery, K. T., No. 22,
holds its regular monthly conclave the
2nd and 4th Thursdays in each month,
at their asylum, Stevens Lodge hall. All
Sir Knights in good standing are cor
dially invited.
\V. HAMPTON, E C*
CHAS. MOBQAH, Bee.
Mars Lodge, G, U. O. of O. F. No. 2202,
meats every second and fourth Wednes
days, hall No. 317 Wabasha street, be
tween Third and Fourth.
J. F. COQUIRE, N. G.
W. T. Johnson, P. S.
Brotherhood of Railway Porters meets
1st and 4th Thursdays in eacb month
Pioneer Lodge room, Jackson between
6th and 7th.
S. WT.
ta-
Light, P.
C. A. Brown, Sec.
MINNEAPOLIS.
St. Anthony Lodge, No. 2877, G. O.
of O. F., meets the 1st and 3d Wednes
days in each month, for instruction,2nd
and 4th Wednesdays for business, at No
220 Nicollet Ave.
J. PARSONS, N G.
Z. W. MlTCUELL, P. S.
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