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St. Cloud Democrat. (Saint Cloud, Stearns County, Minn.) 1858-1866, February 23, 1865, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83016836/1865-02-23/ed-1/seq-1/

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I
TH£ OfiAAOORAT
Is published at St. Cloud, Steams County,
Minnesota, every Thursday afternoon.
OFMCI—IX POST OrncK BCILWXO, WASHINGTON
AVIXVK.
W. MITCHELL, Editor Proprietor.
TERM S
TWO DOLLARS A TEAS, IN ADVANCE.
BATE S O ADVERTISING
One column, one year, $75 00
One-half column, cn« year, 40 00
One-fourth column, one year, 25 00
One column, six months, 45 00
One-half column, six months, 30 00
One-fourth 'salumn, six months, 18 00
Oue square, one year, 10 00
One square, six months, 7 00
Business cards, five lines or less, $5 per
annum six lines, $6 seven lines, $7.
Legal advertisements at statute rates,
[i en lines of this sized type constitute a
square, and cards will be charged propor
tionate to the space they occupy in brevier
solid.]
O W O
Of all kinds executed with neatness and
dispatch, and at reasonable rates.
Real Estate Agency,
ST. LOUD MINNESOTA.
INTENSIVE
Explorations of Land in
this District subject to private entry,
nnd '.oug experience in Land Office business,
ive tlii undersigned peculiar advantage*
i. the
S on of a
.Ami location of Land Warrants.
a W a a
or sale at a small advance on New York
I tecs.
Contested Pre emption cases prosecuted
I fibre tic Local and General Land Offices.
Attention paid to
HE PAYMENT OF TAXES
lu Bentmi, Sherburne, Morrison nnd
te-irns ounties.
i-viil. ts for sale in St. Cloud.
vGnlS-tf L. A. EVANS.
H. WAIT,
J* A N E
AyO LICENSED DEALER IN
Kxiti tngi-, iHnil Scrip,
County, unit Stutr Outer*.
•A S ft
I E E I N
C..U
lions and Remittances promptly
ni.il..
Taxes paid for Non-residents.'
Offi on Washington avenue, one door
south of the Central House. v6ul8-tf
WILLIAM J. PARSONS,
Attorney and Connseller at Law,
TJ. S. Bounty, Claim and Patent Agent,
ST. CLOUD, MINN.
PRACTICES
in all Courts, State and Fed
eral prosecutes claims before any of
the Departments at Washington.
t&~ Particular attention paid to 'he cel
lei-tion of Bounty and Arrearages of Pay
of Sol liers, Pensions for Discharged Sol
diers or for the heirs of those who have
dod in the service.
Offi.-e in 3d story, Broker's Blo^k, over
J. C. & H. C. Burbank & Co. v6n23
EDWARD O. HAMLIN,
Has resumed the
A I E OF A W
IN ST. CLOUD, MINN.
Ofice, Five Doors south of H. 0. Wait's Bank
GEO. W. SWEET,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW,
VI ILL attend promptly to Collections,
W and payment of taxes in Stearns and
Benton Counties. Special attention given
to cases before the Local and General Land
OHices.
Office OB 8t Germain at, over Broker's Store.
ST. CLOUD, MINN.
M. C. TOLMAN, M. D.t
S I I A N A N S E O N
ST. CLOUD, MINN,
Office over Edelbrock's Store.
WM. R.
S I I A N
ST. CLOUD,
-*i
SEAL ESTATE.
HUNTER,
AND SURGEON,
J.
S I I A N
MINN.
W E N
TJ A
it*
%T.
ST. CLOUD, MINN.
FO A KIND S O
JOB PRINTING,
SEND TOUR ORDERS TO
Tli© a O
Sf^t
ST. CLOUD BOOKSTORE
J. M. ROSENBERGER,
BOOKSELLER, STATIONER rf NEWSDEALER
IIM always on hand a Fin* Assortment of
and stationery
ALSS—
THE LATEST PAPERS & MAGAZINES
THE STINDftRD SCrloOLBOOKS,
And everything usually found in a first
class Bookstore. vttnl8-tf
PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY.
PHOTOGRAPHS, AMBROTYPES, &C,
TAKEN AT
MrH a a
Opposite the DEMOCRAT Office,, Lower town.
Hours between 9 A. M. and 4 p. K.
Every variety of Albums, Frames and
Cases kept on hand. von52-tf
7
[FROM LIVERPOOL."!
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER,
SAINT CLOUD, MINN.
N. B.—Watches, Clocks, Time-pieces, Mu
sic Boxes, Jewelry, &c, &c.
Neatly Fixed and Warranted.
Old Verge and Lupine Watches made in
to New English Patent Levers at a small
cost.
Engraving done to order. v5n51-ly
JOHN SCI! WAKTZ,
Keeps constauily on hand
Saddle*, Harness, Carriage Trimmings, $c.
St. Germain^ street, neir Washington are
ime. Saint Cloud. Minn.
A. BUKEM vX,
HEALER I\
WATCHES, BLOCKS AND JEWELRY,
Silver un Plntr W a
126 Third Street, St. Paul
Four th»,rs Mow Thianpnm's Bank.
Watches, Clocks and Jewelry earefullyre
paired by experienced workmen.
ST. PAUL HAT STORE.
W IT. A S O N
WHOLESALE DEALER BY THE
Case or Package,
S r. CLOUD, MINN.
St. Cloud
O O
J^JYTJD
BKjSj •"—.vrrciaa swwsasscwjWBs-^ •:-...-. ji^-.af..ftr.i*.igj\ gwir
opposite the Dridge
Cornel-nf :',ij in.I VTabasbaw ots.
S. O CRAWFOttU,
DEALER & MANUFACTURER
or
All kinds of Cha'rg and iTuiurhofd
S O E
S O
JAMES BIGGERSTAFF
HAYINGGermaid
opene a Boot and Shoe Shop
on St. street, two doors above
Burbank & Co's store, is prepared to make
boots and shoes, of every style and qual
ity, at
REASONABLE RATES.
Repairing done with care. He respect
fully invites his friends to call and see him
at his new stand.
JAMES BIGGERSTAFF.
St. Cloud, Sent. 16th I808. v6nl8-tf
ANTON SMITH,
BOOT AND SHOE 8 O E
A full supply of
Boots and Shoes,
BUFFALO OVERSHOES & MOCCASINS,
Kept always on hand, and for sale at fa
vorable prices.
A good stock of Leather and Shoemaker's
Findings.
Particular attention paidto Custom Work.
The highest market price in Cash paid
for Hides. ANTON SMITH.
Washington av., St. Cloud. v6nl9-ly
A1AURER & SCHERER,
Manufacturer and Dealers in
Boots, Shoes, Leather and Hidings,
(Between Tobey's and Book Store)
ST. CLOUD. v7n24-ly MINN
E N W. W E A
CARRIAGEMAKER.
I
A N SURGEON,
Will practice Medicine in all its branches
including midwifery and operative surgery
St. Cloud, Minn, Dec. 11th, 1862.
A
A E removed to my new shop near
the Bridge, rhere I am prepared to do
all kinds of work in the Carriagemaking
line. Wagons, carriages and sleighs made
in a neat and substantial manner at low
rates. Particular attention paid to repair
fag- v8-tf
O A S O N E S
BLACKSMITH.
AL
kinds of work done in the best
possible manner. Particular atten
tion given to horse and ox-ehoeing, plow
work, and repairing of all kinds. Shop in
aame building with Henry W. Weary.
W E O
MERCHAN A I O
WOULo
invite his friends and the pub-
lic call and examine his New Styles
ts Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods. Partic
ular attention paid to custom work.
VOL. VII. ST. CLOIID, MINNESOTA, T^U^DAY, FEmuJlRY 23. 1865.
A1A* TIPSY BUT MB.
Out of the tavern I 're Just stepped to-nlgbt
Street! you're cnnelit in a very bad plight
Moon! 't la a very uneer figure yon cut
Oi.eeyataft«fcR,lrkUa^DttMriMta«t
Tipsy, I see, you are greatly to blame:
Old as yon are, 't is a horrible shame.
Then the street t«mp»-v,b*t WfcaJilotu sight!
None of them soberly standing upright
Rocking and staggering—why, on my word,
Saeh of the lamps is as drank as a lord I
All is confusion now isn't it odd!
Xothing Is mW-that I MU uuroad
Sure it were IUKVMI the crewto remain,
Better go into Jhe tavern 140*111.
—From the Gtrmaw. i. -"V 2 0 Ml!
From the Philadelphia Evening Post.
CHANGES.
BY BELLA Z. 8PENCER.
A quiet little step rippled the grass
in the meadow, and Herman Graves
looked out from the cool shade of his
retreat among the hazels to the path
down which Rose Nevil walked slowly,
her ejes downcast her sweet lace en
dowed with sndness. She did not ob
serve him as he lay stretched at full
length upon the green sward. It she
had, the little head would have erected
itself proudly, and the sweet lips have
smiled for Rose was every inch a wo
man, and as proud as a little princess.
Never would she have permitted him
to revel in the sweet sense of his power
as he did then, lying there with, tri
umph dancing in his handsome eyes aud
all over his fine face.
f:.
He watched her gtaceful movements
as she went down to. the edge ot the
brook and threw her jug into the spark
ling poo). Rut she did not draw it
forth and return to the little cottage up
among the trees with it upon her head.
The movements which had quickened
as if by a sudden impulse, again grew
slow and pensive. Had Herman been
a little closer, he might have seen tears
in the eyes he had often compared to
violets and pansies, with their changing
light of deep and pale.
With the string attached to tie han
dle caught up loosely within her fin
gers, she half leaned against the rude
fence along which the path lay, while
her head drooped sadly. And thus site
stood for scverxl minutes, unconscious
of all save her own sorrowful thoughts.
The golden rays of a setting sun fell
upon the fair brow from which the
brown hair was brushed away revealing
the pure, blue-veined temples and ivory
white throat in a beauty that was like
radiance upon marble. The arms, too,
round and dimpled as a little child's,
gleamed below the full, short sleeve,
while the little feet looked even small
er nestling among the grass, and which
her short skirt could not conceal.
Herman Graves was young, impul
sive, and had a keen eye for the beau
tiful. This pretty, pensive picture
aroused him, and while his heart beat
with unwonted kindness, he arose and
quietly approached her.
She did not observe him until he
stood at her side, with one hand grasp
ing his gun as it stood upon the ground
the other resting on the fence, while
his head was bowed elose to her face.
"Why so pensive, Rose, da-ling?"
She lifted her eyes an instant to his
face with a quick glance, and then they
fell again to his feet silently. No an
swer came from the sweet lips, though
the rebellious blood mantled the fair
cheek. [.r
"No answer for me, Rose? Come,
this is unkind. -You look std. aad I
am sorry hut yon will not tell, me
what troubles you. I would like to
help you, Rose."
"That is best done by being kind all
the time, and then I should not feel
hurt Or sorrowful/' she answered invol
untarily. But the same instant she
would have given much' to recall her
words, for they were bat an acknowl
edgment of his power to wouud her.
Why, my little girl, what have I
done—how have Tbeen unkind?" he
asked with feigned ignorance.
For reply she gave a little, impatient
pull at the cord, drew the jug to the
surface of the: brook, and lifted it out
upon the grass. From that it went to
her head and sat securely upon the mass
of brown hair, while the pearly drops
trickled down upon the white neck and
upraised arm, as she turned' into the
path towards the cottage. She would
not stoop to explain what he knew very
well already, so 'she' weiit on silently:
"Rose, this is not like you," he cried
following her. In a moment We put
SOQtE'fY* I
out bis hand and took the jug from her
head^setting jt upon the ground, and
moment more the little fingers
in a
,#!$P, )}w broad, soft!
'palm, "^will ijiot. let. you go in this
way, my Rose.' If I have offended,
tell me in what Way, (hat I may not
again be guilty of the saine. What is
kf*.'T'-." '",'"' "c
She struggled to free her hand vain
ly then a passionate cry broke through
her. lips.
*40h, Herman, ydu are cruel I will
not bear it! You are trifling with me
—have been all the while. If you had
ever loveJ me as you have so often de
dared, you would not delight in tor
meuting me in every way, as you do!—
I thought you so generous, so manly
but you are not even true to yourself
You,do things too weak and petty for
a man of earnest self respect. What
good cun it do you to trifle with roe,
trying to make me believe in your lore
while your heart is /given to another
"Jeuloua. Rose 1 Q, what an unwor
thy sentiment, to harbor in this dear
little bosom," he laughed reproachfully
"I had not thought that of you
She tossed her head scornfully
"No, notjealous, Herman. You know
better than. that. Rut I am a poor
humble itfrl, with nothing to recom
mend mo to one like yourself, save a
fair share of beauty which you love to
praise, that you may cheat me hito con
fidence But she if rich, accomplished
and liandsomer than You cannot
help loving her and I am willing that
you should. But while you do this,
you should not seek me—should not
bring her day after day across my path,
and while w.thin my very sight shower
upon: her the tendcresi attentions. It
is mean and unmanly. Your self-re
spect should save you, if nothing else/'
"You are aefere,'**he said, dropping
lier hand and speaking, coldly.—
"Blanche:.Ives is my mother's guest,
and it is my duty to be very polite to
her. Do you not understand this?—
When we come near you in my favor
ite rambles as we often do, I assume
more interest in her to cover the joy I
fed at sight of your dear face. You
know very well, Rose, that I dare not
betray myself yet. No steps have been
taken to prepare them at home for what
is to come, and I must be prudent for
what is to come, and I must be prudent
for your sake as well as my own Wo
men are quick wittcd, and Blanche
might discover more than I care for her
to know if I do not act upon the de
fensive."
"Then why bring her across my path
at all Herman, your excuse is no ex
cuse. I am but a simple girl, but I
cannot be deceived. You are day by
day destroying my trust in you—my
respect for you and it is this that
makes me sad. When I remember how
dear you have been tome—how noble
in my eyes, before she came, it is hard
to reconcile myself to the changes that
are becoming so apparent now."
Her lips quivered, the pearly, drop
standing like a dew gem in the blue
eje, slowly rolled over the round, pol
ished check. Herman was touched
with the beautiful frankness and truth
of her manner and words. For the
moment he even regretted the unwor
thy part he wa«, playing. Simple and
humble as her lot was, Rose's notions
of propriety were unerring, her'princi
ples clear and elevated Any man
might be proud of her love and confi
dence, and'.both had been his—full,
true, generous. She was not niggardly
in her affections but' the girl's pride
and sense of right were as strong and
full as her love. did not want to
lose this pearl out of his life. He was'
nobler and better in 'her presence.—'
However much he might be carried
away while out of her sight, a few. mo
menta in her presence—a few words in
heir gentle tones, restored her poWer.—
Good resolves were born of the self,
same hour in which her little hand was
put forth to meet bis in' greeting, and
all that was evil in his nature shrank
abashed from the gaze of her clear,
truthful eyes. He could not be other
wise than good, ifrahly tnen.
Yes, singularly enough, his besetting
sin seized upon' him the moment he
found an opportunity to tease her after
their little parting Secure in the
knowledge that she loved him better
.than all .the world besides, he had no
fear of the consequences, and used his
poWer in a most ungenerous and un-
vl-i.
'1? J» i|
manly wayj striving to make her jeal
ous and miserable by bringing Blanche
lyes, his mother's guest, across her
path =:os' often as possible, showering
tender attentions upon her, and then
affecting ignorance ot any cause for of
fence when he again met Rose. Now,
when she reproached him, he assumed
a coldness he did'not feel, for he was
secretly pleased with the state of affairs
until he saw something of the. danger
in whien he stood It was far from his
intention to lose her iespect* and'when
she-declared the truth in those earnest
tones and with such tears, he could not
doubt ber:
"Rose," he faltered, and the feeling
in his voice was genuine, f'do not learn
to despise me. I have not acted just
right, I know, but I will trust you to
forgive me. You are generous and
kind. Will you not forgive me Rose
"Willingly, if you are in-earnest"
she replied "but Herman, why will
you stoop to such unworthy amusement
as you have indulged in for a few weeks
past:?. I acknowledge the pain it has
cost me, but it was no jealous pang. If
you really loved Miss Ives, and your
happiness depended upon her, I could
give -you up with no unkind thoughts
for her. But I cannot bear to have you
playing a dovble part. I is not just to
her nor to me—atill less just to your
self. .No difference of position and ed
ucation could make me look up to you
with honor when you sully your man
hood by falsehood and deceit.'!,
"This is uncalled for, Rose. I have,
asked your forgiveness, and you pre
tended, to grant it. Yet you do not
apare me, and am not angelic or pa
nent. in my disposition. If you pardon
my little faults, seal it witk satiles and
kind words, or I shall seek pleassmter
company," he said, with a flash of real
anger, his handsome face flushing redly
with the quick emotion.
She winced a little, but answered
steadily:
I am sorry to wound you, Herman
but if you cannot bear to hear the truth,
your repentance is of shallow depth.
Take my words kindly this once. I
promise never again to intrude them
upon them, whatever, you may do. Act
frankly and honorably. I will not lay
a straw in your way. But do not try
to torment me with attentions to anoth
er, as I can so plainly see you have been
doing, and then, when I speak to you,
forced by your own will to do so, evade
the truth and cover it up with false mo
tives. I am willing to wait your own
time for the revelation of our engage
ment to your friends but let me have
the pleasure of holding you in faultless
remembrance during this time. I can
not endure to be treated as a plaything,
hidden away from your friends as un
worthy of their notice, nnd tormented
by a weak desire of yours to make me
jealous. No woman with proper sdf
respeet would bear it. No roan with
proper self-respect: would be guilty of
it. Now: I have said all I shall ever
say upon the subject. I leave you to
your own choice for the future, willing
ly passing over what is past. But re
member that a continuance of such
actions will separate us forever. By.
this I Shall know-the truth of your af
fection. It lies with you to say wheth
er we shall go on with the same purpose
as heretofore, You are to seal our desti
nies as one, or declare our separation
by' your actions. Now, adieu to the
subject-" !--.:.[ r.i .,...
I She laughed lightly and turned her
face to him in the,gathering -shadows
for now the sun had sunk, and the
night was advancing. Rut an angry,
perverse mood had taken possession of
the man, For the first time in his life
She had roused him to a stubborn re
sentment. /She was taking too high a
stand with him) and he would not yield
to this princess like authority which
she had assumed. With a dark brow
and sullen voice he lifted his gun»swung
it oyer his shoulder, and turned from
her, sayintr, as he did so:
I have not deserved this at your
hands, Miss Nevil,.and shall submit to
no such tests as you eeem disposed to
subject me to. If you cannot trust to
my love, I' will not again force the dec
laration upon you. Until yon arc in a
kinder and more amiable mood, I will
bid you good evening." ..
She looked after him with anguished
eyes and pale lips, as he sauntered away
Snd entered the grove beyond the mead
ow. But he never once turned a glance
ew«»
"Ah, good-evening, Miss Nevil.-—
Will you not give me a spray of those
beautiful flowers for Miss Ivea? We
cannot boast such at the Mansion
throughout our conservatories."
"Certainly," in calm, even tones, and
with, the pruning knife beside her, she
carefully cut the. fairest, and presented
them as he leaned from his saddle over
the garden railing.
"Thank you. But see what unreas
onable mortals we are. Your kindness
has made me bold. Something tor my
self, too, Miss Nevil, please."
Without a word, but the simplest
manner in the world, she complied, cut
ting a little starry cluster of blooms
whose language was "submission," to
which she added another which spoke
ot "treachery." As he took them from
her hand his quick glance read their
meaning, and he colored slightly. An
other bow, a quick spurring of the rest
less steed, and the two bounded away
gaily, he bending as they went to give
his companion the flowers he had beg
ged for her
Rose had acted her part wdl, but
their forms were scarcely lost to sight
ere the tears fell like pearly drops of
dew upon the flowers she tended. He
had given ber a eruel and unkind blow,
and she felt it deeply.
"So it is all past," she sighed to her
self. "Thus he has decreed it. Well,
perhaps it is better. A lover so unkind
would scarcely make a good I husband,
and mine must not be weak and capri
cious. Miss Ives will suit him better,
perhaps, and he will not dare to trifle
with one so near his equal. I must
give him up."
The two equestrians came back again
before the hour had expired in which
they first appeared, but their pace was
slow, neir conversation very earnest,
evidently. Rose was ftill quietly bus-
ied with her flowers, seeing which Her
man felt disappointed more than was
reasonable or kind. Had she not be^n
there, ho would have exulted in the
thought that she was somewhere shed
ding tears over his indifference, and his
spirits would have risen accordingly.
But Rose was mistress of the situation.
She knew better than to give him any
such selfish pleasure, and remained
where she was, noting his redoubled at
tentions to Miss Ives at the sight of
her, with a feeling akin to scorn.
That night Rose paced her little
chamber for many hems after her fath
er slept, pondering all the past in her
own mind. She was no romantic, sen
timental maiden. Her life had been
too full of earnest duty for anything be
yond the practical to weave itself deep
ly into her nature. Yetshe was loving
ladies generally are, because more
thoughtful and earnest and this change
was to her a s-re trial. It was a hard
thing to see the-beautiful light fade
from tho fair form ot the man she had
enshrined as noble within her most sa
cred thoughts, and leave the defects too
glaringly visible for even love to pass
over. The deformity shocked and
pained her beyond power of words, and
V/t^l^7
back, and she took up her jug with a she shivered and grew sick under the
heavy nigh, walking back to the cottage emotions the revelation had brought
and her neglected duties with an aeh-, her She had no mother or sister—
in heart. No complaint passed her: njt even a friend to whom she might
lips. She know that one of ihe most'go for sympathy and advice, so the
important urs of her life had come, struggle was more bitter. But before
and began to read its lessons bravely.
Several days passed, and she did not
sec or hear anything Of Herman. He noc nee and beaut
made no signs of repentance, and she
could do nothing except to wait for fu
ture developments.
A week after the meeting in the
meadow she was among her flowers in
the garden at the end of the cottage,
when the clatter of horses' feet made
her look up Herman and Miss Ives
came sweeping djwn the road, his head
bent toward her in eager conversation,
while her beautiful face glowed'with
rosy blushes. Hose's heart gave one
great throb of agony, and then *ank
sick and faint within her bosom. Both
checked their horses slightly as they
came nearer, and, directed evidently by
Herman, Miss Ives's black eyes fell up
on her as they passed. Rose's pride
came to her aid, and though her face
was as pale as the delicate white flow
ers- over which she bent, her violet eyes
were elear and steady in their unliftcd
glance. Herman lifted his hat gallant
ly, reined in his hor^e with sudden im
pulse, and called to her in a gay and
joyous tone,
NO. 31.
the day dawned, it was all past, and
she slept like a child in her sweet in-
As for Herman, he strolled careless
ly through the shrubbery with Blanche
after tea, until both were wearied, when
he went to bis room to enjoy, his-cigar
and his thoughts. He was not very
well pleased vith himself, for he really
loved Rose as much as he was capable
of loving anyone, and he knew that big
conduct of this afternoon would be ta
ken s« ri'iusfy.
Perhaps he did not regret it as a bet
ter man might have done. He was both
worldly and selfish, though far from
vicious and the embarrassments of an
engagement with one beneath him
ni'ght now be put aside easily, leaving
him free to choose one in every way
his equal, and his parent's choice, if
not his own, as best fitted to become
his wife. Blanche herself was not
averse to bis attention. His love of
power, and inate vanity had led him to
sound her feelings already, so that his
mind was easy upon this point.
Still the knowledge of his present
position with Rose was not agreeable.
The last interview had revealed depths
of pride and power of resolution which
he would find it difficult to combat,
with all of his assurance and winning
suavity of manner.
Thinking over it after he retired, he
grew restless and unhappy but when
morning came his evil genius held him
fast within its clutches, and to punish
her for her pride, he resolved he would
not go near her for a week. Then,
perhaps, her distress at the thought of
his indifference, would melt her into
graciousness and reason.
With this view he rode, walked, and
flirted extensively for tour or five days,
while the gentle girl whose love he had
trifled away, went daily abont her du
ties, having laid away forever the bright
hopes kindled when he first whispered
in her ear a tale of devotion,
From the houi in which he had bent
to Uke the flowers from her hand, all
was at an end between them. It only
remained for her to school herself into
the thought of the change—to reason
away the bitter pain of disappointment
at heart. This had been done soon by
anusual strength of will and purpose,
and Rose pursued her way evenly
sadder and more thoughtful than before
perhaps, but not unhappy. The battle
had been fought—the victory won'
Life for her had a purpose, and she
could not pause to weep over the slain
in the conflict. She must walk onward
—look upward, leaving behind the man
who had proved unworthy. "*^f
(CONCLUDED NEXT WEEK.)
^. .*.
LETTE FROM RUSKCRANS ON E
W A AND SLAVERY.
The subjoined letter from General
Kosecrans has been handed to us tor
publication. It was, of course, not in-
I or at it 0
a re
S ^onble to his patri
otism and humanity, we infer he will
have no objection to seeing it in print.
General Rosecracs is one of those Cath
olis to whose notions of Christianity,
any doctrine favoring the institution of
slavery, is utterly abhorrent:
YELLOW SPRINGS, OHIO, Nov. 10X
1865 Afy Dear Sir: Thanks foryour
kind note. I must say that the earnest
sense of justice, and the keen percep
tion of simple fidelity to the country's
interests without party bias, which the
loyal people of the country exhibit, fill
mc with consolation and hope. That
God's judgments are in this war, 1 think
no one can fail to see with more than
ordinary clearness. That He chastises
us in mercy, I humbly hope. I hope
it because I see Christian men of all
persuasions showing their sense of de
pendence on Him. That God will have
mercy upon us, preserve, the unity of
the nation, and deliver both races from
a
v. pray tor, and hope for.
"tf/A 7I?!?"
S 0 re
dreadful curse, African slavery, I
f_VS flanking ycu for your prayers, I re-
main very truly yours,
W. 8. ROSECBAKS.
Rev. Dr. Ely, Roslyn, Long Island.
tm
—Brown's Bronchial Troches, advertised
in another column, are highly recommended
for public speakers and others, for the re
lief of colds aad to clear the voice. Their
efficacy is strongly attested by congressmen
clergymen and singers, who use them.
Among the certificates to their merits we
observe letters from Henry Ward Beeeher,
N. P. Willis, E. H. Chapin, and otbersof
eminence.—N. T. Eve. Post.

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