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Indian chieftain. (Vinita, Indian Territory [Okla.]) 1882-1902, October 30, 1902, Image 1

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CHIEFTAIN.
CHIEFTAIN PUBLISHING CO.
VINITA, INDIAN TERRITORY, THURSDAY, OCT. 30, 19.02.
VOL. XXI. NO. IO
THE INDIAN
vKtBi fflJjffiwBySfi
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BADGETT-SANDERS MERCANTILE CO
THE BIG STORE
Is full of choice merchandise. Every line now
complete and bargains in every line. We have
the best Dry Goods stock in Vmita; The best
clothing stock in Vinita; The best shoe stock in
Vinifca; The best cloak and suit stock in Vinita;
The busiest Grocery stock in the Cherokee Na
tion. PRICES RIGHT on everything.
Wait for the announcement of our big Nov
ember sale. Biggest sale ever held in Vinita.
In the meantime buy your fall supply from us.
You will save money on every purchase.
adffett-Sanders MercantilefCo.
iiiiffl
THE OLD RELIABLE
I REDUCED RATES
ICTllW2
On Railroads Taken Advant-
of By Throngs of
Homoseckors.
age
PASSENGER SERVICE
&AK.N0
POWDER
Absolutory Pure
THE RE IS NO SUBSTITUTE
On Doth tlm Kty and Frisco Are
Taxed by the Tremendous
Tide of Travel Toward the
Great Southwest
SLUMP IN CORN.
Prices Take a Tumble and the End
Not In Sight.
Is
The local corn market this morn
tag shotted a decided downward
tendency that threatens to develop
Into a continued slump. The first
quotations ranged from 32 to 30
cents, which prices are expected
to drop severol points by Monday,
The buvera thii.k that the first
o! next week a downward move,
ment will set in, and probaby rrBt
around 2oo. Large quantities of
tho cereal are holng unloadod ok
the market and the sharp demand
has abated somewhat, effecting a
decline from strictly natural causes
DAWES INTERESTED,
CANNING FACTORIES PAY.
ANNUAL REPORT
Of tho Dawes Commission
Made Public by Secre
tary of tho Interior.
TRIBAL "PROBLEMS
Noartng Their Final Solution and
the Five Civilized Tribes Are -On
the Threshold of Great
Prosperity.
The annual report of tbt Dawes
Commission, reviewing the work
of the commission in adjudicating
the affairs of tho several tribes,
has been published by the Secre
tary of (he Interior.
The report tutnmatizss the work
of the commission for the fiscal
yca7 as follows:
"The Cecal year just closed has
been the most noteworthy tince
the commission entered upon its
duties The bitter anil allotment
(sentiment has largely folded to
the influence of reason and time,
and the Five Civilized Tribes are
now fairly upon the threshold of a
mw era. The enactment of legis
lat.on and the confirmation ol
agreements has enabled the com
mission to make marked progress
in remedying the objectionable
political and social conditione
which prevailed in Indian Terrl
tory for many years. While more
or lees irritation is yet noticable
in some quarters, yt matters gen
erally are rapidly assuming the
tlcBiiod status. On the part of the
commission practical working ma.
chinery Iicb been designed and put
in motion. System and method
in all branches of the work appli
cable to the complex subjects with
which the commission has to deal
have been installed and a healthy,
vigorous current of business has
taken the place of the congested,
feverish conditions of the country
which prevailed a short lime since.
Should the agreements now pend.
ing before the various tribes be rat
ified, the ultimate end in view will
depend for its attainment almost
eoieiy upon me elements ol ..tnti
and labor. The vexatious negoti
ations which have been in progress
for nearly a decade will have been
ended and the satisfactory and
speedy culmination of a very per
plexing problem may be anticipated."
METOHDIST CONFERENCE.
Alrrty ministers and Delegates
Attendance.
In
The fifty-eighth annual confer
ence of the Methodist Episcopal
cburcb, south, of the Indian and
Oklahoma Territories convened a'
Muskogeo Wednesday ,Oct. 22, with
Bishop IIoss, of Dallas, presiding
This wa the largest conference
ever held in this district and in In
diont've of the tremendous growth
of the Methodist church since thl
conference was founded in 1811,
the year of the division of tin
Methodist Episcopal church.
It is interesting to note that the
first conference convened Wodner
day, Oolober 23, 1844, and the one
next to convene will be Wednes
day, October 23, fifty nine years
later. The conference was founded
at Riley's ohspel at Park Hill
near Tahlequah.
At that time the work was al
most entirely missionary work
among the Indians and there were
only two or three pastoral charges
in the entiro conference which
then as new, tmbriced Ihe two
territories. Twenty twoyaara ago
there wore 3,600 members and
twenty five ministers. There
were twotve or fourteen churches
and only one parsonage located a'
Okmulgee. There was not an ed
ucational institution in the terri
tory under the supervision of th
church.
Now there are four educational
institutions, 130 parsonages, 180
pastoral charges, 145 ministers oni
250 church buildings. List year
there was expended for genera!
church work in this conference.
805,000, all ol which was collected
In the conference. The educa
tional institutions, as properties,
are worth $200,000.
At tho opening seesion over 250
delegates were in attendance,which
number wob later swelled to more
than 300.
Rev. M. L. Butler, of Muskogee,
who has served as secretary of the
conference sinco 18S8, was re
elected and chose as bis assistants
Revs. J M Porter, W. B. Lee and
$. B. Afnawortb, end as statistical
eecrejprles Revs. W. F. Dunklr,
MVnSGur8t ano'VlinTrSyiei.;
jfPiiB following committees wVre
dnlmed and appointed:
DELAWARE CASE
Will Be Argued Before the
Court of Claims To-
Morrow.
WILL BE APPEALED
WRIGHT'S DUTIES
win
Be Temporarily Assumed
J. W. Zively.
By
Aged Ex-Senator Says Territory Will
Soon lie a State,
'me twontletti annual Lako Mo
honk Indian conference is in seB
eion at Lake Mohonk, New York.
ReportB on the work oi the In
dian service and the progresHive
steps taken by the fiyo civilized
tribes toward the dissolution oi
tribal forms of government were
read and discussed.
An interesting feature of the
opening session was the reading of
a letter from the venerable Henry
L, Dawos, of Maesichusetts, bIiow
ing that ho is still very much In
terested In everything pertaining
to the welfare of the Indian.
In his letter, Mr. Dimes gave it
as his opinion that Indian Terri
tory would eoun enjoy the liene
filB of a stato government.
Country honey at- liuleailno's.
As a result ol the colonist rates
established by all railroad lead
ing into the Southwest, an army
of homeeeekers is entering tins
and contiguous territory every
day, and the passenger strvlce on
all the roads is bbitg taxed to
handle the tremendous tide of
travel.
The action of the railroads in
giving reduced rates hasjirovtn
to be one of the most potent fac
tors In exploiting the resouices.ol
the SouthweBl. The first excur
sion on the Kaly brought over 1000
homeeeekers Hub way, 400 of
whom, It Is estimated, bad tickets
for points in Oklahoma and In
dian Territory.
Tho majority of tho excursion
lets came frrm Illinois, Iowa, Ohio
and Indiana, and are of the thrifty
farmer class of tho middle west
Ono section of tho train carried
over COO passengers ticketed for
points in Texas.
The idea of making the colonist
rates originated with Col. S F. B.
Moroe, passenger iraffio manager
of the Southern Paclflo, with head
quarters at Houston, Texas.
The colonization of the South.
west has always been a pet hobby
with Mr. Metres, and he lias sue
ceedoel in interesting the other
roads penetrating this section.
Thousands of industrial agenta
arc now being employed by the
difleront lines in inducing imml.
gratiun this way.
The cunning e-casoo just closing has
bicn one of the most successful In the
hlHnry of the business In tho South
west. If Vlultii had landed a can
ning factory laet spring, a proposition
considered t one time by the Com
mercial c'ub, It would huvo paid for
Itself this j car. From a Virginia ox
chirgo c (j into tho following:
"HtOKlT IN TOMATO CANN1NO "
"The tomato doners of Hotctoutt
county and their natno Is legion arc
about closing ono of their most suc
cessful 6e3sum. Tbero are about 125
plants In operutlon in the county and
they will avorago an output ot 3,000
cases, with a net profit ot at least 03
cents per case. In many Instance?,
wben tbo packer rallies bis own toma
toes, tbo-profit is much nrnre than
this. This shows up a profit to the
canners of something like 200,000 for
this rear."
BOOMING TERRITORY.
Rock Island Railroad Offers Dig Cash
Prize for Dest Article on
Territory.
MANY COMPLICATIONS
.fabljp worship Revs A M
Butler ond T F
AOjf-tAT L
n.wurillr
QiPffiSLf.
HpBJ&rJ
Jftkll
OrTUIBI
Threatened Through Carelessness ot
Property Owners In Filing on
Lots.
Territory Postmasters
Thu following eppolniinoits of
Indian Territory pontamvteru have
been announced: In tho Cboctuw na
tion Fiancls A. MrAleor, liokchltoj
CharlQB J Luno, McAlostor; 0. f.
Ohoate, Ohoate. In tbo Cherokee nation-
Richard Dock, Flint. In the
Chickasaw i utlnu Jesse 8. Freeman,
Daughert)! Anhlo Stophcnson, Hun-
ton) James K. Davanay, Okru, mid
LowlsG. Nlcht'lsflshoMliigo, Among
tho Creeks John J. Darnell, Inola.
The Rock Island system, in fol
lowing up its recently announced
policy of booming the Indian Ter
rllory and encouraging emigration
to this country, has offered $375 in
cash and transportation to Dartles
living in tho territory who will
write them a letter describing the
conditions as they exist here and
the prosperity of the people.
Letters should deal with the
writer's experiences since he set
tled in tho territory. They should
tell how much money ho brought
with him, what he did when he
first came and what measure of
success has sinco rewarded his ef
forts.
Letters should not be JeBB than
300 nor more than 1,000 words in
length, and will be used for the
purpose of advertising the south-west.
This liberal proposition should
be taken advantage of. The rail
roads havo determined to build up
the territory, and they should be
given the enouuragoment they de
serve,
For circular giving details,
write jonn Henastian, passenger
trailio manager, Rook Island sys
tern, Chicago, III
If you havoa stuvo which Is leak
In; air through the J ilnls, bolter give
It away, as ym ura pasulng dollars'
worth nt heat und unburned fuel up
I mo v.iiiiHiiirj no iiiuutu yuu con
tinue to uso it, uud get a Oulosat Ed.
Leo's.
Serious complications in obtain
ing title to town lots are threat
ened, through the carelessness of
property owners in filing on wrong
lots. Three havo already filed on
one lot on the East side, and the
members of tho townsite commis
sion think that In this as in many
other instances it bos been through
ignorance of their lot numbers.
There is a map in the commis
sion's offices which can be con-
J. W. Zsvely has been ordered
by the Secretary of the Interior to
assume the duties of chief Indian
Inspector in the Indian Territory,
pending the recovery of J. George
Wright, who is ill uthis home in
Chicago.
Mr. Wright's condition is such
that even under the most favor
able circumstances he will not be
able .o resume his duties for
several months. The important
matters which are now coming be
fore his office, uromuted the Bee
retary In ordering Mr. Zevely,
who is thoroughly conversant with
Indian affairs to Muskogee. Mr.
Zevely is at present in St. Louie
and will leave for Muskogee ul
once.
RESENT REPORT.
and Periodicals A
0 H Rev, J A Parks,
In, R A Crosby, S M
rlcl Uonferenco Uncords
R F Gassoway, S 0 Carshall,
J E Lovett, J B Mitchell, A J
Trickey, C F Mitchell.
On Conference Relations U F
Roberts, L W Cobb, J D Edward",
W A Brewer, 0 W Mayalt, J M
Woodward.
On Spiritual Stale of the Church
T P Howell, J F Sherwood, G
W Damon, W R Waters, A L
Woodlifl, T M Jackson, J S Adair,
A S Williams, E M Myers.
On Bible Cause W D Walking,
M D Hill, A L Boyd, T 0 Shank.
J M Russell, T C Mayberry.
On Temperance-Z B Wbiteburst
J F Thompson, J W Head, J D
Blackwell, A II Homer, B C Clark.
F E Shanks, D F Roberts.
On Admission to Conference J
0 Fowler, U V Wyatt, J B McDon
old, Moss tt eaver, J S Lamar, W
II McKinney, W H Pipkin.
EXPENSIVE GAMING.
From Whatever Decision is Ren-
dred By Court of Claims and
Will Bi Advanced On
D cket of Supreme
Court.
The presentation of the argu
ment ol th Uhrroken Nation in
'he DrUwxre csso will be made by
iltnriicy W. T. Hurdlings bofure
th o-'urt of claims tomorrow..
This Is a suit in which th Dels
WBres claim, under their sgrep
mi nt mi thu time of thetr adoption,
a pr-r capita Hllntnie-nt of ICO acres
if Und abive their pro rata share
Cherokee citizens.
Thl iruporlMit oico will be op
praletil from whatever decWon is
rendered by tho court of claims,
and will he ndvmired on the docket
if Him supreme ourt for final de
rision under the following section
o' tne treniy:
"8o. 23. All DHlnwdr Iiiiliune
who are members of the Cherokee
Nation shall take lands and share
in the funds of the liiie, as their
rights may be determined hy the
judgment ot tbo Coutt of Claims,
r hy the Supremo C.urt if op
piuled.in the putt ir.stitu'eid there
n by the Delaware again! the
Chrrokee Nation, and now pend
np; lint it raid suit bo not deter
mined befori sitld commission is
ready to lie-in the allotment of
lands if the tribe on herein pro
vided, the commission shall cause
to be segtegated one hundred and
filtv. seven thousand six hundred
acres of lend, including lands which
have been selected and occupied
by Delaweres in conformity to the
provisions of their agreement with
tho Cherokees dated April eighth,
eighteen hundred and sixty seven,
such lands so to remain, subjeot to
disposition according to Bueh judg-
Rlcnt-as myJcj...rertfiereU ia ssjd
cause; and raid commireion snail
thereupon proceed to theiUolmnt
of the remaining land of the tribe
as aforesaid. Said commission
shall, when fine I judgment is ren
dered, allot lands to such Dels
wares iu conformity to tbo terms
of the judgment and their Individ
uA rights thereunder. Nothing in
this act shall in any manner im
pair the rights of either party to
said contract as the eama may be
finally determined by the court, or
shall Interfere with tho holdings
of the Datawares under their con
tract with the Cherokees of April
eighth, eighteen hundred an J sixty-
stiven, until their righ's under said
contract are determined by the
courts in their suit now pending
agoloet ihe Cherokee?, said cult
etmll be advanced on the docket of
"iid c-uMB ami he determined the
earliest time prtotioehln."
FORLORN HOPE
Whisky Sellers Claim Arkansas Laws
Art) Only Ones In Force In Terri
tory Towns,
A test rasp, it is said, will cirae
up at Ihe December term of the.
United Slates court at Okmulgee
in which Territory Hhleky sellers
will attemp' to show that tho fed
eral liquor laws do not apply to all
Territory towns.
Tho grounds upon which the
fight will be made is, that the prop
erty In thn incorporated towns Is
vested In the whiten and that said
towns aro not a part nf the torrl
ory. This being the esse, it is
held that the laws forbidding the
sole of intoxicating liqnors do not
apply 3 them, but that the Arkan
sas laws are the ones in force.
There i r- said to be precedents la
Oklahoma that are paralleled with
the came one which will b argued
before the court next December,
ind that Ihe rupr-me court of the
United Stales hits decided tht the
lawn of the ItidWn Territory do
not apply to incorporated towns,
whiob are separata and dUtiuai or
gaiiizatlous. chocTaw sqaubble.
V. T. Ifutchlnss Will Ask Courts For
Injunction Restraining flcCurtaln
From Signing Deed.
The recognition of Green Mo
Curtain by the Secretary of tho In
terior has not settled the Cbootaw
imbroglio, as was anticipated At
toruey W. I. Hutchiuge, a skill
ful and contitnt fighter, who ia
representing the Hunter faction In
Was Ing'. m, is reported as saying
that unites the Secretary of the In
terior experiences a speedy change
of heart, he will take the matter
into the federal courts and ask for
an injunction restraining McCur-
tain from signing the deeds to
Choctaw allotments.
The suit will be instituted ia
either the name of Hunter or Dukes
and Mr. Hutchings promises an
interesting encounter.ln which tie
charges of intimidation and force
law will be thoroughly aired.
1MBW4HI RULING.
Churches Will De Allowed One Hun
dred by Ooc Hundred Fifty
Foot Lots.
Tuskahoma Olrlg Say They Are
Tickled to Death With Their
Food.
A CALL
For 11 ctlng of SlngleStntctiood Exe
cutive Committee,
Chairman Ling nf the townsite
commission has received a ruling
on the size nf the non assessable
lots allowed the churches in the
Cherokee lownsttes. Under the
ruling the churches are allowed
lotb 100x160 feet.
Many had interpe ttu the sec
tion relative to the question as
only allowing the enureses 50x150
feel but under tho ruling the same
size lot U alo allowed for parson
age purposes-
EL BERTA, TEXAS.
New Town in the Great Fruit and
Vegetable Belt of East Texas.
Heavy
Fines Paid By
Qomblers.
Muskogee
suited and such mistakes avoided.
in Borne instances where more
than one party has filed on the
same lot it has been .done inten
tionally, with a view to a contest.
In the matter of filing, the com
mission urges all lot holders to
make sure of their numbers before
filing their applications as it will
save many delays and much nn-
uoyance in obtaining title.
deneral Rucleer'a Wife.
Several days ago a short sketch of
General Daniel II, Rnckcr, tho old o t
oftlccr In point of service In the
United States army, was published In
tne Chieftain and mention was in ado
that ho had married, idurlog bis
frontier servlcu, a Oucrukee girl. Dr.
Krumct Sufr has written that the
young lady In question was Miss Flora
Ooody, who was married to General
Uucker at Clark's Spring plantation
near Ifort Gibson, February 20, 13.10
Miss Coody was tho niece ot Chief
John fto) und sister of William Sbory
Coody, who at tbo age ot thlrty-throo
framed tho constitution ot the Choro
kee nation.
The tearful report sent out from
Tutkehoma, Bomslime ago, to the
effect that the young ladies of the
Female Institute were being slow
ly, but eurely.statved to death has
been spiritedly denied by the sup
posed martyrs themselves.
In an open lettor they slats that
the rsports to the effect that they
were fed entirely on corn bread
and treaklo were maliciously un
true, and that they are simply
"tickled to death" at their treatment.
"Tho Golden State Limited"
Is the Name of the New Rock bland Sys
tem Train to Calif oraU VU Kama
City and El Pato, Tex.
Recfuitly tho Rock Island system
offe.v,3 tiOO cash prlzo for tbo moat
appropriate naiuo for their now
limited train to California, via Kan
sas, via Kansas City and El Paso, Tex.
Tnero were thousands ot names pre
sented from all parts ot the United
States, Too name decided upon was
"The Golden Stato Limited," sub-
mlttod by T. H. Davis of tho New
York Central Hues, Denver, Colorado.
Foley's Kidney Cure
maxes Kiaaeys aaa Ditaaer ngtiu
gold by Peoples' drug store,
Fines approximating 8700 wire
paid by Muskogee gamblers, Sat
urday, as the result of a cu'.-in on
their game by the authorities of
the Western district. A week pre
vious a raid was made on a gambl
ing house and a select bunch ol
tin horna corraled
In Commissioner Leekley's
court Saturday, the parties who
owned and wero running the house
were fined $200 each and some of
the hangers.on were given small
fines of $10 and cobIh. Tom Ma
Daniel ana Aioeri uartiner were
fined 8100 and coBts and six others
were fined $10 and costs.
In abaeesing the fines, Commia
loner Leokley took Into considers
lion the fact that the parties be
fore him promised to close their
places of businosa and tu keep
them closed and tho house that
Iibb beon rented for a gambling
house will not bo used for that
purpose again.
"Watah the Kidneys."
"When they aro aUVted, life Is In
danger," sajs Dr. Abernothy, tho
great English physluUn. Foley's KSd-
I ney Cure makes sound kidneys. Soli
by Poiple'a drug store. dw
The Single Statehood Executive
Committee of Oklahoma and In
dian Territory is hereby called to
meet in Oklahomt City. Okie., at
ten o'clock a. ni., on Monday, the
10th day ol Nv-mber, 1902, for
the purposes of considering and
determining whether a third Sinsle
Statehood Convention for Okla
homa shall be called, whether or
not the people of the "Twin Ter
ritories" shall b celled upon by
tiiis committee, in the event
ano'her delega h o invention be
called, to consider and hy said
delegate convention deoide tho ad
viBahlllty of framing a state con
stitution and thereupon further
seek and d mand admission into
the union ot states, and then and
thero to attend to all other busi
ness that may properly como be
fore the committee. v
Business of vital importance,
questions o! greatest moment, are
pressing for attention and solution
and each and every member of
the committee &" urgently re
quested to bo present at this meet
ing .This October 27th., 1002.
E. N. Ratcmff, Chairman.
W. U WaIKBR, Secretary.
Out of Death, a Jaws.
"When death scorned very near
from a severe stomach and liver trou
ble, that I had sutloied with for years"
wrllos P. Muse, Durham, N. Q, "Dr,
King's Now Life Pills siYcd my life
and gave perfect health." Iiet pills
on earth and only 25c at People's and
A, W. Foreman's drug stores, dw
Towns do nut- urn. They aro built
Tuat W why the Mts-tourl Trust Co.
und aSyuninetonf buslue- men are
building i rte t iwn nf EI Iterta. Low
rat i t-i ilMwtm:. For complete lltera
ture addren Jime-i lUrker, Gen'l
Pats, and Tkl. Ajent, M. K. k T.
Ry , 518 Wulnwrlght Oldg., St. Louis,
Mo. 1
He Was a Politician.
One day a turtle announced that be
could walk on tho water, and tbat be
would do it at a certain date and place.
The turtle was known as a good mixer,
tielcg equally at humo In tho dry and
in the wet. lie alto had a record with
the "porty buys un account ot a certain
aQatr with a hare, wherein he, had wnn
out. (iu be lal luts of friends who
wore aiixluuH t ee if he could get
there. When the day came all the flth
assembled at the place while the frogs
sat on the bank and croaked. The
turtle stood on thehore and watched
the assembling ot the 'multitude,
which at la-t tilled tho treim. Then
he apprnjcnert the water and calmly
walked screw on the headtof the suck
erf, sldc-tep In occasionally to get
hU foot ou a luhster. Moral; That Is
the way It Is Iu politic. -Antlers
American.
The dtrraan Twist of It.
Legal terms are often confusing to
those oitlde the profession but the
ttiiluwlng which occurred In the pro- ,
bate court at Elyrla, Ohio, N. P.
Johnson' oil home, tells of an ex
coptlonal mlxup In which hworsBee
of the law was combined with English
Mpokcn with a Weber aud Fields
movement.
One day a German wo Ban came ia
to court and announced excitedly,
"Gbudge, ray husband has JoostdM
detested. Ho loft ma and three young
InlQels, and I want an exeutloar
appointed,"
The judge was too staggero I to M-
ply Immediately. The nomas fsar
Ing some mistake, added;
"Ain't this the right place? Ain't
you the cbudge of reprobates?"
Pictures framed at IJrtino UrfcJHB,
tier's.
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