OCR Interpretation


The Muskogee cimeter. (Muskogee, Indian Territory, Okla.) 1901-19??, June 30, 1904, Image 3

Image and text provided by Oklahoma Historical Society

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025060/1904-06-30/ed-1/seq-3/

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Sweet Sklmmllk.
There is no better ration for thq
calf than sweet skimmilk. After the'
calf ha been weaned it still has a,
craving for the kind of food that na
ture provided for it. The feeding of
nearly sour milk has been practiced,
and the feeding of. whey, but we are
euro that the calf has no particular
liking for that kind of food. Under
modern methods of dairying it is pos
sible on many farms to have the skim
milk sweet. Where hand separators
are used, of course it is an easy mat
ter to have milk of the kind we have,
indicated. Even where the milk has to
be hauled to the creamery, tho farm
er can, if ho will, have milk that is
sweet when he gets home from tho
creamery. If it is not, he has himself
or the creamery to And fault with
about it. If it is tho creamery, he
should take tho matter in hand at
once. In many cases it is the fault
of tho other patrons of the creamery,
if the skimmilk is sour when the
farmer gets homo with it. The said
other patrons have got into the habit
of hauling to the creamery milk that
is sour or nearly so. Perhaps they
are "every-other-day" men. Tho milk
they bring is skimmed and of course,
'the skimmed milk goes into the tank
from which each man draws the skim
milk to which he is entitled. Tho
sour or nearly sour milk thus mixed
with the other and better milk acts as
a starter and sets tho whole to sour
ing. All the farmers on returning to
their homes from such a creamery
find tho milk sour. This is a matter
they should look into. There is no
reason why all ' should allow them
selves to bo injured by the few.
Sometimes tho farmer is himself to
blame in not having his cans in proper
shape for the reception of the milk
at the creamery. It may 'be that he
himself is bringing milk in cans that
havo "starter" in all tho seams. If so,
he should clean up and clean up vigor
ously. The sweet skimmilk is what
he needs especially if calves are to
bo fed, and the sweetness it, worth
striving after. Tho younger the calf
tho more need there is that the milk
be sweet, for tho more delicate is the
digestivo apparatus that is to handle
it. For such animals somo feeders
assert that sweet skimmilk is worth
twice that' of .skimmilk such as is
usually received from tho creamery.
Scours is one of tho greatest causes
of calf mortality. It is induced by the
kind of food the calf receives, and It
is believed that both sour milk v' arid
unusually cold milk help alongthe
bad effects. Sweet milk is of too
much value on the farm to bo ig
nored. Progress in Buttermaking..
In no other industry has there been
greater progress during the last few
years than in dairying, says M. Mor
tensen. Tho methods employed by
buttermakers ton 'years ago will now
not bo rocognized by any up-to-date
buttermaker. The machinery is dif
ferent. Tho buttermaker who' at that
time was generally chosen from tho
ordinary walks of lifo is now a man
who has attended school for perfect
ing himself in his profession. Somo
years ago one of the leading questions
at tho convention was, how to avoid
mottles. Tnis is a thing not frequent
ly spoken of to-day. The buttermaker
as a rulo now understands the me
chanical part of buttermaking to such
an extent that ho knows how to pre
vent mottles. Tho question of most
importance now is how to make a
high and uniform grade of butter pos
sessing keeping qualities. Wo do not
aim to mako the kind of butter that
used to win sweepstakes a few years
ago as that did not very often possess
keeping qualities. The butter now in
highest demands is quite different
from our fancy butter of a few yean
Hortts' Only Obligation.
A story that comes from a country)
region not far from New York concern,
a native who was seen stolidly flow
tng a field with a team of weary and
dejected horses. As they approached,
the observer of rural life remarked,
sympathetically, that the horses
"didn't seem to like the work." "Urn,"
commented the farmer, briefly, "they
don't have to like it; they only have
to do it." Harper's Weekly.
Problem for Naturalists.
A naturalist has recently pointed
out that in its native forests the hair
of the sloth is green, owing to the
presence on or even in ,the hairs of a
microscopic gree'h aja. The green
color fades after death, as the chloro
phyll is readily destroyed by sunlight
The question has arisen as to the de
sirability of restoring the hair to its
green color in mounted specimens of
sloths in museums.
The Preacher's Evidence.
Roland, 111., June 27. Diabetes has
lo long been looked upon as an in
curable form of kidney disease that
a sure cure for it must rank as one of
the most valuable medical discoveries
of the age. And every day brings
forth fresh evidence that Do (Id's Kid
ney Pills will cure diabetes. Im
portant evidence in their favor is giv
en by Rev. Thos. P. Norman, the well
known Baptist minister here. Mr.
Norman says:
"I had all the symptoms of a bad
case of diabetes and received so much
benefit from the uso of Dodd's Kid
ney Pills that I cheerfully recommend
them to anyone suffering from that
dread disease. Dodd's Kidney Pills
will cure the worst form of diabetes."
Dodd's Kidney Pills always cure
diabetes, one of the final stages of
kidney disease. All the earlier stages
from backache to rheumatism are
naturally much more easily cured by
the same remedy.
Turkluh Canal.
The work of creating a new outlet
or the Hermus was done by Turkish
engineers and Turkish capital. The
new canal was cut through low-lying
plains a distanco of twelve miles and
stands as a most creditable monu
ment to the progress of a country
which has for many centuries been
almost constantly occupied with war,
Fine Note Paper.
It is not a pleasant thought that tho
brilliant white note paper which yom
hand rests upon may have in it the
fibers from the filthy garment of somo
Egyptian fellah after it has passed
through all the stages of decay until
it is saved by a rag picker from the
gutter of an Egyptian town; and yet
it 1b a fact that hundreds of tons of
Egyptian rags are exported every year
into America to supply our paper
mills.
Divers Will Dive Deeper.
The discovery of a London physi
cian vis claimed to have increased the
safe depth for diving and cassion
work from 100 to 200 feet. The "sim
ple remedy is slow restoration of nor-,
mal conditions, the evil and fatal re,
suits having been traced to the sud
den removal of the excessive at mo
pheric pressure.
, American Goods In Asia Minor.
Articles of American manufacture
Which are finding a market in the
Islands of Asia Minor are cotton
goods (sheetings, gray drills, canvaa
and calicoes); hardware (carpenters'
tools, locks and nails), timepieces,
cheap Jewelry, agricultural imple
ments, machinery and windmills,
sewing machines and various novel
ties.
Growth of National Capitol.
When the extension planned for tho
nation's 'capitol at Washington has
been made, the edifice, including the
works of art which it contains, will
have cost nearly $20,000,000. In 1709
the first building lot on which the cap
itol stands cost $500. The cornerstone
was laid Sept. 8, 1793, with a speech
by President Washington, a military
prociiiioa and a bjurbeoue.
pnilra i nrMHWJ
Hi
Ha
AVegetable Preparattonfor As
similating iheFoodandRcgula
Ung IheStoinachs andBuwefo of
Promotes Digcalion.Chcerfuh
nes s and Rest. Contains neither
Opium.Morpliine norMincrol.
Not T arc otic .
nmtpetfouo-ssNuanTcwt
Mx.Smn
Amtt Strd
AperTecl Remedy forCoitsOpa
Tlon , Sour Stomacn.Diarrhoca
Worms .Convulsions ,1 cverish
ness and Loss of Sleep.
Facsimile Signature of
NEW YORK.
KXACT COPY OF WRAPPER.
W.N.U. Oklahoma City No. 27, 1904.
BEGGS' BLOOD PURIFIER
CURBS catarrh of tha atomacta.
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HSjJBBBMBtsiL,
ON OUR TRADE MARK k
F GET TO KNOW IT WHEN YOU SEE IT BL
B AND THEN NEVER BUY STARCH WITHOUT IT. jk
M DEFIANCE STARCH IS WITHOUT EQUAL IT IS GOOD. fj
IT IS BETTER. IT IS THE BEST AND MORE OF IT FOR TEN M
CENTS THAN ANY OTHER STARCH. IT WILL NOT ROT THE Eg
M CLOTHES. YOUR GROCER HAS IT OR WILL GET IT f YOU MB
m ASK FOR IT. - .'' . B
L SATISFACTION OR MONEYBACK.' J
MANUFACTURED BYv y m
The DEFIANCE STARCH CO., jT
- s OMAHA. NEB. ' fr
CASTORIA
Tor Infants and Children.
The Kind You Have
Always Bought
Bears the
Signature
of
For Over
Thirty Years
CASTORIA
TH1 MNTMIII MMMNV. R(W YORK CITY. '
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1 "tiAtJ iiilft
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MN LUKES WHEKE AIL ELSE 1 AUK.
m4 Heat Cough Byrup. Taste Hood. Um
lcj in umo. Hold br aruaensts.
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