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The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, May 27, 1868, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1868-05-27/ed-1/seq-1/

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HAWAIIAN
GAZETTE.
punusnr.D
Every Wednesday -lorning,
AT S&-00 PER AJfStm.
Slalled to Foreign Subscribers at $7.00.
OmcE On Merchant street, west of
BOOK AND JOB
PRfflrme iliumixt .
TUB "OAZBTTB" omcJ
Is now rirparrJ to execute all enters tor
run in mx mm.
Or EVERT DBHCRIPTIOX,
-WITH iTEATHBSa AUD DISPATCH
he Tost Office, Honolulu, II. I.
printed n4 polluted by J. Morr Skitb, t the
GoTormtnt Printing OS', to whom 11 bosintM
VOL. If NO. 19.1
HONOLULU, WEDNISDAT, M AT 27, 18G8.
$6.00 PER YEAR.
comnmntcitlonii mom ve auurrwwu.
BUSINESS NOTICES.
McCOLGiUV At JOII'SOX,
MERCHANT TAILORS,
FORT STBEET, HONOLULU,
10 Opposite T. C. Ilcnck's. fly
IRA RICHARDSON,
ElirOKTEK AI MHAI..EU
1H BOOTS, SHOES & GENTLEMEN'S FUB-
NISHINQ GOODS,
Corner ot Fort and Merchant Street!,
S HONOLULU, II. I. Pt
LANGLEY, CE0WELIT& CO.,
Wholesale Druggists,
Cor. Itattcry unci Clay Street,
sax ric.Avci.sco, cal.
6-3 in
EDWIN JONES,
GROCER AND SHIP C HANDLES,
I.aliuiua, Maui.
Money and Recruits furnished to ships on
6-ly favorable term!.
TIIEO. II. IsAVIES,
(Late J&Dlon, Green Jt Co.,
IKPOETER .& COHHISSION MERCHANT
AG EST FOR
Lloyds' and the Liverpool Underwriters,
Northern Assurance Company, and
British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co.
3-ly
MACHINIST,
Fort Street, opposite Odd Fellows' HalL
Gives particular attention to the repair of
Fire Arms, Sewing Machines, Jt Locks.
Drairtujs of Machinery, dc., made to Order.
W-tt
c. n. LEVERS.
j. o. dickson.
Lewers & Dickson,
IMl'OUTEItS, WHOLESALE AND
Ketall Dealers in Luuiher and Building
Materials. Fart, King and Merchant streets,
Honolulu.
J. S. WALKER. C. ALLEN.
WALKER & ALLEN,
Shipping and Commission
MERCHANTS.
jo-tf HONOLULU. II. I.
L. L. TORBERT,
DEALER IN LUMBER AND EVERY KIND
OF BUILDING MATERIAL.
Office Corner Queen and Fort Streets.
13-ly
v Holies & Co.,
SHIP CHANDLERS & COMMISSION MER
CHANTS, Queen Street, particular attention paid to the
purchase and tale of Hawaiian Produce.
refers ar rEititissioN to
C. A. Williams A Co., I C. Brewer A Co.,
Castle 4 Cooke, II. Hackfcld A Co.,
D. C. Waterman, 1 C. L. Richards A Co.,
2-iy
George G. Howe,
Dealer in Redwood and Northwest Lumber,
Shingles, Doors, Sash, Blinds, Nails,
6 Paints, etc
At his Old Stand on the Esplanade. 36-ly
MKSS. J. II. MIACIf,
Fano.y MIITiner,
3 FORT ST., BETWEEN KING & HOTEL.
'Bonnets mad,, up and trimmed in the latest
styles. Stamping, Braiding and Em
broidering, executed to order.
S. Siividgc,
IMPORTER & DEALER IN PROVISIONS
AND COMMISSION MERCHAT.
AGEXT FOR THE
Haiku Sugar Company,
Sale of Kawaihae Potatoes.
Fort Street, Honolulu. 5-ly
F. A. SCIIAKFEU &. CO.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
HONOLULU, n. I. (58-ly)
Ed. Hoffschlaeger & Co.,
IMPORTERS & COMMISSION MERCHANTS
Honolulu, Oahu, 11. 1. 4-ly
A. S. Cleghorn,
WHOLESALE & RETAIL DEALER IN GEN
ERAL MERCHANDISE,
Fire-proof Store, corner of Queen and Kaahu-
inanu Streets.
Retail Establishment on Nuuanu Street,
4-ly
Tlie.otlorc C. ficuck,
IMPORTER & COMMISSION MERCHANT.
Honolulu, Oahu, S. I. l-ly
; H. Hackfeltl & Co..
GENERAL COMMISSION AGENTS.
Honolulu, Oahu, S. I. 8-ly
J. D. WICKE,
Arc nt for the Ilrcmcn Board,
oi" Untlenrritcn.
. All average claims against said Underwriters,
occurrinfr in or about this Kingdom, will
have to be certified before me. 7-ly
0111111? floon,
COMMISSION MERCHANT AND GENERAL
AGENT,
AQEXT FOR THE
Paukaa and Amauulu Sugar Plantations.
Importer of Teas and other Chinese and For
eign Goods, and Wholesale Dealer in Ha
waiian Produce, at the Fire-proof Store,
Nuuanu Street, below King. 21-ly
Afon? & Aclmck,
Importers, Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
General Merchandise and China Goods,
Fire-prool Store in Nuuanu Street, under the
Public Hall. 43-tf
WM. RYAHf.
VAXiaS? STOK1 Xo. 2,
Hannaltea Street,
All kinds of Merchandise and Groceries.
39-1
JEWELER AND ENGRAVER
MR. J. COSTA
Is now prepared to execute with promptness
all work in his line of business, such as
Watch and Clock Repairing,
Manufacturing Jewelry,
' t- Arid -Engraving.
Shop on Fort Street, opposite Odd "Fellows'
Hall.- 61-Jm
BUSINESS NOTICES.
IIYZIAX BROTIIEKS,
Importers and Wholesale Dealers
In Fashionable Clothing, Hats, Capa.JBoots
and Shoes, and every Tariety t Gentle
men's Superior Furnishing Goods.
Store know 11 as Capt. Bnow'i liulldlng
MtacmxT ErattT, Uonolnln, Onhn.
E. M. VAN REED,
COMMISSIO MERCHANT,
KANAGAWA.
Having the best facilities through an intimate
connection with the Japanese trade for the
past eight years, is prepared to transact any
business entrusted to bis care, with dispatch.
17-tf
E. I. AIAMS,
AUCTIONEER & COMMISSION MERCHANT
Fire-l'roof Store, Robinson's Building, Queen
Street, Honolulu. ' l-ly
JOHN S. McCREW, M. D.,
1HVSICIAW Si SURGEOS,
OFFICE Over Dr. E. IIolYmann'a
Drug Store, corner of Kaahumanu and
Merchant sts., opposite the Tost Office.
Residence on Chaplain Street, between Fort
and Nuuanu Streets.
Office Hocbs from 8 to 10 A. .; from 3
to S P. M. (l'-iy
George Miller,
CONTKACTOK AND IUIIL1)EK,
Honolulu, U. I.
Shop on the Esplanade, opposite Court House.
30-tf
C. S. BARTOW,
ATJCTIOWESa.
Sales-Room, Queen Street, one door from
Kaahumanu Street. 17-ly
J OH 31 H. PATS,
NOTARY PUBLIC
And Commissioner of Deeds
TOK THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA.
Ollice at the Bask of Bishop & Co.
2-ly
J. MONTGOMERY
CONTINUES TO PRACTICE AS A
Solicitor, Attorney, and Proctor in the
Supreme Court, in Law, -Equity, Admiralty,
Probate and Divorce. 3-3t
H. A. WIDEMANN,
KOTAKV PCKUC.
OrFicc at the Interior Depabtxent.
-iy
J. P. HUCHES,
Importer and Manufacturer
OF At,!. KINDS OF SADDI.EKY.
Carriage Trimming done with neatness and
dispatch. All orders promptlyattcnded to.
Corner of Fort and Hotel streets, Honolulu.
10-ly
SAMUEL C. WILDER,
SUGAR I'EAATEIt.
Pest-Office address, "Wilder Plantation,"
7-tf) , Kualoa, Oahu.
N E V I LLE& B AR R ETT,
Planters & General Store Keepers
KEOPUKA, S. ZONA, HAWAII.
(Near Kealakekua Bay.)
Island produce bought, Ships supplied with
Wood, Beef ard other ncessaries.
Agent at Honolulu
..A. S. Cleohors.
U-ly
CHAUNCEY C. BENNETT,
Dealer in Newspapers, Magazines, Period
icals, etc.
Fort Street, near King,
Honolulu. 19-tf
M. S. GRINBAUM & CO.,
IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE
Dealers in Fashionable Clotliing
Hats, Caps, Boots and Shoes, and every variety
of Gentlemen's superior furnishing goods.
STORE IN MAKEE'S BLOCK,
Queen Street, Honolulu, Oaliu.
10-tf
sac-tux PICE.
B. A. P. ClfcTIX.
C BREWER & CO.
COMMISSION AND SHIPPING
MERCHANTS,
Honolulu, (Inliu, II. I.
AGENTS Of tlie lioston and Honolulu
Packet I.lnc.
AGENTS For the Ilakre, IVallukn and
liana Plantations.
AGENTS For Uie Purchase and Sale of
Island Produce.
REFER TO
Jons M. Hood, Esq. New York.
Ciiab. Brewer & Co. 1 p.().
Jas. Hckseweix, Esq. f B06lon
J. C. Merrill & Co. )
K. S. SwilN & Co. San Francisco.
ClIAS. WACOTBROOKS,Esq. J 5-ly
E. C. ADDERLEY,
Importer and Maker of all Kinds of
SADDLERY, HARNESS, &c.
Carriages trimmed 'with neatness and dis
patch. All repairs done Tvith care and
promptness.
SHOP OX FORT STREET.
Next doorto J. M. Smith & Co's Drag Store.
N. B. A choice lot of Ladles Superior
Saddles on hand. 43
J. H. THOMPSON,
GENERAL BLACKSMITH
Honolulu, ii. i.
HAS COXSTASTLT
on hand and for sale, a good
assortment of
BEST REFUTED BAR IROH !
ALSO
Best OIncksmitlt's Coal,
At the Lowest Market Prices SS-ly
M. RAPI.EE,
-SHIPPING AND COMMISSION AGENT,
Office with E.P. Adams, Esq.,
QUEEN STREET, HOXOL.TJT.U.
axnas it kuissiox to
Gen. Morgan I Smith, U.IMeMO. C Erewtr A Co.
S. ConinL I Ueurt. Walker A Align.
titan. Bkhards A Co. IE. P. Aduni, Esq.
SUGAH & MOLASSES.
1808
180S
IIII.O, II. I.
Sugar and MoInxxcH.
iROP COMING IN AND FOR SALE IN
quauiiiues w run. urcii3icii, uv
WALKER ALLEN,
6-6m Agents.
0N0MEA PLANTATION.
Sugnr and Molnf.es Crop 18G8
ZOOMING IN, FOR SALE IN Q.UANTI-
ties to suit purcnascrs. by
WALKER A ALLEN,
3-Cm Agents.
PRINCEVILLE PLANTATION.
SitKnr !nd MoInHMCN Crop 1SG8
COMING IN, FOR SALE IN QUANTI
ties to suit purchasers, by
WALKER A'ALLEN,
3-Cm Agents.
"WATLUKU PLANTATION.
3VEW CROP
COIIG IX.
For sale by
C. BREWER & Co., Ag'ts.
51-3m
.IAKKE PLAMATIOX.
1VEW CROP OF
SUGAR AND MOLASSES
"VfOW COJIIIVG VS.
JLi For sale by
51!m C. BREWER & Co., Agents.
ir. XI.E3IPEIC,
Piano Maker & Tuner,
OFFERS HIS SEIIVICKS
fiir TtnftiTtnir nnrl Tntiinc PifinOfi.
I 1 Miarinir the be.t of Strings and
Material on band.
SntlixlUctioii Guaranteed.
-Order left at the Family Drug Store. Cor
ner of Fort and Hotel Street, will meet with
immediate attention. 12-3 in
H. IT. BETERA5C.
G. X. CLARK
SEVEEANCE, CLAEK & CO.,
Commission Merchants
AND
SHIPPING AGENTS,
Sail IViiiicImoo, CjiIh.
We will attend to the sale of Sugar, and all
kind, of Island Produce, also to the purchas
ing and forwarding of Merchandise.
Caalk Advance mode on C on sign -13
mtiil s. Cm
BELLE VUE LODGE,
1028 Stockton Strppt. San Pranolcoo.
Apartments Furnished and Unfurnished.
THIS Splendid House, favorably
known, two blocks from tho Plain, is
particularly patronized by families. The ap
artments have all the latest improvements,
and command a beautiful view of the Bay. 'A
magnificent garden adorns the centre of the es
tablishment and is for the ufc of the guests,
gymnasium lor the children.
The eating department is conducted by one
of the best cocks on the Coast.
Price Moderate and Careful Attendance
35-3ra
G. W. NORTON & CO.
COOPEES AND GAUGEES,
AT THE NEW STAND
OIV Till! ESI'IIVAIE.
WE ARE PREPARED TO
Ujt: i-ii attend to
-jJU WORK IW OUR IilTJT!
At the Shop next to the Custom House, where
we can be found at all working hours.
WE HATE OX HAND AND I'OR SALE
OIL CASKS AND BARRELS,
Of different sizes, new and old, which we will
sell at the very
LOWEST 3IAK.KET RATES.
All work done in a thorough manner, and
warranted to giro satisfaction.
All kinds of Coopering Materials and Coopers'
Tools for Sale. Wm
JKO. jiOTT. SAIl'l. NOTT.
John Nott & Co.,
COPPER & TIN SMITHS,
rVKE PLEASURE IN ANNOUNC
ing to the public that they are prepared
to furnish all kinds of Cotper Work;, consist
ing in part, of STILLS, ST1UKE PAXS,
SOltQIIAJf PASS, WOnilS, PUitPS, tc.
Also on hand, a full assortment of Tin
Wade, which we offer for sale at the lowest
market prices.
ALL KIXDS OF REPAIRING DOA'E
WITH S-EATA'ESS AND DISPATCH.
Orders from the other Islands will meet
with prompt attention.
Kaahumanu Street, one door above Flit-
ner's. 51-3m
Y0LCA1V0 HOUSE.
CRATER OF KLLATJEA, HAWAII.
MTHIS ESTABLISHMENT IS
now open for ihe reception of visitorsZCf
to the Volcano, who may rely on finding com
fortable rooms, a good table, and prompt at
tendance. Experienced guides for tho Crater
always in readiness.
ETEAM AND SULPHUR BATES !
Horses Grained and Stabled if Desired.
CIIAItGES REASONABLE.
Parties visiting the Volcano via Hilo, can
procure animals warranted to make the jour
ney, by D. II. Hitchcock, Esq., Hilo. 35-ly
GEORGE WILLJAMS,
LICENSED SHIPPING AGENT,
GOIVTIAUES the business on
his old plan of settling with officers and
seamen immediately on their shipping at his
office. Having no connection, either direct or
indirect, with any outfitting establishment,
and allowing no debts to be collected at his
office he hopes to give as ?od satisfaction in
the future as he has in the past.
"KOffice on Jas. 'Uobinson A Co.'s Wharf,
near the U. S. Consulate.
Honolulu, March 27, 1S67. 51-3m
.
1868
EUEOPEAN JITtTATION.
Cajilsuue, Jan. 20, 1SGS.
An exact and rcMabl statement of affairs
In the Old World at he present moment,
would be an easy mattr If I were to confine
myself to bare facts nly. For instance, I
might devise a neat lifle table, with a few
colnmns on the left, towt in the respective
budgets for tho last en years (for com
parison's sake), of the rlncipal countries of
Europe; their lloatinj debts ; the rapid
growth of annual deficit with the Ingenious
methods to. cover them the ever Increasing
taxation of the people, yx, etc. ; then, wrlt
ingon the right say then edit side Sadowa,
Konigsgraetz, Mentsn German Unity, or
Prussian aggrandizenpit, (which f), etc.,
etc., and lower downJcorrcsponding to the
31st of December, of lit blessed year 1SC7,
such words as partU 'allure of the crops,
severe winter. drcatfU snfferinm. trade
'prostrate, general diontent, but above all,
that instinctive fear of a;oming catastrophe,
which has pervaded allclasscs, and which
makes a population restleis-and then leave
It to you to make out the M'nce sheet.
Rut a serious political riter mint not be
satisfied with stating facts only. Ifhe wishes
to impart to others his own apprciation of
things, and of the consequences that may.
follow therefrom, he must enter irto the dis
cussion of the causes which ha produced
those facts, and then, by logics' reasoning,
lend his readers to the same onciustons he
himself has come to.
I am aware that prophctit politics are
rarely worthy even of the ver slight atten
tion they usually receive. Sonuch depends
on Individual lives, on latent tut Irresistible
popular opinion, on those icidents which
even statesmen In the desptr of Ignorance
call " accidents," that the kenest observers
are constantly at -fault SUI, it is worth
while sometimes to look aound, to see, If
wc can, whither Europe is difting. That it
is In motion, is evident, and the point to be
ascertained Is whither the Idc is carrying
the nations.
Is it to that blessed era wilch the gentle
men of the peace conventloi of Geneva, (of
notorious memory), and eucj like, dellizht so
much in showing to us in tie dimness of the
future, or Is it to a dangerous rock in the
channel a European warl' All the signs
w hich have ever preceded Luropean convul
sions exist around us in lunndancc. The
regime of law uas, it is adrUttcd, ended.
If we review the events o! last veart if we
consider the national policy of each individ
ual state, and sec how far tktt policy affects
geucraj politics, we shall luve no difficulty
in answering the above questions.
The Luxembourg nlljir, which, in the
spring of last year, seyncd to make war in
evitable, was a natural conscnucnce of the
great German wart France stood neutral
during the strife, aud, no doubt, by the pre
viousiy given assurance oi ner neutrality,
had rendered a most important 6erviee to
Prussia, enablini: her to concentrate all her
active forces in Bohemia and on the Main.
The means which Prussia was to employ for
bringing about a fusion of the different Ger
man elements, had the approval of a roan
who, like the Emperor Napoleon, had stood
np for the principle of nationalities. But
Ills IHMIV nllliuui; lit. thn uicanlllir uut'ur
the war, which decidedly he could have prc-
veniea uy turowing uis Bwora into me scale,
tnrncd out not to have such a disinterested
act ou hU part as was believed at first. lie
neer thought (and who did think it?) that
Prussia would overcome her enemies In such
a short time, and so completely. lie had
hoped, after a long, and to both parties ex-
nausiing, war, to remain master 01 tue situ
ation, and play the part of suprtaie arbiter.
Thouch he interposed at Nikolsbarrr. and
stopped the Prussians before Vienna, he
couia not cuange wnai uaa uecn none in me
North I mean the absorption cf Hanover.
Hesse-Casscl and Nassau nor could he pre
vent rnim iruui cuuciuuing miuiarv trea
ties wuu tnc remaining soutiiem mates,
which intent be said to have at once estab
lished German Unity, at least as far as foreign
accression was concerned.
ai tlie epicnaia ana unexpected success of
tue missions, me rrencn wno, mini now,
had been accustomed to consider themselves
the first military nation of tint world, became
alarmed and jealous. The French diplomacy
luougiu tue momcni a lavorauic one lor ae-
manding at Berlin, territorial compensation
for services rendered. The ncreinotorv re
jection of that demand by Count dc Bis-
maric, ana tnc siorm oi inaignatton it aroused
throughout Germany, made Mr. Drouvn do
Lhuys resign and gave Napoleon that unfor
tunate idea of buying Luxembourg from the
needy King or Holland, William III. How
that affair was settled, yon are aware. It
teas a mistake, and a great one. It left a sore,
which the Emperor's enemies have taken
good care to keep open.
ii war aia not nrca out men, It was main
Ir owimr to the efforts of Lord Stnnlev. Tint
I think lam safe, when I say that both France
and Prussia were glad enough for having a
pretext not to come to blows. The first, be
cause she was not ready, the latter, because
she wanted lime to breathe, and had enough
on her hands. Besides the opening' of the
Exhibition drew near, and the mighty Inter
ests engaged in that enterprise could not be
discarded.
It was durintr that macmlflcent dlsnlar of
uuman ingenuity anu enterprise, mat two
events occurred, which spread a gloom over
Europe, aua at once destroyed the expecta
tions of those, who from the gathering of so
many Sovereigns and their personal inter
course had hoped fresh guarantees fori good
understanding among them.
un mcoiu oi June, tne role, ucrezowskl,
fired unon the Emneror Alexander in the
Bols de Boloime. The cursed deed of a sin
gle miscreant brought the old Russian party
iniu power again, iiussia uccame cairnngea
to 'France and with more fervor than ever is
following now Its traditional oolicv.
un mc nrci oi July, oi ine very moment
wneo tue r.mperor napoieon was aisinout-
inir the prizes, the news arrived that Mail
million, whom by the aid of bis troops be
uaa inaae mperor oi jiexico, ana wnom at
the peremptory demand of the United States'
Government, he bad to abandon to his own
resources, had been shot on the 10th of June
at Qncretaro.
That was the greatest, defeat the Empire
uuu as yet susutiuea, ana tue impression oi it
ou such a sensitive people, as the French are,
could not be bnt very deep and galling. All
the sacrifices in men and money had been
made in vain, and moreover there remained
the moral obligation imposed upon the
French Government to indemnify somehow
the bondholders of the Mexican loan, whom
they had encouraged to subscribe.
Soon another cause for inquietude came
from the South. Garibaldi, the great patriot
and soldier but poor politician, thought the
moment propitious lor solving the Koman
question that Gordian knot of modern times
by the sword. This fresh complication of
Italian c flairs was owing partly to the In
trigues of the party of action, who know but
too well how to make capital out of the in
fatuation of their countrymen, partly also it
must be acknowledged, to the double faced
policy of the French.
It would be as well to remark here, that
for some time past the Emperor's policy has
chagrined his real friends and encouraged his
enemies. The boldness, which before had
characterized so much the man and his ac
tions, seems to have given place to vacilla
tion and irresolution. Is it, that age and in
firmity have broken the elasticity of that mas
ter mind ? Have late events shown him, that
his star is on the wane, or disgusted by the
Ingratitude and meanness cf men has he be-
come indifferent f "Quicnsabe."
But so much In certain, that for some time
past a sort of fatality has attached itself to
all bis combinations and undertakings. It
would be unjnfit, however, to burden him
with the sole responsibility of his recent acts. ,
There is a poweiful faction at the Tullleries, 1
(whose bead is the Empress, the so-called
" Spanish faction,") reactionary and bigoted,
the same through whose influence the Mexi
can campaign had been decided upon, and
who, short-sighted as they are, do not see
that they are playing into the bands of the j
enemies of the imperial dynasty.
On the other band there Is the " war par- 1
ty" hardly less influential than the former,
and whose name sufficiently Indicates its
tendencies. Without openly adopting the i
views of either of them, the Emperor has 1
allowed himself to be Influenced of late and !
has committed some mistakes, which his
own better judgment might have averted.
I have said the French policy had been a
double faced one In regard to Italy. The
French troops left Rome on the 15th of Sep
tember, 1SG0, In conformity with the Con
vention concluded between the Emperor and
the King of Italy, and it was understood
that henceforth the Pope should be left to
his own resources. But what did really
happen? Til" FrMeU C.ooml XlumAnt, tiy
order of Marshal Nlel, went to Home to In
spect the " Autibes Legion," in which deser
tions had become frequent. The General
made a speech as if he had French troops
before him, and Inquiry being made It was
found that they were considered as snch.
Upon this the Government at Florence made
strong representations at Paris, declaring
that the Convention of September had been
violated. These representations remained
without effect Meanwhile the popular pas
tions had been aroused In Italy, and Garibaldi
made his wll known raid Into the Papal
States, there to meet at Mentena, not far
from the doors of Home, with his second
Aspromonte. French divisions arrived Just
in time to save the Papal troops from de
feat! And so the French are at Rome again and
the temporal power of the Pope has been
granted a new lease. How long will It last
and what, wc may ask, has been gained?
The Pope more than ever Is'ndverse to grant
ing reforms in what is left to him of his
patrimony. To all pressing demands and
friendly advise, Cardinal Antonelll auswers:
" Non nossnmusj" The Vicar of Christ has
his capital fortified by French engineers and
spends the "Peters Pence" In recruiting
soldiers.
In the Kingdom of Italy, things go from
bad to worse. The treasury is empty; the
organization of the acquired provinces re
mains suspended ; the Ministers without
moral support; the political factions accuse
each other of Incapacity or even treason ;
brigandage is flourishing more than ever;
the southern provinces arc overrun by the
secret agent of King Francis, who praise the
blessings of the old regime and openly In
stigate the people' to revolt; tha-friends of
Garibaldi and Mazini shout, Rome or death,
and do all they can to Increase the general
confusion. In fact the Italian ship of stote
is not unlike a ship witli breakers ahead,
and of whose crew, instead of working hard
to save the craft, go some to pray and some
to curse.
Even bearing In mind, that France Is a
Catholic country and that the Emperor has
necessarily to reckon with that powerful
Jiarty, which represents ultra-Catholicism In
"ranee, still It Is difficult to understand the
real motives, which made him decide upon
that second Roman expedition. Of course
he could not allow Garibaldi to plant the
red flag upon the capital, but he might (by a
secret understanding with King Victor Ema
nuel) have allowed the Italian army to cross
the frontiers, and his own troops to come
just one day too late, when he could haTe
eUiuj,d 1,1a !ouldra bofora aocomplUUud
facts and left the matter for diplomacy to
settle.
A strong pressure must have been made to
bear upon him In this affair. At least one is
apt to think so in noticing tlie language of
the papers or tuat party, wnicu l nave canea
the Snanish Dartv. These naDcrs openlv
? reach war Ith Italy, the destruction of
talian unity, Napoleon's own work, and the
restoration oi ineneposca rnnces.
Letting alone the financial question of that
expedition, which has heavily burdened the
J"rench budget, the Emperor has alienated
from himself the sympathies of the Italian
people, (his natural allies in a possible war
with Germany), while on the other hand it
has not satisfied the clerical party, for whoso
benefit the expedition had been undertaken,
and who now rcoroach him with not having
done enough. To give an idea of what the
French temper Is at the present moment, I
have only to point out to you the debates
abont tlie new Army Bill, both in the Senate
and the Chamber of Denuties. and yon will
agree with ine when I say that France 1
restless, ill-content, ond ready for the strife.
I have dwelt upon the affairs of France,
because, from a political point of view, she
is after all the central nation of Europe the
pivot on which diplomacy alwoys turns and
because we all know that any storm arising
there is more sweeping and destructive, in
its effects than when it comes from any other
quarter.
As every mall supplies yon with English
papers, you are aware that England has
plenty of work to attend to. What "With
Fenlanlsm, the expedition to Abyssinia, the
cries for reform, and her not very friendly
relations with the United States, It is no
wonder that she feels nneasy, however re
assuring tlie language of the press may be.
So much is certain, that should war break
out, England must, sooner or later, be forced
into it in spite of herself, and her position
would be an awkward one.
To speak of Spain would be to repeat the
old storv over and over arain. The onlv
hope for that unhappy country Is that the
-people snonia rouse inemscives to action,
and pnt an end to that swindling concern,
which some persons are yet pleased to dig
nify with the name of a Constitutional Gov
ernment In the East black clonds are forming. Dor-
tending very little good. Russia is at her
old tricks again. Jt is very aitncuit, as we
read the tidings from the South-cast of the
growing pressure upon the Porte on behalf
of the Greek Christians; the enthusiasm of
Athens as sue welcomes a Kussian Grand
Duchess as her Queen; the obstinacy of the
Cretans; the Incessant menaces of Servla,
and the forminir of armed bands on the
frontiers of Bulgaria, to doubt that another
ana more powermi enorl lor tne expulsion
of the Mussulman is at hand. I can not
vouch for the truth of a report which has
Deen going tne rouna ot tne papers lately,
that there exists a thorough nnderstandinir be
tween Prussia and Russia, which gives the
latter entire freedom to move southward,
without opposition from North Germany. I
can naraiy ueneve iuai sucn a wary ana cau
tious statesman as Count Bismark should
have entered into any positlrc engagements
respecting his future policy. Should, how
ever, such a treaty exist, it would -certainly
explain wly Russia can intrigue in the Prin
cipalities without opposition from the Ho
hcnzollern now reigning there ; why the Pan
Slavonic agitation is spreading along the
Lower Danube; why Bohemia is openly ap
pealing to jtussian aia.
When Russia has converted her present arms
into as many breech-loaders, and we shall
seel
And Germany yon will say. I must con
fess at once, that my task here becomes
more difficult I Shall have to speak of the
many changes wrought by Prussia and Aus
tria by the war of ot 1SGC; of what has been
done and of what remains to be done; of the
relations in which these, two countries stand
to each other and to the rest of Europe ; of
c policy purscca oy in ear respective .Minis
ters and of ibe difficulties they have to con
tend with, the one in bis efforts to bring about
German Unity, the other In bis endeavors to
regenerate his adopted country. For this, I
have to refer yon to my next, as the closing
of the maiLis at hand.
"Before concluding, howeTer, I wish to
point out to yon one fact more, which alone
would be sufficient to define the present po
litical situation of Europe. The colossal and
general armaments which take place every
where, are tbo Immediate consequence of
the Prussian victories, as almost every conn
try on the continent thinks itself under the .
necessity of adopting the Prussian military
system and to exchange the ordinary rifle for
tne dreaded needle-gun or some other breech
loader. And what If the unhappy Idea shonld
gain strength, that the newly organized ar
mies ought to prove practically the efficien
cy of the different systems of arms which
they have adopted ?
"St tU parent, para beUum," It is said I
But such a peace establishment wonld ab
sorb the whole of the resonsces of a country,
and could not by any means sustain Itself for
any length of time. But peace or war, one
thing is certain and Inevitable if a complete
change does not take place soon, and that Is :
a general bankruptcy f
I grieve to say that the future I have drawn
Is a gloomy one. I shall be happy indeed, if
in my next, I can give you more cheerful
news. . H.
BY AUTHORITY.
AN ACT.
TU l-liaugtr lUw iv Ar I41B D
Court of tho r ourth Circuit
Be it Enacted, by the Ktag, and the LegUla-
Ure Aaiembly of the Uawauan Jtlandt, tn
the Legitlature of the Kingdom aiiembled :
Section 1. The- term of the Circuit Court
now appointed by law to be holden at Nawili-
will, witnm and for tne rourtn Circuit of this
Kingdom, on the first Tuesday of May of each
year, shall be hoiden hereafter at Nawiliwili,
ou tne nrst xuesuay ot August, tn eacn year.
sectiox 2. All Acts and parts or Acts In
consistent herewith, are repealed.
section 3. This Act shall take effect upon
its passage ; prodded, that the term of said
Circuit Court appointed to be holden during
the present year, shall be holden at Nawiliwili
on the first Tuesday of May, anything in this
Act to the contrary notwithstanding ; but the
Unicf Justico or toe supreme Court may, by
his written order, direct the Sheriff to adjourn
the same to any day not later than the nrst
Tuesday of August, of the present year.
Approved this 21th day or April, 1S63.
Kauehaheha R.
AN ACT
To authorize the Collector-General of Customs
to permit the withdrawal of Alcohol in
certain cases.
Be it enacted, ly the King, and the Legila
the Atitmhly of the Hauaiian Iilandi, in
the LegUlature of the Kingdom unentitled :
Tho Collector-General of Customs, in his
discretion, may allow Alcohol to be withdrawn,
from the Custom House for medicinal, mechan
ical, or scientific purposes, on the payment of
a duty of fifty per cent ad valorem the party
or parties applying for and withdrawing the
same, giving satisfactory security that it shall
.be used only for such purposes.
Approved this 30th day of April, 1S6S.
KAXEHAUEnA R.
AN ACT
To provide for the Adjournment of Courts in
the absence of the Presiding Justice.
Be it enacted, by Ike King, and the Legttla
the Attembly of the Hawaiian Itlande, in
the Legislature of the Kingdom attembled:
Section 1. If no Justice of the Supremo
Court shall attend any Circuit Court at tho
time which it is appointed to be holden,. the
Circuit Judge, or if no Circuit Judge be in
attendance, the Sheriff may open the Court
and adjourn the same from day to day, and
from time to tide, until the attendance of some
Justice of tbo Supreme Court) but no such
ftjjournmsnt shall be for a longer time than
three days, unless there shall be produced and
recorded by the Clerk, at the time of such ad
journment, a written ordor by the Chief Jus
lice of the Supreme Court, fixing the day to
which said Circuit Court shall stand adjourned.
Sectici. Tho 873 section of the Civil Code
is hereby repealed, and so much of tho 885
section of said Code as provides that the sess
ions of Circuit Courts shall not extend, during
any one term, beyond the period of fourteen
days, is also repealed.
Approved this 30th day of April, 1S68.
Kauehaiieua R'.
AN ACT
To provide for Reports of Judicial Business.
Be it enacted, by the Ktng, and the Legiela
tive Aetembly of the Hawaiian Itlandt, in
tie Legitlatvre of the King dom anembld:
Section 1. It shall be the, duty of the Cir
cuit Judges and District Just'ces, on or before
the first Monday of January in each year, to
male reports to the Clerk of the Supreme
Court, of the amount and kind of publio
business done ia their respective Courts. Such
reports Ehall set forth particularly the amount
nnd kind of official business done in each
Circuit and District during the year preceding,
the number of persons prosecuted, the crimes
and misdemeanors for which such prosecutions
were had, and the results thereof, and the pun
ishments awarded against any person convict
ed thero)n. The Chief Justice of the Supreme
Court shall direct the form in which such re
ports shall be made, and the Clerk of said
Court shall issue blanks in conformity with
such direction.
Section 2. This Act shall take effect from
and after the date of its passage, and all Acts
and parts of Acts inconsistent herewith, are
repealed.
Approved this 30th day of April, 1868.
Kauedameha R.
AN ACT
To provide for an Additional Term of the Cir
cuit Court in the Third Circuit.
Be it enacted, by the King, and the Legitla
tire Attembly of the Hawaiian Itlande, in
the Legislature of the Kingdom atsembled:
Section 1. A term of the Circuit Court shall
be holden at Waimea, on the' Island of Hawaii,
within and for the Third Circuit of the King
dom, on the first Tuesday of November in each
year.
Section 2. The term of the Circuit Court
nojg appointed by law to be bolden on the first
Tue id ay of September, within and for the said
Third Circuit, shall hereafter be bolden at
Hilo, on the first Tuesday of May in each year.
Sections. Either term may be adjourned to
the other seat of Justice in the Island of Ha
waii, appointed for holding said Circuit Court,
whenever, in the opinion of the Justice of the
Supreme Court presiding at the same, the In
terest of public Justice shall require such ad
journment. Section 4. This Act shall tako effect upon
its passage, providing that the term of said
Circuit Court appointed to be holden daring
the present year shall be held at Waimea, on
the firnt Tuesday cf September, anything in
this Act to the contrary notwithstanding, but
the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court may
by his written order direct the Sheriff to ad
journ the same to any day not later than ths
first Tuesday of November of the present year.
Approved this 2d day of May, 1888.
Kak CHAM EB A R.
AN ACT
To promote the safety of inter-island commu
nication. Be it EXACTED, ly the King and the Legisla
tive Assembly of the Hawaiian Islands, in
the Legislature of die Kingdom assembledl
The six hundred and thirty second section
of the Civil Code is hereby amended by adding
thereto' the following words :
" Such application oust be accompanied by
the certificate of nm competent person to bo
chosen by tf ector General ; that the ves
sel applied f . u sea worthy, and in good
order, otherwise no register will be granted.
Ths fea for such certi-eate shall be three dol
lars. ' Approved this 13th day of May, 1863.
KaxxbaxeqA R.
AN ACT
To amend Section 99$ of the Civil Co4
Be it enacted, ly the King and the LtaVta
tire Assembly of Uie Hamilan Islands, in Ms
Legislature qf the Kingdom aaemUed:
Section 1. That Section 999 of the CivH
Code of this Kingdom be, and the saiao Is
hereby amended, so that the Section will read
as follows :
" Secttox 999. Any party dee-dsr fcisMetf
aggrieved by tho decision of ths Commissioners
for the settlement of controversies respecting
rights of ways, and rights of water, aay ap
peal therefrom to the Circuit Court of the re
spective circuits, or to the Supreme Cosrt,
which Circuit Court or Supreme Court shall
hear and determine the case in banco, aai
allow tho introduction of "new evidence : Pro
vided, however, that any party desirous of so
appealing, shall give notice of the same to thn
Commissioners within five days after the ren
dition of their decision, and pay to the Com
missioners the costs accrued, to ths data of
such appeal, and deposit with the Commission
ers a bond in tho sum of one hundred doBarj,
with sufficient surety to be approved by a
majority of said Commissioners, eonditioned
for the payment of costs farther to accrue, is
case tho appellant is defeated In the Court
above. Whereupon a certificate of appeal
shall bo granted.
KA-EBAkKBA H.
AN ACT
To amend Section 1183 of the Civil Code.
Be it Enacted, by the King and the Legist a
tire Assembly of the Hawaiian Islands in
the Legislature of the Kingdom assembled :
Sectiox 1. That Section 1183 of ths Civil
Code be, and the same is hereby amended by
striking out tho word " fully." in the third
line, " and attested by the Kublna Nui," in
the 5th and 6th lines, so that the Section will
read as follows :
Section 1183. The Marshal, or soma ona
deputed by him, shall inflict the punishment
of death, by hanging the criminal by the
neck until dead, when the body shall ba dis
posed of pursuant to the direction of the
Court No capital punishment shall be so in
flicted until the warrant for that purpose be
signed by the King ; nor. shall such punish
ment be inflicted after His Majesty's pardon.
Approved mis iJin day or JUay, 1863.
Kami oak sua R.
RESOLUTION.
Resohed, That the Minister of Finance Is
hereby authorized to pay out of tho publla
money, the sum of six thousand eight hundred
and forty-four dollars and forty-eight cental to
uetray tue expenses oi tne late expedition or
His Majesty, ia the steamer Kilauta to Ha
waii. Approved this 13th of May, 1868.
Kaxehaxeha R.
AN ACT
To amend Chapter 33, Section 2 of ths Penal
Code, relative to vagrants and disorderly
persons.
Be it enacted, by the King and the Legista
tite Assembly of the Hawaiian Islands, in
the Legislature of the Kingdom assembled:
That the second section of the thirty-eighth
chapter of the Civil Code, be so far amended
that it shall bo competent for any Police Court
or District Justice to cause any Idle or. disor
derly person to bo detained for a period not
exceeding two years. .
Approved this 13th day of May, 1368.
KAUEnA-EHA R.
AN ACT
To amend the Constitution granted by His
Majesty Kamebameha 5 on tho 20th day of
Auguit, 1864, proposed in accordance with
Article 80 of the Constitution.
Be it Enacted, ly the King and the Legisla
tive Assembly of the Hawaiian Islands, in
the Legislature of the Kingdom assembled:
That Article 56 be, and the same is hereby
amended by striking out the' words "one hun
dred and fifty," and inserting in the place
thereof, tho words " two hundred and fifty,"
so that the article as amended shall read as
follows :
"The Representatives shall receive for their
services, a compensation, to be ascertained
by law, and paid out of the publio Treasury
but no increaso of compensation shall Jako
effect during the year it shall have been made;
and no law shall be passed, increasing the
compensation of said Representatives beyond
tho sum of " two hundred and fifty dollars for
each session."
Approved this 13th day of-May, 1868.
Ka-ehaxeha R.
Ltbelle Wheckers. The wrecking party
of the second expedition to Wake's Island,
returned by the British brig Clio last month.
They sailed from Honolulu last September,
in the schooner Moi ICoAfne, and landed on
Wake's Island, after a pleasant passage down
of a month. Capt English, Mr. Thos. Fos
ter and nine Hawaiian divers' were landed,
with a part of their stores, and apparatus
for distilling water. Tbo next day, towards
night, the wind shifting, the schooner took
her anchor and put ont to sea, to avoid a
lee shore. The vessel was never seen again
afterwards. The wind on the third day
veered suddenly to the westward, and blew
a living gale. On the Island its force was
terrific, trees on ihe windward side were
torn up, and carried quite across the lagoon
and branches strewed the whole island.
Captain Zcnaa Bent, the mate Mr. White,
and seven Hawaiian seamen perished with
the schooner. The weather at Wake's Island
during the five months that the party were
there, with the exception of the typhoon
Thursday was pleasant and fair:
The lagoon abounds with flsh,nd from
the middle of February, the birds made their
appearance, and' there was plenty of eggs.
On these natural resources of the Island the
the wreckers managed to live without serious
Inconvenience, while by distillation they pro
cured as much wateras they required. Their
wrecking was finished many weeks ere a (
chance to leave the island was offered.
Though it lies In the track of the China
bound vessels, it is Incorrectly laid down,
and therefore they give It a wide berth, es
pecially when passed on the wlsaward side.
Daring the four months, only oe Tcseei was
communicated witha brig tfeat torched
within two weeks after the party taa-ed, and
before they bad given op hope for the reira
of their schooner. Several sail were teem at
Intervals, bnt they passed on without BOtleJsg
the istandj'or the signals on the shore. At
length the Clio appeared, bosad M&berfor
wrecking- purposes, sot belsff aw are that
the Honolulu party were there. Kearthe
Island the CZ(o spoke a bark, wMefc was prob
ably the vessel which bad agreed, wbea tear
ing Honolulu for Cfatsa, to loaest at the Isl
and and report upon the Ms e the party,
forwhose safety, on asosat at loag absence,
serious tears were entertained bars. The
die waa chartered for HonoUht, aad knVmg
on board the party, the, qsrfcksHTsr d awr
material of the wrecked LMt, arrived aAsr
a plfisant ran of thirty days.

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