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The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, August 12, 1868, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1868-08-12/ed-1/seq-1/

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HAWAIIAN
FCDLISIIED
GAZETTE.
BOOK AND JOB
FROSTING EiTA3LlMirr!
THE "GAZETTE" OmCE
Is Daw prepared to execute all orders fee
run aii fiKf mim.
Of ETHRY MeCRIPTKHr,
WTTH UEATNBBS ASH DISPATCH
Every Wednesday Morning,
AT 80.00 PEIt AXXTJM.
Mailed to Foreign Subscribers at $7. IK)
Office On Merchant street, west of
he Post Office, Honolulu, II. I.
Printed and imblbbrd bT J. SIott Smth. tHii.,
OoTtrnmsnt Mating OQco, to whom all bosiaeti
comtnonicaxioni must be aAdrrated.
BUSINESS NOTICES.
W. L. CKEF..V
GENERAL COMMISSION AGENT AND
BROKER,
ornca is rnu-raoor scildrtgs.
SS Queen Street, Honolulu, H. I. (ly
C. X. SPE5CES. B. VACrARLAXE.
CIIAS. IV. SPEXCEB. Jfc CO.,
GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
21 Harm Street, Ilonolnln. ly
BIcCOLGAX &, JOHSSOS,
MERCHANT TAILORS,
FORT STEEET, HONOLULU,
10 Opposite T. C. neurit's, ly
IRA RICHARDSON,
mroitxEit azvi dealek
IK HOOTS, SHOES & GENTLEMEN'S TUB.
NISHING GOODS,
Corner of Fort and .Merchant Streets,
9 HONOLULU, II. I. fly
EDWIN JONES,
GEOCEE AKD SHIP CHANDLER,
Lnhainn, Slntii.
Money and Recruits furnished to ships on
6-lyJ lavorable terms.
XIIEO. II. DATIES,
(Late Janion, Green a Co.,
LMFOETER A. COMMISSION MERCHANT
AG ext ron
Lliyds and the Liverpool Underwriters,
Northern Assurance Company, and
British" and Foreign Marine Insurance Co.
3-' ly
HI'.IHJV BKOTIIEBS,
Importers and Wholesale Sealers
InaFashionable Clothing, Hat, Caps, Boot!
and shoes, and every variety or Uentle
..men's Superior Furnishing Goodi.
Store lcnoivn as Capt. Snow's Building
- MncHAXT Etaext, Ilonolnln, Oalm. so
C. B. LEWERS. J. O. DICKSOX.
.LE1VRS IUCKSOX,
IMPORTERS, WHOLESALE AND BET ALL
DEALERS IN LUMBER AND BULLD-
DTG MATERIALS,
Fort, King, and Merchant Streets,
SS) HONOLULU, II. I. fly
J. S. WALKER. 8. C. ALU!!
E HIPPING & COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
It HONOLULU, II. I. ly
L. L. TORBERT,
DEALEE IN LUMBER AKD EVEET KIND
OF BUILDING MATERIAL.
Office Corner Queen and Fort Street.
IS-ly
BOIXES &. CO.,
, BHLP , CHANDLERS AKD COMMISSION
MERCHANTS,
Queen Street, Ilonoluln.
Particular attention paid to the Purchase and
bale or Hawaiian Produce.
mrr.Es bt febhissiox to
C. A. Williams & Co., I C. Brewer A Co.,
Castlo & Cooke, II. Hackfeld A Co.,
D. C. Waterman, C. L. Richards A Co.,
-iy
GEORGE G. MOIVE,
Dealer in Eedwood and Northwest Lumber,
Shingles, Door, Sash, Blinds, Kails,
Paints, etc-
At his Old Stand on the Esplanade. S6-ly
MRS. J. II. BLACK,
FASHIONABLE MILLINER,
POET ST., BETWEEN EXNG & HOTEL.
Bonnets made up and trimmed in the latest
styles. Stamping, Braiding and Em
broidering, executed to order.
TP. A. SCHAEFER Jt CO.,
COMMISSION MEECHANTS,
38) Honolulu, Oahu, II. I. ly
ED. HOFPSCHLAEQEE & CO.,
IMPORTERS & COMMISSION MERCHANTS'
Honolulu, Oahu, II. I. ly
A. S. GLEGU01t.",
WHOLESALE AKD RETAIL DEALER IK
GENERAL MERCHANDISE,
Fire-proof Store, corner of Queen and Kaahu-
manu Streets.
Retail Establishment on Nuuann Street.
- ly
XIIEOBOUE C. JIEUCK,
IMPORTER & COMMISSION MERCHANT.
i) Honolulu, Oahu, II. I. fly
v' BCIIACKFELD & CO.,
GENERAL COMMISSION AGENTS.
S- Honolulu, Oahu, S. I. ly
THE TOM MOOSE TAVEEN,
0 V JT. O'KIELL,
g Corner of IClug &, Fort Sreets. ly
J. D. WICKE,
Agent for the Ilrcnicn Board
of Dadcmriters.
AU average claims against said Underwriters,
occurrine in or about this Kingdom, will
have to be certified before me. 7-ly
CIItNG IIOO.-V,
COKNISSION MERCHANT AND GEN
ERAL AGENT.
Agent for the Paukaa and Amauuln
Sugar Plantations.
Importer of Teas and other Chinese and Fer
' eign Goods, and Wholesale Dealer in Ha
waiian Produce, at the Fire-proof Store,
- Nnuanu Street, below King. 21-ly
R. XV. AIVDKE1VS,
Fort Street, opposite Odd Fellows' HalL
Gives particular attention to the repair of
- -Fire Arms, Sewing Machines, a Locks.
Drafting of Jfcclineiy, are., Made to Order.
SO- ly
WILLIAM KVAIY,
Variety Store No. 2,
. iHaunakca Street.
All kinds of Merchandise and Groceries.
39- ly
Hawaiian Rice
COOLIE aid "EXTRA. For
- ealc in quantities to suit by
A. a CLEGHORN.
r-tSO-lj; Agent Honolulu Rice Mill.
VOL. IV-.N0. 30.1
.BUSINESS NOTICES.
E. S. FLAGG,
CIVIL ENGINEEE & SUEVEYOE,
-J Lahnina, ainui. f3m
e. r. adaxs. - 8.0. wilder,
ADAMS Jc WILHEB,
AUCTION & COMMISSION MERCHANTS
27) Qneen Street, Honolulu. ly
M. KAPI.EE,
SHIPPING AKD COMMISSIOK AGENT,
Office with E. P. Adams, Esq.,
QUEEN STREET, HONOLULU,
airras'iT riaxissiox to
Gen. Morgan L. Smith, U.IMeurs. C. Brewer i Co.
o-von.ni. nenrs. naixrra AUen.
Messrs. IUcb.rdi a Co. IE. P. Adams, Ssq. 41
ATOZVG Jt ACnVCK,
IMPORTERS, "WHOLESALE AKD RETAIL
DEALERS IK GENERAL MERCHAN
DISE AKD CHINA GOODS,
Fire-Proof Store In Nuuanu Street,
3 under the Public Hall. ly
C. S. BAKTOW,
AUCTIONEER,
Sale. -Room on Queen Street, one door
17 from ZCaahumanu St. ly
CIIAUIN'CEY C. IIE3iEXX,
DEALER IK NEWSPAPERS, MAGAZINES,
AKD PERIODICALS,
19 FOIIT STREET, HONOLULU, ly
join II. IAXY,
KOTABY PUBLIC AKD COMMISSIONER
OF DEEDS
FOB THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA.
Office at the Bake of Bisnor i. Co.
2 ly
J. MONTGOMERY
CONTINUES TO PRACTICE AS A
Solicitor, Attorney, and Proctor in the
Supreme Court, in Law, Equity, Admiralty,
rrobate and Divorce. 3-ly'
H. A. WIDEM ANN,
KOTAKY PUBLIC.
OrriCE at the Istehior Departvest.
- ly
SHXBJUX TECS.
H. A. T. CISTIX.
C. BREWER & CO.,
SHIPPING & COMMISSION
TV! i-: kott isrrns,
Honolulu, .II, I.
AGENTS Or tlic llo.ton and Honolulu
Packet Line.
AGENTS For the Malice, IValluku and
liana Plantations.
AGENTS For the Purchase and Sale of
Island Produce.
REFER TO
Job M. Mood, Esq
Cms. HatwEs t Co. .
Kew York
Jas. IIcxkcwkll, Ks?
. .Boston
J
J. c 31caanL uo.
K. B. Swam i Co J-San Francbxo
Cue, W.Oaooas, so. J 0-1 J
G. W. 1V0RT01V & CO.
COOPERS AND GAUGEES,
AT ME KEW STAND
OA XIIE ESPLATVABE.
PREPARED TO
ATiTi WOKS TEC OTJR UJSfE
At the Shop next to the Custom House, where'
we can be round at all working honrs.
WE HATE OX It AND AKD FOR SALE
OIL CASKS AND BAEEELS.
Of different sixes, new and old, which we will
sell at the Tery
LOWEST HARK&T RATES.
All work done in a thorough manner, and
warranted to give satisfaction.
All kinds of Coopering Materials and Coopers'
2-J Tools for Sale. 3m
HUGHES,
mporter and
Manufacturer
OF ALL KINDS OF SADDLERY.
Carriage Trimming done with neatness and
dispatch. All orders promptlyattended to.
Corner or xort and Hotel streets, Honolulu.
10- ly
NEVILLE & BARRETT,
lanters & General Store Keepers
KEOPUKA, SOUTH KONA, HAWA1L
(Near Kcalakekua Bay.)
Island produce bought. Ships supplied with
ood, Heef and otlier ncessanes.
Agent at Honolulu,
....A. S. Clegbobx.
ly
M. S. CRINBAUM & CO.,
IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE
Dealers in Fashionable Clothing
Hats, Caps, Boots and Shoes, and every Tariety
of Gentlemen s superior mrnitiung goods.
STORE IN MAKEE'S BLOCK,
10 Queen Street, Honolulu, II. I. ly
E. C. ADDERLEY,
Importer and Maker of all Kinds of
SADDLEEY, HAENESS. &c
Carriages trimmed with neatness and dis
patch. All repairs done, with care and
promptness.
SHOP OS FOB! STEEET.
3Text doorto J. M. Smith & Co's Drugstore.
N. B. A choice lot of Ladies Superior
Saddles on hand. 43-ly
BOUT KVCnOFT,
I Xi TT 2SOL 33 3E2 DEL ,
HAS OPENED HIS SHOP ON KING
Street, next door to Horn's Confection
ary Shop, and offers his services in all branch
es of Plumbing. All Jobs will hereafter be
executed with promptness and in a thorough
manner. 26-3m
KONA COFFEE I
Constantly en Hand and for Sale in Quanti
ties to Suit.
UNDERSIGNED INFORMS
the public that he is prepared to furnish
Choice and TelI Dried Eon Coffee,
Having the agency of the following parties in
Kona :
Messrs. Neville k Barrett, Eeopnka.
H. N. Greesweix. North Kona.
t D.' Mostgom est, Eailua.
G. H. SrAcurso, Eahalun.
21-3 ta A. S. CLEGHORN. I
p.
BUSINESS IN' OTICES.
J. H. THOMPSON,
GENERAL BLACKSMITH
HONOLULU, II. I.
IL1S COSSTASTLT
on hand and for sale, a good
assortment of
BEST BEFITTED BAE IEON J
ALSO
JBest Blncksmitb's Coal,
At the Lowest Market Prices f3S-ly
jbo. sott. sak'l mott,
JOHN NOTT & CO.,
Copper &. Tin Smiths,
rriAKE PLEASURE IN ANNOUNC
JL ing to the public that tbey are prepared
lolomtsb. all kinds or CorrKR ork. consist'
ing in part, of STILLS. STItIKE PAXS.
SOUGUA1I PAXS, WORMS, PUMPS, ore.
Also on band, a full assortment of XI5
Ware, which we offer for sale at the lowest
jnarket prices.
All Kinds of Repairing done with
Neatness and Dispatch.
Orders from tho other Islands will meet
with prompt attention.
Jvaahumanu street, one door abOTe Flit-
ners. 2i-3m
JEWELER AND ENGRAVER
aiR. a. cosxa
Is now prepared to execute with promptness
ali work, in his lme or business, snch as
Watch and Clock Repairing
jMJiituiaciuring rMfiry,
And EngraTlnc;.
Shop on Fort Street, opposite Odd Fellows
Hall. 2t-3m
JAIHES L. LEWIS,
COOPER AM) GAUGER,
AX IHS OIiS STAND,
Corner of King and Bethel Sts.
A Larrc
stock of OIL
SHOOKSand
all kinds of
COOPERING MATERIALS
CONSTANTLY ON HAND.
He hopes, by attention to business, to merit
a continuance of the patronage which be has
heretofore enjoyed, and for which he now re
turns his thanks. 24-3m
YOLCAiVO ROUSE.
CEATEE 0? KLLAUEA, HAWAII.
MTHIS ESTABLISHMENT ISffis
now open for tbo reception of visitorsiCf
to tbe V oleano, wno may rely on finding com
fortable rooms, a good table, and prompt at
tendance. Experienced guides for the Craer
always in readiness.
STEAM AKD SULPHUR BATHS !
Horses Grained and Stabled if Desired.
CHARGES REASONABLE.
Parties visiting the Volcano via Hilo, can
procure animals warranted to make the jour
ney, by D. H. Hitchcock, Esq., Hilo. 37-ly
GEORGE WILLIAMS,
LICENSED SHIPPING AGENT,
0 O:TI-IJES the business on
bis old plan of settlinc with officers and
seamen immediately on tbeir shipping at his
office. Having no connection, either direct or
indirect, with any outfitting establishment,
and allowing no debts to be collected at his
office be hopes to giro as good satisfaction in
the future as he has in the past.
'JHUUDce on J as. nobinson x Uo.'s itnarr,
near the VS. S. Consulate.
Honolulu, Marcb 27, 1E67. 24-3m
PIANOS TUNED.
bPIANOS and other
SMUSICAL ICSTBUilENTS
'Tuned and Repaired, by CHAS.
DERBY, at tbe Hawaiian Theatre.
Lessons given on the Piano & Guitar.
The best of teferences given. il-ly
Hawaiian Leather.
J OLE und Saddle Leather,
j tanned goat skins, for sale by
A. S. CLEGHORN,
30-ly Agent Walmca Tannery.
INSURANCE NOTICES.
SAN FRANCISCO
BOARD OF UNDERWRITERS.
THE mid ernineil Imviliplieeu
appointed agents for the San Francisco
Board of Underwriters, representing the
California Insurance Company,
Merchants' Mutual Jtlaiine Ins. Co.,
Pacific Insurance Company,
California Lloyd's, and
Home Mutual Insurance Company.
Beg leave to Inform Masters of Vessels and
the public generally, that all losses sustained
by cssels and Cargoes, insured by either of
the above companies, against perils of the
seas and other risks; at or near the several
Sandwich Islands, irtH hart to be verified bv
them.
21-3m H. HACKFELD & CO.
IIA3IBURGII-BRE3IEA'
ITRE INSUEANCE COMP'Y.
THE UNDERSIGNED, HAVING
been appointed Agents of the Above Com
pany, are prepared to insure risks against r ire
on Stone and Brick Buildings, and on Mer
chandise stored therein, on the most favorable
terms. Fur particulars apply at the office of
5-ly F. A. SCUAEFEB A, CO.
Merchants' Mutual
MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY-.
OF SAT FBAXCISCO.
THE undersigned having been ap
pointed Agents for the above Company,
arc prepared to issue policies on Cargoes,
Freights and Treasure.
WALKER A ALLEN,
12-om Agents, Honolulu.
California Insurance Company.
THE Undersigned, AGE.TS
of the above Company, hare been author
ised to insure risks on CARGO, FREIGHT
and TREASURE, by COASTERS, from Hono
lulu to all ports of the Hawaiian Group, aad
Tice Tens. 9. HACKFELD A CO.
8-Iy
HONOLULU, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12, 1868.
Wnter Spout at Sea.
Stemsiiip Nevada,
Off the Coatt of Guatemala, June 3, 1SGS.
This morning, we were favored with an
extraordinary ohenomenon. snch as has been
rarely witnessed in any latitude, or in any
ocean, exciting the commingled admiration,
tear and astonishment of all hands on board.
Within the brief snacc ofan hour, between
8 and 9 o'clock, no less than three large water
spouts were visible lrom the snip s aecK, ail
near enouzb to arouse dread apprehensions
as to the possible consequences. One of
them, the most formidable, made directly
towards tue vessel, moving lrom me west
towards the snn. and annarentlv leavlnirno
chance for the escape of the ship except by
cnanging onr course, wmcn was aone witu
ont loss of time. Another followed directly
in our wake at abont the same speed as wc
moved, ana say only a qnarter or a mile be
hind, for a time leaving It alogethcr prob
lematical which would win the race. While
this question was pending, as may be readily
imagined, the mind of every person on board,
not excepting even veteran officers, remained
in painful suspense. Of course, with Capt
Kellv (sometimes known on the Vest coast
as uiu "peicuaiiuanuer, jio. commanu, nu
precaution was neglected which tended to
insure the general safety. As a primary
movement, the big gun was got 1j readiness
to attack tbe strange visitor, should it ap
proach too near, hoping to Dreac ine sus
pended column of water while yet at
distance, and thereby avert the threatened
delnge.
Tbe scientific world, equally with your
readers, may like a description more In de
tail, as tnc Dbenomenon mar wen uexanKca
smong the latest of modern wonders. Avoid
ing technical phraseology, I will premise as
loliows:
This morning, June 3d laU 13' 50' N.
lone. 91" ST WT. air 66'. barometer 27.70-
wblle tbe sun was partially obscured by con
siderable masses of showery clouds, two
water spouts were seen some two and a half or
three miles due west, the ship's course being
west-northwest. They seemed slowly to ap
proach the vessel, the water beneath them
being in great commotion, partly from at
mosDherlc disturbance, and partly from the
festive gambols of an enormous school of
porpoises, wnicn appeared to nave cnosen
this arena for their exploits. A heavy, dark
shadow rested over the surface of the water.
except In the comparatively small space at
tbe terminus oi ine spout, wmcn, lor con
venience, misrht be called a huge sea serpent.
suspended between heaven and earth. At
this point oi contact, at ine oase oi me
column, the spectacle was suinrcstive of a
seething cauldron, or a section of tbe "cave
of the winds," at Niagara, clonds of vapor
being drawn upward with tremendous vio
lence. Abotc, rested a heavy penumbra of
HarK douo, moving siuggisniy, until, at last,
alter an Interval oi nnecn or twenty mm
utes, tbe serpentine column, at first up
right and rigid, coma com togeiucr no
longer, so obliaue was the unule of In
cllnation, and the whole fabric suddenly van
ished from sight. The companion spout was
separated onlv by a short distance, but was
of less magnitude, and disappeared almost
simultaneously, after performing evolutions
corresponding witn tnose already described ;
and where lately the sea foamed with rage,
calm now succeeded, with nothing to mark
LUC BIMJb VAICJJ. Bll.l UJB VI Ultc, duiaktvu,
it may oe, oy carcasses oi acau usu.
The temporary alarm on shipboard imme
diately subsided, and conversation relating
to this extraordinary spectacle was begin
ning to flag, when yonr correspondent ob
served a small pear-shaped cloud forming
overhead, oi a wmusn asucn color, ana,
watching carefully through a glass, noticed
presently that the stem began slowly to drop
or elongate. At the time, as testified to by
several witnesses, there was no perceptible
disturbance of tbe water beneath, but within
five minutes light feathers of spray began to
flv from tbe crest of the waves, at a distance
not exceeding 1,000 yards, which might easily
have been mistaken for the splash of a por-
polse.or the spout or a whale, and almost
immediately ascending and descending fun
nels of white vapor, the latter very dark,
met in mid-air, forming a close connection,
the shane beimr serpentine, as before, at
tended by a gently undulating movement
from one extremity to the other. Rapidly
this column began to revolve, and acquired
a steadily progressive motion; the sea at its
base was changed to a bed or foam und va
por, rounded into a fleecy cushion for tbe
suoDOrt of tbe loftv superstructure a sound
as of a " rushing, mighty wind " became dis
tinctly audible this alone breaking the
death-like stillness.
The scene was sublime beyond descrip
tion, constraining every beholder to silence.
Even the occasional reverberations of thun
der, noticed a few moments before, were
hashed. But feelings of awe and wonder
quickly gave place to impressions akin to
terror, when it became evident that the ship
lay directly in the path of the waterspout,
now towering high towards the zenith, and
wblcb, by this time, had grown to huge pro
portions, dark and threatening, Usupproaeh
being heralded by screaming birds and por
tentous roars. Quickly all bands were or
dered below decks, the passengers rushing
pell-mell down the companion-way, some of
them with affrighted shrieks. The brass gun
on tbe forward deck for the moment proved
unavailing, the cartridge having been ram
med down wrong end foremost, and tbe
priming wire mislaid. "For God's sake, fire
that gun," somebody cried, "or we are
lost!" Meanwhile the steam whistle shriek
ed, and the ship was steered on a different
course, one or two volunteers assisting at
the wheel. In the Interval of extreme so
licitude that followed, imagination occupied
itself in depicting frightful disaster. " Was
it possible tbo steamer might sink if struck
by the spout?" "Was there any spot offer
ing a secure retreat?" or were "all the light
upper works of tbe steamer liable to be
crushed by the impending delnge?" Sug
gestions like these were rapidly passed in
review, and the hearts of strong men quailed
within tbem.
But a calmer mood returned when the
dreaded spout was seen astern, about to dis
solve and pass harmlessly away. The last
movements of dissolution were like the ex
piring throes of the dolphin, so rapid and
varying were the different -phases presented.
The column, which at first stood nearly per
pendicular, dark, rigid and heavy against tbe
clouds, (the upper terminus gently blending
with the body of vapor behind it, tbe lower,
veiled by fleecy wreaths of mist), was now
attennated to a mere film a spiral tube of
most delicate texture, within which was ob
servable a tremulous motion, as though tbe
lifting power was beiDg relaxed, and it was
uncertain whether the dark body of water
within should finally yield to the power of
gravitation, or ascend heavenward. For a
moment, the light spiral network of the tube
was darkened by the downward rush of wa
ters. Then followed a partial return, when
lo! the structure separated in mid-heaven,
and an immense body of water literally slid
down the funnel with a heavy thud, as falling
lead, into the bosom of tbe deep. In other
words, tbe upward motion of the inclosing
cylinder of white vapor was reversed, and
then followed a headlong rush to the sea,
down the inclined plain. But this was not
alL The falling colnmn assumed tbe ap
pearance of a coil in a rope (a lariat, for ex
ample). The film that was drawn up was
also coiled. After rectdlug a space, the lower
section seemed instinct with life, and re
erected itself heavenward. The union thns
formed was bnt momentary, for when a clap
of thunder was beard tbe parts were disen
gaged, one falling into the sea, and tbe other
floating awar with the clouds as tbe tail of
a kite follows the wind, if broken from its
fastenings. In the descent, a dark, spherical
body was observed, having nearly the ap
parent diameter of the moon at its full, which
was plausibly explained to be nothing more
than an end or sectional view of the same
object.
Thns ended one of the most remarkable as
well as one of the moat sublime, and it may
be said terrific, spectacles (for snch it wis to
some in truth), ever afforded in the field of
natural science. Although the engneer of
ine aevaaa nas made seventy trips along tills
coast, and been fifteen years here In constant
service, ne coniessca to naving seen noinmg
comparable. So, too, said our experienced
oincere. And wnatevcr may do me opinions
on tbe subject, it is at least truo of Capt.
aeiicy mat ne came so near going "up
spout," or down it Is Immaterial which
that he has no desire to try it again.
In rezard to a controverted tonic. I desire.
in this place, only to quote the authority of
rroicssor urocKjesny, oi innity uoiiegc,
Hartford. CL. who savs. of water spouts :
" Tbe torrents Of rain by which this phe
nomenon Is often accompanied, can be fullv
accounted for by tbe rapid condensation of
vapor mat occurs wnen me warm, humid air
or the sea sows inward to the vortex or the
whirl, and these combine with the cold air
oi toe upper regions or tnc atmosphere,
which descends to fill tbe partial void."
This view Is somewhat opposed to the
commonly accepted theory that the heavy
volnmes of water which fall from spouts are
originally drawn up from the sea by the ro
tary motion oi a wuinwiua, in oocaience to
the law that nature abhors a vacuum. And
tbe fact that water falling from a spout Is
known to be fresh, so far as observations
have extended, tends further to corroborate
the views of the Hartford scientist. At tbe
same time, it would be difficult to convince
the passengers on the Sevada that they did
not sec volumes of water, perhaps many tons
in the aggregate, drawn up from the surface
of tbe sea into the whirling Tortex that
swept over it bo innousiy.
Before closing, it should here be added
that tbe disappearance of this soont was
followed by a heavy wind and rain, giving
nrpmnnltlnn nf n. "tflrlnf mil, " na re
marked by our ship's captain, but there
proved to be no canse for serious alarm. It
was also observed that riie course of the
spout was across a Etrip of deeply discolored
water, extending seaward from the coast of
unatcmaia, supposed to ue ine eucci oi vol
canic action.
The statements above given coincide with
tbe observations of all our ship's companv.
and can be affirmed by Capt. Kelly, or any of
the passengers.
Respectfully, Wii. H. Hallock.
What Geographical Science Owes to
Missionaries.
There is no class of men tbat has contrib
uted more to tbe advancement of Geograph
lc.il Science than missionaries. Impelled by
an earnest desire to benefit tbeirfeliow-men.
by imparting to them knowledge that shall
by its hnmanizing influences bring them out
from the darkness of barbarism, with a self
denial and patience worthy of our highest
approbation, they surrender the society of
Kindred and iriends ana mecomiorisoi civii
cd life for homes in distant and unknown
lands. Toward whatever portion of tho
globe we may turn our eyes whether it be
amid the snows nf tbe artics or under the
burning snn of the equator in the jungles
of India or on the Islands of the sea wher
ever man has made bis habitation,-may be
fouud the missionary, laboring, not for the
accumulation of wealth, not for personal
aggrandizement, nut as me apostle or mm
who commanded. "Go ye Into all tbe world.
and preach the uospel to every creature."
xrommc missionary siauons tnrouguout
tbe world, wc receive not only much valua
ble Information relative to tbe country, its
people and products In their immediate
vicinity, but there are few missionaries who
do not explore the surrounding country, to a
greater or less distance. Let us, by way of
illustration, state a single instance: A mis
sionary society desired to make a trial of
tneir worK m iuistern Airicu, tucn a new
field, and established a mission, the head
quarters of which were on the eastern coast
oi zangueDar, opposite ine island oi .iiom
bas. After establishing themselves, for tbe
purpose of becoming acquainted with the
manners and customs of the native tribes,
that they might tbe better judge of the pros
pects of the result of their labors, they pene
trated Into tbe Interior: on one of their ex
plorations, seeing a lofty mountain, tbey
made tbeir way to it This was a snow
mountain, tbe Kiflimanjo.
An account of this journey was published
in England, but tbe existence of such a
mountain was denied by the scientific men
there. Tbe missionaries persisted in their
testimony, and in order to be able to furnish
further proof of tbe truth of theirassertions,
made further explorations, and not only dis
covered a second snow mountain, tbe Kenia,
but sent home information, obtained from
the natives, of a great inland sea.
the tfoyal ucograpulcai society, alter mak
ing tbe most thorough investigation, possi
ble, determined to send an expidltion to ex
plore this country and the result was tbe
discovery of two lakes, the Tacranvika. and
one larger than this, wbich was named, by
Capt Spekc the Victoria Nyanza.
While this expedition, under Capts. Spekc
and Grant, was at work in this vicinity, an
other expedition, of which Mr. (now Sir
Samuel) Baker was the head, was formed
for the purpose of ascending the Nile, and
finding, if possible, another and larger lake,
of which vogue reports were obtalucd from
the natives. After various detentions und
overcoming almost nnsurmonntable obsta
cles, tbey at length, in March, 1S&4, came in
sight of tbe lake. " Like a sea of quicksilver
lying far beneath the great expanse of water,
a boundless sea horizon on the soutli and
sontliwest, glittering In tho noon-day sun ;
while on tbe west, at 50 orXO miles distance,
blue mountains rose from the bosom of tbe
lake to about 7.000 feet above Its level."
This lake, which they named tbo Albert Ny
anza, proved to be the source of the upper
branches of tbe Nile, and settled definitely a
question that has troubled the geographical
worm ior years.
it is not pronaoie that those results would
bavc been obtained lor years but for the es
tablishment of the missionary station allud
ed to.
But It is not as explorers that missionaries.
as a class, render the greatest service to geo
graphical science, but as aids to exploring
expeditions, by establishing for them points
of departure. There are but few expeditions
that do not on tbe outposts of civilization
bait at a missionary station, to gird them
selves anew, before plunging into the un
known regions before them. Tho frlendhlr
of the natives of the country secured by mis
sionary labors enables more complete pre
parations to be made, and often supplies
guides ior some distance, and frequently In
troductions to and sale passage through, sec
tions upon wbich tbe light of the missions
shine only by reflected rays.
There is scarcely a history ofan expedition
of discovery in any country tbat does not
contain confirmation of this, and the ac
knowledgment of the explorers of their
indebtedness to the missionaries. Cotton's
Journal of Geography.
T vna nnn frav tmt Tnna 1 Ht. tf.a Kill
throwing open the public lands of the South
to tbe poor whites and blacks, became a law.
it is expeciea to worK an important, revolu
tion. The "quantity of surveyed, unsold.
public land, all of which will become sub
ject to entry by actual settlers nnder tbe
dui, was, in fCDmary last: in ArKansas,
9 "8,012 acres; in Alabama, 6,732,058; Flor
ida, l'J.aYV.Ui; Louisiana, uvsoUtu, and in
Mississippi, 4,700,737, or a total of 16,393,541
acres Of, course, not all of this domain is
capable of cultivation. But most of it is,
according to tbe records of the General Land
Office, and it will afford homes to hundreds
of thousands of settlers. It is estimated tbat
no less than 30,000,000 acres of arable land
will be thrown open to the landless people
of tbe BoBtb. Tola will (rive 375.000. home
steads, allowing fire persons to a family.
Cleans oi independent support win ne inns
afforded to no leu than 1,875,000 persons.
The Losdos Times charges five shillings
sterling for the notice of a birth, marriage
or death.
Fascctatioi frequently leads to Aswigsa-
Uon." ' ' - "
S6.00 PEE YEAE.
Iced Muslims tor StrmcES. It has doubt
less occurred to many n one, while admiring
the beautiful effects produced by frost on the
windows, to imagine how delightful Itwould
be if a sensation of coolness could bo pro-
.. , . V i . 1 . . x . .
uuwu iu tuts euiiry oays oi summer oy me
aspect of thoso effects, artificially produced.
Aue iinigiuauon nas Deen realized, it is
known that by almost any ordinary salt, re
duced to a liquid, and applied with a hrn.l.
to window panes, those fairy-like forms of
ciysiauno lonage may oe successfully repro
duced, and that, with a little chemical Inge
nuity, any tone of color may be given themj
from snowy white to richest purple or
coolest green. That process is well known ;
but another step in advance has recently
been taken in the same direction, by means
of which muslins may be similarly iced for
summer near, ine line wmcn separates a
pretty experiment from a commercial pro
duct is tbat wbich may be drawn between
results obtained by an original manipulation,
which can only be reproduced by a repeti
tion of tho same original means, and those
results which, once perfected, can be repro-
uutxu, uu wjuiuvin, uy mero mecnanicai pro
ecsscss. Daguerreotype was merely a pretty
tov until Talbot discovered tho mran. nf
proaucing mu enrao effects on. paper, and a
process for multiplying the image when once
produced. An nnaloirons method has hern
discovered by M. Bertscb, and practically ap
plied by M. Buhlmin, for multiplying, as
from an ennraved plate, the exanlsito etfecls
of the crystaline, f rom which any number of
tuiprcasiuus cau no iacn, in any lone or icy
grays, of vale, silvery preens, or any conl
tint In order to secure continuity of de
sign, without stop or interruption, the first
manipulation takes place upon a polished.
cjuuucr, uy means oi wnicn a continuous
Eattern, "neTer ending, still beginning," is
nparted to as many thousand yards of any
textile fabrics as msv be reanired. Sn thit
for the flrst time in tho fanciful history of
.oauiuu, itcu uiuaiius, ior mc summer sea-
boh, may ne nad in any quantity. Oh, ye
nymphs of Icy hearts, let us see yon clothed
in me appropriate uvery oi iced muslin.
Popular, Magnetism. We have received
a paper read Dcrore the American Institute,
by John A. Parker, on " Polar Morrnetism."
Which is. at ail events, an lne-enions end
unburn uiscuaeiuu ui a suujeci wnicn pos
sesses not only scientific bnt pratical interest
The main topic of the paper is the revolu
tion of tho magnetic pole around tho north
pole. The fact of this revolution is certainlv
established. In 15S0 the magnetic polo was
Bifcuaieu uu a meriaian iony-nve degrees cast
of Greenwich. InlC53itwas on the meri
dian of Greenwbich. In 1790 it was seventy
degrees west of that point, and Is now put
by Mr. Parker at one hundred and eighteen
degrees west of Greenwich. Assuming, to
account for this regular progress westward,
that magnetism is u universal principle, Mr.
Parker accounts for the revolution of the
Magnetic polo as caused "bv rnamn-lli nf.
traction to the highest centre or system to
which tho earth in her various revolutions
is immediately related." The direction of
the needle only indicates the line of attrac
tion, and not an absolute magnetic pole
Mr. Parker regards polar magnetism as
simply the result of a magnetic force, which
is rendered active by revolution, and " Identi
fies itself With that force Which sstmnnmpr
call tbo attraction of gravitation, a force
known to exist, but for which no satisfactory
cause has ever been assigned."
According to his theory magnetic attrac
tion, or the "attraction of gravitation," in
revolving bodies,, is the opposite of tbat
centrifugal iorcc created bv their revolution.
and always equal to it The magnetic pole
revolves around the polar axes of the earth
In the same time in which the earth, together
With the solar system. Performs a cnmnletn
revolutIon.relatfvely to that system around
which the snu itself revolves, and this period
Mr. Parker estimates at six hundred and
forty years.
Such is tbe theory of Mr. Parker, evi
dently the result of much reflection, and
supported and illustrated with great ability.
Without diagrams it cannot be readily made
clear, but we have given enough to indicate
the bearing of his speculation. Ar. Y. Jttt.
A Cure for Neuralgia. Head. Face.
Tootu on Jaw Aches. About ten vers ago,
writes a correspondent of the Builder, I was
laid up with an excruciating neuralgic head
ache, which seemed to encircle the ear of
that side of tbe bead alone affected. Tbe
idea that the headache had something to do
with the car as a centre ocenrred to me, al
though in the ear Itself there was no ruin. T
had a little almond oil, and also spirits,
dropped into the ear, but without any good
cucct; nucu ine inougui suggested llsen
that perhaps a little of thn atvpsthet!,. rihr
(not the nitric,) might do" good, by deaden
ing the .nervous pain. I had some drops of
rectified sulphuric ether, therefore, put into
my ear, and, iu the course of half an hour,
my headache was entirely gone. 1 have since
fonnd, both from my own occasional experi
ence, and that of others, tbat ether so ap
plied, Is, In nearly all cases, an effectual euro
for those very painful headaches, faceachesl
jawaches, and toothaches, which are com
monly Known as neuralgic and rheumatic
If a very severe case, two or three days may
elapse, during wbich the pain may be apt to
recur, especially from new and even slight
exposure to draughts; but repeated applica
tions of half a dozen drop.", or less, of ether.
at a time, seems certain to subdne the most
violent attack, sometimes in a very few min
utes. A drop or two of almond or olive oil
afterwards put into the ear, I have thonght,
tended to protect from a new attack. As tbe
ether sometimes gives pain In the ear for a
moment while being applied, a single drop
should first of all be carefully put In, and
men iiiurCf-as ine case win auow. 1 nave
my hearing or otherwise, from tiie use of
ether in this way, nor have I heard of any
from others who have, tried It at my rccom-
menuauun. jxen.
Exflouatioh op GitEESLAND. At the re
cent meeting of tbe Geographical Society of
London, It was stated that Whympeiwho
though one of the youngest associates of !
society, was well known for his courage and
sell-reliance In snrmountlng the highest peaks
of the Alps, had conceived thu bold idea of
penetrating along the surface of tbe glaciers
of Greenland and into tbe interior of that
snow-clad continent Mr. Whymper believ
ed, from tbe great number of deer tbat find
melr way to tbe coast, tbat there are within
the glaciers well-grassed valleys and recesses.
He also thought it possible to trace by land
tbe extent of Greenland to tbe north. To
acquire some knowledge of tbe latter, was
one of the msin'geographlcal projects of the
late projected polar expedition. Mr. Whym
per makes a preliminary trip this year, and
will be aecompanled by an experienced Dan
ish guide from Copenhagen. Sir Roderick
Jlurcblson considered this enterprise, if It
were successful, would be the ne plus ultra
of individual geographical adventures. It
will be remembered tbat Mr. Wbvmner nar
rowly escaped death last year in crossing tbe
Matterfaorn, when a young nobleman and
one of tho guides of bis party lost tbeir Uvea
In a crevasse. 'Mr. Whymper is brother to
the gentleman of tbe same name who is artist
lo the Western Union Telegraph Extension
Company, and who is now in the North Pa
cific with CoL llulkley's expedition.
A Double Suicide. A determined double
suicide, near Paris, has just been brought to
light A river-keeper on the Marne, while
passing along the banks, near Joinville-le-Point,
observed the bodies of a male and fe
male floating near the surface. Having
brought them to land, they were found to
be bound together, tbe man's left arm to the
woman's right while the former had abont
ten pounds weight of rocks In bis pockets.
Tbey were both elegantly dressed, and bore
no marks of violence, and bad apparently
been in thenater abont a fortnight
News that is not always graphic Tele
graphic news.
The beet Board at Health a light diet
Jtiscellaneoua Items.
A rarLosopnER savs that "a mac wltsottt
money Is poor, bnt a man with notUBg.bat
money is still poorer." -
Col. Colt's Estate. Tho distribution
of tbe estato of the late Samuel Colt of
Hartford. Conn., commenced June !HL The
propertyjrvlll amount to between c8,06P,069
and (1,000,000. There are a dozen twin ta
be provided for, and Mrs. Colt and ber sea
are to have the remainder, which will be s
snug little sum.
The Stbosobst Max. Ambrose A. BoMfe
of Auburn, Ohio, recently lifted a dead weight
of 2.737K pounds, which Is the. greatest lut
ing feat on record. Ho has been practkiog
at intervals during the last tlx years. Dr.
Wlnshlp, for several years past eonsMered
me strongest man in me world, at last ac
counts bad lilted only 3,600 pounds.
Tiie little State of Rhode Island has a model
Legislature. That body adjourned after s
session of four days, during which no lese
than 83 acts and resolutions .were
Bhode Island law-makers must be futtf
the job, and not by the day, or eiee tMf ate
chosen from that class of tnefnl citizens who
do not go to tRsaiiegiswture to sake a 1
ont of the business. Some other L
tares, as well as City Councils, might learn s
profitable lesson from the itnode Islanders.
AnrsurHiis AnvsnTismn. Mr II. W.
Webb and Mark Twain have given ttr speed
mens of bow circulars may be made cone,
and advertisements converted Into very
readable matter. But nothing In this Hee
yet equals Artemus's announcement of Me
lectures, where ho gave certificates of their
efficacy in the style of the patent medicine
notices. Tho one purporting to be given by
President Lincoln was admirable. We quote
it from memory: "Dear 81r I am freoto
say tbat, for people who like yonr style of
lectures, they are just the style of lectures
wmcn sucn people lute.
A Stbasqe Resemblance There was re
cently in the Southwest, a tragedy somewhat
similar to the murder of the Deering family
in Pennsylvania, by which a family named
Dcerfield was murdered. The murderer of
the latter fcmlly has been convicted. His
name Is Coovert, and there Is a most remark
able resemblance between him and Probst
Both are five feet seven or eight Inches high,
have blue eyes, light hair and turned up noses.
Both have a striding walk and stoop In the
shoulders, and both served In the army. The
strangest resemblance of all, however, is
that Coovert, like Probst, bas lost the thumb
of his right hand, which was shot off while
he was In the army.
Tm. Ttn.llmraa r),lnn.n FK.. .... .1.11 1
a photographic saloon In New York recently,
and near the doorway to the street, on their
exit, a number of ladles stood to scrutinize
tbem. One of these, being near the rather
handsome form of Tung, and forgetlng good
manners In her desire to acquire knowledge,
deliberately took iu her ungloved hand his
long and elaborately plaited cue. black, as
coal, and critically examined It Tung eyed
the lady for a moment; a smile illuminated
his broad flat face as he glanced at her
own coiffure, and then bowing, said: "AH
mine I all mine I" The inquisitive female
retired in disgust "
Tub Mileage System. The unequal sts-
tern of Congressional Mileage, against which
the New Vork Tribune has for many years
waged a warfare, Is now being attacked by
that journal under tbe fresh Impetus afforded
by tbe report of tho Secretary of the Trea
sury, showing that the mileage paid to mem
bers of the SSth Congress reached the snra
of 139, 163. The members from California
received nearly 812.000 eacb. The highest
sum paid was to Wallace of Idaho $12,981 ;
tbo lowest to Davis of Maryland $64.
Tim department of State has, received a
dispatch from tbe United States Consnlat
Zanzibar, dated Nov. 1st. 1&C5. in which he
communicates the failure oi the East African
expedition, which was fitted out from that
place in the yearlS65, for the purpose of ex.
plorlug tbe northern rivers of Africa. The
cxpfonnir oartv consisted of ten Enronean
and thirty natives. Five of tbo former and
eight natives arc now all tbat arc known to
be alive of tbe expedition, the object of
which" was to ascend the Jnbes River as far
as possible in steamers, then to travel over
land to tbe Nile, and to follow that river to
its month. The hostility of the natives, and
hardships of the climate, were the causes of
the disastrous result .
Tue Lahouaoe or the Etes. It has often
been said that a woman with a hazel eye
never elopes from her husband, never chats
scandal, never sacrifices her bnsband's com-
ion ior ner own, never finds rault, never
t.lbo tnn mnnh nw nn llttln I. 1m.-i ...
entertaining, agreeable and lovely compan
ion. 'Wo never knew." ssvs a brother anlll-
driver, "but one uninteresting and -unaml-able
woman with a hazle eye, and she bad a
nose which looked, as' the Yankee says,' like
me iiiue cna oi noiuing, wuiiiieu aown to
poini."
The grey eye is tho sign of shrewdness and
talent Great-thinkers and captains have It.
In woman it Indicates a better head than
heart The dark bazle is noble In significance
as in beauty. Tbe blue eye Is admirable, bnt
may be feeble. The black eye take care I
Look out for the wife with a black eve!
Snch can be seen almost dally at tbe police
uuicc, generally wuu a complaint against mo
husband for assault and battery.
Romantic Love op Gen. Walker. The
history of General Walker, the Filibuster,
like tbat cf other men of .mark, Is not free
from the romance of love as well as tbat of
nr. While a law-student In New Orleans.
he conceived a warm attachment for a very
interesting young lady who was deaf and
dumb. She bad been well educated, asd
was of very engaging manners. Her misfor
tune drew towards her the sympathies and
regards of al tender-hearted persons. With
bis character.ttic originality and peculiarity
of feeling and sentiment, Walker became
criiuiu.rrTor this young lady. She recipro
cated iU .rfgard, and for some time they
were never nappy nniess logemer. lie soon
acquired a knowledge of ber signs, and tbey
conversed with great facility the mediam of
of tbeir conversation no doubt addlssrasst
to their enjoyment -At last some slight ml,
understanding Interrupted their intercosne.
and before a reconciliation could be efleeW
the voung lady died. TMs eveat gave a
tinge of melancholy to tbe thoughts a&d
character of Walker. Perhaps, as raaey of
bis friends thought, It produced the great
change In bis character wbich (nsBed a
change from the quiet modest Modest, to
the bold, daring, dauntless revolutionist aad
warrior.
Female Refobters. The recent anniver
sary meetings in New xorlcbrosgBt np i
extraordinary things, and among the i
remarkable were three female reporters. The
Women's Rights Convention was attended
by three ladles, thj reportorlal rtpreaenta
tivei of women's rights newspapers is sssf.
ferent parts of tbe country. Two of the
three were strong-minded bloossera, aasl the
other had discarded hoops and "sieiV? aat
appeared in a meek retiring dress. The Jwi
reporterglves the following spky dseeripttoa
of tbe force at work:
Miss Ada Fessenden Craig, of CbieaM,
was garbed in tight-fitting black silk !,
green silk doable breasted vest asd any pai
etot, which reached a little lower tsass her
hips. When sbe got warm at her weak she
opened ner paieiot placing ner right mm
the lea knee, and upon the elevated
was piacea ster paper, and pile har
with the ntBKMt nonehslAnee. The
was dressed la orasee-eolorea
Knickerbocker J)ant. loese vest, aad Ssnrbsr
tonic tightened round the waist. Tl: c getaT
erbocker pants are flB-iahed bjr olsatlam, thai
remainder of the leg very hrswa, hf-fXa
way encased in tfeln fleeh-eolered, njifaWsjii
stockings. The third reporter Bstessjt to
the. SetoliMon; asd was dressed ka Masjc,
without hoops, taraease Prnims feat, tfls
bereJed hair, green steetJag sad ? Has as
5
Zi.H&.: .a.Xr.' j.Sfrfa

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