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The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, August 19, 1868, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1868-08-19/ed-1/seq-1/

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HA. 1VA.IIA.N
BOOK AND JOB
printing lusanoit!
THE "OATE1TE" OFJICK
Ij bow prpred to eifcnttr fcH erfa fctr
run in m vm,
Ot EVEJIT DBSCR1TT10N,
WITH NEATITHSB AJST) DISPATCH
rCBLIfUED
Every Wednesday Morning:,
uijJli 1 -1 ji
AT SOJW PER AISXTJJI.
Mailed o Foreign Subscribers at $7.IM)
OmcE On Merchant street, west of
he Post Office, Honolulu, II. I.
Frlntel anil published 1y J. 3I0TT SxrrH, it the
Gorernment Printing Offlce, to whom all basinets
communications most be addressed.
VOL. IV---N0. 31. i
HONOLULU, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 19, 1868. S6.00 PER TEAR.
BUSINESS NOTICES.
tv. r.. gheex,
GENERAL COMMISSION AGENT AND
BEOKEB,
ornci is ras-raoor Ecutrycs,
SS Qnull Street, Honolnlu, II. I. ij
c. X. spexcer. H. yxcrACUXE.
CIIAS. 3". SPEXCEIE &. CO.,
GENERAL COMMISSION MEECHANTS,
4 Queen Street, Honolulu. fly
McCOLGAA fc JOIEASOX,
MERCHANT TAILORS,
FOBT STEEET, HONOLULU,
10 Opposite T. C. llcnclt'a. ly
IRA RICHARDSON,
IMPORTER AJI DEALER
IK BOOTS, SHOES & GENTLEMEN'S FUE-
NISHINO GOODS,
Corner of Fort and 3Ierchant Streeta,
S HONOLULU, II. I. !
EDWIN JONES,
GROCER AND SHIP CHANDLER,
Lnlminn, JTInui.
Money and Recruits furnished to ships on
6-ly favorable terms.
THEO. II. IAVIES,
(Late Janlon, Green A Co.,
IMPORTER i. COMMISSION MERCHANT
AOEST TOR
Llojds' and the Liverpool Underwriters,
Northern Assurance- Company, and
British and Foreign Marino Insurance Co.
a- iy
JVX21XX WItOXHEKS,
Importers and Wholesale Dealers
In Fashionable Clothing, Hats, Caps, Boots
and Shoes, and every variety of Gentle
men's Superior Furnishing Goods.
Store known as Capt. Snow's Building
MracniXT EiariT, Ilonolnlu, Oahu. 50
C. H. LEWIES. J. O. DICKSON.
LEWERS &. MCKSOS',
IMPOBTERS, WHOLESALE AMD BET AIL
DEALERS IN LUMBER AND BUILD
ING MATERIALS,
Fort, ICIng, and Merchant Streeta,
HONOLULU, II. I. P
J. S. WALKER. 8. C. ALLEN.
lVAEKEIt & AEEEIV,
SHIPPING & COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
IS HONOLULU, II. I. pj
L. L. TORBERT,
DEALER IN LUMBER AND EVERY KIND
OF BUILDING MATERIAL.
OrriCE Corner Queen and Fort Streets.
13-ly
VOLLES &. CO.,
SHIP CHANDLERS AND COMMISSION
-MERCHANTS,
Queen Street, Honolulu.
Particular attention paid to the Purchase and
Salo of Hawaiian Produce.
REFERS BT PERMISSION 10
C. A. Williams A Co., C. Brewer A Co.,
Castle A Cooke, H. JIackfeld A Co.,
D. C. Waterman, C. L. Richards A Co.,
2-ly
GEORGE G. HOWE,
Dealer in Redwood and Northwest Lumber,
Shingles, Doors, Sash, Blinds, Nails,
Paints, etc
At his Old Stand on the Esplanade. 36-ly
E. S. FLAGC,
CIVIL ENGINEER & SURVEYOR,
3 8 g,niialna, Maul. 3m
SIRS. JT. II. WACK,
FASHIONABLE MILLINER,
FORT ST., BETWEEN KING & HOTEL.
Bonnets made up and trimmed in the latest
styles. Stamping, Braiding and Em
broidering, executed to order.
F. A. SCIIAEFER &. CO.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
SS Honolulu, Oaliu, II. I. 'ly
ED. HOFFSCHLAEGER & CO.,
IMPORTERS & COMMISSION MERCHANTS
fj Honolulu, Oaliu, II. I. ly
A. S. GLEGIIORIV,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN
GENERAL MERCHANDISE,
Fire-proof Store, comer of Queen and Kaahu-
manu Streets.
Retail Establishment on Nuuanu Street.
ly
THEODORE C. IIEUCK,
IMPORTER '& COMMISSION MERCHANT.
1J Honolulu, Oaliu, II. I. ly
II. IIACKFEEW Ac CO.,
GENERAL COMMISSION. AGENTS.
8- Honolulu, Oahu, S. I. ly
THE TOM MOORE TAVERN,
Ity J. O'AIEEI.,
Corner of King &, Fort Sreeta. fly
J. D. WICKE,
Ajjcnt for tlte Bremen Board
of Underwriter.
All average claims against said Underwriters,
occurring in or about this Kingdom, will
have to be certified before me. 7-ly
CIIUAG MOOX.
COMMISSION MERCHANT AND GEN
ERAL AGENT.
Agent for tiie Paulua and AraamUu
Sugar Plantatlona.
Importer of Teas and other Chinese and For
eign Goods, and Wholesale Dealer in Ha
waiian Produce, at the Fire-proof Store,
Nuuanu Street, below King. 21-ly
R. W. ANDREWS,
rort 'Street, opposite Odd Fellowi1 Hall.
Gives particular attention to the repair of
Fire Arms, Sewing Machines, k Locks.
Drairingi of Machinery, te., madt to Order,
. miXIAM RVAIV,
Variety Store No. 2,
' -MHunaLcca. Street.
All kinds or Merchandise and Grocerits.
.39- 1
.BUSINESS NOTICES.
E. P. ADAHS. S. G. WILDER.
ADAMS fc iriEUER,
AUCTION &. COMMISSION MERCHANTS
27 Q,necn Street, Honolulu. ly
31. KAPLEE,
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION AGENT,
Office with E. P. Adams, Esq.,
QCEEX STREET, HONOLULU.
axrras bt rraxissiox to
Gen. Norgan L. Smith, U.lMessrs. C Brewer A Co.
S. Consul. Messrs. Walker t Allen.
Messrs. Richards t Co. It 1. Adams, Esq. Jl
AFOrVG &. ACIIUCK,
IMPORTERS, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
DEALERS IN GENERAL MERCHAN
DISE AND CHINA GOODS,
Fire-Proof Store lu A'nusnn Street,
43 under the Public Hall. ly
C. S. BARTOW,
AU CTIO N EE R,
Salea-Hoom oik Queen Street, one door.
17 from ICaaliuniann St. ly
CIIAX'IVCEY C. BE.WETT,
DEALER IN NEWSPAPERS, MAGAZINES,
AND PERIODICALS,
10 FOKT STREET, HOSOLULU. ly
.IOIIIV II. PATV,
NOTARY PUBLIC AND COMMISSIONER
OF DEEDS
FOR TIIE STATE OF CAUFORXIA.
OiSce at the Bask or Bishop & Co.
2 ly
jTmontcomery
COXTIXUES TO PRACTICE AS A
Solicitor, Attorney, and Proctor in the
Supremo Court, in Law, Equity, Admiralty,
Probate and Divorce. 3-ly
H. A. WIDEMANN,
IVOTARY rUBEIC.
Office at the Ixtebior Depabthest.
o- ly
sbiuux ricr- h. a. t. cajhu.
C. BREWER & CO.,
SHIPPING & COMMISSION
Honolulu, II, I.
AGENTS Of the Huston and Honolulu
Packet Line.
AGENTS For Ilie Makee, IVollultu and
Hann Plantntlons.
AGEXTS For the Pnrcliaae and Sale of
Island Produce.
BErEB TO
Joux 31. Hook, Eso. Kew Tork
CB1S. BaiKia A CO 1 Tlntnn
Jib. nrasiwrn. Esq B'on
J. a JIUUULL 4 CO. ."),
R. S. Ewux A Co San Francisco
Cats. W. Etoors, Esq.. j 5-ly
G. V. KORTOPf & CO.
C00PEES AND GAUGEES,
AT THE NEW STAND
OX THE ESPLANADE.
5 WE ARE PREPARED TO
iBJwtgt attend to
Ai.ii wozuc nv oun. vana
At the Shop next to the Custom House, where
we can be found at all working hours.
ATE HAVE ON IllSD AND FOR SALE
OIL CASES AND BARRELS,
Of different sizes, new and old, which we will
sell at the very
LOWEST MARKET RATES.
All work done in a thorough manner, and
warranted to give satisfaction.
All kinds of Coopering Materials and Coopers'
:- Tools for Sale. Sm
J. P. HUGHES,
Importer antigManufacturer
OF ALL KINDS OF SADDLERY.
Carriage Trimming done with neatness and
dispatch. All orders promptlyattendcd to.
Corner of Fort and Hotel streets, Honolulu.
10- ly
NEVILLE & BARRETT,
Planters & General Store Keepers
KEOPUKA, SOUTH KONA, HAWAII.
(Near Kealakckua Bay.)
Island produce bought. Ships supplied with
Wood, Beef and other ncessaries.
Agent at Honolulu A. S. Cleghors.
11- ly
M. S. CRINBAUM & CO.,
IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE
Dealers in Fashionable Clothing
Hats, Caps, Boots and Shocs.and every variety
of Gentlemen's superior furnishing goods.
STORE IN MAKEE'S BLOCK.
10 Q.nee ii Street, Honolulu, II. I. ly
T0LCAK0 HOUSE.
CRATER OF KILAUEA. HAWAII.
MTIIIS ESTABLISHMENT ISggi
now open for the reception of vifitorsif
to the Volcano, who may rely on finding com
fortable rooms, a good table, and prompt at
tendance. Experienced guides for the Crater
always in readiness.
STEAM AND SULPHUR BATHS !
Horses Grained and Stabled if Desired.
CHARGES REASONABLE.
Parties visiting the Volcano via Hilo, can
procure animals warranted to make the jour
ney, bylKlLlIrTCBXOCKEsqMj
GEORGE WILLIAMS,
LICENSED SHIPPING AGENT,
COXTEUES tlie business on
his old plan of settling with officeraand
seamen immediately on their chipping at his
office. Having no connection, either direct or
indirect, with nny outfitting establishment,
and allowing so debts to be collected at his
office he hopes to give as good satisfaction in
the future as he has in the past.
Hi-Office on Jas. RobinEon i, Co.'s Wharf,
near the U. S. Consulate.
Honolulu, March 27, IStt. 2i-3n
PIANOS TUWED.
pianos and Mother
musical iustiiuments
'Tuned and Hepairwl,- by CHAS.
DERBY, at tho Hawaiian Theatre.
Leaaona given on the Piano & Guitar.
The best of references given. 51-ly
9i. " -
BUSINESS IN OTICES.
J. H. THOMPSON,
GENERAL BLACKSMITH
HONOLULU, II. I.
has cosstastlt
on hand and for sale, a good
assortment of
BEST REFINED -BAR IRON!
ALSO
Best Blacksmith's Coal,
At the Lowest Market Prices 3S-1 j
JSO. NOTT. SAH'E XOTT.
JOHN NOTT & CO.,
Copper & Tin Smiths,
qiAKE PLEASURE Iff ANNOUNC-
JL ing to the public that they are prepared
to furnish all kinds of Copper Wobk, consist
ing in part, of STILLS, STJUK'E PAA'S,
SOIIGIIAJI PAXS; 0J!3IS, PUMPS, dc.
Also on hand, a full assortment of Tlx
Wabe, which we offer for sale at the lowest
market prices.
All Kinds of Repairing done -vritli
Neatness and Dispatch.
Orders from tho other Islands will meet
with prompt attention.
Kaahumanu Street, one door above Flit
ncr's. 2l-3m
JEWELER AND ENCRAVER
MR. J. COSTA
Is now prepared to execute with promptness
all work in his line of business, such as
Watcli and Clock Repairing,
Manufacturing Jewelry,
And Engraving.
Shop on Fort Street, opposite Odd Fellows'
Hall. 24-3m
JAMES L. LEWIS,
COOPER AND CAUCER.
AT THE OLD STAND,
Corner of King and Bethel Sts.
A La r pre
etock of OIL
SHOOKSand
all kinds of
COOPERING MATERIALS !
CONSTANTLY ON HAND.
He hopes, by attention to business, to merit
a continuance of the patrouajje whichhe has
heretofore enjoyed, and forWlilcb. he now re
turns his thanks. 24-Sm
KOII'T ItYCKOFT,
DE Xj TJ 3VE 3E5 33 DEL ,
HAS OPENED HIS SHOP ON KING
Street, next door to Horn's Confection
ary Shop, and offers his services in all branch
es of Plumbing. All Jobs will hereafter be
executed with promptness and in a thorough
manner. 26-Hm
SUGAll & MOLASSES.
1808
18C8
18 6 8
HILO, II. I.
Sugar anil 3IoIasgcs.
CROP COMING IX AXD FOR SALE IN
quantities to suit purchasers, by
WALKER 4 ALLEX,
24-3m Agents.
0N0MEA PLANTATION.
Sugar unci ItlolasKcs Crop 1S08
COMING IX, FOR SALE IX QUAXTI
tics to suit purchasers, by
WALKER A ALLEN,
24-3m Agents.
PRINCEYILLE PLANTATION.
Sugar mill Molasses Crop 1SOS
COMING IX, FOR SALE IX QCAXTI
ties to suit purchasers, .by
WALKER A ALLEN,
24-3m Agents.
WAILUKU PLANTATION.
NEW CROP
TVJOW COMIIVG KV.
L For sale by
21-3m . C. BREWER & Co., Ag'U.
INSURANCE NOTICES.
SAN FRANCISCO
BOARD OF UNDERYRITERS.
THE untlcriiigned having been
appointed agents for the San I rancisco
Board ot Underwriters, representing the
California Insurance Company,.
Merchanta' Mutual 2IaTlneIlisCo.,
Paelflc Insurance Company,
California Lloyd', and
Home Mutual Insurance Company.
Beg leavo to Inform Masters of Vessels and
the public generally, that all losses sustained
by Vessels and Cargoes, insured by either of
the above companies, against perils of the
seas and other risks, at or near the several
Sandwich Islands, Kill have to It vtriflcd by
thtm.
24-3m H. HACKFELD i, CO.
II.UIIJiJIGII-IIItEJIi:.-Y
FIRE INSURANCE COMP'Y.
THE UNDERSIGNED, HAVING
been appointed Agents of the above Com
pany, are prepared to insure risks against Fire
on Stone and Brick Buildings, and on Mer
chandise stored therein, on the most favorable
terms. For particulars apply at the office of
5-ly F. A. SCHAEFER &. CO.
Merchants' Mutual
MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY.
OF SAW FKAACISCO.
TIIE undersigned having been ap
pointed Agents for the above Company,
are prepared to issue policies on Caugoes,
Freights and Treasure. v
WALKER & ALLEN,
12-Cci Agents, Honolulu.
California Insurance Company.
THE Undersigned, AGESTS
of the above Company, have been author
ised to insure risks on CARGO, FREIGHT
and TREASURE, by COASTERS, from Hono
Iula to all ports of the Hawaiian Group, aid
Tice versa. H. HACKFELD & CO.
S-ly
Earl Russell on Ireland.
Earl Russell's second letter on Ireland con
tains the following passages:
In my former letter I bad to notice a gross
personal attack made upon me by a Secretary
of State, before my publication appeared, and
I thought myself entitled to return the blow.
At present, I am glad to haTO no such attack
to resent But I can not forbear to notice
that General Feel, on April 2nd, mode a bit ing
jest on the party to which I have the pride to
belong.
"The liberal party have been referred to,"
he said, "as the engineers and pioneers who
clear tnc roaa, out I raiuer iook upon mem
as guide-posts, which point out the road
and a very bad road it often is but who never
advance one inch themselves." Cheers and
Ianghter.l
General Peel is so honest and irood hu
mored that one is always inclined to take in
irood Dart anvtbicir lie may say. But lest his
joke should bo taken in sober earnest, I ven
ture to put to mm the loiiontng questions:
1. Was it not an inch of advance to abolish
SO close boroughs, sending 111 members to
Parliament, and to deprive 0 more boroughs
of 1 member each;
2. Wa3 It not an Inch of advance to give
rcurcsentatlves to Manchester. Leeds, and
Birmingham, a concession which the Duke of
y eiungion anu oiruoueri reel ncreuiiHuniy
refused?
3. Was it not an Inch of advance to reform
the Poor Laws, a task which Sir Robert Peel
professed himself unable to undertake;
4. Was It not an Inch of advance to com
mute the lithe in kind. In England, a vexa
tion to the clergy and laity alike, a task to
which Mr. Pitt lound himself unequal?
5. Was it not an Inch of advance to abolish
slavery In our colonies, a measure to which
Lord Derby, In his better days, so greatly
contributed?
C. Was it no gain to religious liberty to
enable the Saptists to register the birth of
tneir children wunout baptism in tue unurcu,
and the Unitarians to be married without a
blessing in the name of the Trinity, and to
relieve all Protestant Dissenters trom tho
vokeof beinir coinncllcd to take the Sacra
ment according to the rites of the Church of
tngiannr
T. Was it no gain to freedom of trade to
repeal the navigation laws, to form a com
mercial treaty with France, and to rcdnce
the tariff from the large volume which Mr.
gic page? Were not the Hnancial plans of
jur. tiiaasionc an incu in aavance r
8. AVere not the introduction of Poor Laws
in Ireland, the commutation of tithes, and
the act for the sale of encumbered estates,
an inch In advance to that country? Lastly,
was not the support given to the unity and
Independence ot Italy an inch lu advance
in behalf of the great "Cause of Civil and
Religious Liberty all over the World," the
old standing toast of the Whig party? lean
Imagine that this list, added to the Catholic
emancipauion and tbc repeal of the Corn
Laws, measures of which the Liberal party
are the pioneers, will grieve the heart of
many an old Tory, and that General Peel, on
reading It will say, with Macbeth:
" A fourth I Start, eyes 1
What, will the line stretch out to the crack of doom T
Anotheryet? AseTeothT I'll see no more ;
And yet the eighth aiitears, who bears a glass
Which shows me many more." ,
Yes, "many more! The diseased mind of
Ireland has yet to be ministered to ; a "sweet,
oblivious antidote" may yet induce her to
forget her griefs, anclcntand of modern date;
the "perilous stuff" which weighs upon ber
breast may yet be removed, and in her exult
ant strength she may hail the "wearing of
the green" as the emblem of a new hope,
and the sign of a renovated youth, les.
"many more!" To name but one. National
Education a measure really national, per
vading the whole people, and leaving In the
shade tho meagre proposals of the present
Government would clear the way for that
long and fair train of further reforms already
reflected to us in the glass of the future.
When wc reflect that for twenty-six years
Wllberforce and Clarksnn labored wltbout
success to abolish tbc slave trade, and that
twenty foury ears more elapsed before slavery
was extinguished by law; when we remem
ber that, although for more than a century
the House of Stuart liaie ceased to compete
for the Crown, tbc grievances of Ireland are
yet waiting for full redress; that for twenty-
six years tnc cause oi uatuouc emancipation
met with defeat at county electiuns, while
its leaders were ostracised, wc must ac
knowledge how slow and feeble Is the pro
gress toward knowledge and justice, even of
tbc noble-hearted people of this free country.
When wc perceive how many there are, even
now, who fail to feel for the ill-used Irish
man as their predecessors failed to feel for
the enslaved African, we must own that we
still shrink from the light of day.
' What from thlsbanenbelnKdowo reap 1
Our senses narrow, and oar reason frail ;
ma snort, ana imiu a gem tnai loves me ceep,
Anil all tilings weighed in custom's falsest scale:
Opinion an omnipotence, whose Tell
Msntles the earth with darkness, until right
And wrong are accidents, and men grow pale,
Lest tbelr own Judgments should become too bright.
And tht-Ir free thoughts he crimes, and earth have
toomucnugnt.-'
Xlie great Couiiterlciier.
Charles Ulrica, the notorious and accom
plished counterfeiter, In the United States
Court, yesterday, pleaded guilty, after with
drawing bis first plea of " not guilty," and
was sentenced to the Penitentiary for twelve
yeare. He ts regarded by the United States
authorities as the most accomplished and
dangerous counterlclter in tnc conntry. ills
detection and conviction at this lime arc
mainly dne to the efforts of Cob Wood, Chief
United States Detective, of Washington, now
In this city.
Charles Ulrlch was born In Westphalia, and
received a liberal education, but early In life
developed remarkable talents as a draughts
man. He is about thirty-three years old.
At the commencement of the Crimean war he
went to England, and joined the royal rifle
brigade as draughtsman, served throughout
that warfaltbfully, and received an honorable
discharge. He then came to tbls country,
and settled In New York, where ho com
menced the business of an engraver, and car
ried it on for two years successfully, having
realized enough to purchase a nice little resi
dence in that city, which one of his wives
now enjoys. Ulrlch commenced extensive
counterfeiting about two or three years ago
in New York, and made as much as $30,000
on United States bills, according to his own
statement. The authorities soon discovered
a connection between his establishment and
the most expert counterfeiters, and thence
forth his course was precarious and down
ward. He was arrested In New York first,
and imprisoned, but escaped before trial.
lie was arrcsica next in uacuaa uy ine
United Statu authorities, but before being
broncht Info the States broke jail In Toronto
and escaped. Knowing bis daring character,
special watch was kept upon his actions,
even to calling him every half hour during
bis connnement mere, dui in spito oi tue pre
caution he succeeded In outwitting his keep
ers and effected bis escape Willi a shoe
maker's awl picked up in the eboeebop of
the jail, Ulrlch made a graver, and with it
fashioned a key for bis cell ont of the iron
hoops of the slop-pail. He made a rope of
his blanket, scaled tbc jail walls, and escaped.
When he reached the Niagra River the officers
were on bis heels, lie crossed mat liver a
little above the falls in a lickety skiff, and
came near being drifted Into the Irresistable
current a little above where It takes its fear
ful leap. He made for this city, and com
menced or continued operations as a manu
facturer and dealer in counterfeit United
States bank bills.
While serving out a term in the Sing Sing
Prison, New York, he contracted an intimacy
with the jailor's sister-in-law, and when re
leased' married her, having at the same time
a wife living. About that time be became
acquainted with James Colbert, an English
boxer, who keeps a "crossman's" den in
New York, and through him with Mary
Brown, a shrewed German! girl living at
Colbert's house. The value of Ulrlch as a
counterfeiter was recognized at once by
Colbert, and he kept him close at work on
I plates, allowing no one to nave access lonim.
Ulrich Is a good-looking fellow, and soon
won the favor of Mary Browu, who reci
procated his allection Dy communicating ma
alias Harwood. a notorious New-York coun
terfeiter, and he, In conspiracy with Mary
Brown and Kate Gross, took Ulrlch into
full companionship ana started Hesiwaru,
, in pursuit ol lortunc, on tneirown response
blhtv.
Ulrich'a original wife came with him, and
tbc entire party arrived In this city, 'lhey
rented a tv o-storv frame house at Clevea, in
this county, and set to work issuing $100
counterfeit bills. .Mrs. Ulrica was sent oacK
to New-York as unnecessary, and the adven
turous Charles mado love to a pretty German
gtrl in this city, then living witn ncr iatncr,
an industrious tailor " over the Rhine." To
make a long story short, he married her and
set her to worK snoving me new -nun
dreds." Marv Brown not realizine sum
clentiy from the business, suspected Burdcll
of treachery, and tent Kate Gross to Phila
delphia to act as the Eastern agent lor me
new "hundreds." of which she procured any
quantity from Ulrich on the scoro of their
hrst love. Col. Wood was watching the opera
tions closely, and discovered at last that
the counterfeit mouey reached Philadelphia
irom umcinnau turougu Auams express
Company, and accordingly put a detective In
the Cincinnatfofflce to watch the forward
ing operation. Burdell was arrested, first,
and kept in the room of a hotel for 'some
time. Ulrich turned up next, was arrested
and also taken to tbc hotel. He made a
partial confession, and promised to tell
where the plates were If bis wpmcn were
allowed to go Unpunished as accomplices.
Ulrich was taken to New-York on promise
of the authorities to do so. lie was then
transferred to Brooklyn, but escaped to
Canada, and passing, through there, as al
ready shown, reached Cincinnati a second
time.
He was betrayed here by his women, who,
with that unaccountable perversity of de
praved feminine nature, cling to the object
of affection and seek at the same time to
destroy It, Ulrich made frequent attempts
to break jail here, the last only tbc night be
fore last. He succeeded in procuring small
files and had cut through his window-bars
and unscrewed the nuts on the hinges of his
cell door before being discovered. From all
accounts Ulrich is the counterfeiter of, the
Seven-thirty bonds, about which there was
such a pow-wow In Washington some time
ago, and it Is believed that he has made more
plates than any other five counterfeiters in
the country, lie is highly intelligent, with
agreeable and plausible manners, cool as a
steel trap, and always sclf-pussessed and
ready. It would be difficult to say who is
most entitled to credit for his detection,
but with it the great gang of large counter
feiters in the country is broken up, and will
cease from worrying until an equally bold
spirit arises to reorganize them, if, indeed,
Ulrich docs not again escape and pursue
his counterfeiting career. t'incfiinarf Com.
Human Itoncx.
Correspondent of tho X. Y. Times.
In resuming the description of the recent
excursion of the officers and guests of the
Chicago and Northwestern and Union Paci
fic Railroads to tho heart of the Rocky
Mountains, I find that in tbc haste of writing
my first article, I omitted to mention an ex
ceedingly interesting, and, perhaps profound
ly Important discovery, which has been lately
made at Antelope, a station 450 miles west of
Omaha. Iu digging a well for the railroad
company, there was readied, at the depth of
sixty-eight feet, a layer of human bones
undoubtedly human, from tbc fact that there
was a scull and jaw, as well as other bones
from tbc extremities and trunk. I know
very little about the discover', other than
that bones are this day visible in the earth
that has been thrown up from the well; and
I should think that tbis extraordinary cir
cumstance for 6uch It seems to me would
attract the attention of geologists and scien
tific men. Fpr if it be correct that human
bones are found in tho ordinary line of for
mation in the tertiary vein, I suppose there
will have to be a revision of current scientific
opinion, both as to the origin of the human
race ana the date of its existence upon tbis
planet. The subject, as I have said, is of the
profoundest interest, and it remains for our.
tavanf to dctermino whether these human
bones were covered so deeply by a cataclasm
or were deposited there In prehistoric times.
Some of the army surgeons at Fort Saunders
or other posts on the line of tbc Pacific Rail
road would probably aid in this investigation,
II no other means of getting information
could be obtained. I may add that a friend
or mine in this city, who has passed over the
road, has a femoral-bone in his possession,
which proves beyond question that tho relics
are of the human race. The excavators as
sert that in the process of digging they have
found layers of bones in Which the remains
of elephants and tigers were unearthed, it
being known to everybody that these animals
are extinct species on this continent.
These remains were the subject of a rather
amusing inquiry at Laramie, by a hirsute,
slouchy, very rough and yet highly theologic
al frontiersman, who said to the possessor of
the strange relics, looking at them curionsly
as he spoke: "Oh I some bones 1 What
sort, eh?" "Well, I Ihiuk, .the femornl
bono of a man," was theanswer. "What?"
drawled out the rude man of the plains, with
terrible emphasis. "A man's hip bone," re
plied my friend. "How you suppose tliey
got there?" "I don't know," "You be
lieve they were buried there?" "Yes."
" When?r' "Well, say a million yearsagot"
"Ha! hat" roared ont the frontiersman,
"You're one of them'feilows that don't be
lieve the Bible." "Why not?" said my
friend. "Well, don't you kuow, the Bible
says Adam made the world out of dirt 3,000
years ago?" "Well, yes!" was the reply,
" I believo the Bible does say something of
that kind" the last speaker evident ly having
in mind the maxim that " it is dangerous to
argue with the master of thirty legions,"
and his opponent In this Instance having In
foil view an Arkansas bowie-knife and a
brace of revolvers.
Extraordinary ITehoibx or x Ror. The
Rev. E. J. Beck, the Bishop of Newfound
land's Commissary, relates an heroic incident
furnished bim for that colony:
A poor boy, whose name no one knows,
but we may hope it Is recorded in the Book
of Life, found three little children, who, like
himself, had been washed ashore from oueof
the many wrecks, wandering along that
dreary coast in tbc driving sleet They were
crying bitterly, having been parted from their
parents, and not knowing whether tbey were
drowned or saved. The poor lad took them
to a sheltercdpot, plucked moss for them,
and made them a rude, soft bed, and then,
taking off his own coat to cover them, sat by
them all the night long, soothing their terror
until tbey fell asleep. In the morning, leav
ing them still sleeping, he went in search of
the parents, and, to his great Joy, found them
looking fur the children, whom tbey had
given np for dead. He directed them where
to find them, and then went on himself to
try to find some place of shelter and refresh
ment But when the parents were returning
with their recovered little ones, tbey found
their preserver lying quite dead upon the
snow, not far from where they parted with
him. The long exposure. In his exhausted
state, was too much for his little strength,
and having saved his little charge a stranger
to them as they to him he laid down and
died.
Sas Frascisco, July 8. The proprietors
of the patent fire-extinguisher yesterday ob
tained permission to set fire to the steamship
Sonera, lying at Saucellto, for tbe purpose of
showing how easily a fire could be extinguish
ed with one of tbelr lire annibilatora. Un
fortunately tbe tables were turned, and tbe
fire extinguished tbe aunlhilator and turned
tbe vessel to tbe water's edge. Tbe damage
was trifling, as tbe ship had been stripped
preparatory to breaking ber up.
Hoc, tltc Inventor or tbc Print
Ing Press.
Richard M. Hoe, Esq., is one of tho most
successful business men and manufacturers
of New York. His fame as the inventor of
tbc great American cylinder printing press is
now world-wide, and his factories In this city
and in England give employment to a large
number of people. All the great dally news
papers and many of the weekly Journals of
New York and other cities, in tbls country
and in Europe, are now printed on these
presses, llialnventionhas contributed more
to tbe general diffusion of knowledge among
the masses by means of the dally newspaper
and weekly journals than any other agency,
and It justly ranks among the greatest
achievements of the age. He was born in
humble life in the city of New York, Sep
tember 12, 1812. His father was an English
machinist, who came to the United States to
seek his fortune, In the year 1803. After fol
lowing the occupation ot a carpenter for some
years, he finally commenced the manufacture
of printing presses In 1825. A brother of the
elder Hoc also came out to tbls country and
followed the occupation of a mason. Both
of these brothers were nen of great reliabili
ty of character, and were held in much es
teem. Richard succeeded his father in busi
ness in 1SS3, and in association with his
brothers, he continued It to the present time.
They have established the largest manufac
tory of printing presses in this country, and
bucIi is the demand for their presses abroad,
that they have been obliged to establish a
factory in England. They also manufacture
a great variety of other presses. Their ofjlco
b in narrow old Gold street, on the site where
their business was first made successful.
Mr. Hoe's first patent was in 1S42, for im
provements in single and double cylinder
pres6cS,Vwbereby six thousand Impressions
per hour could bo obtained. He patented
other improvements in lS45,andinJulyIS47,
patented bis celebrated type-revolving print
ing press, which is now admitted to be the
best in the world, and by which twenty-thousand
impressions per hour can bo given. As
few of our readers probably know what this
press really is, wc will attempt a brief descrip
tion of it, premising that a type-revolving
press was patented by Nicholson, in Eng
land, in 1700, but the invention did not suc
ceed In holding the types.
Some time since the Messrs. Hoc stated to
us that one-hundred and thirty-three presses
bad been made In the United States. Of this
number, sixty-threo arc in use in tho United
States, tbirty-flvu in Eugland. eight in Scot
land, one In Ireland, one in I ranee, and five
in Australia. Besides these, four have becu
made In England under the jiatent, and two
Iu France. The London Timet, and many
other leading journals of Europe are printed
on tbe Hoe press.
Mr. Hoe has passed considerable time in
Europe, called thither partly by the introduc
tion of his press there, and partly by a love
of travel. Ho bas given to this press the
study of a lifetime. His aim has not been to
produce a machine of ingenious construction
as much as it has been to invent one of the
most practical utility in the achievement
Like all inventors, he has met with all man
ner of discouragement on his road to success,
but being a man of remarkable perseverance,
of rare Inventive genius, and understanding
thoroughly what was wanted in a fast print
ing press, he devoted energy, "talents and ex
perience to the accomplishment of his pur
pose. The result Is the Hoc press, which,
perhaps, more than any modern machine,
has received the encomiums of the world.
Mr. Hoe Is a quiet, unassuming gentleman.
He never made himself conspicuous In any
way save by his invention. He Is a man
noted for his sterling traits of character. His
great press is not more truo to mechanical
laws than be is to those of honor and justice.
in :act, me popuiarcuaractertstics or toe man
have bad much to do with tho success of the
invention. He has been found reliable in all
his statements, and while enthusiastic In fa
vor oi ins press, never promised more than
It could readily accomplish.
He Is a well proportioned, flue looking man.
His head Is large, with regular and promi
nent features, which are full of expression.
His eyes are full, and his brow is Intellectual.
You see at a glance that he is a man of men
tal and moral force, and not less personal
energy. He Is courteous and affable, and In
tho truest sense a high-toned gentleman.
ieia jvr. uuu.
Female Operatives. It Is well worth
while to note tho gradual advancement that
appears to have been, made In tho extension
of the field open to female effort, and'gratl-
; iu uc auiu iu ueiieve mat as oia preiu-
Ices die away and tho capabilities of
mis
class of operatives become better understood
ana appreciated, they may rise to the com
paratively independent position now occu
pied as workmen by the sterner sex.
The number of female operatives, as com
pared with that of men, in New York city,
was ascertained some years ago to approxi
mate tbc ratio of thirty-eight to one hundred,
but of late It bas doubtless increased, owing
to the number of new occupations which
of late have been made available them, or
which they have more largely followed, and
among which may be named printing, engra
ving, photograph coloring, and telegraphy.
As compositors tbey have proved very suc
cessful, and earn from eleven to twelve dol
lars per week, being paid the 6ame per one
luuusuuu cms as men.
They are even employed at press work, for
which thei- receive an average of six dollars
per week; and also as binders, book-sewers,
and gliders, for which the wages vary from
five to ten dollars is week. In each of 'these
occupations, it is said, with apparent reason,
that they are steadier and more reliable than
tbe maiu operatives. As engravers, women,
if skilled, can earn about twenty dollars a
week) but this is subject tothe serious draw
back of there beiog no certainty of continu
ous' employment Among the few branches
of work in which female operatives meet
with no direct competition, may bo mentlom
tioncd the somewhat laborious one of bur
nishing silver and gilded ware, at which they
make from eight to nine dollars a week.
The clothing business and the manufacture
of corsets, hoopskirts, etc., probably employs
the larger proportion of labor of which we
are speaking, and the wages paid may be said
to average about seven dollars a wei. As
a fnrorablo contrast to ihla low rate of com
pensation, It may be mentioned that compe
tent saleswomen receive much higher wages,
there being ouo or two instances In which It
Is said that a salary of five thousand dollars
Is cheerfully given ; bnt It must of course be
understood that tbe recipients are persons
having great experience, and capable or con
trolling a circle of customers.
it should be a subject or congratulation
that among our people the demand ror labor
is so great that none of tbe baleful results
that are said to have taken place In England
from tbc Introduction of female labor are to
be feared, for instead of permanently lower
ing the average of wages, it may be said to
liberate an increased proportion of male
workmen for tbe heavier and more arduous
classes of industry. Let employers facilitate
the entrance or females to any field of em
ployment ior wnicn metr strength is fitted;
et Inventors reduce the drn-rcrv of labori
ous occupations, until such are brought with
In tbeir capabilities or performance; let the
thoughtful ones of tbc community at large
ponder tbe subject, not merely as a passing
topic of remark or newspaper comment, but
seriously, as ono of tbe most Imnortant of
all tbe Industrial questions of the time, and
pernaps some aay oromer me Darsn lines of
trade may be swerved and bent until the
wages of women shall aDcroximate more
nearly, and we may add, more Justly, to those
oi men.- .unerican Artisan.
The Eotal Mail Steam Packet Co. We
observe by a notice of the Secretary of tbe
Royal MailC . jay that on and after June
2nd, tbe stc ". s of the line will run
from Southampton to Asplnwall, thus con
veying tbe passengers through wltbout
change and saving the freight from tbe dam
age of the extra, handling required to have It
transferred from one ship to another.
Miscellaneous Items.
Gen. Grant hrs re-bought the farm near
St Louis, which he used to cultivate.
A uam killed himself In Hartford recently,
because he could not get work.
A TRAVxirxo Insurance Agent recentlycot
Indignant at a fellow for savins; that' his
company was not sound enough to lBsnreplg
iron in a basement
The carriers of Susan Anthony's paper,
the devolution, are chiefly little girls, weariag
a pretty uniform, abort red dress. They at
tract much attention In New York.
Tue Emperor Don Pedro of Brazil, and tie
Empress, hare each resigned one-fourth of
their allowance from the national treasury,
In order to reduce tho national expenses.
The Venetian upper-ten are scandalised
because tho young Duchess' of Aosto, daughter-in-law
of Ylctor Emanuel, has presumed
to wear a " cheap and common-placo calico
petticoat'
Tub P S N Co.'s steamer Panama left
Taboga for Callao on the 12th Jnnc, where
she will take her place In the new Una to
Eugland, via the Straits of Magellan, under
command of Can t II Slvell. R NR. Star and
Herald.
Cast Steel. Experiments Just made at
the Navy Department with cast steel resulted
in favor or an American brand tho Black
Diamond Company. Pittsburg. Penn. which
stood the ordinary test of 242,100 pounds
tensile strengtn to tue squara incu, neiug ine
highest on record, and showing a superiority
over English manufacture.
The text of the PaDal Allocution on the
state of religion in Austria, has been received
In Loffion, The Pope declares that the Con
cordat should have been regarded by Austria
as perpetual in effect, and he warns all per
sons who approve of the laws recently passed
by the Rclcbsrath concerning the press, re
ligious toleration, civil marriage and public
education, to beware, ot the spiritual pains
and penalties attached to violations of the
sacred rights of the Church.
A vew stylo of bonnet may soon be expec
ted to be In vogue; tho manufacture of them
has already commenced. Thcv are made.
from manifa pulp, moulded on a block, then
spread with dissolved shellac and covered
with woolen flock or clothier's waste, and
frcssed till It has a velvet appearance. There,
s one objection to them, and that will be
iatai to mcir popularity unices aeaiers are
cunning enough to devise a way to remove
It they don't cost enough I Tbe expense of
manufacture aoes not execca ten cents each.
An inspection or tbe remains of Stephen
A. Douglas was made on tbe 2d or June, pre
paratory to their removal to the tomb erected
to his memory. Upon removing tbe lid cov
ering tbo glass, tbo face of tbe Illustrious
Senator was found to be In a remarkable
state of preservation, almost as natural as
when buried seven years ago. The complex
Ion is very fair, tbe contour of the head and
face apparently unchanged, and the expres
sion quite natural and plainly recognizable.
Tho hair looks as black and glossy as ever,
and tbc raiment as new and neat looking as
when first put on, not presenting the least
evidence of mildew or discoloration.
Progress op Tahiti. Letters from Tahiti
to tbo 5th of November give somo Interest
ing details of the cultivation there, that of
the sugar-cane having greatly extended, and
the produce or excellent quality, being In
much demand Iu the markets on the Ameri
can coast, as also In those of Australia and
New Zealand. Europeans now possess up
wards of 15,000 acres In the island, and are
continually making additions. The coloniza
tion bas extended to the Marquesas, In which
some 10,000 acres havo been placed under
cultivation, and the beneficial progress Is
extending.
Some of tho women or Manchester, Eng
land, who, lrrcspcctivo or sex, possess the
requisite qualifications or tbe elective fran
chise, havo demanded that tbelr names be
placed on the registry of voters; they claim
to be registered on the phraseology of an
act of Parliament, which declares tbat'in cer
tain cases the word "man" shall be con
strued to include " woman," and that the
word " he " shall mean " she." There are In
Manchester alone 7,000 women who make
this claim, and there chances of success are
. , .. , ..I.. Ktl.f If iirnF.tl 4 i
like demand will be made all over tho king
dom ; ana tnus mere win uc mrown mio me
approaching elections for a new nousd or
Commons an clement which neither Disraeli
nor Gladstone dreams or.
Is European court circles hard stories are
told concerning tbe growing intemperance
of tbe Emncror oi Russia. He Is said to be
drunk most oflils time, and his recent Illness,
was not a slight stroke or apoplexy, as was
reported by tbo continental papers, but
simply an attack or delirium tremens. The
Empress, although a confirmed invalid, Is
In such despair about It that sho has arous
ed hcrseirfrom the Indolent lire which she
has been leading ror somo time pact, and
now she tries to be as much as possible in
tbe company or tbo Emperor. Tho gossips
In St. Petersburg tell, also, disgusting stories
about the Emperor's love for his daughter-in-law,
the young Prlnbcss Dagmar, and of an
estrangement which. In consequence, It Is
Said to have taken place between him and
tbo Crown Prince. The latter, It Is stated,
neglects hl3 young wife entirely, and man
ages to be as much away from home as pos-
1DIC.
Separation of the Siamese Twins. The
Brooklyn Eagle, ot July 3d, says: After Ur
ine together threescore venrs. the Siamese
Twins have resolved to separate. No closer
rraleroai nmon man mat or (jnang ana .og
has been known amotur men. During a lonz.
life tho sympathies of the brothers have been
SO complete that tho frequently employed
and extravagant measure ot affection has
been absolutely realized one could not live
apart from tbe other. This singular, or
rathcrvlural, attachment Is about to be cov
ered, and probably no sundering of family
ties was ever regarded with so wide-spread
Interest as. this will be. When persona of
different sexes desire to be divorced, tbey go
to Chicago; Chang and Eng being of tue
same sex, will go to Parts to bo relieved of
companionship of which tbey are finally
weary. Years ago, distinguished English
and Freneli surgeons, who examined the Si
amese phenomenon, differed In opinion as to
tbe probable results or an operation destined
t. mnl-o thrt nnn twain. The doubt mEjja
the Twins hesitate, until now, at the age of
39, owing fo apprehension that disease con
tracted Dy one may oe curouiuoicaicu iu loci
other, thev are anxious to get rid of one
another. Chang and Eng married sisters,
and each is tbe lather of nine children. It 1
not Improbable that tbe attentat to avert
possible danger to one may result fatally to
both. The surgical experiment will soon be
made.
Trie Oaklasd Disaster. A terrible acci
dent occurred at tbe Oakland wharf on tho
evening of July 4th. About 5 o'clock, a large
number or people were going on board of
the steamer El CapUan, when the chads by
which the moveable wharf is bong, gave Way
and about one hundred persons wereyreeip;
luted into tho water. They were rascVted as
rapidly as possible, but many are' ksowa to'
have been drowned.
Abont 100 or 150 persons were precipitated
into tbe water. Ten bodies bad bees recov
ered np to tbe 6th.
The search ior tbe mlislrg bodies Is still
being prosecuted. Too much honor cot
be awarded to the brave fellows who jsajd
Into the water and helped to save those who
were unable to assist tbesaselre. Assent
-the number were the two Italians, Fstrero
and Casio, who after saving the uvea or sear
ly a dozen persons were taestsftlTts drown
ed. Tbelr remains lay in state at the aresory
of the Garibaldlan until to-day, whia the
faneral took place with most so Venn sshI im
posing ceremonies. The proceatioa. was
composed of the Garibaletlaas as an escort!
and about 580 citisens, principally X ,
nn fnnt fntlntreii hr l(fl AT BtflM llaiissisisis
forming In all a procession, fHy oae 'ssife
la length. , ;i .

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