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The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, August 26, 1868, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1868-08-26/ed-1/seq-1/

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HAWAIIAN
GAZETTE
BOOK AND JOB
Every Wednesday Horning, j
PRINTING lUSEMQrr !
THE "GAJUnTE'- OmOt
Is now prepared to extent all orders fsr
fisii iii fm num. .
OT KVSHY DESCKlrnOS.
WITH KEATITHfiS AND BISFATOX
AT 50.00 PER AXSUJI.
Hailed to Foreign Subscribers at $7.W.
OrncE On Merchant street, west of
he Post Office, Honolulu, II. I.
rriaui and rnUUhd by J. Morr Enra, at the
Gorcrnmr tit I'linticR OSce, to whom all business
cofiuauniesttoDS most be addressed.
VOL. IV NO. 32.1
HONOLULU, WEDNESDAY, AU GUST 26, 1868. 6.00 PER YEAR.
BUSINESS NOTICES.
XV. I. GRCO,
GENERAL COMMISSION AGENT AND
BROKER,
omci is rm-rxoor srru-rsca,
IS Qbwb Street, Honolulu, II. 1. fly
c. x. srEscra. n. xAcrAKLASE.
CIIA.S. IV. SFEVCKIt &. CO.,
GENERAL COKMSSION MERCHANTS, "
I Queen Street, Honolulu. If
McCOLGAA ic JOILYSOA,
MERCHANT TAILORS,
FORT STREET. HONOLULU,
10 Qppoalte T. C. Henelt'a. flj
IRA RICHARDSON,
IJIFOKTJUtt AAI IEAIJGR
IK BOOTS, SHOES & GENTLEMEN1.!! FUR
NISHING GOODS,
Corner of Fort and Merchant Streets,
J HONOLULU, II. I. Pj
EDWIN JONES,
GROCER AND SHIP CHANDLER,
Ealiuinu, Maul.
Money anil Recruits furnished to chips on
6-ly favorable terms.
xiii;o. II. IAVIES,
(lata Jsnion, Green A Co-,
IMPORTER i COMMISSION MERCHANT
Ac est ran
Lloyds' and the Liverpool Underwriters,
Northern Afiurance Company, and
British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co.
S- lJ
IIY3LA IinOTIIKItS,
Importers and Wholesale Dealers
In Fashionable Clothing, Hats, Caps, Boots
and Shoes, and every variety of Gentle
men's Superior Fnrnlshing Goods.
Store known as Capt. Snow's Building
MsacaiST Srxxrr, Honlalii, Oahtu M
C. n. LEWERS. 1. C. D1CKS05.
LEIVEKS &. IICISO,
IMPORTERS, WHOLESALE AND EETAIL
DEALERS IK LUMBER AND BUILD
ING HATEEIALS,
Fort, Xing, and Merchant Streets,
J HONOLULU, II. I. ly
J. . WALKER. 8. C. ALLEX.
WAJLKKIt Ac AXJLEA,
SHIPPING & COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
W) HONOLULU, II. I. Pjr
L. L. TORBERT,
DEALER IN LUMBER AND EVERY KIND
OF BUILDING MATERIAL.
OrriCE Corner Queen and Fort Streets.
lS-ly
IIOU.CS A; CO.,
SHIP CHANDLERS AND COMMISSION
MERCHANTS,
Queen Street, Honolulu.
Particular attention paid to the Purchase and
Sale of Hawaiian Produce.
BErzRS sr rrRMisjio.x to
C. A. Williams A Co., C. Brewer i. Co.,
Castle A Cooke, H. Hackfeld A Co.,
D. C. Waterman, I C. L. Richards A- Co.,
2-ly
GEORGE G. HOWE,
Dealer in Redwood and Northwest Lumber,
Shingles, Doors, Sash, Blinds, Nails,
Faints, etc
At bis Old Stand on the Esplanade. 36Vly
E. S. FLAGG,
CIVIL ENGINEER & SURVEYOR,
2S I-alinlmi, Jliml. 3m
.mtS. J. II. ULACU,
FASHIONABLE MILLINER,
FORT ST., BETWEEN KING & HOTEL.
Bonnets made up and trimmed in the latest
styles. Stamping, Braiding and Em
broidering, executed to order.
1 A. SCTIAEI'EIt Ac CO.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
3S Honolulu, Oanu, II. I. My
JSD. HOFFSCHLAEGER & CO.,
IMPORTERS & COMMISSION MERCHANTS
J Honolulu, OaUu, II. I. ly
A. S. GLEGIIOKA,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN
GENERAL MERCHANDISE,
Fire-proof Store, corner of Queen and Kaahu-
mana Streets.
Retail Establishment on Nnuanu Street.
t- ly
THEODORE C. IIEUCIat,
IMPORTER & COMMISSION MERCHANT.
1 Honolulu, Oanu, II. I. Qy
II. IUCKFELO At CO.,
GENERAL COMMISSION AGENTS.
6- Honolulu, Oahn, S. I. ly
THE TOM MOORE TAVERN,
BY J. O'ZVIEUL,
S3 Comer of King Fort greets, ly
J. D. WICKE,
Ajtcnt for the Bremen Board
of Undcrvrritcrs.
All average claims against said Underwriters,
occurrinc in or about this Kingdom, Trill
hare to be certified before me. 7ly
C1IOG IIOO.
COHNISSIOH MERCHANT AND GEN
ERAL AGENT.
Agent for the Panltaa and Amauulu
Sugar Plantations.
Importer of Teas and other Chinese and For
eign Goods, and Wholesalo Dealer in Ha
waiian Produce, at the Fire-proof Store,
Nuuanu Street, below King. 21-ly
K. IV. ASDREWS,
MAOHmfflST,
Fort Street, opposite Odd Fellowi' HslL
Gives particular attention to the repair of
Fire Anns, Sewing Machines, a Locks.
J3ratnjt of Jfcelinerj, -c., rujde to Order.
So- It
WHJL.IAM, KYAIV,
Variety Store No. 2,
Mnnnakca Street.
AU kinds of Merchandise and Groceries,
jn. ly
.BUSINESS NOTICES.
E. P. Ada's. S. C. WILDER.
AUA3IS A: 1VII.BEK,
AUCTION & COMMISSION MERCHANTS
C7 Queen Street, Honolulu. fly
31. KAM.EE,
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION AGENT,
Office with E. I. Adams, Esq.,
QUEEN STREET, HONOLULU.
aims sr rcunseios to
Gen. Morula L. Snilth, V.Mpn. C. Errwtr & Co.
S. Consul. I Ueen. Walker t Allen.
Messrs. Eichards kCa. IE. P. Adams, 1J. U
AFOXG & ACIIUCIC,
IMPORTERS, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
DEALERS IN GENERAL MERCHAN
DISE AND CHINA GOODS,
Fire-Proof Store In Nuuanu Street,
43 under the Public Hall. ly
C. . BARTOW,
AUCTIONEER,
Sales.R.oom on Queen Street, one door
177 from TXaahumanu St. lJ
CIIAIJIVCEY c. BEirrx,
DEALER IN NEWSPAPERS, MAGAZINES,
AND PERIODICALS,
19 FORT STREET, HONOLULU, ly
JOIIIV II. PATV,
NOTARY PUBLIC AND COMMISSIONER
OF DEEDS
TOE T11E STATE Oy CALirOESIA.
Office at the Base or Bishop & Co.
t it
J. MONTGOMERY
COXTIXCES TO PRACTICE AS A
Solicitor, Attorney, and Proctor in the
Supreme Court, in Law, Equity, Admiralty,
Probate and Dirorcc. 3-ly
H. A. V 1 DEM AN N,
XOTAKY PUBLIC
OrriCE AT THE ISTEEIOR DeFARTJCEST.
o- ly
eaxaass rrxx.
B. A. T. CAUIS-
C. BREWER e CO.,
SHIPPING & COMMISSION
MEB.CTT A,
Honolulu, II, I.
AGENTS Of the Boston and Honolulu
Packet Line.
AGENTS For I ho Maker, IVallaku and
liana Plantations.
AGENTS For the Purchase and Sale of
Island Produce.
REFER TO
JouxM. Hoon, Esq NewTork
Cass. Bacwix 1 Co 1 ri-ton
J is. Hraxiirtu, lia J -BoeI0Q
J. C. Muxnx A Co. 1
B. 6. Swus Co. i-San rrantisco
Cass. W. Baooas, Esq. ) S-ly
G. VT. IVOIlTOiV & CO.
COOPERS AND GAUGERS,
AT THE NEW STAND
0 THE ESILAAIE.
WE AKE PKEPARED TO
fgaMi attend to
att. work m our Xixxra
At the Shop next to the Custom House, where
we can be found at all working hours.
WE HATE OX HAND AND FOR SALE
OIL CASKS AND BARRELS,
Of different sites, new and old, which we will
sell at the very
LOWEST MARKET RATES.
All work done in a thorough manner, and
warranted to giro satisfaction.
AU kinds of Coopering Mate rial and Coopers'
Tools for Sale. 3m
J. P. HUGHES,
Importer and Manufacturer
OF ALL KINDS OP SADDLERY.
Carriage Trimming done with neatness and
dispatch. AU orders promptlyattended to.
Corner of Fort and Hotel streets, Honolulu.
10- ly
NEVILLE & BARRETT,
Planters & Genera! Store Keepers
KEOPUKA, SOUTH KONA, HA WAIL
(Near KcalaVekna Bay.)
Island produce bought, Ships supplied with
Wood, Beef and other ncessaries.
Agent at Honolulu.. .......A. S. Clegboes.
11- 1T
M. S. CRINBAUM & CO.,
IMPORTERS AND 'WHOLESALE
Dealers in Fashionable Clothing
Hats, Caps, Boots and Shoes, and eterj variety
of Gentlemen's superior fnrnishing goods.
STORE IN MAKEE'S BLOCK,
10 Queen Street, Honolulu, II. L ly
VOLCANO HOUSE.
CRATER 0E KIIATJEA. HAWAII.
MTIIIS ESTABLISHMENT ISsgh
now open for the reception of visitors
to the Volcano, whj may rely on finding com
fortable rooms, a good taljle, and prompt at
tendance. Experienced guides for the Crater
always in readiness.
STEAM AND SULPHUR BATHS !
Hones Grained and Stabled if Desired.
CHARGES REASONABLE.
Parties Tisiting the Volcano Tia Hilo, can
procure animals warranted to make the jour
ney, bj D. II. Hitchcock, Etq., Hilo. 37-lj
GEORGE WILLIAMS,
LICENSED SHIPPING AGENT,
COXTI3iinES the business. on
bis old plan of settling with officers and
seamen immediately on their shipping at his
oSce. Ha ring no connection, either direct or
indirect, with any outfitting establishment,
and allowing no debts to be collected at his
o5ce he hopes to give as good satisfaction in
the future as he has in the past.
S3.0Cce on J as. Robinson A Co.'s Wharf,
near the IT. S. Consulate.
Honolulu". March 27, 1S6T- 21-3
PIANOS TUNED.
PIANOS AND OTHER
MUSICAL ICSTRUMENTS
'Tuned and Repaired, by CHAS.
DERBY, at the Hawaiian Theatre.
Lessons giTen on the Piano & Guitar.
The best of references giten. SI-Iy
BUSINESS NOTICES.
J. H. THOMPSON,
GENERAL BLACKSMITH
HONOLULU, II. I.
HAS COSTASTLT
on hand and for sale, a good
assortment of
BEST REPINED BAR IRON!
ALSO
Best Blacksmith's Coal,
At the Lowest Market Prices SS-lj
JX'O. JtOTT. SAf'l.2COTT.
JOHN NOTT & CO.,
Copper & Tin Smiths,
fTTAKE PLEASURE IN ANNOUNC
JL rnjr to the public that they are prepared
to furnish all kinds of Corrrn Wonst, consist
ing in part, of STILLS, STSIKE PANS,
SOBGJIAM PASS. VTOHUS, PUMPS, tc.
Also .on hand, a full assortment of Tlx
Wabe, which we oCer for sale at the lowest
market prices.
All Kinds of Repairing done ivltU
Acatness and Dispatch.
Orders from the other Islands will meet
with prompt attention.
Kaahumanu Street, one door above Flit
ners. 2l-3m
JEWELER AND ENCRAVER
MB. JT. COSTA
Is now prepared to execute with promptness
all work in his line of business, such as
IVatcu ami Clock Repairing,
3Ianufacturlnc; Jewelry,
And EntrraTlng.
Shop on Fort Street, opposite Odd Fellows'
Hall. 2141m
JAMES L. LEWIS,
COOPER AND G AUGER,
AS TEE OU) ST-OITO,
Corner of King and Bethel Sts.
a v .........
If stock of (JlL
SHOOKSand
all kinds of
COOPERING MATERIALS !
CONSTANTLY ON HAND.
He hopes, by attention to business, to merit
a continuance of the patronage which lie has
heretofore enjoyed, and for wTiich he now re
turns his thanks. - 34-3m
KOIXT EVCKOFT,
3P Xj TJ 3VE 13 DEI jEJ. ,
HAS OPENED HIS SHOP ON KING
Street, next door to Horn's Confection
ary Shop, and offers bis services in all branch
es of Plumbing. All Jobs will hereafter be
executed with promptness and in a thorough
manner. 2$-3m
SUGAll & MOLASSES.
1SCS
1868
HILO, II. I.
Sugar and Molasses.
CROP COMING IN AND F0K SALE IN
quantities to suit purchasers, by
WALKEK 4 ALLEN,
24-3m Agents.
0N0MEA PLANTATION.
Suilr ii n 1 1 Molasses Crop 1808
COMING LN, FOR SALE IN QUANTI
Ges to suit -purchasers, by
WALKER A ALLEN,
21-3m Agents.
PRINCEVILLE PLANTATION.
Sugar and Molasses Crop 1808
COMING IN, FOR SALE LN QUANTI
ties to suit purchasers, by
WALKER ALLEN,
ZiSm Agents.
WAILUKU PLANTATION.
iYEW CHOP
"vrow coMi
For sale bv
21-3m C. BREWER & Co., Ag'ts.
JNSURANOE NOTICES.
SAN FRANCISCO
BOARD OF UNDERWRITERS.
Till! umler8ifjnellmviiiprlecri
appointed agents for the San Irancisco
Board oi Underwriters, representing the
California Insurance Company,
Merchants Mutual Marine InsCo
l?aclfic Insurance Company,
California Lloyd's, and
Home Mntnal Insurance Company.
Beg leave to inform Masters of Vessels and
the public generally, that all losses Bustained
by Vessels and Cargoes, insured by either of
the above companies, against perils of the
seas and other risks, at or near the several
Sandwich Islands, vill have to be rerifled by
them.
21-3m H. HACKFELD A CO.
iiA.iniritGir-ititi:.iiK
FLEE MSUEANCE COMP'Y.
THE UNDERSIGNED, HAVING
been appointed Agents of the above Com
pany, are prepared to insure risks against Fire
on Stone and Brick: Buildings, and on Mer
chandise stored therein, on the most favorable
terms. For particnlars apply at theomce of
5-ly F. A. SCHAEFER A CO.
Merchants7 Mutual
MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY.
OF SAA FBAXCISCO.
rpHE undersigned baring been ap
JL pointed Agents for the above Company 7
are prepared to issue policies on CArGOES,
Feeights and Teeascke.
WALKER A ALLEN,
12-m Agents, Honolulu.
California Insurance Company.
THE lindersisricd, AG EATS
of the aboTe Company, have been author
ised to insure risks on CARGO, FREIGHT
and TREASURE, by COASTERS, from Hono
luln to aU ports of the Hawaiian Group, aid
rice Tens. H. HACKFELD k CO.
-S-ly
SnXWsttiH
History of the Kamehamehas.
TaAniAixs nest Tax liawirux or.iL Kaxixic.
Ifnmelinmfha I.
This King was born at the time of gnat
war, which immediately foUowed the death
of Kcawe, the King of Hawaii. Mokn wa
at that time King of HUo, Hamakna and part
of Puna, while Kalanlknihonnlnamokn was ,
King of Mini, and brother of Kekualpolwa'
nnl, the Queen; AlapalNul, the eon ofKa'
nana, was living with the King of ManL
IVhcnAlapal heard how the Kingdom of
Hawaii bad been disposed of, he formed the
design of making war npon those chiefs. Ho
accordingly proceeded to Hawaii, and meet
ing the chiefs in battle, be was victorious
over tbcm, causing them great loss, and thus
Hawaii became one Kingdom under AlapaL
He took two chiefs, Kaianiopuu and Klo
na, and adopted them as his children, giving
them the command of his forces. Kekanlike,
the same mentioned above as Kalanlkulho
nulnamokn, remained as King of MauL Ho
was living at Kanpo, engaged in building
houses of worship for his gods. His gener
als, three in number, were stationed with the
soldiers of the King, at Fopolnri, Kumunul,
and Pohoula.
Kekanlike was very fond of war, and bo
fore long lie sailed for Hawaii and made war
on Alapal in Kona. The flghUng was severe,
and there were large bodies of soldiers on
both sides. Kekanlike destroyed everything
growing that he could get hold of through
out Kona. However, he was obliged to re
treat before Alapal, and took to his canoes.
Proceeding to Kekaba, he mocked the peo
ple there, and at Kawalhae he cnt down the
cocoauut groves. Landing at Kohala, be
slaughtered the Inhabitants, and seizing their
goods, returned back to Maui.
When Alapal heard of these evil doings of
the King of Maul, he was moved with pity
ior the people of Hawaii, and consulted with
his chiefs, followers and soldiers, intendlug
to carry the war into MauL They all advised
him to that effect, for be was a noted war
rior, and came near being master of tbo
islands, from Hawaii to Oabu. He could
bare done so if ho had desired, but he was a
chief that had regard for the families of other
chiefs; and besides, he was connected with
the Royal families of Maui and Oahu.
Alapai's residence was in Kallua, In Kona.
It having been decided to go to war with
Maul, great preparations were made. All
the chiefs and common people went to this
war from all parts of Hawaii. Alapai and
his generals and bis troop embarked in a
large fleet of donblo and single canoes for
the expedition. Landing at Kohala, the
camp of the army stretched from Koaic to
Punwepa. Embarking again, the King of
Hawaii landed at Kapakal, Kokoikl, near
Upolu, and close to the lleiau of Paao, call
ed Mookinl, North Kohala.
The second night after arriving at this
place, Kekualpolwa was taken with the pains
of child-birth. This Kekualpolwa belonged
to Hawaii and Is a different person from the
one ot tbo same name belonging to Maui.
She was a daughter of Kekela and Haae.
The night was very rainy, and there was
no suitable place where she could lie-in, and
she was compelled to remain under the lanai
of the sleeplng-honse. The chiefs remained
awake a long time, waiting for the expected
event, but weary with wotching and shiver
ing from the cold rain, they at length went
to sleep, leaving the immediate attendants of
the chicfess. She retired into the house, and
lying down by the side with her feet towards
the thatch, the child was born. But previous
to this, a man came on the outside of the
bonse, opposite the place where the chiefeES
lay, and crouching down, listened. The mo
ment the child appeared, this man lifted up
tbe thatch of the bouse, spread a piece of
tapa under the child, and wrapping it up, dis
appeared with it in his arms. When tlic
chiefs arose in tbe morning, they were aston
ished toSnd that the child bad been stolen
away. When It was fully daylight, all Ko
hala was searched for tbe child, and some
houses were burned.
But tbe person who stoic the child was
Nacole, chief of Kohala. His object was to
get possession of the person of the yonng
King and so become his guardian, and even
tually the King should become attached to
him, and be be tbe favorite.
Tbe child thus stolen away and hidden was
the First Kamehameha.
Kamehamcha I. was born at Kokoiwl, in
the month of February, or early in March
perhaps, in tbe year 1736. His mother was
a high chiefess among tbe families of Hawaii.
His father was Keoua, the younger brother
of Kaianiopuu, both children of Kamakal
mokn. It was an ancient custom among tbe chiefs
to bestow a child npon the chief of some
other island. Thus it has frequently been
said that KabekiU, son of the King of Maul,
was the father of Kamchameba, but that
arose from tbe fict that the chiefs of Hawaii
and Maui were closely related by blood.
It Is said that tbat'was the reason why Ka
meeaumoku and Kamanawa were made to
live together; they were tabued twins of Ke
kanlike, King of Maul, and were to lire at
Hawaii, for the child of Kabekili, (Kameba
meha). Iu a song or mele composed by Keaka,
the wire of Alapal, King of Hawaii, it is said
that Kamehameha was born in the month of
Iknwa:
"In Tain were the pains cf the chief la Iknwa."
Another mele places the birth in MakaUi:
"The prayer is cflered to the great powers;
In Mskalil was the burning bet day;
Then wms born the young chief, sod there was a
cry went up." f
Tbere.'was rain, thunder and lightning, the
nignt that Kamehameha was born.
Tbe month called Iknwa is noted for rain,
thunder and lightning. It corresponds to
tbe month of February and tbe first part of
March.
Mskalil, is tbe coHectiTe came of the six sum
mer moo tin Txi35-
t The two idioms are so entirely differest, that it
is quits Impossible to render tbe fall lores sad effect
of the Hawaiian meles into TnrHth The Imagery,
so rrernant to llawmiuns, is incomprehensible to
the foreign mind, sad the poetry, cf which they
are fall of some of the finest Bights, becomes, wbea.
reduced lato the practical, plain, nnromsntic Anglo
caxon. (unless, indeed, great poetical license Is allow
ed) ths plainest kisd cf pros. TzAXS.
On account of the confinement of Kekual
polwa, she did not accompany Alapal, the
king, in tbe war against MauL
About this Ume, it was ascertained that
Nicole was the person who bad carried off
the child. It was then decided thit"Nieolo
should be its guardian, and Kaianiopuu ap
pointed bis younger sister Kekunuhlelmoku
to act as Its foster mother.
At Ilalawa, in the interior port of Kohala,
was Kamehameha nursed and tended until
he was about five years of age, it which time
Naeolc returned tbe chUd to Alapal Tbe
latter gaTO him in charge of Keaka, who
thenceforward became bis principal nurse.
When Kekanlike returned to Maul from
bis raid on Hawaii, wherein he bad slaughter
ed the people of Kohala and despoiled them
of their goods, be made his residence at Mo
kulau. In iiUDO. with bis mind, however,
strongly fixed on making another descent on
Hawaii, with the design this time, of robbing
the people of Waiplo and the chiefs and peo
ple of the district of Hamakna.
But the Almighty interposed what proved
to be an obstacle to bis going to Hawaii,
lie was taken very ill with a spasmodic,
twitching disease, which the doctors tried In
rain to cure. So at Moknlau the succession
of the kingdom was settled, by the decision
of Kekaullkc, the dominion of Maul was con
firmed to Kamehameha, because his rank
was superior to that of other high chiefs.
So that both on the side of tne chtef families
of Maul and Hawaii, the Kamehamehas were
highest in rank, Kaianiopuu, King of Hawaii,
baring confirmed the same by bis decision of
the succession to his heirs from Klwalao.
Kamehameha II. and III. were descended
from these two families of kings.
To be continued.)
Tlie Chinese Treaty.
The Washington correspondent of the Bos
ton Journal gives the following synopsis of
the articles of the treaty negotiated by the
Chinese Embassy and Secretary Seward :
It is now understood that tlio negotiations
were concerning additional articles of the
treaty of June 18th, 1S6S, and that those ar
ticles were signed on the 4th Inst, by Wm.
H. Seward on the part of the United States,
and by Anson Burlingame, EnToy Extraordi
nary, and Chi Kung and Snn Cbla-Kna, Asso
ciated High Envoys of the Emperorof China.
There are nine additional articles which have
thus been agreed upon, and which are now
before the Senate of the United States for
ratification.
Article one declares that the Emperor of
China, in making concessions to the subjects
of Foreign Powers of the privilege of resid
ing on certain tracts of land, or resorting to
certain waters of that Empire for the pur
poses of trade, has not relinquished bis right
of eminent domain overland and waters, and
will not permit hostilities or surrender his
right of Jurisdiction over person or property
thereon.
Article two stipulates that any privilege or
Immunity in respect to trade or navigation
within the Chinese dominions, which may
not have been stipulated by treaty, shall be
subjected to the discretion of the Chinese
Government, and may be regulated by it ac
cordingly, but not in a manner incompatible
with treaty stipulations.
Article three provides that the Emperor of
Cbinasball have the right to appoint Consuls
at ports of the United States, who shall c.n
joy the same privileges and immunities as
those which ore enjoyed by pnblic law and
treaty In the United States by the Consuls of
Great Britain and Russia.
Article four, provides that citizens of the
United States in China, of every religious
persuasion, and Chinese subjects In the Uni
ted States, shall enjoy liberty of conscience,
and shall be exempt from all disability or
persecution on account of their religions taitb
or worship in cither country. Cemeteries of
whatever nationality shall be held in respect
nud free from disturbance.
Article fire recognizes the right of man to
change bis borne and allegiance, but con
demns any other than an entirely voluntary
emigration for these purposes.
Article six provides that citizens of tbe
two nations snail enjoy in the other the same
privileges, immunities or exemptions in re
spect to travel or residence as may be enjoy
ed by the citizens of tbe moat favored nations.
" Article seven recognizes the necessity for
representative coins having a common value,
and also a common standard of weight and
measures for all countries.
Article eight provides that Chlnescsubjects
shall bo admitted to all schools and colleges
of tbe United States without being subject
to any religions or political test, and also
authorizes citizens of the United States to
maintain schools In those places In China
where foreigners are permitted to reside.
Article nine sets forth thattbeUniied States
always disclaiming and disavowing all inter
vention by one nation in tbe affairs of an
other, does disclaim and disavow any inten
tion or right to interfere in the domestic ad
ministration of China. There is evidently
something omitted here in regard to thecon
struction of railroads, telegraphs, or other
material internal improvements. On the
other hand, His Majesty the Emperorof Chi
na reserves to himself the right to decide the
time and manner and circumstances of intro
ducing such Improvements within bin domin
ions. With this mutual understanding it is
agreed that if tbe Emperor of Cbina shall at
any time, determine to construct such works,
and shall apply to the United States or any
other Western Power for facilities to carry
out that policy, engineers shall be designated,
who shall be paid by the Chinese Govern
ment. The above sketch of tbe nine articles now
before the Senate is substantially correct. If
they are ratified, ti.e United States will vir
tually become the protector of Chins against
any aggressive demands of the European
Powers. Should they consent, Cbina will
become neutral ground, under its own offi
cials and laws. Nor can Foreign Powers, as
heretofore, enforce civilization at the can
non's month.
Bbave Little Pabaocat. Tbo Brazilian
forces arc faring very badly on the Parana.
A heavy bombardment of Hnmaita, and a
combined attack on the rear of that position,
undertaken for tbe purposs of cutting off tbe
communication of the Paraguayans, failed,
after a desperate conflict. The allies, as tbe
Brazilian forces are termed, fought des
perately; but tbe comparative handful of
Paraguayans were still more desperate In
their resistance, and drove off their enemy
with great loss. Against Paracnay, a coun
try not so large as PennsTlTinla or New
York,andofapopulaUon or only 1,000,000
Brazil, tbe Argentine Confederation and Uru
guay bring 73,000 soldiers and twenty-four
Teasels of war, of which ted are iron-clads.
The pertinacity and unanimity of tbe people
of Paraguay are without a parallel in tbe
history of tbe world. In Fort Hnmaita they
hare only 2,000 troops. These hare, it is
said, so undermined the fort that if they are
compelled to vacate it by tbe enemy, they
will be enabled to blow it up after leaving it
Even the Paraguayan women are in arms,
fighting against the invader. It is no longer
proper for the civilized world to look idly
upon this struggle of tbe brave little republic
against such fearful odds, and under such
desperate circumstances. Sncb a war has
been In progress long enough. It would be
correct for the great powers to interfere and
put a stop to it. Humanity calls for such s
step.
As unknown lady has ieen engaged to sing
it a Parisian theatre, she stipnlaUng that she
may be allowed to wear a mask, and that no
attempt be made to ask who she is, or where
she Uvea. It is surmised that she possesses
both rank and fortune.
CALIFORNIA CORRESPONDENCE.
ESFECIALLT TO TUX HAWAIIAN GAZETTE.
Sax Fbascisco, Aug. Sd, 1SC3.
Seymour and Blair dominated.
When the JTontana took her departure
from this port, on her last Toyago to Hono
lulu, she carried out word that the National
Democratic Convention had met in New
York, and effected a temporary organization,
but very UtUe news beyond that. The two
thirds rule wis adopted by the Convention
as being, of course, the most Jkmocrafic plan,
and this had the effect to protract its sittings,
in unsuccessful balloUngs, for several days.
Henry W. Palmer, of Wisconsin, was chosen
temporary Chairman. SubaequenUy, (on the
Cth), Horatio Seymour, of New York, was
elected tbe permanent presiding officer. Oo
tbe 9th, the same gentleman received the
nomination for President of the United
States, on tbe 2d ballot Pendleton, Han
cock, Hendricks, Field and Johnson were
the most prominent candidates In opposi
tion tbo three first named leading through
out the contest. On one ballot. Chase re
ceived a complimentary vote from the Call.
Ikrnli delegation, and that was pretty much
tbe extent of bis popularity, although the
attempt was made in the galleries, by pro
longed and vociferous "applause, to create for
him a forced recognition. The dodge would
not serve. The Chief Jnstice bad but few
friends among the delegates, and even these
were committed to other candidates. Frank
Blair, of Missouri, received the nomlnaUon
for Vice-President.
Antecedents of the A'omlnees.
Before the Presidential campaign is over,
we shall all learn enough of the political bi
ography of tho Tarlous candidates. The bat
tle of the Republicans wUl bo fought on
General Grant's record. The tactics of the
Democracy will be, as far as possible, to pre
vent Seymour's past history from being
brought to light They can not, however,
couceal the fact that, while Governor of No w
York, ho opposed the draft, and would, in a
very short time, have taken that State out ol
the Union, or plunged it into bloodshed and
anarchy, If the Government had not taught
him an admonitory lesson in the shape of
40,000 troops, quartered wltbin calling dis
tance in that State, under charge of Gen.
Ben. Butler. Neither can he wipe out the
damning record of his speech to tho mob in
the city of New York, which had fired tho
city, demolished buildings, and murdered the
unoffending negroes wherever they showed
themselves. Instead of ordering out the
military, to disperse these atrocious villains
with grape and canister, he went among
mem ana aaaressca tnem in rose-water
phrase, requesting them, as his " friends,"
to desist from their belUsb work and go
home.
Gen. Frank Blair was so zealous a Republi
can during the war, that he resigned his seat
In Congress to join tbe army. He com
manded one of the divisions under Sherman,
iu the celebrated march from "Atlanta to
the sea." His lntensejadicalism caused him
to quarrel with Mr. Lincoln, because ha
thought that gentleman too slow, humane
and lorgivlng in his treatment of rebels. He
has turned a complete somersault
ISctvrecn Stool.
In this ill-assorted selection of candidates,
it will be seen that an attempt was made to
please both parties ; and, as is usually the
case under like circumstances, neither is en
tirely satisfied. The chivalry element of the
Democracy have poured out the vials of their
bitterest wrath against Gen. Grant, because
of bis having been a "Federal Butcher."
Tbey must now either choke down their
spleen, or, by Implication, condemn one of
their own men, when they denounce ours.
This is certainly a most humiliating attitude,
particularly as it renders stultification abso
lutely necessary. Tbe war Democrats will
be very loth to accept Seymour, and if they
do, it must be without the exhibition of
much enthusiasm. He can gain no strength
from the Republican ranks, and without ac
cessions from that quarter, it is difficult to
seo how he can be elected. Tbe Republicans
are at this time immensclr in the (majority
throughout tbe Union, and bo I feel confi
dent they will remain. Or, If a man like
Seymour can be successful, in the face of all
he did to defeat the loyal cause while chief
executive officer of the great State of New
York, then there Is very little sincerity or
fidelity in tbe people, who suffered so much
and contributed so freely to crush out his
political friends during tbe rebellion.
s Conservative" Soldiers' and Sailors' Con
vention. .Some funny things occur in this world,
and among the funniest, was a "Conserva
tive" Soldiers' and Sailors' Convention, held
as a kind of tender to tbe National Demo
cratic Convention in New York, while that
body was in session. Perhaps yon can im
agine what sort of a body that Is. They are
brave chaps, undoubtedly, who can be "con
servative" during a battle! There were a
good many of that kind of troops at the bat
tle of Bull Run. "Conservative!" men
who, if they fought to put down tbe re
bellion, now acknowledge by tbclr acts that
tbey did wrong, or an base cnougb, if they
thought themselves in tbe right, to desert
the cause of justice iu order to display
a mockery of parfy fealty!
I think it would be safe to assert that
seven-eighths of these "Conservatives" were
made citizens by the special Act of Congress
relating to those who served out their time
In the army, without going through the reg
ular forms of naturalization; that most of
them enlisted for tbe sake of tbe bounty;
that six-sevenths of tbe number were Irish
men, and that of these, five-sixths and three
fourths belonged to the Church represented
by Pio 'ono. Generals Franklin and Slo
cum disgraced themselves by taking part iu
this body, which bad the brazen effrontery to
"declare tbe belief that they (tbe Republi
cans, intend, by the use of tbe army under
Grant's supreme control, to cause tbe elect
oral vote of some of the States to be cast for
himself by force or fraud ; and declare the
solemn conviction that tbe free institutions
of tbe country bare never been in greater
jeopardy than now, and tbey look to tbe de
liberations of the Democratic party now as
sembled in Convention with the greatest
anxiety, belieTing that on their action de
pends the future prosperity of our country."
Recess or Congress.
Congress, by concurrent resolution, bis
agreed upon taking a recess from tbe 27th
inst to tbe 3d day of September. It is not
deemed entirely safe to "Ieare the President
alone in bis glory." He has made a number
of obnoxious a j paiotaents, which the Sen
ate has rejecti d, -nd could be only get that
body out of tbe way, would make otbsrs still
more objectionable, from among the- rebels
who fought against the Government, and
their copperhead sympathisers, who arc eager
for the spoils. This kind of men. If ap
pointed In vacation, will find It expcatlT to
accept oQcts, for they will bo ctrtata to be
rejected when Congress re-assembles.
Reconstruction.
Yon will observe by the news tint Um
Fourteenth sxaendmentHo tbe CouotHnHon
of tbe United States has been ceecamd la
by the requisite number or States, tad by
Presidential nroclomiUon has) been dsekrsd
to bo part of the organic law of Um.)sshL,
You will also notice that at least serea of tke
Southern States have re-cstabliihcd their loess
governments, and have been admitted to rep
resentation Iu Congress. These comprise
Arkansas, Alabama, Louisiana, Georgia, Fier
Ida, North and South CaroUna.
The Democratic Platform.
A brief analyses of this document wBJ
show bow singularly absurd and mean! ogress
it la In some of its features:
iTIrst The Immediate restoration of SjX
States to their rights in the Union under the
constitution of civU government and tM
American people."
Congress, for two years past, has exerted
aU its power to bring tbe Southern State
back Into the Union, in which noble object
it bis been opposed by every effort and obsta
cle which tne Democratic piny ana su inim
ical Chief Magistrate could throw in IU way.
"Second Amnesty for all post political
offences and tho regulation of the elective
franchise in the States by their citizens."
A proclamation of amnesty bid been Issued
by the President before this paragraph was
"Third Thepayment of the public debt ot
the United States as soon as practicable; tU
money drawn from the people by taxation,
except so much as Is requisite for the neces
sities of tho Government, economically sd,
ministered, being honestly applied, to such
payment, and when the obligations of tho
Government do not expressly stato upon
their face or the law under which ther were)
issued does not prorlde that they shall ba
paid In coin, they ought in right and In Jus
tice to be paid In the lawful money of the
United States."
The -first clause or this section Is verblsge
mere iteration, And on tbe second, the par
ty is uiviticu in opinion.
The sixth section calls for " economy In
tbe administration of the government;" tho
old cry of the politicians, who are all tbe
UmeattempUng to put their arms elbow deep
into the treasury. It also demands s reduc
tion of the army, which Congress baa already
made; and the abolition of tho Freedmen's
Bureau a measure also determined upon by
the samo body.
California Affairs.
Tho Labor Exchange.
A report from the Secretary of this Institu
tion, for the month of June, shows that em
ployment was furnished to 1,233 men and
boys. The report says :
"Tbo orders for labor of these classes
amounted to 1,070, leaving 430 unfilled, ow
ing to ine scarcity oi suitarjie persons, in
consennence or the vcrv larro number of au-
pllcatlons for female help, both from tbe city
and country, It was thought expedient to try
the experiment of filling this class of orders
as far as possible, and -70 females were pro
vided with situations, nearly equally divided
between the city and country. Too orders
amounted to nearly 500, including some from
Oregon, Nevada, Arizona, and from nearly
every section of this State- It Is scarcely
possible to overestimate the demand for fe
male lanor on mis coast, some oi tne par
ties requiring it have sent money to pay tha
travelling expenses of tbe persons engaged.
and havu left It to the Secretary to fix the
rate of wages. Tbe orders for American,
German, English and Scotch women are sur
prisingly numerous. There are several offers
for 1 20 and upwards per month ior females
oi iuis ciass, wno can ao piain cooxing, wean
ing and Ironing for small families. Some of
tbe most nromiiient and responsible citizens .
in this Slate and Nevada being among those'
wno require mis class oi neip.
As a cencrol thine the Irish female ser
vants have a most unreasonable objection to'
leave the city. It Is probsble from this fact
that the orders for females of other national
ities have been so numerous.
Tbe experiments with this class of labor
hare demonstrated the necessity of establish. '
Ing a female branch at the Exchange."
I can only repeat what I said in former com
munication, that the Labor Exchange is the
very best practical mode ever discovered for
tbe encouragement of Immigration to Cali
fornia: and what has proved most singular
thus far Is, that the demand for laborers
male and female exceeds the supply. Ia
two months, 3,274 persons were furnished
with employment Tho Irish girls refuse to
go to the country unless tbe town to which
they are sent contains a Catholic church and
a priest.
small rox.
This terrible epidemic has been among us
for a couple or three weeks post As yet, It v
has been confined chiefly to Petaluma and
this city. Our health officer reports about
one hundred and fifty deaths from this cause,
and the disease is rapidly spreading. At
first the patients were taken to the pest
house, but as considerable reluctbice bos
been manifested by tbe better classes to this
kind of isolation, Where the attendance has
been bitterly complained of, tbe plan bos
been adopted of raising yellow flags over tho
premises sbont which tbe disease exists, ss a
signal for those who fear It to avoid.
There is no abatement, but rather an in
crease of this loathesome epidemic Vacci
nation is going on all over the city. It is
dangerous to take an acquaintance by the
arm, or slap him on tbe shoulder, for fear of
Interfering with his "scab." While some
circles of society are fearfully alarmed touch
ing tbe disease, others care but very little
abont It No panic exists in relation to it
Tbe physicians understand Its treatment very
well, and with all tbe faculties and necessary
comforts t band to stay its progress, feel
confident that tbey will entirely master it In
the course of a lew weeks. .
The Ilsrvc.t
Is being cut, and everywhere an abusdaat
yield rewards the industry of the fcrraet.
Unless there is a demand for our wheat from
abroad, the market will bo completely flat
ted, and the prices ruinously low to farmers
In consequence.
Clustering. the Forces.
With tbe exception of some UtUe baas
among the politicians who are mutterisg
their forces for tbe November election, tbe
city is exceedingly.quiet Mr. Perkins in the '
Pott Office Is displaced by Holland J. BmUik.
Mr. Cheeseman has been sunplanted ia tbe ?
Sub-Treasury Department by a Mr. Feltoa,
from Nevada City. Frank Soule baa lost Ms
bead to make way for CoL Coey, In the later
nsl Revenue Department Mr. L. Upton baa
lost tbe Surveyor-GeneraUhip, Sherman Dsy
being bis successor. Tbe question Is, "Wbe
goes nextr' It Is supposed titat daring the ,
recces of Congress, the Presideet will tsaka
a general clearing ont of Federal apfolatees
on mis coast, ana au mote wno are istjn
to removal tremble In tbelr boots.
Miscellaneous
A Republican Convention wUl be held (a
Sacramento on tbe 5th, to nominate as Elec
toral Ticket Tbe same delegates, or otbera
chosen to meet with them, wtH beM District
Conventions shortly after, and BlaceCOtwsa'
slonal candidates in the field. In tbe tVkd
district, tbe contest Is between WwlsaoHf
land, Good wis, and Hartsoa: la the aea 4,
between Sargent, La Grange, Wheeler, reck
way, Dudley, and McCaHstB ; aad fa tee ni,
between Plxley, Soak, aad Baistew. Pri
maries for tbe choice of delegates to the State
Convention was be4d ia this city ytstsiaay.
The Plxley men are decidedly ahead.
A.

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