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The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, September 09, 1868, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1868-09-09/ed-1/seq-1/

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HAWAIIAN m GAZETTE.
PUBLISHED.
Every Wednesday Horning,
AT $0.00 PKK AjreXTM.
Slallnt to Foreign SntocribfO at ST.OO.
BOOK AND JOB
PRINTING PTABLISHMDIT!
THE 11 GAZETTE" 0FFICK
Is now prepared to exente all onten fcr
mi m mn mm. .
01 EVER-? SKK3OFTI0N,
WITH NEATNESS AND DISPATCH
Orncr On Merchant street, west of
ho Post OEce, Honolulu, II. L
Printed ud paUUbtd 1J 3. MSTT SzlTH, St Use
Oorimawt rHaUnjr OttW. la whom -11 buise.
communtcAtlori, nut be .ddrewd.
YOL. IY NO. 34.1
HONOLULU, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1S68.
$6.00 PERTEAE.
EUSIITESS NOTICES.
IV. I CIEEEA',
GENERAL COMJT1ESI0X AGEXT ASS
BROKER,
omcx is nu.rtoor amscrGS,
SS) Clnrrn Street, Honolulu, II. I. py
c Jt. srrscEB. n. MAcrAciA.xE.
CIIA.S. . SPESCKK &. CO.,
GESXEAL COJOOSSIOS KXSCHAXTS,
21) Qnrcn Street, Honolulu. ly
HIcCOEGAA Jc JOIEVSOIV,
MERCHANT TAtLORS,
PORT STEEET, HONOLULU,
10 Opposite T. C. lUnclt'.. py
IRA RICHARDSON,
IJirOItTEU AAI DIULUn
IK BOOTS, SHOES 4 GENTLEMEN'S FDR-
XISHLXG GOODS,
i Corner of Fori and jlcrcliant Street.,
-) iioxoi.ui.tJ, ii. i. pr
Jjf EDWIN JONES,
GEOCEE AND SHIP CHANDLER,
Ealialna. rilimi.
Money and Recruits furnished to ships on
6-1 vl favorable terms.
VIIEO. II. ItAVIES,
(Ut Jubs, Greta AOk,
EttPOETEE A COJQUSSION KEE CHANT
AC EXT ret
Uoyds and the Liverpool Un derwriters,
-Xorthern Assurance Company, and
British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co.
su ly
IIYMAA IIKOTIIEI-S,
Importers and Wholesale Dealers
In Fashionable Clothing, Hats,"Cir, Boots
and Shoes, and ererr variety of Gentle
men's Superior Furnishing Goods.
Store known u Capt.Snovr Building
Meecbatt PrvtiT. IloooJtJa, Chu. W
c. n. lawnus. J- c nicxsos.
LK1VERS !t IMCKSOA,
IMPORTERS, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
DEALEES IN LUMBER AND BUILD
ING JiATEEIALS,
Fort, Avlup, and Mcrcnant Street,
sg uoa:oi.CL.ct ii. i. " Pr
J. S. VAUtt. S. C. ALLE5.
".VAi-icEit jt aeeex,
EHLPPIKG C013TIESI0N KES CHANTS,
ij noxoi.TJi.r. ii. i. pj-
L. L. TORBERT,
DEALEE IN LUMBER AND ETEEY KIND
OF BUILDING MATERIAL.
Orrios Corner Queen and Fort Streets.
IS-ly
ijoi-i.es & co.,
SHIP CHANDLERS AND COKKISSIOX
KEECHANTS,
Qneen Street, Honolulu.
Particular attention paid to the Purchase and
hale of Hawaiian Produce.
EETEES BT rZEXISSIOX TO
C. A. WSHiami A Co., I C. Brewer Jt Co.,
Castle A Cooke, H. Haekfeld A Co.,
D. C. Waterman, I C. L. Richards A Co.,
2-ly
GEORGE G. HOWE,
Dealer in Eedwood aid Xcrtiwest Lunber,
Shingles, Doors, Sash, Blinds, Nails,
Paints, ete
At his Old Stand on the Esplanade. 56-lj
E. S. FLAGG,
CIYIl ENGINEER & SURVEYOR,
Apor-rs rosT Orncr Box So. H,
S Honolulu Oaliu. 2m
JIRS. J. II. 1IEACU,
FASHIONABLE MILLINER,
FORI ST:, TUT WEEK KTXG & HOTEL.
Bonnets made op and trimmed in the latest
ftjles. Stamping, Braiding and Em
broidering, executed to order.
I A. SCIIAEEEU ic CO.,
comnssiON jlerchants,
SS Honolulu, Oahu, II. I. fir
"ED. HOFPSCHLAEGER & CO.,
rttPOSTEES & COlOnSSIONHEECHANTS
41 Honolulu, O&iiu, II. I. Pj-
A. S. CEEGIIORA,
WHOLESALE AND BXTALL DEALEE 15
GENERAL JtEECHANDISE,
Fire-proof Store, corner of Queen and Eaahn-
xnann Streets.
Betail Estaotishment on Knuann Street.
4- It
THEODORE C. IIEECIa.
EKPOEIEE & COXKISSION HER CHANT.
1 Honolulu. Oahu, II. I. Py
II. HAGKFEU) & CO.,
GENEEAL COMMISSION AGENTS.
f Honolulu, Oanu. S. I. py
THE TOM JSOORE TAVERN,
MV J. O'SIELL,
tSJ Corner or King &. Fort Sreeta. Py
J. D. WICKE,
Aprenl lor tlte Bremen Board
of Underwriters.
All average claims arinst said Underwriter?,
occorrinr in or abont this Kingdom, will
haTe to be certified before me. T-ly
CU1.1G MOOX.
COMMISSION MEECHANT AND GEN
EEAL AGENT.
Agent lor t lie Pankaa and Amauulu
Sutrar Plantations.
Importer of Teas and other Chinese and For
eign Goods, and Wholesale Dealer in Ha
waiian Frodoce. attho Fire-proof Store,
Xssann Street, below King. "1-1 J
It. W. AADRE1VS,
Fort Street, opposite Old Fellows' Hall.
Gires particular attcction to the repair of
Fire Anns, Sewing Machines, A Locks.
Jhvtciw f Jfaeataerv, ax., made to Order,
50- ly
WILLI AM KVAIV,
Variety Store No. 2,
Xauiiakea Street.
AH kinds of Merchandise and Groceries.
3- . ly
.BUSINESS KOTICES.
r. r. ADAH S. S. C. ITILSEE.
A1A31S Jc WIE1ER,
AUCTION & COMMISSION MERCHANTS
7) ttnren Street, Honolulu. py
M. ICVII.EI
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION AGENT,
Office with E. P. Adams, Esq.,
QUEEN STREKT, I10XOLri,C.
aarrxs sr rsxxisaox to
Gen. MorpuL. Smith, CIMcmts. C Brewer a Co.
& CootoL Mer. Walker & Allen.
Hm. KkhuI Co. IE. T. AdAtns, &q. (
AFOSG Sc. ACIICCIC,
IMPOETEES, -WHOLESALE AND BXTALL
DEALERS IN GENEEAL MERCHAN
DISE AND CHINA GOODS,
Flre-Pnwf Store tn Xnnuin Street,
vuuder tlie Public Hall. py
V. S. BARTOW,
AUCTIONEER,
S&lrtRootn on Qnftn Strrrtt one door i
IT from Kaliumitnn St Pj
CILVECEV C. BirSEIT,
DEALEE IN NEWSPAPERS, MAGAZINES,
AND PERIODICALS,
1 PORT STREET, IIOXOI.CLU. py
JOIEY II. PATV,
NOTARY PUBLIC AND COMMISSIONER
OF DEEDS '.
roK the state" or cauixhixia.
Office at the Base or Brsnor A Co.
t l
J. MONTCOIVJERY
COXT1XCES TO PRACTICE AS A
Solicitor, Attorney, and Proctor in the
Supreme Court, in Law, Equity, Admiralty,
Probate and DiTorce. 3-ly
H. A. WIDEMANN,
AOXA1EY JPEltEIC.
Orncs: ATirnc Isteuor D Era nu est.
C- ly
(Saaruucnrx. n.a.r. caetes.
C. BREWER & CO.,
SHIPPING & COMMISSION
Honolulu. II, I.
iGESTS-Of tlie Uo.toii and Honolulu
Packet Line.
AGEXTS For tlie Slakee, tValluAcu ami
Hana Plantation.
AGEXTS For the Purchase and Sale of
Ifclaiift Produce.
EErss TO
Jcr JI. JIw?s, Esaft. Xew York
9nl-.B"! 5" -Boston
J. C Mxaim. Co. )
K. . SwAiX Jt Oo V
Cuas. AT. Bxoeas, Eso. )
lll.t" lit.
Sa Tnadsco
G. W. KORTOIS & CO.
COOPEKS AKD GAUGEES,
AT THE XETT STAND
OA Till'. ESPLISAUE.
jggi WE .UlE PKEPARED TO
SfeiiteSk attend to
ALL WOSS I3V OTJB. TJSTtl
At the Shop neat to the Custom House, where
we can be found at all working hours.
WE HATE OX HaXD AXD FOE SALE
OIL CASES AND BARRELS,
Of different sires, new and oldr which we will
e sell at the very
LOWEST MARKET RATES.
All work done in a thorough manner, and
warranted to give satisfaction.
All kinds of Cooptritg Materials szd Coopers'
it- Tools for Sale. ISm
J. P. HUCHES,
Importer and.g Manufacturer
OF AL.L. KINDS OF SADDLERY.
Carriage Trimming done with neatness and
-dispatch. All orders promptlyattcndcd to.
Corner of Fort and Hotel streets. Honolulu.
10- ly
NEVILLE & BARRETT,
Planters & General Store Keepers
EEOPUKA, SOUTH EOXA, HAW AIL
(Near Kcalakekna Bay.)
Island produce bought. Ships supplied with
Wood, Beef and other ncessaries,.
Agent at Honolulu.. ..
.A. S. Cixcboss.
IT
M. S. CRINBAUM & CO.,
IMPORTERS AXD WHOLESALE
Dealers in Fashionable Clothing
Hals, Caps, Boots and Shoes, and ererr rariety
of Gentlemen's superior furnishing goods.
STORE IN MAKEE'S BLOCK,
! Qnten Street. Honolulu. U. I. Py
YOLCAIXO HOUSE.
CRATER OF EUATJEA, HAWAII.
MTUIS ESTABLISILMEXT IS&
now oj-ec fr the reception of visitors C
to the Volcano, who may rele en finding com
fortable rooms, a good table, and prompt at
tendance. Experienced guides for the Crater
always in readiness.
STEAM AND "SULPHUR BATHS!
Horses Grained and Stabled if Desired.
CHARGES REASONABLE. ,
Parties visiting the Volcano via HXlo, can
procure animals warranted to make the jour
ney, by D. 1L HircHcocE, Esq., Ililo. ST-ly
GEORGE WllXrASlS,
LICENSED SHIPPING AGENT,
COrVTEVCES tlie busduej. on
his old plan of settling with occrs and
seamen immediately on their snipping at his
oSce. Having no connection, either direct or
indirect, with any outfitting establishment,
and allowing no debts to be collected at his
oCiec he hopes to give as good satisfaction in
the future as he has in the past.
i3LOSee on Jas. Robinson A Co.'i Wharf,
near the U. S. Consulate.
Honolulu, March 27, 1SS7. Z3m
PIANOS TUNED.
bPIAXOS AXD OTHER
-riAMlVAii A KJ C X Afc V diii AJ
II Tuned and Repaired, bi CHAS.
DERBY, at the Hawaiian Theatre.
Lewou glTenathe Piano & Guitar.
The best of references given. pi-ly
BUSINESS NOTICES.
J. H. THOMPSON,
GENERAL BLACKSMITH
HONOLULU, II. I.
A HAS COSSTISTLY A
. on hand 'and for sale, aguod
jjr asfortmcnt of
BEST REFINED BAR IRON !
ALSO
Best lilncksmith-s Coal,
At the Lowest Market Prices SS-lv
JKO. SOTT- SAX'1N0TT.
JOHN NOTT & CO.,
Copper & Tin Smiths,
TVKE 1'X.E.VSUnE IX .VXXOUX
ing to the public that they are prepared
tofurnishll kinds of CorrEE Wonc.consist.
ingin part, of STILLS. STJ2JJCH JKAXS.
SOEG11AJI rj.XS, WORMS, XCMPS, Jt.
Also on hand, a full assortment of Tlx
TVaex, which we offer for sale at the lowest
market prices.
All lvlliri of Repairing clone lrllh.
Neatness and Dipatclt.
Orders from the other Islands will meet
with prompt attention.
Kaahumann Street, one door above Flit
Ecr's. Stm
JEWELER AND ENCRAVER
aiR. a. Costa
Is now prepared to execute with promptness
all work in his line of business, such as "
Watch and Clock Repairing,
3Ianufacturlnc; Jeirelrj-,
And Engraving;.
Shop on Fort Street, opposite Odd Fellows'
Hall. ;m
JAMES L. LEWIS,
COOPER AND GAUGED
AT THE OIiD STATJIt,
Corner of King and Bethel Sts.
4
6lOCK OI UIA,
SnOOKSand
all kinds of
COOPERINC MATERIALS !
CONSTANTLY OX HAND.
He hope, by. attention to business, to merit
a eontmnancefbf the patronage which he has
heretofore enjoyed, and forvhicli he now re
turns his thiriv 4sai
SUGAH & MOLASSES.
isc8
IUXO. II. I.
Surir anil ?Iol:ise.
GEOP COMING IX AND FOE SALE IX
quantities to suit purchasers, br
TXALKEE i ALLEN,
. :t-3m Agents.
ONOWEA PLANTATION.
Sugar axitl ?IoIas.--c Crop I!CS
COMING IX, FOE SALE IX QCAXTI
ties to suit purchasers, bv
VTALKEK A ALLEN,
2t-Sm Agents.
PRINCE YLLLE PLANTATION.
Su;riw" mill JIolase. Crop
COMING IX, FOR SALE IX QCAXTI
ties to suit purchasers, by
WALKER A ALLEN,
It-Cm Agents.
WAILTJKU PLANTATION.
"VTEW CEOP NOW COMIXG LX. FOR
1 1 Sale in quantities to suit purchasers,
by C. BREWER A CO..
21-3m Agents.
MAKEE PLANTATION.
Jfetr Crop of Sugir Jt3Iolassc
VTOW COMIXG TX. AXD FOR SALE IX
JlN quantities to suit purchasers by
C. BREWER A CO.,
-l-3m Agents.
IXSUHANCE NOTICES.
SAN FRANCISCO
BOARD OF UNDERWRITERS.
TIIE 11 xi dfi-sirucdli living been
appointed agents for the San Francisco
Board of Underwriters, representing the
California Insurance Company,
Merchant.' Mutual Marine Ins. Co
Pacific Insurance Company,
California Lloyd's, and
Home Mutual Insurance Company.
Bee leave to Inform Masters of Vessels and
the public generally, that all losses sustained
by A sels and Cargoes, insured by cither of
the above companies, against perils of the
seas and other risks, at or near the several
Sandwich Islands, sriB Aore to be verified fry
ttcnt.
:-3m H. HACKFELD A CO.
IIA3IIIi;KGII-UKE3IirV
FERE INSURANCE COHP'Y.
fTUIE UNDERSIGNED, HAVIXG
JL been appointed Agents of the above Com
pany, are prepared to insure risks against Fire
on Stone and Brick Buildings, and on Mer
chandise stored therein, on the most favorable
terms. For particulars applr at the once of
5-Iy F. A.-SCHAEFER A CO.
Merchants' Mutual
MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY.
OF SA EIIASiCISCO.
rrUIE undersigned having been ap
JL pointed Agents for the above Company,
arc prepared to issnc policies on Gascons,
Feeiebts and Tkeascix.
WALKER A ALLEX,
12-om Agents, Honolulu.
California Insurance Company.
THE I'nder.;jrncl, AGEATS
-cf the above Company, have been aathor
uedio insure risks on CARGO, FREIGHT
and TREASURE, by COASTERS, from Hono
lulu to all ports cf the Hawaiian Group, aad
vice versa. H. HACKFELD A CO.
S-ly
1
t- J- e o c Kp-
History of the Kamehamehas.
TustiAtis new tux Hawaiian crS.lL Kaxaiac.
Iaunicltamcliu I.
CnAITEa IIL
This was the commencement of the war
against Kamchameba. Kauhl was a rood
soldier, having been the principal fighting
chief In the wars of his father Kckanllke, on
Maul His kahn, Kca by name, came to
Alapai and said to him, "I have come to dc-
! mind the kingdom for my thief; do yon
take your chief to be king of HatralL" Ala
pal replied, "I will consent to that; but first
do yon bring yonr chief to talk with me, and
then if it Isrignt, I will take my chief to Ha
waii, to the child of the chiefc." Kna was
an ill-looking sore-eyed man, and as he re
turned op the hill towards the fort of Kahili,
Kauhl and his people easily distinguished
him. Kaubi inquired what his business was?
Kua replied, "I am sent by Alapai, your
father, to bring you to him. By so doing,
the kingdom will become yours, and Kameha
meha will be taken back to Hawaii ; that is
my errand in coming; let us go down to the
seaside'.' Kauhi then consulted with his
chief, the priests and the prophets, as to
whether they should take Kua's advice and
go to mctt AlapaL The priests answered:
" When one sleeps uneasily at night, with an
unsatisfactory dream, and another dream
shall come which explains the other, then
the day shall be like the stroke of the Burst
of a swollen stream; thus shall it be with
the wrath of the day, when It meets ia the
road with a hunchback, and sore-eyed, a rain
bow in front. This man who comes hither
Is the rainbow, scattering drops to cool the
heat of the day; we all understand this."
The Hawaiian priests, like the oracles of
ancient Greece, were very enigmatical in their
utterances. Tkass.
Said Kua, " 0 chief, let us descend, thou
and I; listen not to the worthless words of
men ; at the seaside arc w ords of sense and
value, when thou and Alapai shall converse
together."
Bat Kauhi replied to Kua, "I shall cot go
down with you." Then said Kua to Kauhl,
"Ton shall become a poor chief; I desired
that the government should be onrs yours
and mine, but you have despised my words."
Kauhi's forces, under Kukaca, immediate
ly attacked those fighting for KsTnj-h.mphi
and defeated them with great slaughter.
Xtar the house or David ilalo, at the bread
fruit tree on which was wont to be hung
the corpses of those slain in battle there
the soldiers of Kamchamcka were slaughter
ed. Kamchameha himself fied and got oa
board the canoes of AlapaL Said Alapai, "I
thought that this was a contest bcttt een re
lations, but it appears to be an overturning
of the government. I shall convey my chief
(meaning Kamehamcha) back to Hawaii, and
from thence shall come the war." He accor
dingly sailed for Hawaii, taking Kameha
mcha with him. Arriving there, he immedi
ately made preparations for war against Maui,
with the determination to Eparc co pains to
defeat and capture Kaubi. The latter, hav
ing heard of the preparations of Alapai to
again invade Maui, sent a present to Peleio
holani, with a request that he would come
to Maui to help him. PcleioholacI, who was
then acting as king of Oahu, consented to
assist him.
Alapai was one wholcyear making readyfor
thewaragalnst Maui, and it wasinlTSSwhcn
he finally started. This war against Kauhi
was one that was felt all over the land, and
was noted for new modes of warfare. One
was by drying up of the streams of Kauaula,
franca and Mahoina, the streams of Lahai
nalnna. The streams and the tiro patches
were dried up so that Kauhi's soldiers and
people could get no food. The forces of
Alapai kept constant watch over the water
courses of Olowalu, TJkumehame, Wailuku
and HonokawaL
When Peleiobolani heard that Alapai was
at Lahaina, he gathered all his forces at Ilon
okahua aad at Honolua. At Honokahua an
engagement took place, and Alapai's men
were routed and driven as far as Kcawawa.
Alapai was cot present at the fight, but hear
ing that Peleiobolani bad attacked his men
and driven them, he Immediately made ready
to meet the Kauai king. As usual with Ala
pai, he had part of his forces in canoes, and
part on shore. Peleiobolani wished to join
his forces to those of Kauhi, the chief of
Maui, whom he had come to assist, but Ala
pai holding Labaica, prevented him from
doing to. The fighting in this war was very
bloody; PeleioholarJ had some very noted
warriors heroes cf a great many fights, but
Alapai's men far outnumbered them. Blood
Cowed like water, and the king of Kauai, In
trying to assist the chief of Maul, got him
self into a pHikia. The battle of Puunene,
at Kaanapali, was the principal one. Peleio
holani was surrounded and hemmed in, both
on the side of the land and by sea, by the
soldicrsucderKalanlopnuandKeoua. There
Peleiobolani and Alapai met again, face to
face, to call a truce, for the slaughter had
been great oa both sides. The historiai.
here remarks: "Is not this in accordance
with Christian warfare ?" meaning it is to
be presumed, the warfare of civilized na
tions " they go to war with one another la
a friendly way; and so did the Hawaiians in
the olden times."
A principal reason why the King of Oahu
It appears that Peleiobolani, King of Kauai,
in the commencement of this history, is cow
termed King of Oahu, he having probably
either usurped the kingdom, or acted for the
young king who so bravely resisted AlapaL
and the King of Hawaii met again as friends,
was from the fact that ALvpaTs mother be
longed to Oahu, her came being Kalanikan
ldeiaiwinuL From this circumstance, jthc
chiefs of Hawaii were called brothers of 1'e
IciobolanL Another reason why friendship
should exist was that Kalaniopuu and Keoua,
Alapafs generals, were both children of Pe
leAOhclani, their mother being Kamakai
moks. Peace having been declared, Feleiohohtni,
with his counsellor Xaili and his soldiers,
wenttoKoolau, on Holokai, to live. Ka
mehamcha Xal lived in peace and quietness
as King of Maui, and Alapai returned to bis
kingdom on HawalL The latter chief is re
membered as having been a kind and affec
tionate friend to the common people.
The lands possessed by him were Inherited,
from his grandfather, Mahiolali, and he never
interfered In tho landed possessions of the
chiefs or their tenants. He honored his
wives and made feasts for them. His prin
pal wife or queen, was ;Kcaka. He used to
make' a progress occasionally through his
-dominion of Hawaii, but he lived at HUo for
several years. During his residence at that
place, Keoua, (one of his favorite generals)
wajftakea very sick. He was otucrrlse call
ed KalanlkupuapalkalanlnuL Phoebus, what
a name! He died at Walakea, in the year
1752, and there the chiefs lamented for him.
His brother was Kalauiopuu, by whom ho
was persuaded to abduct Kamehamcha IL,
(known to us as Kamehamcha L) This is
firr tima that tire hlatoilHti'tias m4
distinction between the two Kamchamehas.
It was rumored that Alapai caused the death
of Keoua. It may or may not have been so,
but immediately after this a war broke out
between Alapai and Kalaniopuu.
The night that Kalaniopuu went, to get
Kamehamcha, the chiefs were all watching
the corpse of Keoua. Among them were
Kcawcapala, son of "Alapai; Kameciamoku,
Kamanawa, Kecaumoku, and Keawcheulu.
These were all called children of Alapai, and
were among his noted warriors, through
whom he obtained his kingdom. They were
prepared for any warlike emergencies that
might arise; but Puna, the kahu (body ser
vant) of Kalaniopuu, had prepared a war
canoe and placed it between Piopio and Ka
lepolepo. This was the commencement of
Kalaniopuu's disturbances. He had Tcry
few people at the beginning in his attempt,
to abduct the chief, and he did not succeed
in his attempt. This however, was the be
ginningof the war that afterwards took place
between Kalaniopuu and Alapai, and result
cdin the kingdom of Han ali comiDg into
the possession of the former.
Kalaniopuu and Keoua were hereditary
chiefs of Hawaii, and to them belonged the
Kingdom by descent. But Alapai, by his
prowess and superior ability, earned the
kingdom for himself and cut off many of the
chiefs. He was himself, however, a chief of
high lineage, his mother being Kalanikau
Iclcialwi, and his father Kecaumoku.
After the attempt to abdnct Kamehamcha,
which is called the battle of Kalepolepo,
there was a fight at Paieie, adjoining Puaaloa,
between Alapai and Kalaniopuu. After
wards a battle was fought between the op
posing forces at Mokaulele, and it extended
to Mahicaaka. This was another of those
bloody battles of those times. Kalaniopuu
came very near losing his life on this occasion.
He slipped on the paboehoe (the smooth
lava) and was seized by two of the soldiers of
Alapai, one on each side. He grappled with
them both and crippled them. Two others
attacked him and he killed them; two more
came up and he held them out, one in each
hand.
Kalaniopuu's warriors on that day gained
the battle, for the chiefs saw that his soldiers
were very brave, and that he himself was a
very strong mn. After the fight of Mahina
aka, (the full moon) Kalaniopuu became
King of Kau and Pnna, he being a chief of
Kau, because his ancestors belonged there.
Alapai lived at HUo foraycar after this and
then went to Walpio; thence he went to
Kawaihae and went up to Waimea, at a place
called Lanimaomao, where he was taken sick.
Removed thence, he went down again to Ka
waihae, and getting more sick, died there,
first making his will, giving the kingdom to
his son Kcawcopala. This was in the year
1754, and Keaweopala succeeded to the king
dom of Hawaii.
To be continued.
The Hakvest. A Xew England writer
speaks as follows of the harvest prospects
in the Atlantic States and Europe :
Here In Xew England the trralu harvest is
always unimportant, but the leading product,
hay, is abundant, while corn, potatoes acd
garden vegetables will be above the average,
bo far as regards the West and Xorthwcst
the prospects were never better. In the
numberof acres cultivated there is a large
increase over any previous year. The grain
crops are likely to be harvested in good
condition, and in the aggregate will be the
largest ever gathered. The wheat yield Is
throughout the Mississippi Valley spoken of
as having an unusual promise. The farmers
of Western Xew York and Pennsylvania
claim that they have begun to harvest the
largest and best wheat crop since 1846, while
all other products of the field look equally
favorable. I think the farmers of California
will hardly get over $150 per hundred for
their grain next Christmas; if it goes below
that price, those who can will do well to
hold their grain for an improved market in
the fall of 1663. It would be safe, and pro
bably a quite profitable investment.
As to the froit crop in Xew England, the
apple is more important than all thi) others
combined. For many years the scjiply has
not been eqnal to the demand, and the pre
sent season will not prove an exception.
The "set" of the fruit was snperb, but the
core-worm, curculio and the rose-bug have,
in many orchards, left hardly a tithe of the
crop. More apples decayed on the ground
last year in California and Oregon titan will
this year be raised in the six Eastern States.
In the aggregate the harvest of 1SC3 will
be unusually large. In England, from
whence there were unfavorable accounts in
the spring, there will be at-least an average
yield; and in France, and all over the con
tinent, the harvest is reported by tourists to
surpass any within the past ten years.
The True Lite. Final success, the joy of
liie's oarvest, is tne goat oi nnmau copes.
Xo wise or thoughtful man will live merely
for a day. Thepilsrim who seeks a home
is cot content to linger and loiter for the
mere flowers beside the way. The sower
looks forward to fields white and ready for
the sickle. The triumph or pleasure of to
day is transitory. We want a hope that
does cot sink with the settiDg sun.
The true success in life is that which does
cotfailinthceveninzofour days, or leave
them to barrenness. We want that sbont of
"harvest home" that will not die into silence
with the failing breath, but make the passage
of the grave a whispering gallery, where
heaven and earth talk together. Wc want
something that will reach beyond time, be
yond the things of the present, something
that will take hold on eternity. FlareL
Witt is Powers, .the American sculptor,
considered a villain and a thief f Because he
chissled a poor girl out of a piece of marble
and sold her for a " Greek Slave." -
A snx dress pattern was recently thrown
toadanscssc on the Boston stage, whether as
a substantial compliment or a hint, is not
stated.
Tho Penny Journals of Parlsi.
In a country like France, where the press is
tied up, muffled, trodden on, regarded as an
invention perhaps necessary, but very danger
ous, by the Government, and to be thought
of the same as gunpowder, of course many
expedients, curious and Ingenious, are re
sorted to by thoso who really love journalism.
The penny journal in Paris was an outgrowth
of necessity, not of choice, and haa been a
remarkable success. It has had stout hearts
and ready brains to pilot it, and money has
been lavished on Its progress with a skillful
hand. The populace never took hold of any
thing more willingly and eagerly. It found
It its real amuser, its thorough educator, and
appreciated It. Some tlmohn now elapsed
since the illit Journal was born, and It Is a
healthy and vigorous child. It bad nurses
who were sometimes a tride sensational, but
who, after all, had a sterling regard for the.
success of their charge In all respects, and
who knew Jhit quite as much on the multi
tude of facts collected, as on the utterance
of opinions depended that success. Xow
and then, in France, a journal given wholly
to-oplnloo, llko Glmrdlu's LOxrtie, can get
bold of a specialty, and make Itself popular
at the risk of Its editor's peace and profit;
but in general the fireworks gooff the wrong
way the. experiment Is too dangerous to be
often tried. So Paris Is essentially the city
for a good newspaper, not for a guide to
opinions. Tho llfit Journal is cow in the
full tide of prosperity, so far as one can judge
fiym outward appearance. Its subscription
list is covered with the names of nearly
250,000 dally subscribers, and an express
team, driven at a lightning gallop by men in
uniform, delivers the' damp sheets every even
ing at yonr door, whether you live at Passy
or the Castile. Altbocgh diminutive, it is
well filled. Condensation Is practiced to tho
utmost, consistent with good sense, and tho
fcullletons of Timotbee Trim are sought at
night with as much eagerness as the decrees
in tho Monlteur in the morning. I fancy I
know how this journalist works. He has got
tho right idea as to talking to common pco-
filc every day. I imagine he takes an even
ng stroll, pitches on the latest topic, then
f;oes home and studies upon It, and behold I
n the morning he tells the whole Paris world
all abont it, even to the minutiae he got out
of his encyclopedia. Being a journalist, he
knows it will never do to confess that he
docs not know everything: ho must work
the "know how" into his dally scrawl, and
he does It. He Is a queer-looking fellow,
with a huge mustache and a mass of tumbled
hair, which looks as if he was always scratch
ing it, a la Yankee, to bring out the ideas.
He writes on everything; his subjects are
invariably fre.aud his manner la always
spicy. The JrTit Journal owes much of its
success to him. This sheet has imitators,'
the most successful of which Is the JXtUe
Brtue, on the same plan precisely. It has an
editor who follows In Timothce Trim's foot
steps, and has some of his art at making
common things Interesting. Indeed, the two
are very models of ' local editors." And,
let me tell you, this is no light matter. Could
yon but see the Parisian population, the
masses the most curious, easily influenced,
and most difficult to interest, in the world,
you would take your bats off to these poor
devils of scribblers who have made successes
of themselves. And, looking ahead, yon
may sce,a formidable power growing out of
these penny journals. Opinion will creep in
by and by, and the engine which can move the
world, nhich can avert evil and kill vice, the
only thorough purifier and educator, will
spring np. London, though site has success
ful penny journals, has no such Imminent
need of them as Paris. If Xew York had a
good penny sheet, the Herald would not tell
so many lies. I have found one good thing
in Paris journalism, and a thousand bad ones.
May the one triumph over the thousand, even
with covernraent in the way! Cor.Sorinn-
field JlepibUean.
Axoiiinit labok sayixg Maciiine. A
public trial has made in the presence of
several well know railroad men, contractors
and others, of Sleeper's Excavator, which
was not only satisfactory but convincing to
the mind of every one present of its entire
success. The ground selected was near the
San Jose Railroad, on Twenty-first street
no better ground could have been -selected
for a thorough test, as it partook of "hard
pan," which required a strong team to run a
furrow through it. This machine, or wagon,
is quite simple in its construction, so mnch
so that one man and two horses are all the
motive power necessary to do the work of
fifteen men. The operations to be perform
ed by the driver consist simply in placing
his foot oa a treadle, and by a slight pres
sure, when he comes to the loading place,
drops a scoop shaped like the bowl of a
spoon, which enters the ground to any depth
he desires, and forward movement of the
wagon causes the earth to slide over the
scoop on to an endless belt, or elevator, into
the body of the wagon. When it is full he
gives a lever a pull, which raises the scoop,
and the load is driven to the dumping ground,
and without stopping gives another lever a
pull and the load drops through the bottom,
which closes instantly, and is ready for
another load. Its working was tested by
accurately timing how long it took to load
and discharge, and it was fonnd that it took
just ten seconds to load one cubic yard of
cartn, ine leam moving no faster tnan they
wonld if ploughing in a field. It was tested
in ground that had been ploughed, but did
not work as well as on the hard ground; In
fact. It does Its own ploughing, scraping,
loading and dumping, and docs it satis
factorily. It gathers a foil load in going
forty or sixty feet, and takes a clean farrow
twelve inches wide, and, as a street con
factor remarked, leaves a smooth grade with
no loose dirt behind. .We learn that hun
dreds of these machines are now In use at
the East, and that they will be a success here
does not admit of a doubt. Captain A. M.
Burns owns the patent for this coast, and
has three of the machines here. A well
known contractor offered to take tbem all,
but Opt. Burns desires to exhibit what they
are capable of "doing before disposing of
those on hand ; yet he can supply all orders
on short notice. One of them will be placed
la the Mechanics' Fair next week. Alia.
Qciet Vibtces. It is the bubbling spring
which flows gently, the little rivulet which
runs along day and night by the farm-house,
that is useful, rather than the swollen or
warring cataract. Xiagara excites our won
der, and we stand amazed at the power and
greatness of God there, as He "pours It from
the hollow of bis hand." But one Xiagara
is enough for the continent of the world ;
while the same world requires thousands
otfilver fountains and gently-flowing rivu
lets, that water every farm and meadow,
and every garden, and that shall flow on
every day and night, with their gentle quiet
beauty. So with thoacts of our lives. It is
. i . j, i - i : i .i .rt. -
that good is to be done; It Is by the daily':
quiet virtues oi me me unnsuan temper,
the good qualities of relatives and friends
and all, that good is to be done.
Depth op the Sea. Captain Sir John
Ross made some enormous soundings at sea,
one of which, 000 miles west of St, Helena,
extended to the depth of 5,000 fathoms, or
00,000 feet, or nearly 5 miles; the weight
employed amounting to 4o pounds. Another,
made 200 miles west of the Cape, of Good
Hope, occupied 49 minutes, in which time
2,235 fathoms were sounded. Captain Den
bam sounded in the South Atlantic, 7.700
fathoms, or nearly 7.7 geographical miles.
If the existing waters were increased by one
fourth, they would drown the earth, with
the exception of some high mountains.
FEAS3 are felt for the safety of the party
which sailed from Panama some time ago in
pursuit of tb-Imaginary bidden treasure at
the Cocos IfU.uK, as it is fully time some
tidings were iired of them.
A LADT, being asked to waltz, gave the fol
lowing sensible and appropriate answer:
"Xo, I thank you, sir, I hare hugging enough
at home."
The Fksxcb Pbem Law. Tho new Press
Law of Franco is more In agreement with
the spirit of the age than that which K super
sedes. It matters little what motive Indaeed
the Emperor Xapolcon to enlarge the liberty
of French Journalism. Perhaps be is really
carrying out those ideas of progress wbJca
he has so often assured the world are dear to
him, and which ho Is so willing to reduce to
practice as fast as France la educated up to
them and may safely be trusted with them.
Perhaps he Is desirous to make, friend with
so powerful a body of men as the French
newspaper writers, whom co legal discipline
has hitherto been able to coerce Into Servile
adulation of the Empire. Whatovcr Is the
real purpose of the concession. Its effect caa
hardly bo injurious to tho Napoleonic rrjfcwe,
and may prove a solid advantage to It. The
French journals now have- quite as melt
liberty as Xapolcon could be expected to give
them. So long as his rorm of goveramcBt is
oa empire, and he the centra of a strongly
centralized system, so long must ho. In self,
protection, keep some kind of check on tbs
freedom of the press. It Is only under the
mild constitutional monarchies and in repub
lics that the press can expect to enjoy a largo
measure of liberty. In estimating too. signifi
cance, or the Emperor's acts of liberalism,
we must always look at them cot from our
own point of observation, but from his.
Under tho new law, French editors are
free to write what political articles they
please, and arc answerable for the abuse of
the privilege to the correctional tribunals.
The government puts itself In the quasi posi
tion of a private individual. If a prlrato
citizen is libeled he has his remedy in tho
courts; so has the government. Prosecu
tions no longer originate with Imperial min
isters. The prefect of each department coir
has general supervision of the Journals pub
lished in his jurisdiction, just as he has of
other interests. The plan of "warnings,"
which was an Ingenious Bjstem of terrorism,
holding as It did a threatening rod over tho
editorial bead, co longer exists. In case oi
a distinct offence, a prosecution does not
necessarily follow. In this respect, the law
is a cariosity, and reminds one rather of the
discipline of a school than of a statute for
the- government of grown up people. M.
Picard, Minister of the Interior, in his cir
cular to the Prefects, giving them final in
structions concerning the law, enjoins upon
them the exercise of great forbeaMsee with
erring ones (the bad boys of tho-school, We
might call tbem). The prefect Is to main
tain a "survcllancc" over the newspapers,
bat to "keep In "good relations" with them
the very attitude of a schoolmaster toward
his refractory pupils. He is to preserve the
"dignity of ,-power," (his own) but not' to
"compromise the independence of tho wri
ter" in other words, cot to snub him or
humiliate him. He Is to give the offending
journalist a chanae to explain, or take back
If he will to make "voluntary rectifica
tions," as M. Pinard delicately says.- Tho
Prefect may. If he thinks best, make a "direct
reply to the journal that has led the public
Into error," and the printing of that reply la
a sufficient condonation of the offence. Or,
h may cause a contradiction to be inserted
in another journal. The official corrections,
furthermore, must be confined to showing
up the "erroneous figures or the Inexact
facL"
It is only when these moderate measures
fall that prosecutions are authorized. With
the prefect is associated the public prosecu
tor. These two authorities must agree upon
the necessity of legal action before it Is com
menced, ana even then they do cot actually
prosecute until the complaint has been sub
mitted to the Minister of the Interior, along
with a copy of the journal containing tho
offensive article. Finally, when a prosecu
tion is resolved upon, the editor has his
chance of acquittal before a magistrate.
However muchjrefects, public prosecutors
and magistrates may be desirous to prove
their fidelity to the imperial government,
they will not be so very anxious to make ene
mies of a power which they can clearly per
ceive the Emperor propitiate rather than to
overawe. In the country, where the editors
may happen to bo on terms of personal friend
ship with the functionaries, they may be
pretty snre of considerate treatment.
The practical operation of this curious law
will bo watched with interest by tho edito
rial profession in all parts of the world. It
promises well. X. T. Jour, qf Com.
Launch or a Cautorsia Steamer, The
new steamship America, built by Henry Steers
for the Pacific Mall Steamship Company,
was launched from his yard at Greenpolnt
yesterday. Those who have never been on
board of large steamships can have but a
faint idea of their magnitude. Like the
"big trees" of California, their size deceives
the beholder; and even when near by the
spectator does not fully appreciate their vast
proportions until he visits the interior. The
visitor, on ascending a long, high staging on
the port side, found himself on a vast Inclin
ed floor, from which he could look down on
the city. The wheel-house guard seemed
large enough to contain a good-sized house.
These project over tho sides of the ship.
Below the main deck Is the first cabin, and
on the third deck Is the second cabin. The
engine room is located in the hold. Tho
walls of the vessel are of -solid timbers. In
the centre is a massive frame-work, which is
to support the engines and walking-beam.
The engine bed s composed of square tim
bers laid horizontally, and forming a solid
support several feet In thickness. The walking-beam
frame extends from the bottom of
the ship many feet above the main deck. It
is a model of strength, and its braces are
elghtorten feet thick, composed of many
pieces of timber, Iron bolted. The cat on
the ends of these bolts are about the size of
quart cups. All the wood-work has been
planed and polished until it is as smooth as
a mirror. Mnch yet remains to be done.
After the engines are put In, the cabins are
to be constructed, and will be furnished most
luxuriously.
The America Is 380 feet In length, GO. feet
wide, S3 feet in depth, and about 5,000 tons
burden. She is a slde-wheeler, and is to
have flrst-claes engines build at the Novelty
Iron Works. It is nine months since the
keel of the America was laid. The vessel is,
.id to be the lanreat wooden steamship ia
the world. Long before the appointed hear
arrived a large number ef people assembled
In the shipyard and its vicinity. Sloops,
steam-tags, and small craft crowded around
the yard with flags flying from ereij project
ing spar. The upper deck of the America
was packed with ladles and gentlemen. At
12 o'clock the gangway war lowered from
the vessel, and the policemen rushed hither
and thither ordering the cwowd to fall
back. At 12:03 a ebout of exultation
went up, the ship moved, the ways smoked,
and the steam tugs blew their whistles.
The multitude held their breath, the cannon
belched forth a salvo, and the huge mass,
six stories high and nearly 400 feet long,
gilded rapidly into the river. As the ship
touched the water, an American flag, a If
by magic, was flung to the breeze, ana hi as
instant almost she was half across the river,
when she was taken in charge by the tags
in waiting. The launch was most Mece
fnl, and never was a shipbuilder prouder than
the architect of the America, Henry Steer.
N. Y. Tribune, July ZUh.
Self-Depesdesce. Many an nnwtee par
ent works hard, and lives sparingly all his
life for the purpose of leaving enoaajk to
give bis children a start in the world, as it
is called. Setting ayoung man afloat with
money left him by bis relative, is like tying
a bladder under the arms of one who caa Hot
swira; ten chances to one be will lots Hi
bladders and go to the bottom. Teaeh Mot
to swim and be will not need the Kadckn.
Give your child a good edacatlon. gee to it
that bis morals are pure, 111 wind caHivat
ed, and his whole natore mc!e subserrlcat
to the laws which govern sb: aad von will
have given what will be of (note re thas
'the wealth of the ladles. Yes -T gtna
him a start which co miotbrtsae c 4sfris
him of. The earlier job teach Ma to de
pend upon bis own reseefes aasl the Mess
ing of God, the better.
t

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