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The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, September 30, 1868, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1868-09-30/ed-1/seq-1/

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HAWAIIAN
GAZETTE,
BOOK AND JOB
TUB "OAZKTTX" 0JT1O6
Is aow-iweraroil to oxooatoaU ooilow kr
rtill ill .Hit! flUIBC.
or etxrt MexaurnoK,
WITH ITEATXB68 A2TD SIliPATCa
Every Wednesday Morning,
AT S&JXJ FEB AXSUil.
Slallcd to Foreign Subscribers mt ST-IAl.
Orrx On Merchant stret, west o!
he Post 05ce, Honoluk, II. I.
Printed aal fvfctUHst V 3. Jterr Sierra, st Ua
-GoTTTBBCttt rristtai: OSn, to whom ail teaine
wnnnnifattm But b bttnaml
TOL. NO. 37. i HONOLULU, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30. 1868. 6.00 PEE YEAE.
BUSINESS NOTICES.
"iV. X. GKEITV,
GESEEAL COJOOSSIOS AGENT ASS
mDiBHiwiiBn
tS Unrtn Street. Honolulu, II. 1. fly
c s. srssexs. a. umuui.
CHAN- X. SPESCEH Jc CO.,
GE5XSAL myvrTny 3IZ2CHASTS,
1) Queen Street, Honolulu. fly
ZTIcCOLGAA Jfc JOIKVSOIV,
MERCHANT TAILORS,
TORT STKEET. HONOETJLTJ.
IS Opposite T. C. llcutk't.
IRA RICHARDSON,
ijivoiixeu a a i) miAi.r.n
15 BOOTS, SHOES & GESTT.TTMT3S FHS-
SISHING GOODS,
Comer of Fort utl Merchant Street,
j , ( UO.VOt.CLl-, II. I. Pj
EDWIN JONES,
GBOCEB A2tD SHIP C HANDLER,
I:ill lliiill. JIuui.
Meeey asd Recruits famished to ships on
G-lyJ lararaue torses.
xi i to. ii. xaties,
(late Jsm, ems A (V,
ihpobtxb a cosanssioN jizschast
Aetxr roa
UeyeV asd the Liverpool Underwriters,
Nertbeea AmnMt CauT and
Biitha aad Foreign Maria Iararanee Ce.
S- IT
HVJLUV 11KOTIIEKS,
'Importers and Wholesale Dealers
la XwkioGkW CWebmg, Hl!, Caps. Eoots
and Shoes, ui every Tarielr f Gentle
man's Snpeoer Farawsisr Coodi.
Store Lxioitu a. Capt. Suow'i llulldlng
Murmur Stoat, Hmnsala. Cain- 50
c.s. unu. J. c. presses.
LGireitS & DICKSOS,
IXF05IXBS, WHOLESALE ASS RETAIL
DEALERS IK LTJXBEB AND BuTLD-
Kort, IClng, and 3Xercnant Streets,
IS) 1IOXOLCLC, II. I. lr
J. S. WALKZE- S. C. ALLEX.
1VALKEIE. & AXJLE,
SHIPPISG & C0H1IISSI0N 3CEECHA5TS,
19J HOXOLCT.P, II. I. Pj
L. L. TORBERT,
DEALER ET LUXBER AND EVERY ELND
OF BUILDING 2IATEP.IAL.
OrrKi Corner Qcea aad Fort Streets.
-.r
I JO LULLS A. CO..
SHIP CHANDLERS AND COHHISSIOH
atZBCHASTS, '
Queen Street, Honolulu.
Partioaiar atteatioB paid to the Purchase and
Sale f Hin&i Produce.
KxriBS bt rzcxissios TO
0. A. WtHsamj 4 Co., I C. Brewer 4 Co.,
Cattle Cooke. II. HietfeM A Co..
D: C. Waterman, C. L. Richards A Co.,
J-ly
CEOKCE G. IIOWX
Dealer is Eedwcod aid North-treat T.rrnher,
Shizgles, Doors, Sash, Blicdi, Nails,
Faints, etc
At hk 0d Stand oa the Esplanade. 36-ljr
E. S. FLVCG,
CIVIL EKGIKEEE & SUBVEYOB,
Amuu Pst Of ricx Boi Ko. ,
Ilonolulu, Oxhu. a
3IKS. J. IX. BLACKi
FASHIONABLE MILLINER,
Fort Street, betareea Hotel asd Eirg.
IWnneU su4e sp aad triaaneu in the latest
tjlM. gtampisg. Braiding and Ebl
WoMeriag. exeeated to order.
I A. SCIIAEFEE A: CO.,
commissioh heechahts,
36 Honolulu, Oshu, II. I. 'It
ED. HOFf SCHLAEGEE & CO.,
UCP0STE2S & COjnaSSIOSMEBCilASTS
i) Honolulu, Oaiiu, II. I. Ir
A. S. CLEGUOIU,
WHOLESALE AST) BXTALL DEAIXE IS
GESEEAL 2EEECHASDISE,
Fire-f tsof Store, eoraer of Qsees and Haaha-
saaa Streets.
BetaH Eftah&ssunt on Snsana Street.
ly
'iiii:oi)oiii: c hecci,
mPOETEE & C0KXLSS10S JCEECHAST.
1 Ilonolulu. Oaliu, II. I. Pr.
IX. IUCCrELD A: CO.,
GESEEAL COXKISSIOS AGESTS.
t-j Honolulu, Oihn. S. I. pr
THE T02t HO ORE TAYEEIT,
bv J. O'iiixx
Corner or King & Fort SreeU. Pr
J. D. WICKE,
Ajrent lor the Bremen Board
of Underwriter?.
All arerage r1? agauiit caid Underwriter!,
ocearrinr In or ahoct tHj Hingdea, will
hare to be eertined Wore em. 7-1 J
CIILTAG XIOO,
COKXISSIOS 1TESCHAST A5S GES
EEAL AGEST.
Agent for the Faaku and Amauuln
Sugar Plantations.
TmDorter of Teas and other Chinese and For
eign Goods, and Wholesale Dealer in Ha
waiian rroaaee, at tne rirc-pnGl cure,
Sscans Street, below King. 31-ly
K. IV. ASDBCTTS,
Fort Street, cpjcsite Odd FtHffwV Hall.
Girc particnlar attention to the repair of
Fire Amu, Sewing Machines, a Lochs.
Dmcimjt cf Jfedimtrj, fr., wutdt to Order.
"4VIXXJA31 RTAS,
Variety Store No. 2,
Xaaaakta Street.
AQ kinds of Merchasdiie and Groccrkx.
S3- lr
JJUSIiN'ESS NOTICES.
X. T. JTUrt. 8. CWtLME.
.VXA3IS Jc 1VIXJDEK,
ATJCTIOK & cojunssios heechasts
SI Queen Street, Ilonolulu. lj
S. KAILE,
SHLPPISG A5D C023OSSI0S AGEST,
Office, with E. f. Adams. Esq.,
USEES STREET, IIOXOLULU.
airixs
ax rtaaruias to
Geo. Sfersu L. S2dth,r.Mnan.C Bre.er k Co.
&mmL Unci. WtOer i. AlB.
Mcwn. Bkktrb a Co. C P. Adam, U
AFOG A: ACIirCK,
mPOBTESS, -WHOLESALE ASD BETAH,
DEALEES IS GESESAL KEECEAS
DISE ASD CHISA GOODS,
Flre-Proor Store In Xnuanu Street,
O under the Public Hall. px
C. S. BAirTOIV,
AU CTIO N EER,
Sales-llooui on Queen Street, one door
IT from Kaatiumann St. Pjr
CJIAX-TNCKV C. BirVAEXX,
DEALE2 IS SrWSPAFEES, MAGAZISES,
ASD PEEIODICALS,
1 FOUT iTItEET, UUXU1.VI.C Py
JOBS II. PATV,
K0TABY PUBLIC ASD C0SQHSSI0SEB
OF DEEDS
rOC TUE STATE OF CALtfOKMA.
Otfice at the Base or Bisaor A Co.
. j
H. A. Wl DEM ANN,
SOTAKY PfBLIC.
Orricz at Tax Istzeisk Dctaktxxst.
t- lr
ricx.
H. a. r. CAXXSZ.
C. BREWER & CO.,
SHIPPING & COMMISSION
TV! .!H3H TVni?ST
Honolulu, XI. I.
AGEXTS Of trie liostou and Honolulu
Paeltet IJne.
AGESTS For tne -3Ikce, IVaUuku and
liana Plantations.
AGENTS For tne Purcnase and Sole of
Island Prod nee.
EETEB TO
Ja 1L Bos, Ess Sew York
Ous. Exrrta&Co.
J. c. Mmni a ce.
E. 3, Mill A CO.
SanTiaadfO
Cais. T. Bsooxs, Esq.
7
G. W. lVORTOiV & CO.
COOPEES AND GAUGEBS,
s AT THE SEW STASD
0 XIXE lrLl.AI)E.
fp WE -UlE PKEFAKED TO
Ufea attend to
AT.T. WOKS ZZQ- OTJE. JJ3HX
At the Shop next to the Cc;tom Hoase, where
weens be fosnd at all working hocrt.
WE HAVE OX 1IAXD ASD IgR SALE
OIL CASKS AND BARRELS.
Of different sixes, new and old, which we will
sell at the Tcrj
LOWEST 3IAIUCET RATES.
Alt work done in a thorough manner, and
warranted togire satisfaction.
Allkiiisof Ccojerirg-SIiterixla and Coopers
iii Tools for Sale. an
J. P. HUCHES,
Importer and Manufacturer
OF ALL. KIXDS OF SADDLER V.
Carriage Trimming dene vith neatness and
dispateh. All orders promptljattended to.
Corner of Fort and Hotel streets, Honolulu.
14- lr
NEVILLE & BARRETT,
Planters & General Store Keepers
EEOPTJEA, SOUTH KOSA, HAW AIL
(Sear Eealakekna Bar.)
Island predate boertt, Ship rep plied with
Wood, Beef and other necsraries.
Agent at Honolaln i. E. CU6H0R5.
U- lj
M. S. CRINBAUM & CO.,
IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE
Dealers in Fashionable Clothing
Hats, Caps, Boots and Shoes, and exerj variety
of Gentlemen's roperiorfurnishing goods.
STORE IN MAKEE'S BLOCK,
IS Queen Street, Honolulu, H. I. pj
YOLCAIVO HOUSE.
CRATER OE RTLATJEA, HAWAII.
MTIIIS ESTABLISILMEST ISj&
now open for the reception of Ti.TTnr, . i
to the Volcano, who may relj on finding com
fortable rooms, a good table, and prompt at
tendance. Experienced guides for the Crater
always in readiness.
STEAM ASD SULPHITE BATHS !
HcxseJ Grained and Stabled if Desired.
CHARGES REASONABLE.
Parties risiting the Volcano via Hilo, can
procure .t.?.t warranted to make the jour
ney, by P. U. HrrcHCOCg. Esq., HBo. 3T-ly
GEORGE WILLIAMS,
LICENSED SHIPPING AGEHT,
GOATXXXTES tbc lnsines on
his old plan cf settling with o cen and
eamen immediately on their shipping at hit
oEee. Baring no eonncctnn, either direct or
indirect, with any outtting establishment,
and allowing so debts to be eoHecttd at his
oce he hopes to gtTe as good satisfacuoa in
the f stare as he has in the past.
3.0ee oa Jas. Robinson A Co.' Wharf,
sear the TX. S. Consulate.
Honolulu, March 7, IS7. 24-3m
II. TBEBFEB,
Piano-Forte Llaker & Tuner,
jCgawgOFFKHS HIS SERVICES
-T-fer Bepairing and Tuning Pianos,
I f X I 1 "haring the best ef nilrrial' on
hand. Satisfaction gcarantced. Orders left
at Mr. Fkchcra Furniture Booms will meet
vUh immediate attention.
H. TBEUPEB will IcaTe these Islands on
the lit of October, 31 -a
BUSINESS I 0T1CES.
J. H. THOMPSON,
GENERAL BLACKSMITH
HOXOLULU, II. I.
S1AS COSSTASTLY
oa baad and for sale, a good
assortment of
BEST REFINED TtAtt IRON !
ALSO
Best Itlnclisiaitli's'Coal,
At the Loirett Market Frtces SS-lj
JX. 3I0TT- SAx't. SOTT.
JOHN NOTT & CO.,
Copper & Tin Smiths,
JL ing to the pablie that ther are prepared
leisrnun au tin 03 or toprra Worst, en''-
ing in part, of STILLS, STJCt&. JAXS.
SOECUAJf PAXS. WOXXS, JTJtPS, dt.
Also on hand, a foil assortment of Tlx
Wakx. which we ofier for sale at the lowest
market prices.
All IClnds of Repairing done with
Xeatness and Dlsiatch.
Orders from the other Islands will meet
with prompt attention.
Kaahcmann Street, one door abore Flit-
ner s. :l-3m
JEWELER AND ENCRAVER
MK. J. COSTA
Is now prepared to execute with promptness
all work in his line of business, such as
Watch and Clock. IleiHUrtng,
2Iunufaettrtne; Jot rl ry.
And EngraTtng.
Shop on Fort Street, opposite Odd Fellows
II all. :4-3m
JAMES L. LEWIS,
COOPER AIYD GAUGER,
AT TEE OZiB STiUJD,
Corner of King and Bethel Sts.
A Larsc
stock of OIL
SHOOKSand
aU kinds of
COOPERING MATERIALS !
CONSTANTLY ON HAND.
He hopes, bj attention to bosUrc, to merit
a continuance of the patronise which he has
heretofore enjoyed, and for which he nowre
tsms his thanks. 24-Cm
SUGAIl & MOLASSES.
1S6S
1S6S
IIII.O, XI. I.
Sajrar mill Molasses.
GKOP COMING IN AND FOR SALE IN
qcactities to snit purchasers, by
YTALKEK A ALLEN,
ll-3ra Agents.
050MEA- PLAHTATIOH.
Susir and ZTIoIxisses Croi
COMING IN, FOB SALE IN QTJANTI
ties to suit parchaseri, bj
WALKER A ALLEN,
;t-3m Agents.
wPRISCEYILLE PLAKTATIOg.
Sugar and 3Iolascs Crop 1S6S
COMING IN, FOB SALE IN QUANTI
ties to snit psrehasers, by
WALKEP. A ALLEN,
244m Agents.
WATL17K1T PLANTATION.
VTEW CBOP NOW" COMING IN. FOB
LN Sale in quantities to snit purchasers,
by C. BBEWEB A CO.,
Zi-3m - Agents.
MAEEE PLANTATION.
e"v Crop of Sugar A; 3Iolasses
"VTOW COMLSG IN. AND FOB SALE IN
L quantities to snit purchasers by
C. BBEWEB A CO.,
t-3m Agents.
IaVSUEAIVCE NOTICES.
SAN FRANCISCO
BOARD OF UNDERWRITEES,
TXTE untlerslsmcd IiaTinpticcn
appointed agents for the San Francisco
Board oi Underwriters, representing the
California Insuranee Company,
21 r reliant 3Iutnal JIarlne Ins. Co.,
Pacific Insurance Companj.
California Lloytls, and
Home 2Xntnal Insurance Company.
Beg IcaTC to inform Masters of Vessels and
the public generally, that all losses sustained
by " essels and Cargoes, Insured by either of
the abore companies, against penis of the
seas and other risks, at or near the several
Sandwich Islands, will tan to te verified by
t-5m II. HACKFELD A CO.
XXVnBCRGIX-BRITflE"
FEEtE INSUBANCE COMP'Y.
rrUIE UNDERSIGNED, HAVING
I been appointed Agents of the aboTe Com
pany, are prepared to inssre risks against Fire
on Stoie and Brick Buildings, and on Mer
chandise stored therein, on the most favorable
terms. For particulars apply at the oce c f
5-ly F. A. SCIIAEFEE A CO.
Merchants' Mutual
MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY.
OP SAX FBAXCISCO.
rruXE undersigned haring been ap
I pointed Agents for the aboTe Company,
are prepared to issae policies on Casgozs,
Fbxichts and Tszascsk.
WALKEB A ALLEN.
lt-ta Agents, Honolulu.
California Insurance Company.
TXTE UndcrMljrxica, AGCfTS
of the abore Company, hare been author
ised to insure risks on CABGO, FREIGHT
and TREASURE, by COASTERS, from Hono
lulu to aporU of the Hawaiian Group, and
Tiee Tina. H. HACKFELD A CO,
8-Iy
J?recott' XJic anil IVorlts.
ptora the Eerkw d Prsx jlraJos.
A few years ago, ono of the men who has
most contributed to mark the place of the
American nation In the literary uorcment of
the 19th century, was suddenly taken away
by an untimely death. Wiluum 1L Pkes
cott, the eminent historian, died In Boston
on the 2Sth of January, 1SS, In the full rigor
of his talents, abruptly interrupted in the
course of his most lmportaat works. He
was achieving a fame extcndiig far beyond
the limits of his own country, by works of
the highest character, whick have become
popular also in foreign lands : yet very little
was known of him personaly, or of tho ef
forts through which he had ciined his repu
tation. Some were acquainted with the
many obstacles thrown In Ms way by his
(Wbio licAitb, ud ii almost areolae state
of blindness. In the preiica to one of
his principal books, he had discreetly told
the reader of some of his difficulties and
sufferings; but those few lines, impressed
with a melancholy resignation had, so far,
been the only revelation to the general reader,
when George Ticknor. of Boston, published
his most Interestinc book, "The Life of
Frescott." Written by a hand which seems
still shaky with sympathetic emotion and
grief, the narrative comprises the whole life
of Frescott, from th first months of his iu
finer to the very day of his death.
The great Interest that one feels In refus
ing the book is owlnj to the abundance of
details having the chirm and stamp.of truth,
added to the infinite care with which a friend
sets forth the qualitiu, of a friend, and above
all, to the character of affection animating
all the pages devoted to the history of a sim
ple, noble, and painful existence.
The great attraction In rrescott's life Is
not derived from exciting scenes, or unex
pected events, but from the courageous sim
plicity with which he devoted his existence
to study, and died "a martyr to his chosen
calling. Wc have thought that something
touching and instructive is taught by his in
domitable energy In his Infirmities; by the
analysis of his habitual processes of compo
sition; and also from the example of. his pure
and noble nature.
WBliam HIckling Frescott was born In
Salem, on the 4th or May, lTOti. His father,
William Frescott, who, in later years, became
a Judge in Boston, was a distinguished law
yer, and his mother, Catherine HIckling,
was the daughter of a merchant of Massa
chusetts. The Frescott family is proud of
belonging, by Its ancestors, to those glorious
emigrants of the ICth century who, sacrific
ing their country to their faith, went to the
deserted shores of the New World, to find
there a new home, and religions liberty of
conscience. The first among them were the
historian's ancestors energetic and infclii
gent men, who exercised a great Influence
on the destinies or the infant colony.
Yflung William was fond of listening to
the great deeds of his forefathers, and to the
part which his grandfather had taken in the
war of American Independence, and he used
to look with admiration at the sword which
was worn at the glorious battle of Bunker
HilL It is not unlikely that he preserved,
from those early remembrances, his great
taste for relating heroic actions and noble
deeds of warfare. The romances of the old
times of chivalry were among his favorite
books. He evinced in his youth a great
aversion to any kind of exertion, and a great
propensity to idleness and dissipation. Even
his admission to Harvard University did not
alter his Indolent habits. It appears that
he was not able even, to resist all the tempta
tions that were crowding in Lis way. His
biographer informs us that it was the most
dangerous period of his life, and that be used
to think of it, in afU'r.years, with sorrow and
regret. A terrible accident, which was to
have on his future a sad and considerable In
fluence, suddenly changed the course of his
life. While playing with his comrades, a
piece of bread, thrown with violence by one j
of them, struck him in the eye. This un
fortunate blow was the cause of an inflam
mation by which his life was endangered,
and when he recovered, his eye was entirely
lost. The long, weary weeks through which
he passed In darkness and silence, were fa
vorable to sound reflection, and he came out
of his long rest with the firm determination
to make up, by assiduous work, for the be
havior of bis former years. This was, thanks
to his remarkable faculties, a very easy task,
and when he had finished bis University
studies, he had the glorious honor of reading
in public a Latin poem composed by himself,
and dedicated to "Hope." This poem was
lost, and he was never able to find it amongst
his college copy-books, or papers.
Hope was Indeed smiling on him at that
time, when, altera brilliant success, and en
joying renewed health, he left Harvard Uni
versity. He was then 19, and be began the
study of law, under his father's direction.
Two years bad elapsed since his accident,
and he was led to believe that the result
would never be serious, but his Illusion did
not last long. A slight imprudence brought
back the terrible inflammation which had
already endangered his life, and when, after
three months suffering and excruciating pain,
he was allowed to emerge from darkness,
his remaining eye was in such a bad condi
tion that he could hardly esc it to read one
page, or write a letter. He spent one winter
in the Azores, traveled in France, England
and Italy, and tried the most skillful sur
geons of London and Paris, but all without
avafl. When he came back to Boston, after
two yean' absence, he brought back the
came pains, and was obliged to follow the
same prescriptions. Great was the disap
pointment of his poor mother, who had pre
pared for her beloved son a nice room,
adorned "with beautiful, bright tapestries.
The sight of those showy colors caused him
intolerable pain, and they were obliged to
paint the walls green, and to cover the furni
ture with sombre cloth. It would" nave been
weB enough If those precautions had been
incident, but he was obliged to regulate hit
life as if be had been a blind man, or, at
least, as a man who ought to spare bis eye
sight as much as possible.
Those first years of Prescott's youth were
the hardest of his life, but he found a great
consolation and encouragement id the vigi
lant affection of his sister. It has been re
marked by a great critic that most of the
men who have distinguished themselves in
after years, had in their youth, as an intelli
gent and devoted companion, a good and
kind sister, showing, la a smaller way, the
same aptitudes and genius ss their brothers.
During these painful days, Prcscott was for
tunate enough to have his sister Elizabeth
Frescott as a companion and confident. En
tertaining for her brother the most un
bounded admiration, sho deemed herself very
happytobebUreaderaudsecretary. Brother
and sister used to shut themselves up In the
library for days, and while Frescott, his back
to the light, listened attentively, the Indefati
gable Elizabeth would read ior six or seven
hnnn, historical v. ,11.1 mvu, It 1111
the help of that discreet companion, Fres
cott grew bold enough to send an article
which he bad composed, to the director of
one of the most renowned periodicals of the
United States. More than two weeks passed
without bringing any bad news, and our
two conspirators were already sure of suc
cess, and Elizabeth was already fancying that
she was seeing the nimbus of immortality
.round the great writer's head, when, alas t
one day the manuscript was sent back, with
a pitiless refusal. Frescott endured the
bhameful blow with philosophy, but Eliza
beth was tndlgnaut for many a day.
BepuHcd iu that quarter, Prcscott tried an
other. Ho started, iu association with a few
yonng friends, under the name ot the " Club
Eeiiew," the publication of a series of arti
cles, which appeared at Irregular Intervals.
Tbc first number appeared iu February, 1S30,
but the publication as he himself says pleas
antly, "was stopped at the fourth number
for want of subscribers." It must bo con
fessed that it was not Prescott's fault He
had written for the Ret lew three articles,
two of which were novels one of the sen
timental, and the other of the historical
kind.
After these successive disappointments,
Prcscott grew somewhat discouraged. Ho
was then twenty-four years of age, and tho
bad condition of his sight prevented him from
following his father's vocation. He would
have born his infirmity well enough If lib
family, who were desirous of finding employ
ment for him, had not always been interfer
ing with his own Ideas. They vanted tho
future historian to be a shopkeeper. He hap
pily met at that time in the society of Bos
ton, a young girl named Susan Armory, who
had some years before Inherited a large for
tune from her father, a very wealthy mer
chant, ne fell in love with her graceful per
son, and they were married some months
later. Thanks to that good fortuae, Prcscott
not only became independent as far as money
was concerned, but also a happy man, for
Susan Armory was a devoted wife to him to
the very last day of his life. Under these
new. circumstances, Prescotrs parents, see
ing his future safe and secure, left him free
to follow his own Inclination, and he resolv
ed to become one of the illustrious writers
of his country. As soon as he had taken that
resolution, it became tbc fixed Idea of his life,
and he worked accordingly. We shall see how
conscientiously he prepared himself for the
nobleprofessionhcbad chosen. Poet laureate
of the University of Harvard, he could believe
that his education there, as far as the classics
and English literature were concerned, was
a sufficient stock to start with, and that he
did not need any new initiation. But he had
a different opinion of the case, and under
the date of October SOtb, 1S21, he made an
entry in his journal and wrote a programme
of studies, Including grammar, English and ,
Latin literature. He had the perseverance
to adhere to it literally, and he was seen
compiling, as a young scholar, the books of
rhetoric used in the Universities. That task
beingaccomplishcd, he then turned his atten
tion to foreign languages, comprising besides
tlicFrencb and Italian literatures, with which
he was partially acquainted, the German lit
erature, which be was not conversant with.
"This will be sufficient," he modestly said,
"as a general preparation." The Spanish lan
guage, which was to be some time later the
main occupation of his life, was not then in
cluded in bis programme. He spent one
year reading the French authors, from Frois
sart to Chateanbriand, and one year also in
the study of Italian works. Having master
ed Italian, he undertook the study of Ger
man, but his will, strong as It was, failed him
in presence of that difficult language. So
far, he bad been able with the assistance of
a Secretary, toachiere his great undertakings
witbont much fatigue to his eyes, but it could
not be so with tbc German. The first condi
tion required was to get accustomed to the
gothlc characters so completely unknown to
bin, and bis eyesight was not strong enough
to resist the efforts imposed upon IL After
a few months of vain attempts be gave it up,
but it was not witbont a deep feeling of re
gret and sadness. For the first time be was
made aware that bis infirmity was not only
an inconvenience, but also a real obstacle,
and he had a tangible proof of insurmount
able difficulties that his will Itself could not
conquer. After that failure he sunk into a
profound discouragement which caused a
great neglect of his daily labors. Mr. Tick
nor now intervened and caused him to shake
off his melancholy, and he showed his friend
what was the course be had better pursue,
and so brought him into the road that was to
lead him so rapidly to fame and celebrity.
OBSSSVATTOXa BT JOSH BILIJXG3. If a
man wants tew get at his aktual dimensions,
let him visit a crave yard.
If any man wants tew be an old bachelor,
and get sick at a boarding tavern, and have a
back room in tbc fourth story, and a red-haired
chamber-maid bring bis water gruel to
him in a tin wash-basin, I have alwns ted,
and I stick to it yet, he has got a pcrfek right
to do it
When a man loses his health, then be fust
begins to take care of it. That Is good judg
ment, that is !
It is getting so now-a-daze, if a man can't
cheat iu some way, he isn't happy.
Success In life li apt to make us forget the
time we wasn't much- It Iz so with the frog
on the jump; he can't remember that he was
a tadpole but other folks can.
An individual, tew be a fine gentleman, has
cither got to be bom so or be brought up in
it from infancy;' be kan't learn it suddenly
any more than he kan learn to talk iojon
korectly by practicing on the tommy hawk.
Tne Stoskwaix. TT Tall JKifl Gaatt
explains the manner of Low this ship got to
ea despite the French authorities :
It will be remembered of the tlx vessels
built for the Confederates, the StmneaB was
the only one which escaped the vigilance of
the French Government and the American
Minister and was delivered to tho South
erners. Maltre Lecau explained how this
was effected, and exculpated that most Inno
cent of shipbuilders, iL Annan. When
the French Government refused to allow
guns to be placed on board bis vessels. Cap
tain Bullock proposed to M. Annan that
they should be sold to a third power.
Denmark, then at war with Prussia, was In
want of a "ram," and proposed to pur
chase the StoimeaU, but to blind the Prus
sian autboriUc a treatyof sale was tilgned
with" the master of the King' hounds ju the
kingdom of Sweden 1 Mr. Dayton still sus
picious, wroto to Sweden for information,
and the purchase of the vessel was denied
by Count Manderstrom. The American
Minister informed M. Drouyn de Llinrt that
lakeu'by' DermurTkwero'almosl betrayed.
After a great deal of bother the Stonewall,
or Stoer-Koder, as she then was, got under
war with a French crew ou board, and reach
ed Copenhagen. The French crew returned
home. Denmark no longer required tho
"ram," and asked for a reduction of JC13,
000, whlcrnM. Annan would not make; he
demanded payment In full or that the con
tract should be annulled. The contract
was annulled, and just then Captain Bullock
appeared and claimed his vessel. What
could M. Annan, who sold tho vessel to
Captain Bullock, do? Could he prescribe to
Captain Bullock what he should do with his
ships ? Was he bound to warn the Ameri
can? The ship left Copenhagen with a Danish
crew, and was banded over to the Confede
rates in French waters. This was tho only
vessel which escaped, and It was afterward
delivered up to the United States by the
Spanish authorities in tho Uaranna, with
out haring effected a single capture, and
was sold to the Japanese for 2,500,000 francs.
Such is the story of the Stormnill, as related
by Maitre Lecau. It Is ouly lair to M. Ar
man to add that the charge of accepting
double payment has been disproved; lie
returned the money paid to him by the Con
federate agent, and when the Peruvian Gov
vernment paid a higher price than the ori
ginal contract, he divided the profits with
Captain Bullock. Mr. Berryer has yet to
reply for the United States.
UsiricATiox or Coinage. Senator Mor
gan, of the Finance Committee, lias submit
ted his views against the bill recently report
ed by Senator Sherman, from that Com
mittee, for., monetary unification according
to the plan agreed upon by tbo Conference
held iu Paris. Among other objections to
tLe plan, he states that the reduction which
this measure would effect in the present
legal standard value of the gold coin of the
United States would be at the rate of three
and a half dollars in the hundred, and tho
reduction in the legal value ol our coinage
would bo still more considerable. A change
In onr national coinage so grave as that
proposed by the bill should bo mado only
after the most mature deliberation. Tho
movement proposed in the bill appears to
be in the wrong direction. Tbo standard
value of gold coin should bo increased,
brought up to our own rather than lowered.
The reason should be obvious. Authorities
unito in the conclusion that a fall in the
value of the precious metals in consequenco
of their rapidly increasing quantity, is Ine
vitable. Unification to be desirable must
be universal. If the nation wcru compara
tively free from debt Congress might with
some propriety consider the qncstion of
changing the legal standard of coin. But
one effect of reducing it as now proposed
would be to deprive the public creditor of
nearly a hundred million dollars of his right
ful due. In the estimation of the Committee,
such a proposition ought not to be enter
tained by Congress.
It is proper here to say that tho delegate,
Mr. Buggies, who favors unification, has at
no time thought it Just to lower the value of
our coin without making proper allowance
to the holders of several forms or national
obligations. To be acceptable, a change In
our coinage must be a thing or clearly ob
vious advantages, and must proceed from the
yeoplc. There has, however, been no pop
ular expression In favor of the proposed plan,
nor, indeed, any voluntary action in that
direction whatever, on the part of financial
men cither in this country or elsewhere.
The oldest Porteii iu Sax Fhascisco.
It is well known that in the early days of
San Francisco, say from 1S19 to 1S53, hun
dreds of thousands of dollars' worth or
goods, in perfect condition, but for tho time
being unsaleable in the market, were pitched
overboard from vessels in the harbor, the
owners not caring to pay wharfage or storage
on them. Fifty tons of tobacco, more or
less, went into the mnd along the edge of
the Bay, between the corners of Montgomery
and Sacramento, and California and Sansome
streets, and a year or two since excavations
made near the latter point disclosed a regular
strata of that now valuable material soma
distance below the pavement or the street.
The dredging along the city front, outside
the seawall, will ultimately turn up some
curious relics of the old flush times of Cali
fornia. Yesterday, the dredging machine,
which is at work under the direction of the
State Harbor Commissioners, on the line of
Front sL, between Vallajo and Union sts.,
brought to the surface a cask of bottled
porter, evidently of English or Scfitch man
ufacture, from a depth of ten fcet under the
mud aud twenty feet below low-Water mark.
Th? cask was so decayed- that it fell to
pieces, and a portion of the bottles went ont
Into the Bay, but several dozens were saved.
The labels had of course disaoDearcd rears
ago, and the corks not being branded, Jt was
impossinic to ascertain the makers name,
but the porter was in as perfect condition as
when it was first bottled, and In fact superior
to any to be obtained at this time in the
market, as a reportoiial test which we made
fully demonstrated. The cask had evidently
been thrown or lost overboar4 from some
vessel. I ving at or near Cunningham's old
wharf, and people familiar, with the Bistorjc,
of tbc harbor say that It must havs been ly
ing in IU cozy bed for at least sixteen years,
no vessels naving oeen mere since isii.
Seahasstiip. After leaving New York the
first land teen was Watlin's Island, when
about to enter the channel at tbceast end of
Cuba, the cateway to the Caribbean Sea.
The "land fall" proved to be exact, not-
-. i it ii r i i i r t
nun&UDUlug uic cauupy ui ciuuu. naicu
obscured observations every day. Strange,
indeed, to a landsman, is this feat of striking a
mark blindfolded at a distance so irreat. But
a sailor knows where be is almost Intuitively,
precisely as a man who rides up Broadway
every day in an omnibus knows when to
pull the strap, no matter how intensely en
gaged In reading his newspaper. The vete
ran commanaer oi me uuiuing cur, uapuin
T1 U.i -WA-mw. -n AOTtltl, nt M.
kind which Is worth telling. Sailing from
Valparaiso for San Francisco, distant about
5000 miles, without obtaining a giimpse of
land until rearing bis destination, be at last
sounded in a thick fog touched bottom at
tony lainoms, cast ancnor, ana wnen ino
fog tilled found himself directly opposite
the desired harbor. This might be called
"drawing a bow at a venture." but the
achievement was something more. Cur.
Jour, ef Commerce.
-The U. SJsteamer Oaijxt arrived at Mon
terey on the 5th of August.
The Ouipee, says a note from an officer,
has had seven deaths since leaving San Fran
cisco five months ago, from malarious fever
contracted at I i rerto, Nicaragua. The first
victim was ' : - iendee a brother of onr Pay-
master- Mr. iUtjc. the Assistant Surgeon.
also died. At present, both officers and crew
are rapidly improving in health. The Ouipee
win prooaniy oe iu Ban r ran Cisco aoout tne
13th instant JUa.
ITnsMoBMOM NuaaaBr M Walw. Thei
following appear la the AS JfitB GmiHt:
It Tl 1 -.... l . .
1,0 muiuvu uia uujcr ciwawsHRJ
piece of news which probably attraeteel HMs
attention In England, hut which, If it feu
Into the hands of a quick Amerku writer,
might be made the basis of a very lotercotlBg
work. As It Is very short we may veetaro
to repeat It : 'Six hundred and fifty Memo
cmlirrants sailed from Liverpool on Sots-nsay
for the Salt Lake by the way of New York.
A large proportion of the eraigfaat Yfora
women.' Any American bookmaker wtxi
wished to do a clever thing had only to jt t-s
Liverpool after reading this, paragraph a4
there make Inquiries about the aomiu.
He would probably be referred to Wsioc,
and If ho pertued hit Journey twitter are
would soon discover that ho had hit upon the
large training-ground of Mormondoia. TH
would find that toe rear the followers of
Brigham Young and that America gets the
creoii oi inem. a mruiing picture ot i
insnuui state ot social ino in ureal .
might bo drawn from the presence
Bearer' W-m.f'GtAr.. WEugtanu "VS! tmL
LaKe or unciiia ureeic la to any mug wnlca
deserrcs to be called 'Americao;' and aa
enterprising traveler, gifted with a lithe aod
siuewy style, might easily delude a portloa
of his countrymen Into the belief that the
Mormon nursery In "Wale can be safely taken
as an example of tho relations which exist
between the sexes all over the country. If
he did this, and did It well, ho wonld deterro
to be considered a very 'smart' man, for to
use a common phrase bo would have paid
us back In our own coin. Wo send ship
loads of Mormons to America and then write
books to prove that Mormonltm Is the natu
ral fruit of the looso principles which pre
vail lu America."
Tauitl Uuder the head of "Commerce
or Tahiti," the principal Island or the Society
group, some Interesting particulars are given
of Its condition. The financial condition Is
represented as being excellent; the returns
from taxes and customs showlDg27,S07 francs
over tho estimates. Tho French Government,
to Increase Immigration from California, of
fered a free passage, and lu the event of thoto
going not liking the change, a free passage
was provided back. Tho scheme failed, and
disgusted with Its non-appreciation, the free
passage back has becu withdrawn. The value
or Imports in 1607 was 6.000,000 francs,
against 3,000,000 in 1S00. The shipping en
tered last year was S57 vessels, representing
30,000 tons. The system of public instruc
tion has made no progress for tho last two
years. The Catholic school at Papeete con
tained 211 scholars; the Protestant, 313; and
tha other districts or Tahiti, 1,200. A report
upon theso schools says that In reading,
writing, and tho first four rules In Arithme
tic, the ignorance or the pupils was lamenta
ble. It appears difficult to overcome their
natural Indolence of character. Two cotton
cleaning mills have been erected at Papeete,
which sent to France, last year, 23,32s kilo
grammes or cotton. There are 5, MX) acrca
altogether In cultivation on the Island of
Tahiti, of which 700 acres are devoted to
cotton ; jm to cane, ana tne rest to conce,
arrowroot, cocoa, yams, maize, etc Coffee
Is a failure. Taken altogether, considering
the length or time the French hare had su
preme command in the Islands, their pro
gress Is not very striking, and It seems that,
after all. Tahiti will never mako the place it
was anticipated. BrUUh CWonUt
Home. How few men have homes. Moot
have some place where they sleep and take
tbelr meals where their wife, and children
live, but it is a boarding and lodging house,
not a home. Homo Is where the heart Is,
and the heart of too many men Is away from
their hearth-stone, not near it Recently,
not a thousand miles away, a man was kept
In by the terrific storm- His business was
in no wise urgent He conld stay with his
family just as well as not; but the hours
long before nightfall were Intolerable. The
children made a nolso: his good wife want
ed some little things done for the comfort
of the household, and more than that she
wanted to sit by his side for one week day
hour, and talk as they did before they wero
wed.
Alas, for tho woman 1 Those days will
never come. Your husband will como to
his home to eat and to die, but at no other
time. His fellowship Is with men in the
shop, the counting-room, perhaps the saloon,
not with you.
Where Is the trouble? Sometimes with
the wife. No man can live with disorder,
with mismanagement, with fretfulness, with
fault-finding, with complaining, and bo
happy. He will have peace, If not In the
right place, in the wrong one. Many times
with the husband. Men think too much of
business, too little of their families. The
right order Is reserved. In the middle of
the night, waking, men ask, "how soon
will it be momlng, so that I can go to the
mill, or store, or office?" "How toon will
night bring me to the brightest spot on
earth ?" The world is full of sorrow, but
there would be far less If each husband and
wife did what they could and all they could
to give to the others Home.
Mechamcai Skill. A singular instance
of me cbanlcal skill Is given in a Paris Jour
nal. A young man about eighteen years old
not long ago was sentenced to five years,
imprisonment for theft He belonged to a
respectable family, and his conduct in prison
was exemplary. A few weeks since he
begged the director, one day, to tell him
what o'clock it was that he might set bis
watch "Yon have a watch, then?" asked
the director. " Only since yesterday, sir,"
said the prisoner, and, to the astonishment
or the director, produced one made of
straw 1 The little master-piece Is two and a
halfinches In dlamtcr, abont one-half of aa
Inch thick, and will go for three hours with
out winding up. The dial-plate Is or paper,
and a pretty little straw chain is attached to the
whole. The Instruments the prisoner had
at his command were two needles, s pis,
a little straw, and thread. Several persons
or distinction, moved by his surprising
genius formechanlcs, arc now endeavoring
to obtain his liberation.
Cattle Disease. A disease or cattle bos
pmado it appearance In Western United
r tales, it is ucuctcu iu jiavc. com, rrom
Texas. Tbc symptoms arc thus described:
The symptoms or attack are in all Instance
the same. First the milk begin to (ail.
Then the animal droops its bead near the
ground, the ears also drooped and moved
with apparent pain the bead when oppor
tunity offers, Is pressed against any hard or
cold substance. About the second day of
the attack trembling of the flanks, and short
and bard breatblog ensue the animal becomes
Tery1"wcak and Its legs bend and arenstteaiy
under Its weight; there Is a dUposKloa to
lie down and almost Immediately arise, and
this continues until the third day, whea the
disease usually terminates fatally, few cattle
living into the fourth day after the ateaek.
Only cows have so far been attacked.
Ornxarvz Beeate. For this pHrposo al
most the only substance that should be ad
mitted at the toilet It the concentrated sola
tlon or chloride or sods. From six to tea
drops or it in a wlncglatsfall of pare syriwg
water, taken immediately after tho oera
tlons of the morning are completed, wM in
stantly sweeten the breath, by dltlBfctia
the stomach, which, far from being iajared,
will be benefited by the medlctee. Jf aec
ettary, this may be repeated in the Hdie
of the day. In some cases the odor aiMay
from carious teeth is combined with that of
the stomach. If the mouth to weH-riwitd
with a teaspoonful of the soletSea ef Use
chloride In a tumbler of water, the bad oior
or the teeth will be removed.
A New-Osleass editor says that s9a
after begining to learn the priaUae basin ess,
he went to court a preacher daughter. The
first time he attended church, be was Ukea
down at hearing the mtelster aaaoanee as
his text "My dangBter is griereasty tar
ia en ltd with a dcvtL"

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