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The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, October 21, 1868, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1868-10-21/ed-1/seq-1/

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HAWAIIAN
GAZETTE,
rcBLisnxD
Every Wednesday Morning',
at $o.oo"pkr. axxcii.
Hailed to Foreign Subscribers at S7.1K).
BOOK JlND JOB
PRINTING ESTABUSHMDm
THE "GAZETTE" 0HTCB, w.
la now prepared to si rents all ordsrs fssj
plus m m ninw.
Or EVERT BBH0ftI?TIMf,
WITH HEATITBSS SSV DISPATCH
OrncE On Merchant street, west of
he PoBt Office, Honolulu, H. I.
VOL. IV NO. 40.1
HONOLULU, WEDNESDAY, O0TO BER 21, 1868. . 6.00 PER TEAK.
Printed and published by J. Mott Sxitb, at the
Government iYlntlni; vmce, 10 wuc-m au Dusmfii
communications mmt be aaoreMetL.
53
BUSINESS NOTICES.
IV. 1. GItEEIV,
GEffEEAL COMHISSIOK AQEHT AHO
BE0KE2,
omcx tit raz-raoor jtomtcb.
g ftneeji Street, Honolulu, II. I. ljt
C. !t. SPEXCER. H. XACTanLi.XE.
CITAS. :v. SPKVCER & CO.,
OENEBgiL COMMISSION JIEECHAHTS,
SI Queen Street, Honolnlu. flj
HIcCOKjGAIY A; joicvsoiy.
MERCHANT TAILORS,
10 rort it.. Honolulu, opposite T. C. nenck's. ly
IRA RICHARDSON,
mPORTER A.AI DEALER
IK BOOTS, SHOES & GEKTLEMEirs FTTH-
KISHT1TO GOODS,
Corner or Fort and Merchant Streets
ej noxoLDLP, it. i. pr
EDWIN JONES,
QEOCEE AKD SHIP CHAHDLEE,
Lalinlnn, Maul.
Money and Recrnlts furnished to ships on
10-lyaj favorable terms. ,
XIIEO. II. UAVIES,
(late Janlon, Green A Co.,
IKPOETEa A COMMISSION HEBCHAHT
AGIST FOR
Lloyds' and the Liverpool Underwriters,
-Northern A iterance Company, and
British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co.
3-lyt
irrctAX. BROTHERS,
Importers and Wholesale Sealers
In Fashionable Clothing, Hats, Caps, Soots
and Shoes, and every variety of Gentle
men's Superior Furnishing Goods.
Store lenown Capt. Snow's Building
lit Mracruirr gnrrr, Honolulu, Oaliu. 60
C. H. LEVERS. J. 0. DICKSOX.
LE1VEUS tc DICKSOA,
Importers, 'Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Lumber
and SuUdlor Materials. Fort. Kins;, and Mer
2S chant t, Honolulu, II. L. 14
3. i. WALKER. t. C. ALLEX.
WALKER fc ALLES,
SHIPPING & COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
19 IIONOL,TJL,TJ. II. I. flyl
L. L. TORBERT,
DEALEB IN LTJMBEE AND EVERY KIND
OF BUILDING MATEBIAL.
13 Orncx Corner Queen and Fort streets, lyl
IJOEEES fc CO.,
SHIP CHANDLERS AND COMMISSION
MERCHANTB,
Queen Street, Honolulu.
Particular attention paid to the Purchase and
Sale of Hawaiian Produce.
Br.rr.ns it pepmissiox to
C. A. Williams A Co.,
Castle A Cooke,
C. Brewer A Co.,
H. Hackfeld A Co.,
D. C. Waterman,
C. L. Richards A Co.,
2-lyt
GEORGE G. HOIVE,
Dealer in Eedwood and Northwest Lumber,
Shingles, Doort, Sash, Blinds, Kails,
Paints, etc-
30 At bis old stand on tbs Esplanade. lyl
E. S. EEAGG,
CIVIL ENGINEER & SURVEYOE,
Address Post Orrics Box No. 22,
23
Honolulu, Oaliu.
F. A. SCIIAEFEU &. CO.,
COKmSSION MERCHANTS,
38 Honolulu, Oaliu, II. I. ljl
ED. HOFFSCHLiEGER & CO.,
IMPORTERS tc COMMISSION MERCHANTS
4 Honolulu, Oahu, II. I. Ij4
A. 8. CEEGIIORIV,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN
GENERAL MERCHANDISE,
Fire-proof Store, corner of Queen and Kaahu
manu Streets.
Retail Establishment on Nuuanu Street.
4- lyl
THEODORE C. IIEUCK,
IMPORTER & COMMISSION MERCHANT.
1 Honolulu, Oahu, II. I. ly
IX. IIACKFEED & CO.,
GENERAL COMMISSION AGENTS.
S-j Honolulu, Oahu, S. I. ly
THE TOM MOORE TAVERN,
BY J. OWIEEE,
25 Corner of King & Fort Sreets. Iy4
J. D. WICKE,
Agent for tbe Bremen Board
ol Underwriters.
All average claims against said Underwriters,
occurrine in or about this Kingdom, will
hare to be certified before me. 7-lj4
CIIUAG IIOOIV.
COMMISSION MERCHANT AND GEN
ERAL AGENT.
Agent for. the Paultaa and Amauulu
V " Sugar Plantations.
Importer of Teas and other Chinese and For
. eign Goods, and Wholesale Dealer in Ha
waiian Produce, at the Fire-proof Store,
Nnuann Street, below King. 21-1 y4
CIIAUaiCEY C. BEiN'jVETT,
DEALER IN NEWSPAPERS, MAGAZINES,
AND PERIODICALS,
18 FORT STREET, IIOXOLULU. 1?4
R. W. ANDREWS,
MAOHIKTIST,
Fort Street, opposite Odd Fellows' Hall.
Gives particular attention to the repair of
-Fire Arms, Sewing Machines, 4 Locks.
Drainage of Machinery, f-c, made to Order,
- W- ly4
HOBT KYCKOFT,
PLtTMBHR,
HAS OPENED HIS SHOP ON KING
Street, next door to Horn's Confection
ary Shop, and offers his services in all branch
es of Plumbing. All Jobs will hereafter be
executed with promptness and in a thorough
manner. S8-3m
PIANOS TUNED.
(jsJBBpnPIANOS AND OTHER
WJWlMUSICAL IUSTRUMENTS
11 'Tuned and Repaired, by CHA6.
DERBY, at the Hawaiian Theatre.
iVessons srlrea on the Piano Guitar.
-Tfce bet, of references given. il-ly
BUSINESS NOTICES.
J0H3 TIBBETS. TIIOS. SORC5S03.
TEBBETS &. SORESSOX,
SHIP CARPENTERS & CAULKERS
jjg. AtD. Foster ft Co's Old Stand,
.17 Near the " Honolnln Iron Works." 8m
B. F. EBLERS. . A. JAEOEB.
B. F. EIIEERS &. CO.,
DEALERS IN DRY O00DS AND GENERAL
MERCHANDISE,
Fire-Proof Store, Fort Street, above
IT Odd FelloiTs' HaU. Iy4
E. P. ADAMS. S. Q. WILDER.
ADA3IS Ac WILDER,
AUCTION & COMMISSION MERCHANTS
27 Queen Street, Honolulu. ljl
M. RAPLEE,
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION AGENT,
Offlceith E. P. Adams, Esq.,
QTJEEX STREET, HOXOLiVIiC.
Etrras bt riansnox to
Gen. Morgan L. Emlth,U.Meiirs. C. Brewer Co.
8. Consul. MeMts. Walker t Allen.
Messrs. rtlebards I Co. P. Adams, Esq. 41-3
AFO.-YG Sc ACIICCK,
IMPORTERS, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
DEALERS IK GENERAL MERCHAN
DISE AND CHINA GOODS,
Fire-Proof Store In Jfuuanu Street,
43 under the Public Hall. lyl
C. S. BARTOW,
AUCTION E E R,
Sales-Room on Queen Street, one door
17 from Kaahumanu St. Iy4
JOIIIV II. PATY,
Notary Public and Commissioner of Deeds
for the State of California.
Office at the Bask of Bishop A Co.
2-ly4
H. A, Wl DEM ANN,
IVOTARV PUBLIC.
OrriCE at the IsiERion Department.
6-ty4
BEX IX IX MCE. H. A. P. CAITIE.
C. BREWER & CO.,
SHIPPING & COMMISSION
Honolulu, II. I.
AGE.VTS Of the Boston and Honolulu
Packet Line.
AGKXTS For the Dlakee, Walluku and
liana Plantations.
AGENTS For the Purchase and Sale of
Island Produce.
REFER TO
Jobs M. Hood, Esq iew York
Cms. Dsiwza t Co Boston
Jss. HcsxtwEU, Esq
J. C. Mcasxu Co. 1
K. S. Swaix Co ban rrsnasco
Cms. W. Beoois, Esq o-lyl
G. W. lVORTOlV & CO.
COOPERS AND GAUGERS,
AT THE NEW STAND
OS THE ESPLAAADE.
(Hf WE ARE PJtEPAKED TO
EmME attend to
at.t. work in our noun
At the Shop next to the Custom House, where
we can bo louna at nil working nours.
TVE HAVE ON HAND AXD FOB SALE
OIL CASKS AND BARRELS,
Of different sites, new and old, which we will
sell at the very .
LOWEST MARKET RATES.
All work done in a thorough manner, and
warranted to give satisfaction.
AU kinds of Coopering Materials and Coopers'
SS- Tools for Sale. 3m
J. P. HUGHES,
Imnorter and Manufacturer
OF ALL. KINDS OF SADDLERY,
Carriage Trimming done with neatness and
dispatch. All orders promptlyattended to.
Corner of Fort and Hotel streets, Honolulu.
10- ly4
NEVILLE & BARRETT,
Planters & General Store Keepers
KE0FTKA, SOUTH ZONA, HAWAIL
(Near Kealakekua Bay.)
Island produce bought. Ships supplied with
Wood, Beef and other ncessaries.
Agent at Honolulu.. ...... .A. S. CLEonoRX.
11- 1V4
M. S. CRINBAUM & CO.,
IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE
Dealers in Fashionable Clothing
Hats, Caps, Boots and Shoes, and every variety
of Gentlemen's superiorfurnishing goods.
SljsMRE IN MAKEE'S BLOOK,
10 iueen Street, Honolnln, II. I. ftjt
VOLCANO HOUSE,
CRATER OF ELLATrEA. HAWAIL
f THIS ESTABLISHMENT IS W)
psj now open for the reception of visitors to
the Volcano House, who may rely on finding com
fortable rooms, a good table, and prompt attendance.
Expetienceouldes fjr the Crater always on hand.
STEAM .AND SULPHUR BATHS !
Hones Grained and Stabled if Desired.
CHARGES REASONABLE.
Parties TUltins; the Volcano via IIIlo, can procure
animals warranted to make the journey, by D. H.
UiicBCoCE, Esq. 37-ly
F. II. &, a. SEGELKEX,
Tin, Copper, Zinc and Sheet Iron Workers,
Nunanu Street, bet. Merchant & Queen,
HAVE CONSTANTLY ON HAND,
Stoves, Pipe, Galvanised Iron Pipe,
Plain and llote liibbs, htop Cocks,
India Rubber Hose best 3-ply, in
lengths of 25 and 50 feet, with. Couplings and
Pipe complete. Bath-Tubs, and also a very
large stock of Tinware of every description.
Particular attention given to Ship Work.
Thankful to the citiiena of Honolulu and
the Islands generally, for their liberal patron
age in the past, we hope by strict attention to
business to merit the same for the future.
SS-Ordera from the other Islands will be
carefully attended to. 37-ly
WIULIAtt KVAX,
Variety Store No. 2,
MauBaJxca. Street.
AU kinds of Merchandise and Groceries.
V . . 14
BUSINESS IS OTIC ES.
J. K. THOMPSON,
GENERAL BLACKSMITH
HONOLULU, II. I.
HAS COXSTANTXir
on bund and for sale, a good
assortment of
BEST REFINED BAR IRON !
ALSO
Best Blacksmith's Coal,
At the Lowest Market Prices. 33-ly
JKO. MOTT. . SXll'L SOTT.
JOHN NOTT & CO.,
Copper & Tin Smiths,
fTUKE PLEASURE IN ANNODNC
JL ing to the public that they are prepared
to furnish all kinds of Copper Wore, consist
ing in part, of STILLS, STRIKE PAKS,
SORQHAM PANS, WOR3IS. PUMPS, de.
Also on hand, a full assortment of Tlx
Ware, which we offer for sale at the lowest
market prices.
All Kinds of Repairing; done Trlth
Neatness and Dispatch.
Orders from tho other Islands will meet
with prompt attention.
Kaahumanu Street, one door above Flit-
ner s. 3S-3m
JEWELER AND ENCRAVER
MR. a. COSTA
Is now prepared to execnte with promptness
all wort in ms line of business, such as
Watch and Clock Repairing,
Manufacturing Jewelry,
And Engraving.
Shop on Fort Street, opposite Odd Fellows1
Hall. 38-3m
JAMES L. LEWIS,
COOPER AND G AUGER,
AT TBJX OU3 STATU,
Corner of King and Bethel Sis.
A Earere
stock of OIL
SHOOKSand
all kinds of
COOPERING MATERIALS I
CONSTANTLY ON HAND.
He hopes, by attention to business, to merit
a continuance of the patronage which be has
heretofore enjoyed, and forwhlch ho nowre-
tnrns ms inanKs. iS-Bm
SUGAH & MOLASSES.
1808
18CS
. c.
1868
IIIEO, H. I.
Suprar and !TIoIat8CS.
IROP COMING IN AND FOR SALE IN
vy quantities to suit purcnasers, oy
WALKER A ALLEN,
3S-3m Agents,
0N0MEA PLANTATION.
Sugar ami 3IoIassc8 Crop 1808
DOMING IN, FOR SALE IN QUANTI-
KJ ties to suit purchasers, by
WALKER A ALLEN,
33-3m Agents.
PRINCEVILLE PLANTATION.
Sugar and Klolnsscs Crop 1808
DOMINO IN, FOR SALE IN QUANTI-
ties to suit purchasers, by
WALKER A ALLEN,
38-3m Agents.
WALLUKU PLANTATION.
VTEW CROP NOW COMING IN. FOR
IS Sale in quantities to suit purchasers,
by C. BREWER A. CO.,
3S-3m Agents.
MAKEE PLANTATION.
IVew Crop of Sngnr Sc SIoIasHCS
NOW COMING IN, AND FOR SALE IN
quantities to suit purchasers by
C. BREWER A CO.,
38-3m Agents.
INSURANCE NOTICES.
SAN FRANCISCO
BOARD OF UNDERWRITERS.
THE iinderslKiiedlinvInp-bccn
appointed agents for tbe San I rancisco
Board of Underwriters, representing the
California Insurance Company,
Merchants Ulutunl Marine Ins. Co.,
Pacific Insurance Company,
California. Lloyd, and
Home Mutual Insurance Company.
Beg leave to inform Masters of Vessels and
the public generally, that all losses sustained
by Vessels and Cargoes, Insured by cither of
the above companies, against perils of tbe
seas and other risks, at or.near the several
Sandwich Islands, trtt! have to be verified by
them.
3S-3m H. HACKFELD A CO.
IIA-IIIIUKGH-IIKEIE
FLEE INSURANCE COMP'Y.
THE UNDERSIGNED, HAVING
been appointed Agents of the above Com
pany, are prepared to insure risks against Fire
on Stone and Brick Buildings, and en Mer
chandise stored therein, on the most favorable
terms. For particulars apply at the office of
5-ly4 F. A. SCHAEFER A CO.
Merchants' Mutual
MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY.
OF SAflf" FKANCISCO.
rTUIE undersigned having been np
JL pointed Agents for the above Company,
are prepared to issue policies on CaeaoES,
Feeigbts and Treasure.
WALKER A ALLEN,
3S-3m Agents, Honolulu.
California Insurance Company.
THE Undersigned, AG EATS
of tbe above Company, have been author
ised to insure risks on CARGO, FREIGHT
nd TREASURE, by COASTERS, from Ho.no,
lulu to all ports of the Hawaiian Group, and
vice versa. H. HACKFELD A CO.
.u S-Jy4
gill
SATURDAY AFTERSOOX.
I lore to look on a eceoe like this
Of wild and careless play.
And persuade myself that I am not old
And my locks are not yet grey;
For It stirs the Mood of an old mans heart.
And xcakes bis pulses fly.
To cstch the thrill of a hsppy voice
And the light of a pleasant eyeJ
I hare walked the world for ftfurcore years
' And they say that I am old
That my heart i, ripo for the reaper Death,
And my years are well-nigh told;
It Is very true It is very true
I am very old and " I bide my time;"
Hot my heart wOl leap at a scene like this,
And I half renew my prime.
Play on I plsyont Vm with yon. there,
In the midst of y6nr merry ring;
I can feel the thrill of the daring Jump
And the rash of the breathless swing.
I hide with you In the fragrantiay.
And I whoop the smothered call.
And my feet slip on the seedy floor.
And I care not for the fslL
I am willing to die when my time shall come,
And I shall be glad to go
For the world, at best. Is a weary place,
And my pulse Is getting low;
Bat the grave is dirt, and the heart will fall
In treading its gloomy way,
And it wiles my breast from its dreariness
To see the young so gay.
-a, p. m7i.
Prcscott' JLile and lVorliH.
From the Revue des Deux Mondes.
It is an evident fact, which may be as
certained in different parts of his works,
that while sincerely deploring the evils re
sulting from servitude, Prescott was struck
with a sense of tbe dangers that might
accrue from its sudden suppression. He
could not even conceal his impatience
when zealous philanthropists advocated in
his presence thedoctrino of immediate and
bouudloss froedom to the negroes, without
preparatory measures. "When a Yankee,"
he writes in one of his books, " makes his
appearance in a London circle, the first
question addressed to him is : ' Are yon
injavor of, or against slavery?' and he is
treated according to his answer. When
an.Englishman puts his foot for tbe first
time on American soil, would it not seem
very strange to him if be were greeted
with the words : ' Do yon think it right or
not, to let the Chinese swallow opium V as
if that question could decide the manner
in which he should be welcomed or ill
treated." It may bo that this singular view of the
cose was a part of his social and political
principles, although ho can hardly be called
a politician, for bo had a great fear of pub
lic life, with its stormy emotions, and gave
but little attention to the political ques
tions by which America wa3 then agitated,
He considered them an element cf disor
der in the peaceful and studious course
of his existence. In his relations with the
leading statesmen of his tmo, we can dis
cover tracc3 of that disdain, mingled with
fear. He wrote to Bancroft : " How can
you thus flirt with tbe inconstant virago
of Politics while the glorious JIuso of His
tory is ready to receive yon? I can not
say that I understand the fascination ex
ercised by snch a mistress, and I suppose
yoa must pity me."
To,the last, Prescott remained faithful
to the quietude of n retired life; to the
lost, bo was fortunate enough lot to meet
with any discordant element in the peace
ful atmosphere in which he delighted to
live, and which was necessary to the wants
of his heart, and the development of his
faculties. Only once it happened that he
voluntarily sacrificed the monotony of his
habits in order to realize a log-desired
project : he went to England; but he was
ncable to remain long from home, and in
five months after be was back again, hav
ing doubtless enjoyed his trip, but happy
to return to bis family, bis friends, and bis
library. From that time he sf ent his life
equally between Boston, where- he always
passed the winter; a villa by the sea-side,
where he'took refuge during the great heat
of the Eummer months, and bis favorite
conntry-seat at Pepperell, wtere he lived
during the autumn, the most splendid sea
son of the year in that part of the country.
In getting old, he became more and more
attached to this borne, which bad been
bought from the Indians by his ancestors,
" o remarkable fact," he says, "in Amer
ica, where the son seldom sits in the shade
of the trees planted by his father." He
had constantly embellished this estate,
and his greatest anxiety was that it should
not go out of the possession of his family.
He lived there a patriarchal existence, sur
rounded by his children and grand-children,
and having no other interruption to his
daily studies than the visits he received
from hi3 friends, or the many strangers
and foreigners who wonld not leave Amer
ica without seeing the renowned historian.
His ardor for study wo3 not diminished,
and the work to which he devoted the rest
of his life did not cost him less trouble or
labor than his former efforts. For a long
time he had determined to write the life
of Phillip n, and had already conceived
tbe plan of a history of his illustrious and
nefarious reign. When he returned from
England, he expected to receive the in
formation that for tho previous ten years
his friends had collected for him in Vi
enna, Florence, Venice, Paris and London.
Such a long contemplated preparation had
made his "project known. One day, he
was visited by a young man who came to
consnlt him on a very delicate matter, as
' snring him that he was ready and willing
to abide by his decision. He told him
that he was on the point of publishing a
history of the Revolution of Flanders,
nnder the reign of Phillip II, when he
heard of the dangerous competition to
which he was exposed, and that he deemed
it his duty to abandon his right to his
glorious rival. Far from encouraging his
young visitor in that idea, Prescott begged
him to persevere in his design, and uniting
action with speech, he at once gave access
to the special books in his library to his
loyal antagonist. The unknown visitor
was Mr. Lathrop Motley, who afterwards
earned a legitimate reputation in the lit
erary world by his History of the Repub
lic of the Netherlands. But Prescott was
more active than Motley, and the Life of
Phillip II. having appsared the first, Pres
cott announced in tho preface, in the most
amiable manner, the early publication of
Mr. Motley's History of the Revolution
of Flanders.
In the early port of the year 1858, three
volumes of the Life of Phillip II. had
been published, but those three volumes
were to be the last. Of all Prescott's
works, they ore the least known, but we
do not hesitate to put them on a level
with the Conquest of Mexico. If the
Life of Phillip II. has not acquired in
America or other parts of the world more
popularity, it is because it was not termi
nated. Prescott was not destined to pur
sue any longer his great labors. For some
time a vigilant eye might have foreseen
his coming death, in witnessing the grad
ual weakening of his organs. He was no
more able, as onco, to sit in the shade of a
cluster of trees at Pepperell, and known
throughout tho surrounding country as the
"Fairies' Bower." His eyes could no longer
admire the graceful outlines of the charm
ing scenery they bad so long contemplated
He was soon obliged to limit his blind
man's walk to turning solitarily round and
round an old cherry-tree- not far from tho
house; and his continual walking in tbe
same place cut a deep path, which be me
chanically followed. At this timo, he first
perceived the symptoms of another in
firmity, and he remarked with indescriba
ble terror, that he wa3 getting deaf. One
may well imagine how dreadful that ca
lamity would have been to him. He
would probably have experienced this last
cruel infirmity had be remained much
longer on earth. It is not then, perhaps,
a matter of regret that a sudden death
should have spared him that trial 1
In the beginning of 1858, he experienced
the first shock of a fearful disease, which,
judging from the words ho uttered when
he felt the attack, was nothing extraordi
nary to him. Having had a slight stroke
of apoplexy, ho murmured with a faint, in
distinct voice to his- wife, bending over
him, " My dear friend, I am very sorry for
you that this misfortune should occur so
soon." no passed the danger, and having
regained the complete equilibrium of his
faculties, ho was fain to believe that ho
had nothing further to apprehend. The
last lines written in bis journal with his
own hand, are expressive of his confidence
in the future, and of his gratefulness to
God ; but his friends did not share in this
assurance, and experience- was, alas! to
prove that their surmises were right. On
the 27th of J anuary, 1859, he bad a sudden
stroke, as he entered his library, and died
surrounded by his wife, his children, his
favorite sister, (who bad been tbe com
panion and confident of his youth,) and
his old friend Ticknor, who had hastened
to see him when ho heard of the fatal at
tack. To die amongst those be loved was
an oft-repeated wish. They found in bis
will the expression of a singular desire.
He earnestly requested that before being
taken to the cemetery, his'body should be
deposited for several hours in that dear
library where'he had passed the sweetest
hours of his life. This wish was religiously
complied with, and on the same day his
coffin was taken to the church and depos
ited in tbe vanlt where his parents and the
little girl he had so dearly loved, were at
rest. His remains were followed by bis
friends, and a vast multitude of people.
Many men, who bad seen Prescott bat
once or twice in their lives, or who knew
him merely by reputation, accompanied,
his body to its last resting place. Every
body looked sad and deeply moved, and it
was easy to see, as his faithful biographer
informs us, that " the world had experi.
enced a great I033, and that a light as,
useful as it was brilliant, had been extin
guished by the hand of Death.''
A Novel Corhjioe Horses Inside. An
lngenions idea has been carried oat success
fully in Cincinnati, by tbe construction of a
one-wheeled carriage, propelled by the bones
being msiae. u consists oi a large wooaea
wheel, fourteen feet in diameter and six
broad, with foot-board for the horses to
bold. From the axle are suspended seats
for' the passengers, which axle extends on
both sides beyond tbe wheel, it being only
necessary to keep them balanced. Iron
stays from the extremities of the axle am
carried over the top rather In front, which
supports tbe sat for the person who drives
the vehicle, which is done with the greatest
sue, and It can turn in a ranch shorter
snace than a coach. Asnccestmll trial was
made recently with one carrying twenty
four passengers and two heavy draught
horses, previously trained, as they are en
tirely unfettered by harness. A distance of
five mile was performed In twenty-eight
minutes. The work of toe' horses bt easy,
as they. travel on an esdlstu pkak-road.
Eartbquakcsi and Volcanoes.
The recent eifiptlon of Vesuvius and the
earthquakes In the West Indies, have nat
urally turned our thoughts upon some of
tnesc lemoie pennmauons oi nature, wnicn
appal tbe stoutest hearts, and make man feel
his ntter insignificance In the presence of the
organic lorccs oi tne world. jannqnaKes
and volcanoes are rather acenta than effects.
rather the cause of geographical diversity
than geographical features themselves.
An earthquake may produce a momentary
nnauiaiion oi me grouna, lonowea oy no
perceptible result; it may elevate one niton
or depress another ; it may be attended with
a vast destruction or animal lire and the sub
mergence of forests; it may alter the course
of rivers, and produce new stores and beach
es, and bury cities In rains, as It did at Lis
bon In 1755. Innumerable instances of snch
changes can be cited. We will, however,
only mention a few.
The earthquake in Chile, in 1822, elevated
an Immense tract of ground, equal to 100,000
square miles, from two to six feet higher
man it was oeiore, ana parr, oi tno oottom
of the sea remained bare and dry at high
water, exposing large beds or oysters, rans
cles and other shell-ash ; bat strange to add,
all dead. In 1819, there was au earthquake
in India, extending fifty miles In length and
sixteen ieet in Dreaam, wnicn raisca tne sur
face of the land over ten feet, while adloln-
Ing districts were depressed, and the features
oi me scenery quite altered.
The earthquakes of Calabria, which lasted
off and on for four years, from 1783 to 1787,
nrodnced numerous rlssnrps. land&llns. new-
lakes, ravines, falls of sea-cliffs, and other re-
marKaoie cnanges.
In 1743, tic town of Guatemala, la Mexico,
with all its riches and 8.000 families, was
swallowed up, and every vestige of its former
existence ooiueraiea, tne spot Delng now in
dicated by a frightful desert, twenty-five
miles distant from the site of tbe present
town. In 1602, a similar calamity overtook
tue town oi rort tioyai, in Jamaica, wnen
the whole island was frightfully convulsed.
and over 1,000 acres In the vicinity of the
town submerged to tbe depth of fifty feet.
We know so little of the earth that nothing
certain can be predicated. When we remem
ber that tbe deepest mine Is far short of a
mue, ana mat tue eartn on wnosc surface
we live Is 8.000 miles In diameter, we can
form some Idea bo w little we have penetrated
Into its Internal structure. Nothing like so
far as the one-hundredth part of the thinnest
rind of an orange.
Volcanic forces act In a similar manner, in
as far as they elevate, depress, and break
asunder portions of the earth's crust; In
deed, an earthquake and a volcanic eruption,
considered as merely subterraneous move
ments, produce precisely the same results.
Bat volcanoes, properly so called, act in an
other and eauallv important manner in Pro
ducing geographical changes. They elevate
tne crust oi tne eartn Into long, continuous
ridrcs. or mountain chains: thev form Iso
lated cones ; they throw up immense quanti
ties oi lava, asues, loose stones, ana otner
unmt suosiances.
We may mention as a proof of tho wonder
ful power of volcanic heat, that nlthough'the
lava flows out of the crater as liquid as mo
lasses, there has not yet been discovered any
method of .reducing iAva to a liquid state
again.
There arc three kinds of volcanoes: the
extinct, the dormant, and those which ore
incessantly active.
The cause of volcanoes, earthquakes, and
other subterraneous movements, has been
the subject of several theories, but it Is, of
course, impossible to come to any definite
decision on tbe subject. Some connect vol
canoes with one great source of central heat,
tbe residue of that burning state in .which
our globe originally appeared. This theory
assumes that the crust of the earth Is of va
rious thicknesses, and that it Is covered with
immenso fissures, caused sometimes by the
irregular action of tbe earth In cooling, or
else by subterranean agitations. Through
these fissures, water finds its way to the
moss within : this cenerates steam and other
gases, and these exploding and struggling to
eipuna, proance carmquaKcs ana volcanoes.
Occasionally, these vapors make their way
through the apertures, and become hot
sprimjs, like the far-famed Geysers of Iceland.
neurew.
Scenes on the IVIle.
Before leaving Cairo, the English ladles
were Invited to spend an evening In the royal
harem. Accordingly, at 8 o'clock, they
found themselves In a beautiful garden, with
fountains, llirbtcd bv a multitude of varie
gated lamps, and conducted by black ennnchs
mrongn treiiis-covcrea warns to a targe marble-paved
ball, where about forty Circassian
slaves met them, and escorted them to a sa
loon fitted np with divans, at the end of
which reclined the Pasha's wives. One of
them was singularly beautiful, and exqui
sitely dressed iu pink velvet and ermine,
wun priceless jewels. Anoiuer very- nne
figure was that of the mother, a venerable
old princess, looking exactly like a Rem
brandt Just come out or Its frame. Great
respect was paid to her. and when she came
in every one rose. The guests being seated,
or rather squatted, on tho divan, each was
supplied with loug pipes, coffee In exqui
sitely Jeweled cups, ana sweetmeats, the one
succeeding tbe other, without Intermission,
the whole night. The Circassian slaves.
nun loiaea nanasananowncast eyes, stooa
before their mistresses, to supply their wants.
Some of them were very pretty, and dressed
witn great rlcuness ana taste, men Degan a
concert of Turkish instruments, the sound
of which was unpleaslng to English cars,
followed by a dance, which was graceful and
tty. mis was lonowea uy a way. in
which half the female slaves were dressed as
men, and the coarseness of which It is im
possible to describe. The wife ol the foreign
minister kindly acted as Interpreter fo'r the
English ladles, and through her means some
kind of conversation was kept np. But the
Ignorance of tbe ladies in the harem is unbe
lievable. They can neither read nor write.
Their whole day Is employed in dressing,
bathing, eating, drinking and smoking.
Tbe soiree lasted till two In tbe morning,
when tbe royalty withdrew, and the English
ladles returned home, feeling tbe wbole time
as If they had been seeing a play acted from
a scene in the " Arabian Nights,'' so difficult
was it to realize that such a way of existence
was possible In the present century.
Tbe Sunday before they left, curiosity led
them after mass to witness tbe gorgeous cer
emonial of tbe Coptic Church. The men sat
dn the ground with bare feet; the women in
fillerles above the dome, behind screens,
be Patriarch who calls himself the suc
cessor of St. Mark, and is the leader Of a
sect whose opinions are almost Identical
with those condemned by tbe Council of
Cbalcedon as tbe Eutychlan heresy was
gorgeously attired In a chasuble or green and
oia, witn a surer crosier in one nana, pw
iconic and tbe Drairon beinc carved on tbe
top,) and in the other a beautiful crucifix,
rlcblv Jeweled. wraDPed In a cold-colored
handkerchief, which everyone stooped to
kiss. After the reading of the Gospel and
the Creed, the people.Jolned with great fer
vor in tbe Litanies, and began the consecra
tion of the Sacred Species, wblcb luted a
very long time. The Holy Eucharist was
given In a spoon to each communicant, the
hbread being dipped In the wine, and tbe Fa-
tnarcn laying nis nana on ms ioreneaa oi
each person while be gave the blessing. At
tbe same time, blessed bread, stamped with
a cross, and with the came of Christ, was
handed round to the rest of the congrega
tion, like ttu pain txnlt, la village churches
In France. -The Copts boost that there has
never been tbe slightest alteration In their
religious rites since the fourfh century ; and
they are, undoubtedly, tbe only detcendents
of the ancient Egyptians. The Month.
Boston contains at the sreseat time over
18,000 bouses and boteto.
Annual nave loest ten rainiest la
Europe thU yer on kaickaulu aad betel
bills. ' , ' V
Costly Pearls.
Wo all know bow Julius Csesr. wbw he
was In love with the Mother or Stoma
Brutus, gave her a pearl worth nearly a gMt
ter of million of our money: and how Mark
Antony drank one, dissolved In riaewtf, te
value of which amounted to nearly (99,000;
while Clodlus, tbe glutton, swallowed ose
worth $40,000. The example of Cleopatra
found an imitator even in sober: Eneland.
Sir Thomas Oresbam, not otherwise lsmoos,
for acts of roily, still so mistook the meacisc
or loyalty that he ground a pearl, which, tea
cost him 15,000, Into a cup of wine, la o4r
thus fitly to drink the health or bbs great
Queen I This plagiarist again had many
rivals in the mad courtiers or ,LouU XIV.,
who in their insane extravagance, were, wont
to pulverize their diamonds, and occulouallr
used tho powder to dry tbe Ink or letters
which they sent to tbelr beloved ones. Is
diamond powder In the hair much worse f
The largest pearl on record Is probably oc
bought by that most romantic or all travel
lers and dealers In precious gems, Taveroler,
at Catifa, in Arabia, where a pearl fishery
already existed in the days orPtlay. It H
said lor tbe pearl Is unknown to our dY
to have been pear-shaped, perfect in all re
spects, and nearly three Inches long. He ob
tained from the Shah of Persia the enormoa
sum of 111,000 for tbe gem.
iir. Hope's peari, wnicn is loocea upon as
the finest now known, is two inches lone
and four Inches round. It weighs 1,88
grains, and like all such rarities, is of such
enormous ana uncertain value mat no one
would buy it at a market price. Tbe most
beantlful collection of nearls belontrs. how.
ever, to the Dowager Empress or Haas la.
Her husband was exceedingly fond of her,
and as he shared, with other fancies, also that
of fine pearls with her, he sought for them
all over the world. They had to fulfil two
conditions rarely met with: tbey must be
perfect In spheres, and tbey mnst be virgin
pearls; lor he wonld buy none that bad btea
worn oy otners. Alter twenty-nve years-
search, he at last succeeded In presenting bis
Empress with a necklace such as the world
has never seen before.
As tbls admiration for fine pearls has been
the common weakucss of man In all ages and
In all conntrles, we need not wonder at their
playlnga prominent port In religious writ
hes. The Talmnd has a orettv storv. teach
ing ns that those who believed In it, esteem
ed bnt one object in nature of higher value
than pearls. When Abraham approached
Egypt, the book tells ns, he locked Sara In' a
chest that none might behold her dangerous
beauty. But wbeu he came to the place of
paying custom, the officer said: "Fay cus
tom." And he said: "I will nay the cus
tom." They said to him: "Thou carriest
clothes." And he said: "I will pay for
clothes." Then they said to him: "Thon
carriest gold." And ho answered them: "I,
will pay forgold." On this they lurtber said
yi!.tr1hnn hmrMt f!nHlr H renlfori -
'I will pay custom for tbe finest silk." Then
they said : "Surely It must be pearls that thou
takest with thee. And bo only answered :
1 will pav for pearls." Seeing that thev
could name nothing of value for which tbe
patriarch would not willingly pay 'custom,
they said: "It cannot be that thou open tho
box and let us see what Is within t" So they
opened the box and the whole land of Egypt
was illumined by the lustre of Sara's beauty
far exceeding that of pearls.
tience pearls are repeateaiy usea in me
Holy Writ also for the most solemn compar
isons, and to denote tbe highest degree of
perfection. In the Old Testament, wlsdoa
Is praised as above pearls, and In the New
Testament, tbe kingdom of heaven is com
pared to a pearl of great price, which, when
a merchant bad found It, be went and sold
all that he bad and bought It. Even the New
Jerusalem was revealed to Bt, John under
the figure or an edifice with twelve doors,
each or which was a single pearl.
And this precious cem. fit to adorn an
Emperor's crown, and to heighten the beauty
or the fairest of maidens, this pearl of great,
price, perfect In form and beauteous In lus
tre, this Jewel of tbe deep, sought for at the
Eerli of human life, and paid for with the
read of ten thousands It sickens and dies
and vanishes In a day. Every now and then
we read of a noble family, which prided T0
self on the possession of magnificent ances
tral pearls, panic-stricken by finding some
of their precious gems turning or a sickly
color, and crumbling Into dust. It hi but a
ley years since the crown-Jeweller or Franae
solemnly applied to the Academy of Science;
for a remedy against tbls disease, canted
Erobably by the decomposition of the mera
ranes which form part of tbe pearl,, and
after all liable do decay and corruption, like
all animal matter, by contact with air. There
was no answer given, bnt the advice to pre
serve the precious gems, ss much as possi
ble, from the Influences of light and air; and
the Crown of Franco bos since lost tome of
Its most highly-prized Jewels. " Behold, all,
Is vanity and vexation of spirit." Jlnam's
Magazine.
Balzac Iktiso io Dise. Another, very
good thing, too, said by a man who had
notning tue mailer wun nis tongue, oas
this week been repeated in connection with
Balzac There Is a place called tbe Tele
Noire, near St. Cloud, famous for a restau
rant of the first class and for being the re
sort or remarkable men. Two or the latter-
Leon Goylan and Balzac once dined there,
and felt as hungry after their meal as' before.-
" Whatever shall we eatT" asked oee.
'Let ns call up a waiter and ask what they
have got," answered the other. The func
tionary, in cnrled hair and shiny aboes, ap
peared on a small corkscrew kisd of stafr-
the parley began, Balzac qnettloelsK: "Have
you got any leg or mutton?; "Ob, sir,
we nave given tne nut slice to an engine-
an." "jjave yon got. any chick an. jr
r- 1 , 1 I Ikl. M tTT -
you got any steaks!" "Never have any
over, sir, after one." "Have yoa got-any
fish?" "Sbsn't have any, sir, before seven."
"Confound him ' said Govlan, "I'll Blake
him say plain 'no.'" " Have you gotaoy
sphinx" be went on questioning, im
patiently. "Sphinx, sir f Pll go iscfseeMi
the kitchen." Away he west, bnt came aj
In a second. " We have not got any. left,
sir." Balzac's face can be fancied. At'Stst
be looked struck dumb with awe and aatoskh
ment, then suddenly his cheeks were blown
ont like a fnll moon : lie' threw bis Baefeis
down and groaned With laughter. ,Thfe
stood tbe' waiter, In all the sincerity of
conviction, a mute beholder, la cnrled, half,
and ready to swear again that all the afblsx
cooked had been eaten up. FarU Com. If.
x. iterant.
Horrible Histobt or a Gltjttos. Grew-
dler Tarara. who died recently at Florenee.
was one of the greatest gluttons of moders 9
times. He devoured In tbe course oi twenty
four hours a whole quarter of beet A break
fast prepared for ten or twelve pmos be
wonld despatch In very few 'miBBtetu Be
ate limestones, corks, and nearly mrrMae
that fell Into bis hand. A favorite food
his was snakes, wblcb be rehabed
than the- fattest eel. He devoawd the
largest snakes he got bold of, alive, wKksMt
leaving anything of them. 'Whets be was
once employed aa osalstaut in a hospital, he
seized npon a large tom-cat, and was already
occnniedln tearing It tHre, when Dr. Let SUM,
Chief Surneon of tbe Iran, Was teat for.
Tarara held tbe cat by tbe neek and tatt tad
tore it belly with hit teeth, MMkhtf tie
blood, and toon leaving nothiag of It mytpf
tbe bones; whereupon, be gaaweel Hie a
beast of prey on tbe ski a, to tbe annul
or the hospital aMlttaaU who wltnttted
tbe repulsive scene. These milt taste tM
they bad teen bisa drink with Use attaett
avidity the blood of patients that had txea
bled, and othen caoght Urn la eMstr ateees
out ol tbe comae at tbei thtraw-asratt.
When it finally appeared that tMt eaaalfcal
had devoured the whole eorvte ef ' tMNK
He wst distnlttoa troa taa tsssjssaL .
be filled everybody wlth awpealsfbgl
Be died, so years ota, ex a -latin -
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1 WW MM srVRtex TB IPUB w m MM ss sasejs at aa ws tPSSfap I
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