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The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, November 04, 1868, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1868-11-04/ed-1/seq-1/

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rBOOK AND JOB
PRINTING ESTABLISHMENT !
MB ' GAZETTE" OFFJCK
la nov prepared to execute all orders for
run i fM niiTiR.
OF EYZRT DESCRIPTION,
WITH NEATNESS AND DISPATCH
Every Wednesday Morning,
AT SO.00 pkr annum.
Jlullnl to Korclgii SuIiMrlbcrs at $7.0U.
Office On Merchant street, west of
lie Post Office, llonolnlu, II. I.
jjjj
rriuted and published by J. Mott Smith, at the
Government Printing Office, to whom all huilnfrti
communications sinst be addressed.
VOL. 1Y NO. 42.1
HONOLULU, WEDNESDAY, NOVE MBER 4, 1868.
86.00 PER YEAR,
HAWAIIAN
Q A 71
urL
BUSINESS NOTICES.
iv. x..
GENERAL COMMISSION AGENT & BROKER
Office In Fire-proof ItuiMiogs on Queen Street.
2S Honolulu. II. L ijl
c. s. srEsexn. v. mactahhse.
CIIAS. IV. SPEACEIt & CO.,
GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
tjueeu Street, llonolnlu. fly
McCOI.GAi As JTOICTMOrV,
MERCHANT TAILORS,
10 Port fft., Honolulu, opponHgT C llcucLV ly4
C. H. LEWERS J. G. DICKSON.
A: DICKSON,
Impurteri, VhclaI and ltetail Da&lrri In Lumber
and lialldioR MateriaJi, - Fort, King, and Ster
eo cnaiei Honolulu, 11. j- jy
Late Jaxios, Oura A Co.
IMPORTER & COMMISSION MERCHANT,
ASD AGENT FOB
Lloyd's and the Llyerpool Underwriters,
ttrttitlf and 1'oreipQ Marine Insurance Co-, and
Northern Assurance Comjany. 3-lj4
1WY3IAX BBOTIIEKS,
IMPORTERS AND "WHOLESALE DEALERS
In Fashionable Clothing, Hate. Caps, Boots, Shoes,
and every variety of Gentlemen' Furnishing Goodi.
Snow ttnilding, Merchant Street, Honolulu. J 60-1 j4
J. 8. WALKER. 8. C. ALLEIf.
SHIPPING & COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
18 . IIOKOLOLP, II. I. llyi
K. I.. TOItKERT.
DEALER IK LUMBER AND EVERY KIND
OF BUILDING MATERIAL.
13 Ornci Corner Quern and Tort streets. Iy4
JIOLX.ES &, CO.,
SHIP CHANDLERS AND COMMISSION
" MERCHANTS,
Queen Street, Honolulu.
Particular attention paid to the Purchase and
Sale of Hawaiian Produce.
REFERS BT PEEVIS8I0X TO
C. A. Williams & Co.,
Castle X- Cooke,
! C. Brewer & Co.,
11. Ilackfcld & Co.,
C. L. Richards & Co..
D. C. Waterman,
3-ly
GEORGE. G. MOIVE,
Dealer in Redwood and Northwest Lumber,
Shingles, Doors, Sash, Blinds, Nails,
Paints, etc
SG At his old stand on tbe Esplanade. Iy4
E. S. FliAGG,
CIVIL ENGINEER & SURVEYOR,
Address Post Or-nce Box No. 22,
S3 Honolulu, Oaliu. . Cm
I A. SCIIAEFEIE Ac CO.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
38 Honolulu, Oaliu, II. I. Ijr4
ED. HOFESCHXAEGER & CO.,
IMPORTERS & COMMISSION MERCHANTS
4 Honolulu, Oaliu, H. I. 1t4
A. N. CL.EGIIOKIV,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN
GENERAL MERCHANDISE,
Firs-proof Store, corner of Queen and Kaahu-
manu Streets.
Retail Establishment on Nuuanu Street.
4- ly
TIEEOUOIIE C. IIEECK,
IMPORTER & COMMISSION MERCHANT.
1 Honolulu, Oaliu, II. I. fly
II. IIACUFELD Ac CO.,
GENERAL COMMISSION AGENTS.
8- Honolulu, Oaliu, S. I. ly
THE TOM MOORE TAVERN,
BY J. OWIELX,,
SS Corner of King 6z Port Sreeta. Iy4
CUAUXVCEY C. IIEXIVETT,
DEALER IN NEWSPAPERS", MAGAZINES,
AND PERIODICALS,
1J FORT STltEET, IIOXOHILP. lj4
AT THE PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY
On Fort Street,
MAY BE SEG.V THE VH31VS taken
of the Late
JLnra Flow at Kalinlra,
And the Effects of the Late
Earthquake at IVnloliInu, Kau.
Views of Xilanea and other places. Also Cards
of the Kings, Queens, Chiefs, eUL, all for sale at low
prices. Also, Oral and Square Frames of all sizes,
whkh will to sold cheap.
CS-3m U. L. CHASE.
it. w. aiyiikews,
Fort Street, opposite Odd Fellows' Hall.
Gives particular attention to the repair of
Fire Arms, Sewing Machines, I Locks.
Dramngt of Machinery, t-c, made to Order.
i so- . iy
ROB'T KYCKOFT,
OP Xa TJ 3VE 33 H ,
HAS OPENED HIS SHOP ON KING
Street, next door to Horn's Confection
ary Shop, and offers his'services in all branch
es of Plumbing. All Jobs will hereafter be
executed with promptness and in a thorough
manner. 3S-3m
PIANOS TUNED.
PIANOS AND OTHER.
Stnsrr!AT. tttrtrttme vrs
I Tuned and Repaired, by CHAS.
DERBY, at the Hawaiian Theatre.
Lessons given on the Piano &. Guitar.
The best of references given. 51-ly4
UAAVAIIAJV LEATHER.
Sole & Saddle Leather & Tanned Goat-Skins.
A REGULAR. SUPPLY, FROM tbe
Celebrated
"Vnijue:i Tannery,
and for sale at the Lowest Market Bates hy
A. 6. CLEODORK,
3S-3m Agent
KOSA COFFEE.
I HAVE ON HAND A' SUPERIOR
Lot of
Konn Coffee,
Selected by Messrs. NEVILLE & BARRETT,
whose facilities are second to none. The attention of
Dealers is requested before purchasing elsewhere.
For sale in quantities to suit by
3S3m A S. CLEQH0B.X.
A. S. CLECHORN
RESPECTFULLY calls the atten
tion of LADIES to
HIS WELL SELECTED STOCK OF GOODS
At Ills Retail Establishment
38 Oa Xooann Street. 3m
.BUSINESS NOTICES.
C. E. AVIEEIA3IS,
MANUFACTURER, IMPORTER & DEALER
In Furniture of every description. Furniture Waro-
lloom on fort atrrevopposiie unase-s i-noiograpn
Gallery. Torkshopattbeoldetandonllotel
Street, near Fort. Orders from the other
41 islands promptly attended to. ly
IV. BKVS'ETT,
BOOT AND SHOE MAKER,
41 King Street, opposite the Bethel, Honolulu. Py
M. T. MOSXELL,
CABINET MAKER AND UPHOLSTERER,
King Street, East side, twodoors front Nnuanu Street.
41 Will buy and sell second-hand Furniture. ly
J OHS T1BBETS. TBOS. SOREXSOX.
TIDItETS A: SOItEASOA',
SHIP CARPENTERS & CAULKERS
At D.FosUrtCo's Old Stand,
37J Near the ' Honolulu Iron Works." 3m
E. r. EULEKS. A. JAEGER
Jl. F. EIILIiKS A; CO.,
DEALERS IN DRY GOODS AND GENERAL
; MERCHANDISE,
Flre-Proor Store, Fort Street, above
37 Odd Fellows' Hall. Iy4
fe. P. ADAltS. S. 0. WILDER.
, AUA3IS A; WILDER,
jlUCTION le COMMISSION MERCHANTS
E7 Q.ueen Street, Honolulu. Iy4
M. If.AIEEE,
BHIPPING AND COMMISSION AGENT,
Office with E. P. Adams, Esq.,
QDEEX STREET, HONOLULU,
fczrras et r-raMisiox to
lien. Morgan L. Smith, U.)Messa. C Erewer i Co.
S. Consul. Messrs. Walker & Allen.
Messrs. Richards i- Co. IE. P. Adams, Esq. fil-3
IRA RICHARD.SOTV,
IMPORTER & DEALER IN BOOTS, SHOES,
And Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods, corner of Fort
Itna Jlercnant streets, jlonoiolu. . v-ij
EIVIA JOMIS,
I3R0CER AND SHIP CHANDLER,
Laliatna, Maul.
loney and Recruits fuml.hed to Ships on the most
10 favorable terms. Iy4
CIIUftG IIOOX,
Commission Merchant and General Agent,
Importer of Teas and other Chinese and Foreign
loods. Wholesale Dealer in Hawaiian Produce, and
Vgent for the Faukaa and Amauulu Sugar 1'lanta
ions. Fire-proof Store on Kuuanu Street, below
ilng. 21-ly4
AFOSG A; ACIIIICIC.
IMPORTERS, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
DEALERS IN GENERAL MERCHAN
DISE AND CHINA GOODS,
(Fire-Proof Store In Nuuanu Street,
43 under the Public Hall. Iy4
C. S. BAItTOIV,
AUCTIONEER,
Soles-Room on Uueen Street, one door
17 from Haahumanu St. Py4
.lOIIIV II. FATY,
Jlotary Public and Commissioner of Deeds
for the State cf California.
Office at tho Bank or Bishop i, Co.
2-ly4
H. A. WIDE1YIANN,
IN'OTARY FEIII.IC.
OrriCE at the IxTERion Department.
C-ly4
sitrBVlt IT.CE. II. A. P. CAKTCa.
C. BREWER & CO.,
SHIPPING AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
HONOLULU, II. I.
AGENTS Of the lloston and Honolulu
Packet Line.
,GENTS For the Itlaltee, WnlluUu and
liana Plantations.
,VGEJTTS For the Purchase and l ale of
Island Produce.
REFER TO
1ohx M. Hoon, Esq New York
ilHAS. ltSEWtlt i Co., rtoston
las. nexxnrru. Esa J- ..uosion
r. a JltKULl & CO...,., 1
X. S.SWUX i Co , ..... San Francisco
fjHis. W. Bkoois, Esq ) t-ly4
J. P. HUCHES,
Importer andglYianufacturer
OF ALL KINDS OF SADDLERY.
Carriage Trimming done with neatness and
dispatch. All orders promptlyattended to.
Corner of Fort and Hotel streets, Honolulu.
10- ly4
NEVILLE & BARRETT,
Planters & Genera Store Keepers
KEOPUEA, SOUTH K0NA, HAWAII.
(Near Kealakekna Bay.)
Island produce bought. Ships supplied with
Wood, Beef and other ncessaries.
Agent at Honolulu A. S. Clegiiors.
11- ly
M. S. CRINBAUM & CO.,
IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE
Dealers in Fashionable Clothing
Hats, Caps, Boots and Shoes, and every variety
of Gentlemen's superior furnishing goods.
STORE IN MAKEE'S BLOCK.
10 Queen Street, llonolnlu, II, I. lyt
VOLCANO HOUSE,
CRATER OF KILATTEA, HAWAII.
0? THIS ESTABLISHMENT IS S
afc? now open for the reception of visitors to ijCf
the Volcano House, who may rely on finding com
fortable rooms, a good table, and prompt attendance.
Experienced guides for the Crater always on hand.
STEAM AND SULPHUR BATHS !
Horses Grained and Stabled if Desired.
CHARGES' REASONABLE.
Parties visiting the Tolcano via Hilo, can procure
animals warranted to make the Journey by D. H.
llircHcocr, Esq. 37-ly
F. II. V O. SEGELKEX,
Tin, Copper, Zinc and Sheet Iron Workers,
Knuanu Street, bet. Merchant & Queen,
HAVE CONSTANTLY OX HAND,
Stoves, Pipe, Galvanized Iron Pipe,
flam and nose liibbs, Stop Cocks,
India Rubber Hose best 3-ply. in
lengths of 25 and SO feet, with Couplings and
Pipe complete. Bath-Tubs. and also a verv
large stock of Tinware of every description.
Particular attention given to Ship Work.
Thankful to" the citizens of Honolulu and
the Islands generally, for their libera) patron
age in the past, ire hope .by strict attention to
business to merit the same for the future.
'SSS-Orders from the other Islands will be
carefully attended to. 37-ly
BUSINESS NOTICES.
T. II. TMOMFSOIV,
GENERAL BLACKSMITH,
Queen Street, Honolulu,
II u constantly on Land and for Sale at the Lowest
Market IriceiL a poo. assortment of the Best licfined
jmt iron, ana tue vesl liiackemitii a Lu.
JXO. XOTT. SAM'li NOTT.
JOIKV IVOTT &. CO.,
COPPER AND TIN SMITHS,
Kaahnmanu St, one door above Flitner's,
Beg lea re to inform the public that they are ire
pared to fornleh all kinds of Copper Work, anch a
fciuis, strike rana, sorKimin i'aun, orni9, i-umj,
etc, AlfO on Land, a full afwortment of Tin Ware,
which we offer for sate nt the Lowest Market Prices.
Ml kinds of Repairing done with Neatne and
Dispatch. Orders from the other Islands will meet
v ita prompt attention. 00-0111
JAIH:S LEWIS,
COOPEE AND GATTGER,
At the Old Stand, comer King & Bethel Sts,
A Large Stuck cf OU Shocke and all kinds of Coop,
cring Materiali constantly on hand. JTe Lopes by
attention to business to merit a continuance of the
patronage Lfcli be has heretofore enjoyed, and far
wiiicu lie now returns um luanits, -oin
MR. JT. CO.STA,
JEWELER AND ENGRAVER.
Fort Street opposite Odd Fellows1 Hall.
Is prepared to execute with promptness, all work In
bis line tf business, tnxch as Watch and Clock repair
Ins, Manufacturing Jewelry and UneraTing. 3S-3m
LICENSED SHIPPING AGENT,
Office on James Eobinson & Co's Wharf.
Continues the bosineds on hi old plan of settling
with officers and (teamen immediately on their ship
pine at Lis office. HaTinc no direct or indirect con
nection wiid any out 11 tun g eeubiisnment, ana allow
ing no debts to be collected in Lis ufSce, Le hopes to
give as good &ati&Taction in the future as he bos in
me post. aJiKam
G. W. IVOKXOiV A: CO.,
COOPERS AND GAUGERS,
At the New Stand on the Esplanade,
We are urenared to attend to all work in our line
at the Shop next to the Custom' House, where we can
Le found at all -working hours. We hare on Land
and for sale, Oil Casks and Barrels of different sizes,
new and old, which we will sell at the very Lowest
3Iarket Rates. All work done In a thorough manner
and warranted to gite satisfaction. AH kinds of
Coopering Materials and Tools for sale. CS-3m
FOREIGN NOTICES.
n. w. SEvrjuxcc
C E. CIAEK.
SEVERANCE, CLARK & CO.,
COMMISSION MEECHANTS
AND SHIPPING AGENTS,
405 Front St, comer of Clay, San Trancisco.
Are will attend to the sale of gucar and all kinds
of Island Produce, also to the purchasing and for
warding of Meichandise. Caeh Advances made on
Consignments. 3&Gm
JOHN H'CBAEXX,
3. C J1X&EJIX,
S. F. Cal.
roniana.
H'CRAKEI!, MERRILL & CO.,
FORWARDING AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Portland Oregon
Having been engaged In our present business fur
upwards of twelTe yeanvand being located in a Fire
proof Brick Building, ne are prepared to receiTe and
difposo of Island Staples, such as Sugar, Syrups, Rice,
1'utu, Coffee, etc, to advantage. Consignmentri es
pecially solicited for the Oregon Market, to which
ersonal attention will Le paid, and upon which cash
advances will be made -when required.
" RETERE5CXS
Charles W Brooks... San Francisco
J C Merrill a Co
FredJken .. "
Badger a LIndenberger.... "
James ratrick k Co "
Wm T Coleman a Co.. "
Stevens, Hater a Co, "
Allen Lewis... v.. v.. Portland
LaddaTilton. "
Leonard k Greeu. , " l-ly
E. 31. TAIV Ji:KI,
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
Innnga-ivn, Japau,
Having the Lest facilities throueh an Intimate con
nection with the Japanese trade for the past eight
years, Is prepared to transact any business entrusted
to bis care, with dispatch. 17-lyl
H. B. WILLIAMS, H. P. ELAJfClTAED, C B. MOEOIX.
WILLIAMS. BLAKCHAED & CO.,
SHIPPING & COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
31 305 Front Street, San Francisco. u
LAHGLEY, CR0WELL & CO.,
WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS,
22 Cor. Battery & Clay Sts, San Francisco. 6m
INSURANCE NOTICES.
SAIV FRiliVCISCO
'BOARD OF UNDERWRITERS.
THE UNDERSIGNED having Iiecn
Bpfointed A ceii U for the an Franciaco Board
of Underwriters, comprising the
California Insurance Company,
Merchants ?IntnnI Marine Ins Co.,
Pact lie Insurance Company,
California rloydTs, and
Home Mntual Insnraiice Company.
Beic leave to inform Masters of Vessels and the Pub-'
lie generally, that all Vessels tvnd Cargoes, insured
by either of the above Companies against perils of
the seas and other rik, at or near the Sandwich
Islands, will have to be verified Ly them.
3S-5m it. iiAUa.hiaii a w.
CAJ.ironiMA
INSURANCE COMPANY.
THE UNDERSIGNED. AGENTS of
the above Company, have been authorized to
insure risks on Cargo, Freight and Treas
ure, by Coasters, Ironi Uonolula to all ports of
the Hawaiian Group, and vice versa.
&-1J 11. llAUb.r'LLU uu.
3IEKCIKA1TS SIKXITAT,
MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY
Of Sau Francisco.
THE TJXDERSIGXED bavlncr been
appointed Agents fjr the above Companj .are
prepared to issue roiicies on varcjoes, reignt.
ana xreuurc.
WALES t ALLEX,
SSCm AgenU, Uouolulu.
XXAJIXtURGH-llRE3IEV
FLEE IUSTJRAKCE COMPANY.
TUB CXDE1LSICSED navlstj been
appointed Agents of the above Company, are
prepared to lnsnre risks against Fire, on Stone aod
Brlclc Buildings, and on Merchandise
stored therein, on the most favorable terms. For
particulars apply at the office of
S-lvl . y. A. SCHAEFEB t ca
J. . "VICKE,
AGENT FOR THE BREMEN BOARD OF
- UNDERWRITERS.
All average claims against said Underwriters, oc
curring in or about this Kingdom, will hav to be
certified before me. 7-1 v4
Gcrmanr since the War oriSGU,
From la Kerne des Deux Mondes.
When tbo German tribes -first appeared.
they formed one of tho most distinct races
of mankind. They all had the same phys
ical features; fair complexions, bine eyes,
and fair hair ; they also had tho same re
ligions belief, and ihi same traditions; bnt
after the great invasions, the conquerors
were mixed with Ike conquered, and it
was only on the other side of the Rhine
that they preserved their original charac
ter. Deprived of the good administration
and of the regular armies which enabled
Rome to subjugate tie world, the Empire
of Charlemagne embraced too many peo
ple, and could not last long. It was only
in the reign of Louis the Gcrmaine, that
a Kingdom was established, correspond
ing 6omewhat to modern Germany. With
the first princes of the Saxon line, began
a work of fusion and unification which
seemed destined to bring abort the forma
tion of a nation, and of a truly German
Sfate. To obtain that result, it was only
necessary to overthrow the Mgh vassals,
and the Emperor would thin be sure of
the assistance of two powerfd allies ; the
clergy and .the knights, or noblemen of
the lowest order. Henry the Faltener
understood this thoroughly, and trusting
to the well organized forces of his own
country, he caused his autlority to be re
spected everywhere ; repulsed and van
quished tho Slavous, lioherrians and Hun
garians, uruer was establisnea ; tne pop
ulation rapidly increased ; industry and
commerce flourished ; new cities were built
and in the 10th century, Germany enjoyed
a prosperity and organization, so far, un
paralleled. But strange to say, while in
the rest of Europe the tendency to unity
made rapid progress, Germany stopped
short, nnd even seemed to retrace her
steps. Thus, in France, the Capetan3 es
tablished their Kingdom by uniting, cither
by conquest or marriage, the most different
races : Bretons, Provencals, Gascons, and
Flemings. In Germany, tho central power
dwindled away to a mere shadow, majes
tically hovering over a multitude of inde
pendent States. Whence does this con
trast come? , Have the German Emperors
had less genius, or less ambition, than the
French Kings ? Not at all. But if the
Emperors were not able 16 constitute only
one State out of a single nation, while the
Kings of Franco consolidated different
nationalities into one State, it is to bo
attributed to two reasons : first, that the
Imperial Crown was elective ; second, the
ever disappointed attempts at universal
empire, a remembrance of tho Roman
Empire, renewed by Charlemagne.
Tho Chief of a State can, bo elective
without compromising the very exist
ence of the country, when this is defi
nitely constituted, and the attributes of
tho executive power well defined. It is
for this reason that the Republics of
Rome, Tenice, and the United States
havo lasted, whilo Poland has succumbed.
When authority is vested in the hands of
a Council, as in Switzerland, tho change
can take place without commotion. When,
as in the United States, a President is to
be elected, there is an agitation felt in the
New World such as "no European Power
would like to undergo, the people find this
one of the motives why they should try to
curtail his prerogatives. It can be seen'
that to make an Emperor or a King
elective, is nothing short Of leading the
State itself to ruin, or of preventing its
formation. In Germany, anarchy has not
allowed the growth of the State, because
the Emperors, in order to insure their
election, or that of their sons, have sanc
tioned tho independence of the high vas
sals and Bishops, preparing thereby tho
triumph of the Church and the breaking
up of the Empire.
The second cause of weakness tho
dream of universal monarchy has suc
cessively incited the Saxon line, the Salic
line, the ITohenstauffens and the Haps
burg3, to strain all their forces and energies
in order to gain possession of Italy, which
always slips in their hands. This struggle
has been fatal to all, and has even been
the-cause of the ruin of modern Austria.
They wanted to realize that pompons fic
tion, the Holy Roman Empire, which, a3
has been justly remarked, was never en
titled to either of these names, as it wa3
neither holy, nor Roman, nor even a real
Empire. An universal Emperor, nnder an
universal Pope, was the ideal conception,
which, while precipitating Germany against
Italy, has hindered the improvement of
both. Solferino and Sadowa having cut
the gordian knot by which they were
bound to each other, to their common
misfortune, the two countries now seek a
Constitution adapted to their respective
wants. .
While the Emperors, absorbed by the
interest of their external conquests, failed
to accomplish in their dominions the work
of unity, which the other Sovereigns pur
sued with indefatigable perseverance, the
nation itself endeavored to establish a
better state of things by creatpj a cen
tral power and.a true federal organization.
Of all the attempts at perpetual peace,
we will cite only the project proclaimed
by the Diet of 1490, because it has many
points similar to the organization wanted
iow. There wa3 to be, first, a supreme
tribunal of the Empire, deciding upon the
difficulties that might arise, and maintain
ing peace amongst ell ; second, a general
impost for tho support of an Imperial
'trray, whose duty should be to preserve
-internal and external safety; and third, an
innual meeting of the Diet, and a perma-
uent Committee, using the imposts and
Iirecting tho army for the best interests of
the country. Maximilian lost the good
opportunities, arising from the national
wishes of his people, and they were never
to be regained.
Religious dissensions divided Germany,
nnd weakened tho national spirit. There
were no more Germans in Germany : they
ailed themselves Catholics and Protcst-
.nts, and preferred foreigners of their own
reed to their countrymen of a different
iersua3ion. After tho peace of West-
ihalia, the independence of private States
was more and more marked and noticea
ble, till the end of the 18th century. Tho
Germanic Body was then entirely broken
up, and unhappily, after the Seven Years
War, the antagonism of the two great
ival powers became such that Austria and
Prussia were always ready to resort to
irm3 for the settlement of their difficulties,
.t was then that Voltaire said " that the
multiplicity of States would maintain the
quilibriam, until there should arise in
.jermany some power strong enough to
tbsorb the others." German Patriotism,
that strong and admirable feeling which
has produced the late events, wa3 then
inknown. Frederic. II. had no patriotic
cntimcnt, and he hardly knew his mother
onguc. He liked and admired nobody
jut tho French. The great writers, whoso
.vorks were to give the Germans the unity
if an intellectual country, were not na
.ional they thought of the progress of
mankind rather than of Germany. Pa
triotism is a fine feeling, for it prompts a
man to sacrifice himself and his life for
his country, but it is not an innate in
itinct, like that of the family ; it has not
always existed, and may not always exist.
When man shall find in nil countries the
ame security, the "same freedom, the same
rights, he wil consider the whole earth as
his country, and all men as bis brothers.
Even now, we tend to Cosmopolitism. It
is a natural consequence of Christianity,
which knows nothing but humanity and
justice, and commands that conformity of
doctrine should be above the tic3 of blood.
"Those who do my Father's will are my
brethren," is a sublime thought, which, far
from being nn attack against- family ties,
will bo the glorious basis of future societies.
If justice is to bo revered and loved above
everything, am I not obliged to wish for
the defeat of my country when it makes
an unjust war? In the times of old Greece,
the patriotic feeling did not exist, but in
its place was tho civic attachment of the
citizens to their citie3 ; because when the
city was conquered, the citizen lost every
thing his property, his life or his free
dom. In tho middle ages, patriotism was
not to be seen; the princes were alive to
nothing but their .own private interests,
and the common people, not knowing tho
blessings of a heme, had in fuct no country
to love and defend. It was at the timo of
the Revolntion that, for the first time, the
national feelings were awakened in France,
when foreign armies made that ever
remembered invasion of its territory ; and
it wa3 the hatred of the Napoleonic rule
that gave rise to patriotism in Germany.
To fight against the Empire of Napoleon,
Stein borrowed the force of the Revolu
tion itself, and made tho people free. The
Tugendbund, assembling together citizens
from all parts of Germany, inspired them
with the same spirit the hatred of foreign
invaders and taught them that they had
a common country to protect. Tho
speeches of Fichte, the song3 of Korner,
those germaine Marseillaises inflamed
patriotism, and the principles of the
French Revolution, adopted abroad, rose
against France, which had forsaken them.
We know bow tho Holy Alliance de
ceived the hopes that were entertained of
the War of Deliverance Befreiungskrieg
but the German national feelings, the
explosion of which was ''provoked by Na
poleon, were not to be extinguished. In
vain did Metternich try to suppress them ;
the Universities and the students kept
them as a sacred fire, which they insinu
ated into the hearts of all. When Oppor
tunities offered, patriotism would show
itself, as in the complications of 1840,
when Becker composed his patriotic hymn :
"Sie soHen ihn nicht haben den freien
devlschen Mtiein," to which Alfred de
Musset answered in such a sharp manner.
From 1844, tho Germans, frea from ex
ternal troubles, have turned their attention
to internal reforms, and have sought from
tho institution of a' deliberative assembly
in Berlin, the regeneration of the country.
The accession of Frederic William IV. to
the throne caused an outburst of national,
feeling, nnd created on immense sensation.
After the disappointment of the General
Assembly of 18-17, the desire for union and
liberty found at last, in 1848, -its complete
expression in the Parliament of Frankfort,
which eprnng, as it were, spontaneously,
from the very heart of the nation, and as
sembled in the ancient capital of the Ger
man Empire. All the deputies longed for
unity, but how was it to bo obtained f It
wa3 upon this question that the two politi
cal parties sprung up which have ever since
striven to gain -tho mastery. It is neces
sary to know them both.
The first of them, the party of Great
Germany, Gross Beutsch, presented a mag
nificent programme, well calculated to ex
cite patriotic passions: All the German
States, including Austria and her pos
sessions, were to be placed under tho Em
perors authority, thus establishing in the
centre of Europe a formidable Empire of
70,000,000 of people, occupying tho north
of Italy, and disposing, at its will, of tho
rest of the Peninsula ; absorbing Den
mark, through Schleswig-Holstein ; the
Danubian Provinces, through Transylva
nia ; and tho Slavous of Turkey, through
the Croats; wielding its mighty influence
on the Baltic, North, Mediterranean and
Black Seas ; outnumbering by Tar the pop
ulation of France ; superior to Russia by
its riches and' intelligence ; realizing, in
fact, the plan3 of the Othos, the Hohen
stauffens and the IIapsbnrg3 !
The other party, that of Limited Ger
many, Klein Beutsch, did not accept this
seductive scheme, because they were per
suaded that the desperate antagonism of
Russia would frustrate all efforts in that
direction. They wanted to make Fru33ia
a central power, around which all the mi
nor Stntc3 of Germany would group them
selves. They firmly believjjd that Aus
tria should be excluded, for fear of perpet
uating a dangerous dualism, destructive
to the unity of the nation.
CnARGE of McnAT at Etlau. It la nt
Eylau that Murut appears In his most terrible
aspect This battle, fought In raid-winter,
In 1S07, was the most Important and bloody
one that had then occurred. France and
Russia bad never before opposed such strength
to each other, and a complete victory on
either side wonld have settled the fate of
Europe. Bonaparte remained in possession
or tho Held, nnd that was all; no victory was
ever so like a defeat The Held of Eylau
was covered with snow, and the little ponds
that lay scattered over It were frozen suffi
ciently hard to bear the artillery. 71,000 men
on ono side and 85,000 on the other, arose
from the frozen field on which they had
slept on the night of February without tent
or covering to battle tor a continent Au-
gerau, on the left, was utterly routed In the
morning. Advancing tnrougn a storm so
thlck he could not see the enemy, the Rus
sian cannon mowed down his ranks with
their destructive- fire, while the Cossack
cavafry, -which wCre ordered to charge,
came thundering on, almost hitting tho
French infantry with their long lances before
they were visible through the storm, nem
mcd In, overthrown, "the whole division,
composed of 16,000 men, with the excepation
bfl, 500, wero captured 'or slain. Just then
the snow-storm clearlucr ui. revealed to
Napoleon the peril to which he was brought,
and ho immediately ordered a grand charge,
by the Imperial Guard and the whole cavalry.
lothing was further from Bonaparte's ex
pectations or -wishes than tho bringing of
his reserve into the engagement nt this early
stage of the battle, bnt there was no other
resource left him. Marat sustained bis high
reputation on mis occasion, mm proved Him
self for the hundredth time worthy of the
great confidence Napoleon placed In him.
Nothing could be more Imposing than the
battle-Held at this moment Bonaparte and
the Empire trembled in the balance, while
Murat prepared to lead down his cavalry to
save them. Seventy squadrons, making In
all 11,000 well-mounted men, began to move
over the slope, with the Old Guard marching
sternly behind. Bonaparte, It Is said, was
more agitated at this crisis than when, a few
taoments before ho Was so near being cap
tured by the Russians. But as he saw the TO
squadrons coming down on a plunging trot
pressing hard after the white plume of Murat
that streamed in the snow-storm far In front,
a smile passed over his countenance. The
earth groaned and trembled as tbey passed,
and the sabres, above the dark, angry mass
below, looked like the foam of a sea wave
as It crests on the deep. The rattling of
their armor and the muilled thunder of their
tread drowned all the roar of the.battle, as,
with flrm-setarray and with, steady motion
they bore down with terrible force on tho
foe. The shock of that Immense host was
like a falling mountain, and the front line of
the Russian army went down like frost be
fore it Then commenced a protracted fight
of baud to hand and sword to sword, as in
the cavalry action at Eckmuhl. The clssb
ing of steol was like the ringing of counties
hammers, and horses and riders were blend
ed In wild confusion together. The Russian
reserve was ordered up, and of those Murat
fell with his fierce horsemen, crushing and
trampling them down by thousands. But
the obstinate Russians disdained to fiy, and
rallied again and again, so that It was no
longer cavalry charging on Infantry, but
squadrons of horse galloping tbrongh broken
hosts that, gathering Into knots, still disput
ed, with nnrarrelleled bravery, the red and
rent field. It was during this strange fight
that Murat was seen to perform one of those
desperate deeds for which he was renowned.
Excited to the highest pitch of passion by
the obstacles that opposed him, he seemed
endowed with ten fold streDgtb, and looked
more like a supernatural being, treading
down helpless mortals, than an ordinary man.
Amid the roar of artillery and rattle of mus
ketry and falling of sabre strokes like light
ning about him, tho lofty white plume never
once went down, while ever and anon It was
seen glaring through the smoke of battle,
the star Of hope to Napoleon, and showing
that "bis right arm" was still uplifted and
striking for victory. He raged like an un
loosed lion amid the foe. anduis eves, alwavs
terrible In battle, burned with increased 1
lustre, wuue nis clear and steady voice,
heard above the turmoil of strife, was worth
more than a thousand trumpets to cheer on
his followers. At length, seeing a knot of
Russian soldiers, that for a long time kept
up a devouring lire on his men, he wheeled
his horse and drove In fall gallop npon their
leveled muskets. A few of his guards, that
never allowed the white plnme to leave their
sight, charged after bim. Without waiting
to count his foes, he seized his bridle in his
tcetb, and, with his pistol fn one baud and
his drawn sword in tbe. other, bnrst In head
long fury npon them, and scattered them as
if a hurricane had swept by. Murat was a
tbnnder bolt on tbat day, and tbe deeds that
were wrought by him will furnish themes for
the poet and painter.
There Is a conscentlous criminal serving
a term of Imprisonment at Ercms, Austria,
who asks for a new trial on tbe ground that
his sentence is not sufficiently severe.
Focn men have been arrested in New Tors:
and held to ball for carrying on a distillery
on board a vessel. Tbey would take In a
cargo of material, make a short cruise during
which tbe still was operated, and then return
with spirit.
Tbe association for the prevention of gambling-In
New York report that t30.0,089
are spent in the gambling booses of tut eMy :
yearly
Henry Hlorai la IYevv Yotyk.
The rain storm of yesterday, although pi
ductlveofacreatdeal of personal dlscomfo
iro-
'rt,
did an Incalculable amount of good, bv thor
oughly sluicing the garbage-choked gutters
which have so long offended the nostrils of
even the dullest scented citizens ol New Tort
True, certain Ill-drained localities were tub
merged towards the latter part of tho day,
but no drowning casualties occurred. In the
lower portions of the city a great many cel
lars wero flooded, and, were It possible to
provide a comfortable refuge for the misera
ble inhabitants. It would be lust aa well to
keep these subterranean pest-holes perpetu
ally submerged.
The snpply of cars, stages and other public
conveyances was anything bnt equal to the
demand; spare umbrellas were remarkably
scarce, and parties owning- waterproof gar
ments showed qo disposition to part with,
them. Business was greatly impeded and
out-of-door work almost entirely suspended.
The sidewalk In the neighborhood of the
Gold Room and tbe Stock Boards could be
seen with the naked eye daring tho greater
portion of the day, and ordlnarv pedestrians
were allowed tho privilege of walking where
on fine or on moderately foul days Broad
street blatant "bcara" and bellowing "bulls"
most do congregate.
Considerable damage was done In virions
sections of tbe city of Brooklyn by the heavy
ralu storm which prevailed with considerable
vloleucc throughout the. day. The water
came down in perfect torrents, and small
ponds In the outskirts of tbe city assumed
the proportions of lakes deep and broad
amtnrrrt t r navimita a rncsnl nn T,
on Fifth Avenue, where the three children
and man and woman were drowned last
June, rose to a considerable height and
spread over several blocks. The cellars and
basements of a number of houses In the, vi
cinity were flooded and tbe occupants were
compelled to get into tbe upper stories.
Tho streets were like small rivers, and
where the grade was steep the water flowed
down with so much force that it was impos
sible for horses to keep their feet There
was more damage done In Gowanns than In
any. other section of tbe city, from the fact
lira many oi tne streets nave been graded
but a short time, and are formed In such a
manner that when heavy storms occur large
portions are washed away, A large amount
of damage was done to the. streets In that sec
tion by the heavy rain storm which occurred
a few days ago, and the repairs have ijot yet
been completed. Nearly a block on Fifth
avenue was washed away at tbat time, carry
ing with It the Fifth avenue. car track, Yes-
teruuy iac storm caused a similar damage at
the same locality. Tbe banks on the east
and west side kept caring down gradually
uubn jcBiciuo, oitcruuuu, nuen two nunoreu
yards of the avenue slid down, fonnlflg a
large excavation and causing a suspension of
travel.
A number of small houses on Fifth nvennn
and Douglass street were completely sub
merged. The unfortunate occupants were
compelled to abandon their homes, and In
6omc Instances the water rose so last that
they had barely time to collect a few articles
of clothing for their immediate use. They
were, of course, greatly distressed, and some
of the women and children, who scarcely
knew where to look for shelter, wero Weep
ing bitterly over their misfortune.. Thelrlot,
Indeed, seemed hard, as they wandered about
tne streets, arencned with the pitiless rain, In
search of accommodations.
A portion of 1 ourth avenno was washed
away In tho vicinity of Douglass and Degraw
streets. Tho people occupying the shanties
in Darby's Patch, which lies on the west sldo
of Fourth avenue, were flooded out and had
to sceK sneiter elsewhere. A number of
shanties on tbe flats la tho viclnltv of Rl
Hook, and at tho foot or Court street, In the
Twelfth Ward, were submerged and had to
be abandoned by their occupants.
A portion of Hamilton avenue was washed
awav. carrvlntr with If the mUmml trai-l-
Several new buildings in the vicinity were
uuuuwiucu uuu cuusiucruuiy uamageu.
Travel was Impeded for several hours yester
day afternoon on Mvrtla avenue, nnnnt-sv-
Portland, a large body of earth being washed
uuuj rui, uiccu ucrues me avenue, covering
tbe railroad track to the depth of over a foot
Fort Green, or Washington Park, as It is
called. Is being remodelled bvth'e" Park Com
missioners, and Borne or the mounds which
mcy nave put np lotciy were washed away,
the sand disapneariner down Mvrtle inn.
The aspbaltum covering which the workmen
have been engaged In" putting oh the' north-
yvesi portion oi tue rarK, to be used as a pa
rade ground, has been almost entirely de
stroyed. It Is Imposslblo to tcll'at the present
time what the damage at the Park will
amount to.
A largo body or water formed at tho junc
tion ofNavy street and DeKalb avenue, and
when the DeKalb avenne ears nannerl thia
place the passengers wero compelled to stand
upon tue seaia. ine water ran down tho
sowers which empty at the east end of the
Navy Yard in such a body yesterday after
noon that the coverings were thrown fjom
the manholes and it came out like water
spouts. Flushing avenne and the streets In
the vicinity were flooded, and a number of
cellars and basements wero filled with water.
It Is estlmated'that the damage to property
In Williamsburg by the late storm, princi
pally by flooding cellars and damaging found
ations, will exceed 1150 000.
A serious detention of the trains occurred
yesterday afternoon on tho New Jersey Rail
road between Philadelphia and this city, In
consequence of thetrldge over the creek at
Burlington having been completely carried
away yesterday morning. It was completely
swept away by the freshet. Communication
with Camden was consequently cut off, tho
passengers having to be transferred across
the fcTry to Easton, which caused a long de
tention and created considerable confusion.
At Trenton the depot presented an excited
scene, owing to the vexed crowd of travelers
from Bordentown and other places, number
ing about two hundred, waiting for the train
due at twelve minutes past five, which failed
to arrive until several hours subsequently.
y. T. Timet, Sept 5.
Color of the Clouds. Tho varied colors
which the clouds assume at various times,
especially at sunrise and sunset, are explain
ed by Mr. Sorlcy on the principle that tho
clear, transparent vapor of water absorbs
more of tbe red rays of light than of any
other, while the lower strata of tbe atmos
phere offer more resistance to the passage of
the blue rays. At sunrise and sunset the
light of tbe sun has to pass through ahont
200 miles of atmosphere within a mile of the
surface of the earth In order to Illuminate
a cloud a mile from the ground. In passing .
through this great thickness, tbe blue rays
are absorbed to far greater extent than te
red, and much of the yellow! also removed.
Hence clouds thus Illuminated are red.
When the sun Is -higher above the borbon,
the yellow light passes more readily and the
clouds becomes orange, then yellow, and
finally white. Clouds In different parU 'of
the sky, or at different elevations, often
show these various colors at tbe same ilme.
Couldn't see the Psofit. A dec it a
good thing tA have in the country, fkie
one that I raised from a pup. He k a gM4
stout fellow, and a heavy barker and fhtidsr.
Tbo man of whom I bought him said be M
a thorough-bread, but he begins to Hove a
mongrel look about him. lie Is a good
watch dog, though the moment be tee afiy
suspicious person about tbe sretBls he
comes right into the kitchen and sets be
hind the store. First, we kept bis le fee
house, and he scratched arl BJtjM to get est.
Then we tied him up at tbe back of tbe Har
den, and he howled so that- tfce aekltbem
shot at him twice before daybreak, riaoily
we gave him away, and he came back;' tmd
cow be has just returned from a ft t la wMefe
he has torn up a patch tbat bad been sown
for our spring radishes.
A French soldier who during the OisMsa
war deserted asd west to St Petersbsrf;. be
recessJr been; discovered in Frwee, d
sentenced to be shot.

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