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The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, December 02, 1868, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1868-12-02/ed-1/seq-1/

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PUBLISHED
Every Wednesday Morning,
AT S0.00 PER AXXVSt.
Msilletl to Foreign Snbxcrllwr nt S7.UO.
Office On Merchant street, west of
ho Tost Office, Honolulu, II. I.
Printed and published by J. JIott Smith, t tbe
Government Printing Office, to whom all Lusiness
communications mu,t be addressed.
BUSINESS NOTICES.
IV. I,. GRIXX,
GENERAL COMMISSION AGENT BROKER
CHRP In Fire-M-oof Balldlnn on Qaeen Street.
SX JlonoUln, II. I. Or
C. X. SFESCEIt. n. UACFARLAKZ
CIIAS. IV. SPKACEIl fc CO.,
GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
24) Qneen Street. Honolulu, II. I. fly
JIcCOLG-UV A; JOIISOA,
MERCHANT TAILORS,
10 Fort it.. Honolulu, opposite T. C. lleuck's. Iy4
c. n. LKWERS. J. o. DICKSOX.
IsEWKIES Si lICGSO,
Importers, Wholesale and Retail Sealers
In Lnmber aod llaildias; Material. Fort, King and
25 Merdiaut Streets, Honolulu. II. I. (Ijr4
C. K. WIMMAMS,
MANUFACTURER, IMFOETEE & DEALER
In Forniture of erery description. Furniture Ware-
lUMHnonForttret,oproifteChase,sriJOtiaph
Gallery. Wurkshopatlheoldatandon Hotel
Street, rnw Fort Order from the other
41 islands promptly attended to. fly
BOOT AND SHOE HAKEH,
41 King Street, nett to the lletliel. Honolulu, fly
711. T. UOXKEIaIs,
CABINET MAKER AND TJPHOLSTEEEE,
King Street, Honolulu, opjxvite Lesli' Cooper Hiep.
4.1) Will buy and nell sreond-liaod Fnrnltnre. fly
JOHN TIBBETS. TUOS. sorexsok.
'rutitirrs & sorexso:,
SHIP CABPEHTEB.S & CAULKERS
At D. Foster & Co's Old Stand, jSS
7J Xe&r the Uonolnlu Iron Works. (5ni
TIIEO. II. JUA.VIE.S,
ILati Jasiox, GHEES 4 Ce.
IMPORTER & COMMISSION MEECHANT,
AXD AQEWT FOR
Lloyd's and the Llrerpool Underwriters,
ItrltUh and J-oreiffn Marine Insurance Co., and
Northern Assurance Company. 3-ly-t
ilYJIAXV MKOTIIEKS,
IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS
In Fashionable Clothing, Hats, Caps, Boots, Show,
and every variety of Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods.
Snow's Building, Merchant Street, Honolnln. SMyl
J. S. WALKER. S. C. ALLE.V.
WAUCEIt fc AX.JL.EX,
SHIPPING & COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
19 Queen Street. Honolulu, II. I. Ily4
JU Is. TOKKE2ET.
DEALER IN LUMBER AND EVERY KIND
OF BUILDING MATERIAL.
13 Ornca Corner Qceen and Fcrt streets. Iy4
IIOLI.ES .V: CO.,
SHIP CHANDLERS AND COMMISSION
MERCHANTS,
Qneen Street, Honolulu. Particular attention paid
to the purchase and aale of Hawaiian Produce.
EETEAS XT rE&UISSJOX TO
0 L Richards a Oo, III Ilacltfeld a Co,
C Brewer a Co, C L Richards a Co,
D C Waterman 1, jCastle a Cooke. 2-ljJ
M. BtAVlsEE,
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION AGENT,
Office with ArAKS a Wrtnxn, Queen Street.
utrcaa sy fermissiox to
Mesirs 0 L IUchards a Co, pleura Walker a Allen,
Messrs C Brewer a Oo, Adams a Wilder. f41-3
IRA IIICUAKWSOIV,
IMFOETEE & DEALER IN BOOTS, SHOES,
And Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods, curnor of Fort
and Merchant Streets, Honolulu. 9-Iy4
ED1VKV JTOrVES,
GROCEE AND SHIP CHANDLER,
Lnlialua, 9Inui.
Money and Recruits furnished to Ships on the most
10) favorable terras. fly4
ciiuims iiooiy.
Commission Merchant and General Agent,
Importer of Teas and other Chinese and Foreign
Goods, Wholesale Dealer rn Hawaiian Produce, and
Agent for the Paukaa and Amaunlu Sugar Planta
tions. Fire-proof Store on Xuuanu Street, Wlow
King. Sl-ly-t
AFOXG &. AC1IUCK.
Importers, Wholesale and Betail Dealers
In General Mcrchand.be and China Goods, In the
Flre-nrouf Store on Xuuanu Street, under the Public
HalL 4My4
GEORGE a. HOWE,
Dealer in Rodwood and Northwest Lnmber,
Shingles, Boors, Sashes, Blinds, Kails, Paints, etc,
36 at his old stand on the Esplanade. fly 4
E. S. FJLAGG,
CIVIL ENGINEER AND SUEVEYOE,
Annaiss IW-Ofllce Box No. 22, Honolnln. 2S-Cm
l A. SCIIAEl'EIt Sz CO.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
38) Honolnln, Oahn, II. I. fijj
ED. HOFFSCELAEGER & CO.,
IMPORTERS & COMMISSION MERCHANTS
4 Honolnln, Oahn, It .L lyl
A. S. CLEGUOI',
WHOLESALE AND BETAIL DEALER IN
GENERAL MERCHANDISE,
Fire-Proof Store, corner of Qneen and Kaahnmann
Streets, Honolulu. Retail Establishment on Nunann
Street 4-lyl
THEODORE C. IIEECU,
IMPORTER & COMMISSION MEECHANT.
1 Honolnln. Oahn. II. t fly
II. IIACKEEE1 & CO.,
GENEEAL COMMISSION AGENTS.
S Queen Street, Honolulu, U. I. fly
THE TOM MOORE TAVERN,
BV J. O'iMELL,
25 Corner of King and Fort Streets. lyj
CIIAUIVCEV C. BEIVIVETT,
DEALER IK NEWSPAPERS, MAGAZINES,
And Periodicals, Fort Street, Uonolnlu. 19-lj4
B. r. XnLEKS. A. JAEGEC.
U. I EHXERS & CO.,
DEALERS IN SBY GOODS AND GENERAL
MERCHANDISE,
Fire-proof Store on Tort Street, above Odd Fellows'
HalL 37-ly4
r. P. ADAMS. S. 0. WILDER.
ADAMS & WIIsDER,
AUCTION & COMMISSION MEE CHANTS
27 Qneen Street, Honolnln, n. J. (lyl
C. S. BARTOW,"
AUCTIONEER,
Salesroom on Qneen Street, one door from Kaahu
mann Street. 17-ly4
JOHS II. PATY,
Notary Public and Conmissloner of Deeds
.For the State or California. O&ce at the Bank of
Bishop a Cos Kaahnmann Street, Honolulu. (2-ly4
H.'A. WIDEM AiVIV,
NOTARY PUBLIC,
8 Office at the Interior Department.- Iy4
AWAIIAN
VOL. IV NO. 46.1
UUSINESS NOTICES.
SIlJtXl! TICE. II. A. r. CASTES.
C. BREWER & CO.,
SHIPPING AND
COMMISSION' MERCHANTS,
II0N01.TJI.U, II. I.
AGE.YTS Or the II os toll mid' Honolulu
Pnckct Line.
AGKXTS For the ainkee, IVnllnku and
liana Plantations.
AGENTS I'or the Parcnaae and bale of
lalaml Produce
REFER TO
Jonsr M. Hood, Esq Sew York
CflAS. Barwut i Co
Jae. HnrxtWElL, Eso
J. C. Miami 4 Co. "I
..Boston
IL 8. Swaix t Co. I. San Francisco
Coas. W. Beooes, Esa ) 6-ly
711. S. WUirVIIAIJ.il Ac CO.,
IMPOETEBS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS
In Fashionable Clothing, Hats, Caps, Boots, Shoes,
and every variety of Gentlemen's superior Furnish
ing Goods. Ptore in Makce'a Block, Queen Street,
Honolulu, II. I. l-ly4
jr. v. ieiu;kbi:s,
IMPOP.TEK AND JlIANUFACTTJEEB.
Of all klnJa of Saddlery. Carriage trimming done
v Ith uatne9 and dipatcn. AH orders prompt
ly attended to. Corner of Furt and Hotel
10 Street, Honolulu. lj4
r. ir. A: G. tSEGKLKIlaV,
TIK, ZINC AND COPPER SMITHS,
AND SHEET IEON WORKEES,
Nuuanu. Street, between Merchant & Qneen.
Hare constantly on hand, Stores, ripe, Oal
tajlzed Iron Pipe, Plain nud Hose Bibta,
Stort-cocka. India Kot4er Hose bet 3-tIr.
?l!wand Dine complete. Batb-Tulrt. and alto a
rerj large aujes oi iinware or erery description,
jpartienUr i4 tention giren tohfp-Vo:k. Orders
from the other Iflandi will bo carefally at tended to.
Thankful to the Citizeog of Honolnln and the
Islands generally for their liberal patronage in the
past, we hope by strict attention to buelnefs to merit
the dame fur the future. 37-ly
a. m. tiiOaIIpsox,
GENERAL BLACKSMITH,
Queen Street, Honolulu,
Has constantly on hand and for sale at the Lowest
Market Prices, a good assortment of the Best Kenned
Bar Iron, aud the Best Blacksmith' Coal. SS-ly '
IS. RVCBOPf,
HOUSE AND SHIP PITJMBEK,
King St, two doors west of Castle & Cooke's.
Has on hand, Bath-Tnhs, Water-Closets, Yladi-Ba-slns,
Force aod Lift Tumps, Lead and Galvanized
Iron Pijes, and Plumber's Brass-works. Being the
only Plumber in the clty.he will execute all orders en
trusted to him in a workmanlike manner. 3S-3m
JXO. 50TT. SAU'L XOTT.
JOII KOTT V CO.,
COPPEE AND TIN SMITHS,
Zaahnmanu St, one door above Flitner'Sj
Beg leave to Inform the pnbllc that they are pre
pared to furnish all kinds of Copper Work, snch as
Stills, Strike PanR, Sorghum Pans, Worms, Pump,
etc Also on hand, n full assortment of Tin Ware,
which we offer for tale at the Lowest Market Prices,
All kind of Ilep.il ring dono with Neatness and
Dispatch. Orders from the other Islands will meet
with prompt attention. SS-3nt
COOPER AND GAT7GEE,
At the Old Stand, corner King & Bethel Sts.
A Large Stock of Oil Shooks and all kind of Coop
ering Materials constantly on hand. He hopes by
attention to business to init a continuance of the
patronAge which he has heretofore erjoyed, and for
which he now returns his thanks. CS-3m
HIC. J. COSTA,
JEWELER AND ENGRAVER,
Tort Street opposite Odd Fellows Hall,
Is frcparwltodccutewith promptness, all work In
his line of business, such as Watch and Clock repair
ing. Manufacturing Jewelry and Engraving. S3-Cm
LICENSED SHIPPING AGENT,
Office on James Eobinson & Co's Wharf,
Continues the business on hli old plan of settling
with officers nnd seamen immediately on their ship
ping at his office. Having no direct or indirect con
nection with any outfitting establishment, and allow
ing no debts to be collected in his office, he hopes to
give as good satisiactlon In the future as he has In
the past S8-5m
G. IV. IVORTOX &. CO.,
COOPERS AND GAUGERS,
At the New Stand on the Esplanade.
We are prepared to attend to all work In onr line
at the Shop next to the Custom House, where wo can
be found at all working hours. We hare On hand
and for sale. Oil Casks and Uarrels of different sizes,
new and old, which we will sell at the very LoweBt
Market Rate. All work done in a thorough manner
and warranted to give Fatistictlon. All kinds of
Coopering Materials and Tools for sale. CS-Cm
PIANOS TUNED.
PIAXOS and other Musical
k Instruments Tuned and Renaired. bv
A t fi'UAiiajLd ufciiiii, at me uanauan
IS X 1 Tlieatre.
Iaessons given on the Piano & Gnltar.
The best of references given. 5l-ly4
VOLCANO HOUSE.
CRATER OF KILAUEA, HAWAH.
cT THIS ESTABL.ISIIMEXT IS
Pv? now open for the reception of visitors to ZTz
the Volcano House, who may rely on finding com
fortable rooms, a good table, and prompt attendance.
Experienced guides for the Crater always on hand.
STEAM AND SULPHUR BATHS !
Horses Grained and Stabled if Desired.
CHARGES It E AS OX ABLE.
Parties visiting the Volcano via Hilo, can procure
animals warranted to make the Journey, by D. H.
HiTcncocx, Esq. 37ly
NEVILLE & BARRETT,
Planters & General Store Keepers
KEOPDKA, SOUTH EONA, HAWAII.
(Near Kcal&kekua Bnj.)
Island produco bought. Ships supplied it ith
Wood, Beef aod other ncessaries.
Agent at Honolnln A. S. CLEcnoR.1.
11- ljr
It. IV. A1IKEWS,
Tort Street, opposite Odd Fellows' Hall.
Gives particular attention to the repair of
Fire Anns, Sewing Machines, A Locks.
Drairingt of Machinery, t-c, made to Order.
SO- lj4
HAWAIIAN LEATHER.
Sole & Saddle Leather & Tanned Goat-Skins.
A REGULAR. SOPPI.Y, FUOSI the
Celebrated
Wniinca Tanner-,
and for sale at the Lowest Market Kates bj
A. S. CLEOIIORN",
8Mm . Agent.
KOSACOFFEE.
I HAVE OJff IIXXD A SUPERIOR
lot of
Konn. Co Hoc,
Selected hy Messrs. JIEV1I.LT! & BABEETT,
whose fkcUities are second to none. The attention of
Dealers Is requested before purchasing elsewhere.
For sale in quantities to suit by
3Mm A. S. CLEOHOKN.
HONOLULU,
FOREIGN NOTICES-
n. W. EETtXAXCX.
C. E.CIAKX.
SEVERANCE, CLAKK & CO.,
COMHISSION HEECHANTS
AUS SHIPPING AGENTS.
405 Front St, corner of Clay, San Francisco,
We will attend to the sale of Suar and all kind
of Island Produce, alra to the purchasing and tar
wardiog of 3Ifrcbandie. Cub Adrancea made on
uonsignmenif. 39-cm
JOBVX'CBAUy.
Portland.
J. C. HSKKILL,
M'CRAKEIT, MEREELL & CO.,
FORWARDING AND
COMmSSION MERCHANTS,
Portland, Oregon.
HTlng been engaged in our present bnalneitf for
upwards of twelre years, and being located in a Fire-
prooi urif k xiaiiaing, we are preparea to receive ana
difixwef Island Staidec tnchan hntrar. Srrnns. Hire
Pulu, Coffee, etc to adrantage. Consignments es
pecially aoucueo: nr me uregon aiarKet, in wnicn
pertonai anenuon wia ie paid, ana upon wtucu casn
aa ranees iu ie maae wnen requirea.
EErcnxscEs .
Charles TV Brooks San Francisco
J C jlerrill a Co
Fred Iken
Badger a IJndenberger.
James Patrick Co.
VTm X Coleman a Co "
fiterens, Baker a Co '
Allen t Lewis Portland
Ladda Til too
Leonard a Greed l-ly4
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
Kanngawa. Japan,
Hatinc the bent fadlUies through an Intimate con
nection with the Japanese trade for the past eipht
tyears. Is prepare! to transact any businesa entrusted
o iiiB care, wim oupaicn.
B. B. ftlLUjUfS, H. P. BLASCQAfiD, & B. 3I0SGXX.
WILLIAMS. BLANCHAKD & CO.,
SHIPPING & COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
-l 305 Front Street, San Erancisco. Cm
LANGLEY, CKOWELL & CO.,
WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS,
32 Cor. Battery & Clay Sts, San Francisco. 6m
INSURANCE NOTICES.
SAX FRANCISCO
BOD OF UNDERWRITERS.
THE UXDERS1GXED harln been
appointed Agents for the San Francisco Board
ox u naerwriiers, comprising me
Caliroritla Insurance Company,
DIcrclLniita JIutual Marine Ins. Co.,
Pacific Insurance Company,
California LMoyil's, and
Home JUutual Insurance Company.
Beg leave to Inform Mssters of Vessels and the Pub
lic generally, that all Vessels and Cargoes, injured
by either of the above Companies against perils of
lueeeas anu oiaer nsKS, at or near tne aanawicn
Islands, will hare to be verified by them.
3$-3m H. UACKFZLD k CO.
CALH'ORiMA
INSURANCE COMPANY,
THE UJVDEIISIG1YK.O, AGKXTS of
the above Company, hare been authorized to
incur 6 rUU on Cargo, Kreiglit and Treas
ure, by Coasters, lrom llonutula to all port of
the Hawaiian Group, and vice versa,
8-ly4 U. HACKFELD 4 CO.
JIERCILUVTS' MTTTlTAXai
MARINE INSURANCE COLTPANY
Of San Francisco.
TUB UNDEUSICNED having been
appointed Agents for the above Company ,are
prepared toluene Policies on Cartzoes. Krclirlitst
"and Treasure-
WALKER A ALLEN,
3S-3m Agents, Honolulu.
H.vjtaUJiEGir-itatiiiKiv
FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY.
TUG UXDEUSIGXED having been
appointed Agents of the above Company, are
Ercpared to insure risks agalust Fire, on Stone and
trick Buildings, and on Merchandise
stored therein, on the most favorable terms. For
particulars apply at the office of
My4 F. A. SCHAEFEJt & CC.
.T. I. lVICKE,
AGENT TOR THE BREMEN BOAED OF
UNDERWRITERS .
All average claims against said Underwriters, oc
curring In or about this Kingdom, will have to be
certified before me. 7ly4
Insurance Notice.
THE AGEXT FOR THE BRITISH
Foreign Marine Insurance Company, (Limit
ed), has received instructions to reduce the rates of
Insurance between Honolulu and Torts in the Pacific,
and Is now prepared to issue Policies at the Lowst
Jtalut with aspeeial reduction on Freight per Steam
ers. TUEO. II. DAVIFS,
-tf Agent BHU Far. Mar. Int. Oo. (Limited).
SUGAR & MOLASSES.
18G8 1808
aOV i o a o r
ffy j. o j o
HILO, II. I.
Snjrar nnd Zllolasscs.
CROP COMING IS AND FOU SALE IN
quantities to suit purchasers, by
VTALKER & ALLEN,
3S-3m Agents.
ONOMEA PgAHTATIOK
Sngir and MoIatii.es Crop 1808
COMING IN, FOR SALE IN QUANTI
ties to suit purchasers, by
WALKER & ALLEN,
3S-3m Agents
PBIHCEYIILE PIAUTATIOIT.
Sugar and Molasses Crop 1808
COMING IN, FOR SALE IN QUANTI
ties to suit purchasers, by
WALKER A ALLEN,
3S-3m Agents.
WMLUKU PLANTATION.
VfEW CROP NOW COMING IN. FOR
X Sale in quantities to suit purchasers,
by C. BREWER A CO.,
38-3m Agents.
MAKEE PLANTATION.
IVcir Crop of Snjjar Ac Jlolassex
TOW COMING IN, AND FOR SALE IN
.LN quantities to suit purchasers by
C. BREWER 4 CO.,
3S-3m Agents.
WEDNESDAY, DEOEM
Gcrmnny since the lVar oflSOO,
From la Berne des Deax Alondes.J
Vo have seen the circumstances which,
from 18C3 to 18GC, prepared the triumph of
the movement towards Unity. Insur
mountable obstacles seemed to render it
impossible, or nt least very distant, and
they have all vanished away. " Fata riant
intenienlf said 3Ir. von Radowitz, in one
of thosceloquent speeches in which ho
attempted to sketch a plan of the 'means
by which Germany might be re-constitutcd.
He would havo been much astonished
could ho have known the means employed
by his successor to arrive at the end that
he wanted to reach. But would the result
have been different? Sagacious observers
believe that Austria was doomed to suc
cumb under the fatal understanding that
was to take place between Italy and Ger
many on account of their common Aspira
tions towards Unity. If it had not been
for the scruples expressed by the Prince
Regent, the events that took place in 1866
would havo occurred in 1859. It is not,
therefore, to Fate, alone, that we must at
tribute what happened in Germany in
186C. It was impossible that the Germany
of Luther, Kant, Lessing, and Gcethe
should accept the lead of that Empire
which had, nnder the crushing authority of
Metternicb, stifled, for more than half a
century, alt liberal attempts in Europe
sacrificing everything to ultramontane
pressure. It is remarkable to observe how
irresistibly the institutions of tho old re
gime are falling everywhere, and how ev
ery exertion made to support them fails.
He who follows the course of a river is
certain to arrive at the seashore, despite
any delay caused by his inexperience, but
he who tries to go against the current, if
he gets tired, or does not know how to
steer straight, is pushed back or wrecked
upon the rocks.
Let -as condense in a few words the two
preccdinsr chapters, The movement of
Germany towards Unity has its source in
the remembrances of the old German Em
pire, and in the common tics of language
manners, and aspirations. It has been
prepared by literature, poetry, and the
Universities. That movement has been
supported by Italy on tho battle field ; fa
vored by France in tho mystery of diplo
matic combinations ; tolerated by Russia,
and welcomed by England after its success,
and has at last caused the establishment
of the North German Confederation, the
constitution and probable future of which
will bo reviewed in tho next chapter.
III.
The North German Confederation was
established by virtue of the treaty of
Prague. In February, 1867, an assembly,
named by direct universal suffrage, met in
Berlin, and framed a Constitution, the
principles of which are very important to
bo known. It wa3 finished with wonderful
rapidity, for Mr. von Bismarck had said,
in his peculiar, figurative style : " Germany
must be on horseback on the 18th of Au
gust.'' Sho was in the desired position
much before that date, although the Art
icles were all voted only in the beginning
of April.
The German States north of the Main
now form a federation whose bond is as
strong as that of the Cantons of Switzer
land, or of the United States of America.
As in thoso Federal Republics, each coun
try preserves and modifies at its will its
political and civil laws, and is not subject
to the central authority except in matters
of common interest, justifying one supreme
control, namely, the army, customs and in
direct imposts, coinage, banks, weights and
measures, patents and rights of authorship,
commerce, the navy, mails, railways and
telegraphs, penal and commercial rights,
and sanitary measures. Every citizen of
the Confederation enjoys in each and every
State where he goes, all the rights of the
natives of such State. As in the United
States, tho legislative power h exercised
by two Assemblies the Federal Council,
(Bundesrath), representing tho different
States,' and the Parliament, Reichsraih),
representing the whole country. The vote
of these two branches is sufficient for the
creation of a law. The members of the
Federal Council, 43 in number, are ap
pointed by the Governments of the dif
ferent States. Prussia is far from being
represented in proportion to her popula
tion, for she has but 17 for 25,000,000 of
inhabitants, while the other States, with
their population of 5,000,000, dispose of an
overwhelming majority of 26 rotes.
The conditions of election of members
to the Lower Assembly are well calculated
to frighten all but the most intrepid Dem
ocrat : they are chosen by direct universal
suffragej and by secret ballot. The Par
liament enjoy3 the rights which the tradi
tion of free countries seems to warrant a3
necesscry to the exercise of its functions.
It votes the budget annually; can not bo
adjourned for more than thirty days, nor
dissolvedwithout new elections taking
place "within two months, and every three
years it is integrally renovated. No ob
stacle exists to its liberty of action. It
possesses an unlimited right of address,
interpellation, amendment, and even initi
ative, In regard to legislation. And, lastly,
as an essential condition of a truly Consti
GAZETTE,
BER 2, 18G8.
tutional system of Government, thero is
at its head a responsible Minister the
Federal Chancellor, (Dundeskamler).
Tho executive branch belongs to tho
Federal Presidency, (Bundesprcesidium),
which is granted to tho Crown of Prussia.
It is by this characteristic feature that tho
North German Constitution differs from
the Federative Republics with which it
ha3 so many points of resemblance, and
has a similarity to an nnited Kingdom
Not that the powers of the Presidency
arc exorbitant : they are, perhaps, less ex
tended than thoso of the President of the
American Union, but it was inevitable that
they Bhould bo attributed to the hereditary
Sovereign of one of tho States of the
Confederation, who thus becomes 'the
suzerain of all the other princc3,, reduced
to the condition of high vassal. It could
not be otherwise, if a Federative State
was to be established, a3 Prussia insisted
upon having iho predominancy. It was
for this reason that the Parliament of
Frankfort offered her the Imperial Crown.
The President, that is to say, tho King
of Prussia, represents the Confederation
in its international relations : declares
war, makes peace, signs the treaties, con
vokes the Diet. publishes tho Federal laws,
and appoints special functionaries to see
that they ore everywhere executed. He
also selects the Federal Chancellor; is
Commander of the army nnd navy ; de
termines tho composition of the corps of
tho army : appoints the Conimanders-in
Chief, those of tho fortresses, and the
high officials of tho mail and telegraphic
services.
Tho army, above all, has received a
strong organization. Every citizen of tho
Confederation is obliged to serve as a sol
dier, and can not put a substitute in his
place. The duration of servico is seven
years in the permanent army, of which
three are to be spent in the active service
and four in lhe reserve Landicehr). Un
til 1871, the number of soldiers in timo of
peaco is fixed at one per cent, of the pop
ulation, and the different States aro bound
to pay to the Federal treasury 225 thalcrs
per head. After that time, tho Federal
budget and the number of soldiers will bo
fixed and determined by Federal legisla
tion. The wholo army wears tho Prussian
uniform, and is subjected to all the Prus
sian regulations. Tho budget of receipts
is composed of the net products of the
custom-houses ; of imposts on articles of
consumption, and mails; and of moneys
paid by each State in proportion to its
population, until some other Federal taxes
have been introduced. The Constitution
is, besides, open to modification, and can
be altered by ordinary legislation, if the
changes are ratified by two-thirds of the
members of "the Federal Council. The
last article is a very importaut one. It
refers to the relations between the North
ern Confederation and the Southern
States: "They will be regulated by
treaties that will be submitted to the Par
liament." Tho next paragraph reads as
follows: " Tho admission of the Southern
States, or of one of them, into tho Con
federationj can take place by a Federal
decision on the proposal of the Federal
President"
This final stipulation is in opposition to
tho general sense given to the 4th Article
of the Treaty of Prague.J but ?t is to be
remarked, as we shall hereafter see, that
this is not at all tho interpretation admit
ted in Germany.
Tho importance given to the regulation
of material interests is one of the particu
lar and distinctive featnres of the North
German Constitution, and is entirely
adapted to the spirit of the times. One
might be led to believe that be is reading
ths statutes of an industrial company,
rather than the fundamental pact of a po
litical federation. Nothing is said of the
rights of man, but everything relating to
the consulates, custom-houses; telegraphs
and railways, is analyzed to the minutest
detail. It is tho customs union that has
prepared the political nnion,and the North
German Confederation ha3 sprung out of
the Zollverein. One would think, in see
ing Germany taking such a lively interest
in material cares, that, tired of her long
and brilliant metaphysical speculations, she
descends to earth to win a high position
by devoting her energies to commerce and
industry. Bat she may feel at rest, for
the time spent in scientific pursuits has
been useful and beneficial 1
Will the new Constitution give to Ger
many the internal and external security
that sho has been seeking with such fever
ish impatience? The defense of the ter
ritory has been provided for by placing
nnder the command of one individual all
the forces of the States, and by yielding
to the hard obligation of military service,
imposed upon everyone. The internal
dissensions and wars have become impos
sible in the bosom of tho Confederation.
All the sovereigns have been disarmed,
and are, therefore, deprived of all power
for eviL The people have no more fear of
civil wars, caused by dynastic rivalries, for
the Confederation would soon put a stop
to themi But a danger is threatening
from another quarter. The Constitution
places in presence of each other the Fed
eral President, an hereditary King imbued
S6.00 PER TEAR.
with idea3 of absolutism, and a Parliament
elected by the most democratic system
that can be conceived. If we have seen a
struggle between the President of tho
United States and Congress both elected
by the nation is there not a conflict to be
apprehended between two forces evidently
belonging to two different worlds? As
long as Germany believes that this situa
tion of Europe is perilous, and may lead
to war, she will be willing and ready to
make all the sacrifices of men and money
necessary for her defense; but when,
through some celestial favor, peace is in
sured, sho will wish to apply her resources
to the pursuits or industry, and the "ques
tion is whether the sovereign, who, with a
single word, can send aiillion oi soldiers
into the field, will consent to lessen the
military expenses and bend bis will to the
wishes of an assembly of Civilians armed
with nothing but their rights and their
eloquence.
" I do not know," says the chronicler of
the Temps, "n more perfidious nnd wicked
devil than the dinble-coquillc (misprint).
It is ho who in the printing-house slips the
wrong letter into tho compositor's fingers,
and makes him commit the most ridiculous,
sometimes the most indecorous blunders.
Not satisfied with that, he glides through
the door ajar, or, if needs be, through the
keyhole, into tho correcting room, and,
at the right moment, puts a mist between
tho proof and tho corrector's eyes, and tho
disfigured word passes not to bo recalled.
Never, I believe, did that horriblo diable
coquiUe play wilder pranks than yesterday
in a scientific paragraph in tho Temps.
Four times, speaking of an astronomical
phenomenon, the writer of the articlo nsed
tho word nutation ; four times did tho de
mon change the word nutation into nata
tion. His malice was not -yet satisfied.
One phraso ended thus: "These changes
ought to havo more intensity, according as
tho crust shall bo supposed thinner." Do
you know what Domon Coquille imagined?
Of tho ' solid crust ' he mado a ' celestial
crust,' nnd of 'supposed' ho made 'sup
ported.' Since the30 awful transformations
wo havo heard nothing of our scientific
contributor. AVo trust ho has not yet
drowned himself, and that these liues may
dissuade him from tho fatal determination
which, for my part, I should perfectly un
derstand." General Fun. In Wisconsin thero is
a town called Oshkosh. It is regarded by
the peopla of that section as a "great
place for fun." And if wo admit that tho
local definition of "fun" be correct, its re
pute is not undeserved. It chance'd re
cently that a minister fro"i another part
of iho State started to go to Oshkosh.
lie lad gone a few miles on his journey
whe"n he was shocked by meeting a man
limping along, with the blood streaming
down one bidfo of hisfoco. On being ques
tioned, the man said ho had been to Osh
kosh " having a little fun with the boys."
Two miles further on, anotlrer man wo3
met, with an arm in a sling, n bunged eye,
and torn clothing. He told tho distance
to Oshkosh, Baid it was a live town and
that ho had been up there "having a little
fun with the boys. Pondering on these
facts, tho minister proceeded pensively un
til he came to a man seated by the side of
the road with a sprained arm and only
one ear. He was washing the locality
whence the other had been bitten off.
The minister stopped and expressed liis
sympathy. Tho man said that it was no-
tning no had merely been np to Ushkosh
bavins? a little fun with tho bovs. "But"
said tho minister severly, "what do yoa
suppose your wife will say when sho sees
yon in this state?'' Tho man smiled a
sardonic, and putting his hand in his pock
et brought forth a pieco .of nose, a section
of Ecalp, with hair attached, and a pieco of
cheek bitten from his antagonist's face.
and holding them up to the minister said ;
" What do you suppose his wife will say
wuen suescesiimi" ' l lie minister silent
ly went his way, a sadder and a Eager
man. JV, Y. C. A.
Ge-vtlemas (to boatman! "You must
I should think, cet wet. do vounot?" Art
less boatman ''Te3, your honor, we docs,
wcrry wet indeed ; buI'm werry dry just
now, yer honor, and no mistake."
Wiceed Wit. One asked a masri3trate
how he did so conform himself to the pravo
jnstices, hi3 brothers, when they met.
wny, in laitli," said Jie, "1 nave no way
dui to arinK myseu uown to tno capacity
of the bench.'"
A French journalist writes the follow
ing geographical paragraphs: " Paris chat
ters, .Uunicu drinks, Marsaille3 sings, Rome
prays, Lvon3 works, Lcinzisr reads. Madrid
smokes, Manchester packs. Hanover sleep3,
Edinburgh dreamsj Constantinople bathes.
A straxgee visiting the navy yard in
Brooklyn, conversing with some seamen
who had been engaged in the navy during
the war, asked one of them if they had re
ceived any prize money. "Och, indade,
yer honor, yis, a little ; it wa3 sifted thro
a ladder, and all that fell through went to
the officers all that stuck to the steps wa3
lift to tho men."
Lieut. Sturm, of tho Prussian army, who
accompanied the English expedition in
Abyssinia, has presented to King William
the drinking cup nsed by .King Theodore,
and which wa3 found on the bed of the Af
rican monarch, half filled with rum. It is
an enormous buffalo horn, the thick end
of which is closed by a metal plate, form
ing the bottom ; the pointed extremity is
cut off, and the opening thus made is closed
by a wooden stopper. This cup i3 covered
with buffalo skin, and is suspended fo a
leather strap. It ia entirely destitute of
ornament.
A FnESCH womas will lore her husband
If be Is either witty or chivalrous : a German
woman, if lie is constant end faithf ul; a Dutch
woman. If he does not dlsturbier ease aud
comfort too much; a Spanish ,woman. If be
wreaks vengeance on those who Incur her dis
pleasure; an Italian woman, if ho is dreamy
and poetical; a Danish woman, if he thinks
that her native country is the brightest and
happiest on earth; a Kusslan woman, if ho
dlspises all Westerners as miserable barbari
ans; an English woman. If he succeeds in in
gratiating himself with the Court and the
aristocracy; an American woman, if he has
plenty or money.
, BOOK AND JOB
PRINTING EST1BLISHMEKT !
THE "GAZETTE OfTICB
la dow prepared to execute all orders fer
u 113 vm mm,
OF EVERT DESCRIPTION,
WITH NEATWESS AITS' DISPATCH
The iVevr Road Steamer.
The advantages of drawing loads on com
mon roads by steam instead of horse pow
er arc, nnder certain circumstances so
great, that efforts havo been frequently
made during tho past few years to produce
a good and practical traction engine for
tins purpose. All these attempts have
been to soma extent frustrated by two dif
ficulties which, until recently, appeared al
most insuperable. The difficulties con
sist in the facts, first, that the jar caused
by a rough road h so injurious to the ma
chinery and wheels of the engine that they
require continual repair and renewal;
secondly, that if this evil be counterbalanc
ed by making the locomotive of great
size and weight the injury to the road be
comes proportionally great, and an ob
jection of a very formidable nature thus
becomes established. Until the beginning
of this year it seemed as though the choice
must lie between carts and horses on the
ooo hand, and the cost of constant repair
of engines and roads on tho other. But
. Mr. Thompson, a civil engineer of Edin
burgh, has at last succeeded in producing
an engine which, to judge from tho suc
icess which has already attended some
j very remarkable trials of it, prdmwes a so
j lution of the difficulties. Mr. Thompson
had been requested by some friends in tho
Island of Java to optain for them a road
j locomotive for the conveyance of sugar
lrom some ot too large estates to tno port
of Tourabaga.
Tho result of his inquiries after such an
engine was not satisfactory. All thoso
which ho inspected appeared to foil in the
important respects of durability and non
injury to tho roads. The idea then oc
curred to him of fitting stout india-rubber
tires to the wheels of tho engine, and thus
to overcomo the jar and injury aliko to
roads aud locomotive. Tho application
was but the development of a principle
which Mr. Thompson has already applied
to the wheels of tho platform trucks at
railway stations with good results. Tho
preliminary trials of the traction engine
fitted with these tires were eminently suc
cessful. It wa3'at onco perceived that the
machinery and road became by this simple
device exempt from injury, jho steamer,
03 Mr. Thompson calls it, practically runs
along on a self-laid tramway of india-rubber.
The Java engine wa3 of three-horso
power (nominal), but tho bito of the wheels
was so excellent and their smoothness and
easo of motion wcro so great that it was
found possible toitake somo liberties with
the engine of n. very curious nature.
Among other things it wn3 made to cross
n field of soft grass, to run through a field
covered with looso eirth to the depth of
about two feet, to travel over beds of
broken flint, and to. drag a hugo boiler,
which weighed with its track nearly thir
teen tons, up an ioclino of ono in twelve.
These feats were accomplished with the
greatest ease, tho locomotivo appearing to
float along without any symptom of dis
tress. The trials were continued for sev
eral weeks with unifurm tnccess, and in
tho end somo other road steamers " were in
-coarse of construction. Two 'of these have
recently been tried in Edinburgh and Lcith,
in presence of a largo company of engin
eers aud others. One of the engines is in
tended for carrying coals in Derbyshire
ovjr nine milea ofToad with inclines of one
in twelve ; the other is designed for tho
transport of coffee in Ceylon. Tho former
is of ten-horse power (nominal), weight
eight tons, and has india-rubber tires fif
teen inches wide and five inches thick. It
was built to draw weights of only fifteen
tons, but the following arc among its actual
performances: It was run out to a colliery
twelvo miles from Edinburgh, drawing a
train of four wagons, each weighing 2 tons
15 cwt. At the colliery each wagon re
ceived n load Of 5i tons of coal, bo that
the wholo train (including tho engine)
weighed forty ton3. "With this load tho
steamer looking Iiko some luggago train
which had escaped from a station trav
eled with perfect easo along a road having
inclines of one in sixteen until it reached
tho city. There it threaded its way deftly
and surely between the streams of omni
buses, cab3, carts, etc., which form the
staple of the ordinary traffic, and which
wcro more numerous than usual in conse
quence of somo games which were going
on, and because it was a Saturday after
noon. The train sped its way satisfacto
rily over long beds of broken flints, through
barriers put up for road mending, down
steep streets and round sharp corners, the
train of ninety feet following tho engino as
surelyand implicitlyos the toil of a serpent
follows it3 head. In some coses the curves
were so sharp and close together that the
train assumed the form of a letter S. Pass
ing from Junction into Bonnington road,
tho angle was so acute that tho train had
to double back upon itself. Lcith street
has a steep and crooked descent, down
which the train passed with easo ; and fi
nally, the train had to pass into a Terr
narrow lane and enter the gates of the
works where it delivered its coab. The
whole performance was a very conclusive
one as far as the tractive powers of the en
gine and the control of the train were
concerned, incre only remains to notice
the remarkable way in which the india
rubber tires pas3 over obstacles without
injuring them without even displacing
them, and without injury to themselves.
Thus a potato and a carrot which were
purposely laid in the path of the engine
were passed over nncrushed : bed3 of loose
flints were undisturbed; nor was an in
cision or permanent dent made In the tires
by the sharpest stones. Profes3or Archer,
in a paper which he read upon the stbject
before the British Association, aptly com
pares these tire3 to the cushioned feet of
an elephant or camel, ani it is probable
that the tirc3 would prove scarcely more
destructible. The india-rubber tires have
been tried over roads slippery with frost
and ice and wet with complete success.
inese engines promise to present some
important applications. Seems; that they
not only are not destructive to roads, bet
even independent of thea, they may prob
ably be usefully applied for agricajtaral
purpurea, iiuu ii is scarcely neceesery lu
point out that they may have somo impor
tant military applications. Afew of these
engines working up the " Col de Bala
clava" might have eared many lives in the
Crimean winter of 1854, and the increased
weight of siege ordnance would now give
to an engine of this sort an impeftasee
winch it could not then have possessed.
Pall MaU Gazette.
As artesian well, at the County Fan,
near St Low, baa reached a dejttfcef
2,700 feet more than half a mile.

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