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The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, December 16, 1868, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1868-12-16/ed-1/seq-1/

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muHiiaitdlazcttc
rSBUSHED
Every Wednesday Morning',
AT SCUM FKR. AXMIJI.
JIallol to Foreign SnWrllMrr at S7.UU.
OrncE On Merchant street, west of
" he Toil Office, Honolulu, II. I.
. . . i v 1 xrs Cssrrvtr at th
Grmnnent Frtattec 0c, to vheei all bwinws ,
cetaaiualntWa taut l fcUrvtl.
1 I
BUSINESS NOTICES.
J. G. mCKSOA.
Id porter, Wholesale and Retail Dealer
I. Lumber sod Baildiar listerisls. Fort. Kinr. and
S Merchaal Streets, HoooUlc II. I. lj4
IV. 3U C REITS
GENERAL CO MMISSIONAGENT & BROKER
OOce la nre-proof HuBdinr on Qncea Street,
SJ Honolulu. 1L 1. (lyl
c. s. urcMCZE. n. jtAcrARLAja.
CIIAS. A. SPITVCER A: CO.,
GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Zl Qom Stmt, llmtali. II. I. lj
ITIcCOEGAA Jc JOIEaSOrV,
MERCHANT TAILORS,
10 Fort St. Ileaulala, oprile T. C. Heath's. Iy4 j
C. E. -WILLIAMS
MANTOACTUBEB, IMPORTER & HEALTH
la Faroitan of .Trrr aWriptlMi. 1'utbUon Ware-
Osltwy. Wuck.lwp at tae oM slaaj on Ilo4
Street, near Fort OnWr.fnaata.uthw
1 islands protaptly attended to. ly
W. It ETNTV EXT.
BOOT AND SHOE MAKER,
41 Kins: Street. Belt tathc lietbc'. Honolulu, fly
31. T. UOSaULL,
CABINET MAKER AND UPHOLSTERER,
Klnz Street, llsnolcta. eppoite Lewis' Cooper Shop.
41) VUi hyj aa4 s.11 xUaiJ qreiture. lj j
jou.1 TiisETS. rnos. SOCE.XSOS. '
TIDDETS Jc SOKKSSOS',
SHIP CAEPENTEES & CAULZEES ,
At D. Foster ft Co's Old Stand,
Tj Xear the Honolulu Iron Works. J
TIIEO. II. DAVIES. i
Ljltx Janox, Oun i Co.
IMPORTER ft COMMISSION MERCHANT,
asn Asaxr roa
LlojiTs and the UTfepoot Underwriters.
British and 1'or.irn Marine Insurance Co.. and
Northern Assurance Companj. 5-ly4
IIY3IAX 1IROTIIERS,
IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS
la Fashionable dothing. 1UU. Cp. Boob, Soon,
and every variety of Gatlemea's Furnishing Goods.
SooWs fcaBdinr. Jleccbsot Street, lljoolnlu. 50-1J4
J. s. WALkES. S. C. 1UIJ.
walker jc allka,
shipping & commission merchants,
1J Uueea Street, Honolulu, II. 1. fly4
I.. L. TOKHKKJ,
DEALER IB LUKE EE AND EVEEY KIND
OF BUILDING MATERIAL. .
IS Orncx Corner Qaeea and Fort streets. Iy4
1IOIJLF.S fc CO.,
SHIP CHANDLERS AND COMMISSION
MERCHANTS,
Qaeea Street, lloooJala. Particular attention paid
to the iMxrchase and all. of llawanjui Prodoce.
U7E14 IT Ta
C L Kiehanb a Co, I U UaeafeM a 0.
CBrmrtOo, 1C I. RirhwU 4 Co,
I) C Viterana Ej, Cutle a Cuoae. Mj4
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION AGENT,
OtBoe 'with AUkXa a ruaaa, Qaeea Street.
axrias r rii);.w.i to
Men C L Ekaard. a Co,IMen Walker a Alien.
Mtean C Brewer a Co, I Adams a cruder. IW
IltA K1CIIAKWSO.-V,
IMPORTER !i DEALER IN BOOTS, SHOES,
And Gratleucs'i FarnUaiar Goods, corner of Fort
and M.rchut Streets, Uoootdlo. Mj.
El 1VEV jo.i:s,
GE0CEE AND SHIP C HANDLES,
Xalialuaf 3Iaul.
Money and Recruits famished to Ship, on the most
lfrj CiToraUe terms. Pj4
CIIC'G HOO,
ComEiitiion Merchant and General Agent,
Importer ef Tvas and other Catnete and Foreicii
Goods, Wholesale Dealer in II.waBan Frodore, and
Arent for the Fankaa and Amaaala Sarar l'linti
tions. Fire-proof Store on 2iaaana Street, beloir
Ktoe. Sl-lj
AFO.G ACIIECK.
Lnporters, 'Wiolesale and Retail Dealers
In General Merchandraj and China Goods, in the
Fire-proof Store on banana Street, under the Fubuc
Hall.
GEORGE G. HOIVE,
Dealer in Bedvood and Northwest Laiaber,
Shingles, Doors, Sashes, Blinds, N'siU. FainU, etc., '
SBj at his old stand on the Esplanade. (1st ,
E. S. FL.IGG.
CIVIL ENGINEER AND SURVEYOR,
AMiaas PottHSca Box No, llonolnla. psm
V. A. SCIIAEFER Az CO.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
3S
Hooolatu, Oahu, H. I.
Pi
ED. HOFPSCHL&EGEE & CO.,
IMPORTERS & COMMISSION MERCHANTS
41 Honolulu, Oehu, H. 7. Ill
A. S. CLEGUOKM,
"WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN !
GENERAL MERCHANDISE, i
Flre-FTocf Store, comer of Queen and Kaahumanu J
Streets, Honolulu, BetaU EstahUshment on Nunanu ,
Etreet. 4-lj4
THEODORE C. IIECCK,
IMPORTER & COMMISSION MERCHANT, i
'IT nonolnlu, Uahn. IL I. (lj I
II. HACK FEED Jc CO.,
GENERAL COMMISSION AGENTS.
S Queen Street, Honolulu, H. I. lj
THE TOM M00EE TAVEEN,
TBV JT. O'AIEEE,
S Corner of Kinr and Fort Streets. ljl
CXXAIOTCEV C. BEWETT,
DEALER DT NEWSPAPERS, MAGAZINES,
'And Periodicals, Fort Street, Honolulu. 19-1 jl
x. r. nuu. x. jaxces.
"J. F. EOXERS CO.,
DEALERS IN DRY GOODS AND GENERAL
VWh MERCHANDISE,
Finproof Store on Fort Street, shore Odl Fellosrs
Hall. C7-ljt
s..r. asaxi. i. c.-imai.
ADA.HS &. WXXDER,
AUCTION ft COMMISSION MERCHANTS
S Queen Street, Honolulu. XL L lj
C. S. BARTOW.
AU CTIONEER,
Sales room cn Queen Street, one door from Kaahs
maun StreeC 17-lj
JOIH II. PATT,
Votary Publit and Coardjjioser of Deeds
7or the State cf CslUjmls, Office at tha Banc of
Bishop a Ox, Kaahgmaaa Street, Honolulu. J-lj4
M. A. WIDEMAXA,
NOTARY PUBLIC,
C OSca at Sha Interior DepartnieBt. (Ir4
HAWAIIAN
VOL. IT---NO. 48.1
BUSINESS NOTICES.
SUUUX MCI. H. I- CaSTIa.
C. URE1VDK Jt CO.,
SHIPPING AKD
COMMISSIOlf MERCHANTS,
HONOLULU, II. I.
ACCVTS-Of the lloitoii and Honolulu
Packet Unc.
AUEXTS For the JIah.ee, IValloku and
liana Plantation.
AGK-YTS For the Purchase ai,d Sale oT
Wlaiid Produce.
arris
Joax MlIoO, n
Cats. Baxws 1 Oa
Jf.w Tork
1 ..Bo. too
Jis. Ilcastwnx. Eeo,
J. C. Souul Co
K. S. Swjj.1 i Co
Cut W. lams, Eao,
San Francisco
.11. S. ULB.V10I A; CO.,
IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS
In FoshkoaUe Oothins;. Hata Caps, Bouts. Shoes
aad ererr varietT uf tleotlemea s superksr lurnish
inx Uouds. Store In 31alee's Block, Queen Street,
Uouolula. II. I. 10-lj4
j. i. hughes,
IMPORTER AND MANUFACTURER
Of all kinas of Saddlerr. Carriace trintmins; done
with neatness and disiatch. AU orders prompt.
if aneoded to. Corner of Fort and Uotei
10 Streets, Honolulu. 14
F. II. Jc G. SEGELKE.'V,
TIN, ZINC AND C0PPEE SMITHS,
- AND SHEET IRON WORKERS,
Nnnana Street, between Merchant ft Queen.
laTeronstantlFOnhaad,StOTes.P!pe,G4l.
rvtv Tazuxed Iron Pipe. Plain and Hose Bibhs,
PSr Slup-cx-ks. Indto KchUr Uoso h vt S-ple.
ggyti la lencths of 25 and 50 f-et. with evuphegs
ijt and pipe complete. Bath-Tubs, and also a
very Urge stock bf Tin. are of Kitty dncriptlou.
Particular attention gir.n to Ship-Work. Orders
from the other Islands will be carefully attended to.
Thankful to the Citlxeos of Honolulu and the
IsLuds swoeraQy lor their liberal patronage in the
post, we hope by strict attention to business to merit
the same for the future. C7-lj
a. IE. XI103IISOs,
GENERAL BLACKSMITH,
Queen Street, Honolulu,
Has cotutaatly on hand and for sale at the Lowest
Market Prices, a good assortment of the Best Refined
Bar Iron, and the Best BUcksmitb's Coal. 2S-ly
It. RYCROFT.
HOUSE AND SHIP PLUMBER,
King- St, two doors west of Castle ft Cooke's.
Has on hand. KUh-Tuhs, Water-Closets, Wash-Ba-Force
and Lift Pumps; Lead and Gslranized
Iron Pipes, and Plumbers Brcss-works. Belns; the
only Plumber la the city, he will execute all orders en
trustsd to him In a workmanlike manner. (3S-3m
J.XO. SOTT. SAM'L SOTT.
JOIEV SOTT & CO.,
COPPER AND TIN SMITHS
KaahriEiiiiu St, one door above Hitner's.
Bee leare to laorm the poWic that they are pre
Iared to famUh all Linda of Ctprer Work, ractx as
S till. Strike Pans, Soiham Tans, Vt'uims, Pnxup,
etc. Also on band, a fell assortment of Tin Ware,
which we offer for aale at the Lowe t Markt Price.
AU kinds of i.erlritir done with XeatneM and
Dupotdt. Orders from the other Islands will meet
with pruupt attention. 3S-Sm
JU LEWIS,
COOPEE A1YD GATJGEE,
At the Old SUnd, corner King & Bethel Sti.
A LarK StocV of Oil 5 books aad all kinds of Coop
ering Materials cOaWtaatlj on hand, lie hope tj
attention to badness to merit a continuance of the
patronage which he has heretofore ecjojed, and fur
whkh he now retorns his thanks. 3$-3oi
Mir. .jr. cosxa,
JEWELER AND ENGRAVER,
Fort Street opposite Odd Fellows' Hall.
Is prepared to execute with promptness, all work in
his line of boslnees, sach as Watch and Clock repair
ing. Miaufsurt a rinr Jewelry and Ha rra Tine- 3$-3m
GCOIKiE lEEIAIS,
LICENSED SHIPPING AGENT,
0ce on James Robinson ft Co's Wharf.
Continues the basinets on bJ-i aid plan of settling
with officers and seamen immediately on their ship
pin? at his ofic. Having no direct or indirect con
nection with any ontfittisg establishment, and allow
ing no debts to be collected in his office, he hopes to
give as good wtjsttctkc. In the future as he has In
the past. 3SSm
G. IV, XOsttTOX & CO.,
COOPERS .AND GAUGERS,
At the New Stand on the Esplanade.
We are prepare! to attend to all work, in our line
at the Shop next to the Custom. House, where we can
be found at all working hours. We have on hand
and for sale. Oil Casks and Carrels cf different sizes,
new and ol which we will sell at the very Lowest
Market Hates. AU work done in a thorough manner
and warranted to give satufactioo. AU kinds of
Coopering Materials and Tools for sale. 3&-3m
PIANOS TUNED.
sI,IAXOS and other Musical
SSZsInstruments Tuned and Repaired, by
ffFfJlCIUMiS DERBY, at the Uawaiian
i I 'Theatre.
Lessons given on the Piano at Guitar.
The best of references gireo. 51-ly4
VOLCANO HOUSE,
CEATEE OF ETLATTEA, HAWAII.
THIS ESTABl.ISn3tEJfT IS
fcfc now open for the reception cf TisiMrs to Zf
the Volcano House, who may rely on ficdinr ccia
ftable rooms, a good table, and prompt attendance.
Zxperienred guides for the Crater always on band.
STEAM AND SULPHUR BATHS !
Horses Grained and Stabled if Desired.
CHARGES REASONABLE.
Parties visiting the Tolcano via rjHo, can procure
animals warranted to make the Journey, by D. ZL
llrrcucoci. Esq,. g-iy
NEVILLE ti BARRETT,
Planters & General Store Keepers
KEOFUKA, SOUTH K0NA, -HAWAII.
(Near Kealateksa Bay.)
Itlasd produce booglit. Ships supplied with
Wood, Beef asd other sectaries.
Agent at Honolulu.. ...
11-
-A. S. CUGBOES.
it
K. W. AiiDRETTS,
3sa:.os:i3a-is,3?,
Fort Street, opposlta Odd Fellotrs' trail
Gives particular attention to the repair of
Fire Arms, Sewing Machines, a Locks.
Orariagi cf JbcIiaerv, dc, vutde to Order.
SO- ly4
II.ViVAIIAA I.EAXIIEK.
Sole ft Saddle Leather ft Tanned Goit-Siiax.
A REGULAR SCPPI.T, FROM the
Celebrated
Walmea Tannery,
and for sale at the lowest Market Rates by
A. S. CLXGQ0RX,
Agent.
SSCm
KOSA COFFEE.
I HATE OS IIA3TD A SUPERIOR.
Lot cf
Kona CoSee,
Selected hy Messrs. NEVILLE ft BARRETT,
whcsafacIIiUes are second to none. Tha attention cf
SetWs is rojuestsd before purchaslnj; elsewha.
Tor sale In cuan titles to suit by
ZZa A. S. CLEOnORoT.
HONOLULU, WEDNESDAY, DEOEM
FOREIGN NOTICES.
a. v. smrucx. c x. claxk.
SEVEBANCE, CLAEK & CO.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
AND SHIPPING AGENTS,
405 Front St, corner of Claj, San Francisco.
We will attend to the sale cf Surer and all kinds
of Island Produce, also to the purchasing and for
warding cf Merchandise. Cash JLdrancea made on
OnJcntoeats. S-vCin
jobs it'caaxxx,
Fbrtland.
I.CUWU,
S. F. CaL
M'CEAXEN, MEEEHL &.C0.,
FORWARDING AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Portland Orcgoa.
HatIiic ben ciiggl in our pmeDt lratInM tor
cpvmnls of twelr jtrt, &q4 btlnf: hxXtd In Fire
proof Crirk Halklin. we tu fceiuretl to receive and
d.rc of Island SuplM, nch m Mucv, Sympr, Kkf,
Vulrx. Co&t. rtc, to MTantapc Cc'jcnitivxitsf n
pcUllr oliciud for th Onoa Market, to which
jtMoal attrnti will L paid, and cpoa which cash
advances will be made when iQlred.
UJXsU3CK
Char. W DroolU Sin Franc tsco
J C jlerriU Co '
l-rvdlken "
Uadger tiiideaberger
Juki Patrick a Co "
Wm T Coleiuan Co 14
Stereus Baker a Co "
Allen a Lewi l)rtland
LaJd k Ttlton
Xeoaard a Green "
COMMISSION MERCHANT,'
Kanagawte 7apa.
llatin the bet LiciUties through au Intimate con
ntrctiua with the Japantee trade for the -tut eijtht
tjeaxs. U prepssvrrd to trajact auj t4uu.eaW entnuted
v flu care, wiui uupaicn. iflj
b. btttiixiaxj, n. r. blaxchaud, c. s. xoacax.
WILLIAMS. BLANCHAED & CO.,
SHIPPING ft COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
31 305 Front Street, San Francisco. m
LANGLEY, CE0WELL & CO.,
WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS,
S2 Cor. Battery ft Clay Sts, San Franeisco. tm
JNSUKANCE NOTICES,
BOARB OF UNDERWRITERS.
TIIK UADERSIGXED having been
appointed Agents for the San Francisco Board
of Underwriters, compriiiDg the
California IiiftHrmncc Coiupany.
3Icrrluiiitf .Mutual Marine Iti. Co.,
Pacific Insurance Company,
California Lloyd1!, and
Home Ulutual Insurance Company.
Beg leaxe to inform Masters of Vessels and the Pab
lic cenerallT. that all Tesels and Cargoes, insured
by either of the aboTe Companies against perils of
tee teas and otner nsks, at or near toe sandw.cn
Island, will hare to be verified by them.
CS-Cm U. IIACKFELB k CO.
CAEIFOItrVIA
INSURANCE COMPANY,
njpilE UNDERSIGNED, AGENTS of
JL the aboTe Company, hxi bm autbnrizrd to
insure risks cn Cargo, Krelght and Treat
ju-r, by Coasters, from lIotjlaIu to all ports of
the Hawaiian Group, and vice versa.
S-lyl H. IIACEFELD Jfc CO.
MERCIkLJCVXS lUlTTirAL
MARINE INSURANCE C0BIPANY
Of San Francisco.
THE TTNDEU5IG.VED having been
appointed Agents for the above Company .are
prepared to Issue Policies on Cargoes, Freights
and Treasure.
WALKER 1 ALLEN.
SsSm Agents, Uonolala.
1 1 A-ii is L it g ii- is i : i: a
FIRE LNSUEANCE COMPANY.
THE C.VDERSIGXED hawing been
appointed Agents of the abore Company, are
prepared to insure risks against Fire, on Stone and
Brick Untitling, and cn Merchandise
.tored therein, on the most taTorable terms. For
particulars apply at the office of
Mj4 F. A. SCnAEFEE k CC
J. I). IVICIsTE,
AGENT FOR THE BREMEN BOARD OF
UNDER WRITERS.
AU average claims anlnst said Undenrriters, 00
currisp In or about this Kingdom, will hare to be
certified before me. 7ly4
Insurance Notice.
THE AGENT FOR THE BRITISH
Foreign Marine Insurance Company, (limit
ed), has received instructions to reduce the rates of
Insurance between Honolulu and Ports In the Pacific,
and Is now prepared to issue Policies -at the Zomtt
RaUt, with a special reduction on Freight per Steam
ers. TIIEO. It. DAT1FS.
4J-tf Jgnt Brit. Ibr. liar. Jtu. Cb. (Limited).
SUGAR & MOLASSES.
18S8
-I O C D -O
IIII.O, II. I.
Sagrav aad Slolasses.
CROP COMING IN AND FOR SALE IN
quantities to rait purchasers, by
WALKER ft ALLEN,
33-3ra Agents.
0N0HEA PLANTATION.
Segu- and 3IoIasscs Crop 1S8S
COMING IN, FOR SALE IN QTJANTI
ties to suit purchasers, by
WALKER ft ALLEN,
3S-3a Agents.
PEINCEVULE PLANTATION.
Srafjar aadSIoIasses Crop 1868
COMING IN, FOR SALE IN QUANTI
ties to snit purchasers, by
WALKER ft ALLEN,
3S-3a Agents.
WAILUKU PLANTATION".
NEW CROP NOW COMING Ef. FOR
Sale in quantities to rait purchasers,
by C. BREWER 4 CO.,
;S-3q Agents.
UfATrRT! PLANTATION".
IVcit- Crop of Supra r Az Xlolasites
"VfOW COMING IN, AND FOR SALE IN
JLN quantities to suit purchasers by
C. BREWER ft CO.,
23-2 n Agents.
Germany oIbcc tlic War of l!0.
From la Eerue dee lleux Mondea. i
lie last question to bo examined is
this : Will the States of Southern Ger-,
raauy jo'.n the Confodenitioa? or, as it is,
more comBonljr espreised, Yil Prussia
Lcross the Man J An exaggerated import
ance is attributed to this point when it is
made a question of peace or war. The
.Main was passed before the Treaty of
Prague, for after the 26th of August,
1SCG, with the new of repnlsiug tho for
eign invasion that was then apprehended,
Bavaria, AVortemberg and Baden con
cluded with Prussia secret conventions,
placing uDder the direct command of King
William nil their forces and armies. From
that date, the military union has been a
fact, and it is the only one that can inspire
the neighboring nations with uneasiness.
Ou the 8th of July last, another treaty
was signed, establishing economical unity.
The Zollverein is re-constituted on the
basis of an united Parliament, in which
Representatives from oil parts of Germany
trill assemble, and where a decision arrived
at by a majortiy of them will have the
forco of law, and will not be at the mercy
of the veto of one State, that would en
danger the union indispensable to the
material progress of all the others. It
was, undoubtedly, in view' of these Con
ventions that the fourth article of the
Treaty of Prague was couched in these
terms : " The national bond to be estab
lished between the Southern States and
the Northern Confederation, shall be reg
ulated by an ultimate understanding of
the two parties."
The absolute separation of the North
and the Sonth has, therefore, never been
accomplished, and was. never thought to
be, by any one who has ever .taken the
trouble to read the test or the Treaty of
Prague. A national bond uill be estab
lished betweeu the North and the South ;
an oSensiveand defensive alliance exists
between them ; the Prussian military sys
tem will be introduced into the South,
and in cose of war its centingent of men
will be merged in the Prussian army ; and
Conventions regarding coinage, and civil
and commercial laws, will soon produce a
complete uniformity. Knowing all these
facts, what is the great importance to be
attached to tbp would-be barrier of the
Main?
It is a certainty that the North and the
South will be eventually joined together
there is no doubt about it. It is the wish
of the immense majority of the popula
tion on both sides of the Main. The recent
address of the Chamber of Deputies of
Baden embodied these sentiments in the
most emphatic manner: "The German
nation will not find calmness and peace
until it has discovered the definite form
likely to hasten a more complete organiza
tion of the national bond between the
Northern Confederation and the Southern
States, which alone will give to Germany
the essential conditions of life and pros
perity. On the other hand, Europe will
never enjoy the full assurance of a durable
peace before tho re-organization of Ger
many is accomplished on either side of tho
Main, because German Unity is the guar
antee of natural rights, the progress of
peaceful civilization, and the necessary
check to the policy of conquest." It is
very evident that the movement towards
Unity, more impetuous now than it lias
ever been, will not stop before an imagi
nary frontier which seems to have been
traced rather as a barrier to the conquer
ing ambition of Prussia than 03 an obstacle
to the wishes of the South.
It may be interesting be acquainted
with the parties opposed to a complete
unification : they ore precisely all the ex
treme parties.
In the North, the feudal party appre
hends a too intimate union with the
South, fearing that the Prussian genius
Prevssenthum that is to say, the spirit
of order, obedience, respect for the throne
and religion, should be weakened and lost
in the midst of the Southern people, ani
mated by democratic or ultramontane
tendencies.
King William is yet undecided, enter
taining the same feara and apprehensions;
and yet he would be glad, as his son inti
mated, on the occasion of the 25th anni
versary of the renews) of the works: of
the Cathedral of Cologne, '-to by the last
stone to the edifice which has been so
long in course of construction." Wilhelm
L must be in the same situation 03 Victor
Emmanuel, who did not see, without re
gret, his honest and dear little Piedmont
merged in the great and lazy Italian popu
lations. As to Mr. Ton Bismarck, he 13 not at
all impatient to hurry on this re-union of
all the German people, (at least he says as
much, and we can believe him), because it
is beyond a doubt that the Liberal party
would receive from the South such a pow
erful reinforcement as would cause the
failsre of every absolutist measure by an
enormous and compact majority. But theJ
Federal Chancellor can not, for fear of de
stroying his prestige and influence, express
these fears, or show the slightest'besita
tion to receive the Southern States into
GAZETTE.
BER 16, 1868.
the bosom of the Confederation, if they
should formally express such a wish.
In the South, the adversaries of the
Northern Confederation are, tha demo
crats, who are numerous in Wurtemberg,
and the extreme ultramoutaues of Ba
varia. Tho democrats want a Federal
Union as in Switzerland, bnt they dislike
Prussia, which appears to them tho repre
sentative of military power and absolut
ism. The extremo ultramontanes are op
posed to Prussia because it is a Protest
ant country, and because it has vanquished
Austria all-devoted to the Church. But
strango to say, many Itoman Catholics
incline towards Prussia, and desire tho
immediate union of the North and the
South, and while deploring tho exclusion
of Austria, are in favor of Prussia, whose
government reposes on tho principle of
authority, and does not in any way inter
fere with Catholic influence in the schools
or in society, which is not always the caso
in the Southern States.
Aside from the opposition which wo
have just enumerated, tho immense major
ity of the South desires the uuion with tho
North. Mr. Varnbuhler, the Minister of
Wurtemberg, in laying before the Assem
bly the Military Convention with Prussia,
poiuted out the reason of that desire.
" Nobody," says he, " can seriously con
ceive the possibility of the establishment
of a Southern Confederacy, but the South
ern States can not remain isolated. To
whom can they trust ? to Austria? Who
would dare to seriously propose it ? We
have, therefore, nothing left but to accept
the North German Confederation allian:e,
if we do not want to be traitors to onr
German Fatherland.
This feeling is so strong that the As
sembly of Baden accepted, with the excep
tion of one vote, the obligatory military
service that impost of blood which is the
hardest to bear. The business men want
the economical union with the North, to
profit by the remarkable development
of commerce in Prussia. We have, there
fore, the best reasons to believo that,
sooner or later, there will be an union of
the two separated parts into ono Confed
eration. The Germans hold that the
Treaty of Prague is .not an obstacle to
this result. The object of that Treaty is
to guarantee, according to their opinion,
a national existence to the Southern
States, and enable them to constitute an
independent Confederation, but if they
choose not to do it, and if they wish to
avail themselves of their independence to
freely and willingly unite themselves to
their brethren of the North, who can pre
vent them ?
What is the interest of France in this
question ? Mr. Forcade very ably defined
it when he eaid, " German Unity with des
potism might be dangerous, but with a
free government it can not cause the
slightest alarm." And it is almost certain
that the fusion of the North and the
South would insure tho definite triumph
of liberty.
It may be worthy of remark that it
,, . . ... . sue-
wcald be impossible to prevent by force
the completion of German Unity. Former
ly, it was easy enough to stop a sovereign
desirons of aggrandizing hi3 territory by
conquest. Vanquished, he ceved bis ef
forts, and his son would pursue another
object ; an incapable minister would suc
ceed to an intelligent one. It is in snch a
manner that the European equilibrium has
been preserved up to the present age. But
now, that the national feeling has been
roused, the situation is wholly different
no human strength can master it. It gets
inflamed by defeats, and irritated by ob
stacles. It is transmitted from father to
son, and in order to stifle it you would
have. to annihilate the whole race that
keeps it sacredly in their hearts. See Italy
and Poland : Italy coming to life after a
thousand years of servitude, and Poland,
that nothing can appease or discourage I
It has been reported that at Salzburg
there wa3 exhibited a copy of a secret
treaty between Prussia and Bussia. This
is probably a fable, because there 13 no
need of such treaties, which everybody
keeps or violates according to convenience.
Strong alliances are the result, not of ar
bitrary combinations concocted in the se
crecy of cabinets by Ministers or Princes,
but of the identity of interests. As long
as "Prussia feels that she is threatened
from the west, she will turn eastward ; as
long as France and Austria show a hostile
disposition, she will seek the assistance of
Bussia, and- will help the Slavonic disturb
ances. If the case were to be reversed,
and if France were to hold out a sympa
thetic hand to Germany, then -would the
situation assume a different aspect. The
frontier being free from peril, the German,
instead of saying Unity first, and Lib
erty afterwards, would say, Liberty before
all, and Unity afterwards. The great care
of Germany would be to check the pro
gress of Panskviam. The interests of
Prussia and Austria would become again
identical, and alliances would be modified.
Panskrom is for France but a distant dan
ger, white it is for Germany a graTe peril,
for the Slavonians are in the very core of
its provinces, and Trieste is situated in
Slavonic land.
6.00 PEll YEAR.
There is no danger for France iu the es
tablishment of a Germany based upon the
foundations of national rights and of lib
erty, but there would be in tho possible
constitution of a great Germanic-Slavonic
Empire, with 70,000,000 of people, mutu
ally oppressing each other Hungarians,
Germans and Slavonians an Empire ne
cessarily despotic, for despotism alono can
maintain the union of people who would
olherwise follow their national aspirations
an Empire fatally hostile to Italy, and
especially so to France : not to her tem
porary interests of dynasty or ambition,
bat to her institutions and her very genius,
bccaaso.it is she, after all, who has mado
the revplution of 1789 tho very embodi
ment of the great ideas of liberty and
justice. This was tho traditional and his
toric danger which the ancient monarchy
has ever combatted; which the present
government averted in 1S51, 1839 and
1863, and which finally vanished away be
fore tho Prussian sword at the battle of
Kaniigsgraetz. Exile de Lavalste.
JVcuisfatai' by Est. Fesard.
Conscrrallou of Forettis.
Among the reports prepared for the Science
and Art Department ou tho various classes
in the Paris Exhibition of last year, and
which have now been published amon the
Parliamentary papers, Is one upon forestry,
by Mr. Webber, of the Forest Department of
India. The writer questions whether wood
Is not of more Importance to man than Iron,
lie remarks that lu Europe, for several cen
turies, governments, have found It necessary
to Interfere to protect the forests from de
struction. Iu other countries, not long since
covered with dense forests, where the con
stant cutting of timber has been going ou, It
Is found that timber Is getting scarce, even
for present use: no thoocht has been taken
at all of the future. India, the crest coun
try of juucles. bas awakened, and established
a Bjstcm of forest conservation, but not un
til pine nau to do imported iroru .Nor war.
America still boasts of her Inexhaustible
forests and her vast clearintrs, and goes ou
hacking away. A CallfornUn sawyer, who
has made bis fortune In 10 years out of 100
acres of forest grant, picked on the bank of
a navigable river, will tell you that the tim
ber is Inexhaustible; that his eaw-mlll still
stands In a forest so dense that you would
scarcely know a tree had been cot; and that
since he came there every facing to water
carriage Is occupied by parties who arc at
work clearing their grants. But these are
bare statements. It is thus that all timber
gets carried away or destroyed In tho most
maguinceni ioresis, aniiaperiou comes wnen
it is found that all the trees are cut down,
and none have crown to replace them. Such
a probability would have Jeen laughed at In
inaiaau years ago, yei now unas actually
occurred in some of the finest forest. Sys
tematic forest management cannot be too
early sct-a-colns iu a new country, based
upon the principles which have been tried
wun me most Dcneuciai results in European
countries, and matured Into almost a science
after several centuries1 experience In
France and Germany, forestry is one of tho
State professions of the highest scientific
character, ana filled from tho better and edu
cated class who are trained for tho nurnosc
It will give some Idea ot Jhe importance at-
lacuea to lorestry in inese countries, mat
France has S.70O.O0O acres of State forest.
and a revenue of 1,710,0001., in the conserva
tion and management of which, 500,000 Is
annually expended. Prussia has 5,070,000
acres, Havana 1.962,000 acres, while the for
est area oi Austria is l&ouo.uoo acres, with
an export value of 3,000,000). sterling annual
ly realised. Systematic conservation In Eu
rope has restored forests to an area of cor
rect proportion to the cultivation or the
country, and secured a supply for profitable
export. Under British rule, India has begun
to look after her valuable forests, but not
until most of the teak and sat districts had
become unproductive from reckless cutting,
and a scarcity and consequent high price
been the result. These two timbers, which,
with oak and two others, rank No. 1 at
Lloyds for shipbuilding, arc only found In
our Indian possessions, and an Idea may be
formed of the importance of forest conser-
T4tion from the facts put forward in the re-
port of Dr. Brand's, Inspector-General of
r uresis in xnaia, mat me average oi first
class teak trees found In a normal uncut for
est at Beeiing was 14 per acre ; while over
the entire area of Government teak forest
lately taken into management at Mnlmaln,
553 square miles in extent, the first-class
trees which remain standing are only 15 In
10 acres, while stumps and damaged trees
everywhere abound. The sal forests of Up
per India might be shown to be even in
worse plight through reckless cutting and
and utter neglect. There were In 1SC0 prob
ably 4,000 square miles of pure sal forests
along tbc foot of the Himalayas, besides
those in Central India available to Govern
ment. The sal timber Is the only one found
capable of standing the Indian climate for
railway uses; jet now the East Indian rail
way has been obliged lo import pine sleepers
from Norway, sal being scarcely procurable.
Government has therefore become alive to
the importance of forest conservation In In
dia, it being almost too late, and the work
of the new Forest Department, will be for
many years 'that of restoring rather than
working the magnificent jnngfes of India.
Let it be remembered that 40 years ago these
forests were mostly untouched by man, and
supposed to be Inexhaustible; now they are
simply worked ont regardless of future production.-
The Importance of the study and
Eractice of foresting is proved alike by what
as been effected by it in Europe and by tho
result of IU neglect in Asia. BriUth Trade
Journal.
Scddek CosrvxssTOX. One of the zealons
Chaplains of the army of the Potomac called
on a Colonel noted for his profanity, in order
to talk about the religious Interests of his
men. He was politely received, and motion
ed to a seat on a chest, when the following
dialogue ensued :
Chaplain "Colonel, you have one of the
finest regiments In the army."
Colonel" I believe so."
Chaplain "Do you think jou pay suffici
ent attention to the religious instruction of
your men f"
Colonel (doubtfully)-" Well I don't
know."
Chaplain "A lively Interest his been
awakened in the Massachusetts (a ri
val regiment). The Lord has blessed the
labors of of his searants, and tea have already
been baptized."
Colonel (excitedly) "Is that so " to the
attendant : " Sergeant Major, have fifteen
men detailed Immediately for baptism. Fll
be d d If Til be outdone by any MatM
chusetts regiment" S. J. 2L
' A cxzOTTXAX advocating obstinacy for the
right, illustrated It by naming a deacon who,
when a member of the church, at the sugges
tion of the pastor, prayed that the Lord
would either take away their deacon's obsti
nate nature, or else take him to heaven, be
cause they could not get along with him on
earth, rose promptly up In his place and said,
Brethren I won't go V
Sena Tare ago, a rather fast youth ws
relating the experience of his voyage across
the ocean to a svrflpathlziao; friend. Said he,
"I tell yon -what, old fellow, there's one
good thing about it, though. Ton can get
as tight as you please every day, asd every
body thinks you're only seasick."
BOOK AND JOB
PRINTING OTBUSHMOTI
T11B "OAZITTTR" 01T1CE
Is now prepared lo execute all orders for
Mil ill !AKT I111TIK.
Or EVERY DKSCKiniOX,
WITH NEATNESS AKD DISPATCH
The Largest Balloox EvR Made. A
gigantic balloon bas been constructed at Ash.
burn ham, near Chelsea, aad 1 Intended to
afford the public some sronsutlcal experience
undtr circumstances which will Insure safety.
The balloon Is four times the size of that
used by Mr. Glashicr, and contains S30.000
cubic feet of gas. It Is nearly spherical la
shape, and Is capable of ralslnc a load of
eleven tons. No less than JCiS,000 Is said to
have been disbursed upon bringing it to its
E resent complete state. It Is filled with pure
ydrotrcn, and Is worked by a steam-engine
of 200 horse-power. The gas la made la tho
private grounds of the balloon, and on a seals
which bas, perhaps, never been attempted
In the history of chemistry. Some 00,080 of
sulphuric acid and 110,000 pounds of Iron
tilings have been consumed. The balloon Is
held fast by a cable when It ascends. The
weight of the cable Is -i tons, and its length
( . 1. r ... . TI.. tutlnn. t. H.MtniF nnnM
and paraphernalia weigh 2f tons, which,
wun us caoie, matt u ions oi penuaucufc
iM.tm, m tu,lnM nr etv (Ant a. Ita
avallablo llftlnc power. Thirty persons are
the complement the carls Intended to bold,
and assuming theso to average 150 pounds
each, a balance of some 3 tons lining power
Is left in favor of the balloon. Tha personal
experience of those who went up on Thurs
day Is decidedly favorable to this latest addi
tion to metropolitan entertainments. Be
tween three and four In the afternoon. West
London saw a large brown globe for tho
new balloon Is nearly spherical In shape
mount slowly In the air, the cable attached
to It recalling the Inflated balls and string
which have been latterly a child's toy. This
was a blank ascent,and purely experimental.
A quarter of an hour's waiting, during which
the balloon remained above at a distance of
from 1.500 to 2.000 feet, and the word waa
clven to tho engine men topuil down. Grad
ually and surely, and with no perceptible
strain, tho brown ball was brought nearer
and nearer until the circular car beneath It
assumed shape and size, and the stout string
and Iron rings were caught by the drilled
men iu waiting, and run Into the stout Iron
hooks waiting to receive them. This done
and the balloon Is secure the case with
which this desideratum Is arrived at being
not the least Interesting of the experiences
of the afternoon. The experienced French
tcronaut under whose personal care all as
cents are made, and the manager of the under
taking go up together now amid the cheers
of all present, and when these have been
brought down, and tho balloon fixed with
the same regularity and certainty as before,
a gangway Is placed and a party of thirty,
incinaing two r rcncii lauics ana a utiio coy,
are passed Into the car. The sailing or flying
motion through the air la described as In
spiriting and delightful. The earth and its
dwelling-places, Its trees, its roads. Its rivers,
drop slowly down, and resolve themselves
into a clearly defined, widely spreading map.
The steamers plying on the Thames, recalled
the toy boats at the Polytechnic ; the black
ants rushlog busily to and fro in the barren
space Immediately below were schoolboys In
a playground a few minutes since ; the strips
of drab tape stretching their devious courses
to right and left are roads; tho squares and
oblong greeu patches with dark borders,
fields; and that large tablo upon Which a
gamo of dominoes is apparently being played
is Brompton Cemetery, and it Is Its profu
sion of white tombstones, sonio flat, some
upright which aro recalling tho old game.
There seems a mighty stir among the pigmies
below, and huzzalis which become iilnt In
tho distance, but are never quite lost, corao
up to us cheerily. The small boxes drawn
by ants. Into which cabs and omnibuses have
resolved themselves, twine their way along
the strips of drop tape and almost arouse
wonder by never deviating from their patn.
A schoolboy gives a shrill whistle, and we
bear It as if it were close by. Tho gratings
and checks of tho ropes were, however, very
slight, both in ascending and descending, and
the return was made and the party landed
without a bitch. -The trip occupied exactly
seventeen minntes, and the extreme height
gained waj from 1,500 to 2,000 feet. onton
Xtofly Ann.
A distinguished Superintendent of public
instruction In one of the New England
States propounded, a few years ago, tho fol
lowing question to a large number of teach
ers :
" What proportion of such children as you
have bad under your charge, could, In your
opinion, be so educated and trained, that
their existence on going out of this world,
would be a benefit and not a detriment, an
honor and not a shame to society, provided
these children should all frequent schools,
taught by teachers of high Intellectual and
moral acquirements, during ten months each
year, from theage of four to sixteen ?"
From a large number of replies thus ob
tained, we select the following striking testi
monies: Mr. Grtscolm, after nn experience of forty
yearstestifies: "That ninety-five per cent
would be supporters of the moral welfare of
j the community, that nlnetccn-twentleths, of
j the Immoralities with which society Is af-
niciea wouia oc eraaicatea irom mesons oi
our social institntions, and that not one per
cent would be found irreclamable."
Mr. Solomon Adams says: "I would con
fidently expect, that ninety-nine ont of a
hundred would become good members of
society, the supporters of law, order, Justice,
truth, and all righteousness."
Rev. T. Abbot witnesses as follows : "I
think the work of training up the whole
community to Intelligence and virtue would
soon be accomplished, as completely as any
human end can be accomplished by human
means."
Mr. F. A. Adams says : "In the course of
my experience, In tcachlns between three
and four hundred boys during the last ten
years, I have, been acquainted with but two,
In rezard to whom I should not feel strong
confidence of success, according to the pro
posed experience."
" Miss C. E. Beccher bears the following
emphatic testimony: "I do not believe that
one no, not a sinslc one wonld fall of prov
ing a respectable member of society ; nay
more, I believe that every opo would, at the
close ofllfe, find admission Into the world of
endless peace and lore."
'This testimony embraces chiidrenof both
sexes, from different parts of our country,
and extends over the" list half century.
The Pie Bor wso Became a Peisce.
The first Prince Menschlkoff was a pie boy
at Moscow, and was delivering things at a
nobleman's kitchen one day when Czar Peter
tbc Great was expected to dine at the house.
While waiting about he overheard the noble
man give special direction for the preparation
of s favorite dish of the Czar's, and after
ward, while the cook was absent, the boy
saw him place something in a dish which he
believed to be poison. As soon as Menschl
koff saw the Czar In the streets be cried out
his rolls more loudly than usual, and even
began to sing and approach the Czar to make
himself seen. Peter called to him and asked
him some questions, to which he answered
so happily that the Prince said. 'I win keep
thee In my service." Menschlkoff accepted
with joy. At dinner time, without orders,
he entered the banquet ball, and stood be
hind Peter. When the dish appeared, be
bent down and whispered "not to touch of
it." Peter got up, and, with trailing face,
made pretense to take the boy Into as adjola
Ing apartment, when Menschlkoff expaiBed
bis suspicion. Upon the Czar returning to
the table, the boyard again offered the dish,
and Peter asked hlo to sit by his side asa
partake with him. 'gke nobleman colored,
and said it became not a subject to eat the
same as the Emperor, who, seeing hU eabar
rassment, took tbc plate and offered It to a
dog, who swallowed all its contest. Bt a
few moment afterward it begaa to rss ssd
bowl, then staggered, fell, aad soon exfitti.
The boyard was secured, but next twrkTac
waa found dead in bis bed. MeMebikoff cssa
not to sell rolls say "o8vr; tbe Srst step to
his rapid fortune was aside, aad bis dnwsiitis
ants are a most powerfM feffiUy la B.isia to
this day.

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