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The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, January 27, 1869, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1869-01-27/ed-1/seq-1/

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PUBLI SITED
Every Wednesday Morning,
AT SG.00 PER AX.VUM.
Hailed to Foreign Sulxcribm at $7.00.
Office On Merchant street, west of
he Post Office, Honolulu, H. 1.
rrlnted and jmMished by J. Mott Surra, at, the
Government ITintlnl: Office, to -whom all business
communications man be addrewed.
BUSINESS NOTICES.
J. G. DICKSOX,
Importer, 'Wholesale and JUtail Sealer
Id Lumber and Building Materials. Fort. Kinc and
3 Merchant Streets. Honolnlu. H. I. Iji
IV. I. GREEK,
GENERAL COKMISSION AGENT &B OKE
Office in nre-pmof BoudinEs on Queen Street,
M Honolulu, H. I, Pjr4
C. y. SrEXCZB. B. VAcrAKLASE.
CIIAS. 1. SPE.XCER & CO.,
GENE AL COMMISSION ME CHANTS,
31) Qneen Street, llonolnln. 1?. I. fir
MERCHANT TAILORS,
10 Fort U Honolnla, opposite T. C. Henck'. lyi
C. E. WI LLIAMS,
MANUFACTU X , IMPO TE & SEALS
In Famitnre of exery dMcription, Fnrnitnre Ware
IUmm on Fort Street, opposite Ouue'i Photograph
Gallery. Workshop at the old Und on -Totel
Street, near Fort. Orden from the other
41 island promptly Attended to. pT
IV. BEETT,
BOOT AND SHOE HAKES,
41 Kins Street, next to the Bethel. Honolulu fir
M. T. DO.WELL,
CABIEI AKES A D UPHOLSTER E,
King Street, nonolnln, opposite Lewis Cooper Shop.
41 Will bny and nell aecond-hand Fnrnitnre. ly
sons TTBBCTS. inos. SORCSSOS.
TIBBETS & SOREXSOS,
SHIP CAEPENTEES & CAULKERS
At D.Foter&Co' Old Stand,
3TJ Near the llonolnln Iron Works, (im
TIIEO. II. DAVIES,
tin Jajio, Gaiei Co.
IMPORTER & COMMISSION MERCHANT,
A!CD A0X5T rOK
Lloyd's and the Liverpool Underwriters,
British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co and
Northern Assurance ComjAuy. Z-lvl
M3US BIEOTHEItS,
IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS
In Fashionable Clolhlnc Hats. Cans. Boots. Shoes,
and .Terr T&rietT of Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods.
Enowa Building. Merchant Street, nonolnln. 50-ljI
1. S. WALKER. S. C. AU.E.1
WALKER A; ALLE.,
SHIPPINQ & COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
19 Qneen Street, Houolnlu. II. I. fly
TU Ii, TURBERT,
. DEALER IN LUMBER AND EV EY KIND
OF BUILDING "MATERIAL.
13 Orncs Corner Qneen and Fort streets. Iy4
IIOELES & CO.,
SHIP CHANDLERS AND COMMISSION
MERCHA TS,
Qneen Street, Honolnla. Particular attention paid
to tne porcnase ana esie ol Hawaiian rroauce.
lErzss ST rir.Mi.,io to
C L Richards A Co, III IlactfeM a Co,
C Brewer Co. CL Richards a Co.
1) C Waterman Esq, (Castle a Cooke. S-lyl
IRA KICIIARISO.
IMPORTER b SEALER IN BOOTS, SHOES,
And Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods, corner of Fort
ana jiercnanl streets, Honolulu.- 9-174
EOIVIA JO.ES,
GEOCER AND SHIP CHANDLER,
laUalna, 3IauI.
Money and Recruits famished to Ships on the most
iuj larorawe terms. jiy.
CH.VXG HOOrV.
Commission Merchant and General Agent,
Importer of Teas and other Chinese and Foreign
Goods. Wholesale Dealer In Ilawallan Produce, and
Agent for the Paukaa and Ainauulu Sugar Planta
tions. Fire-pro.if Store on innanu Street, below
AFCVG & ACIIUCK.
Importers, 'Wholesale and Retail Sealers
In General Merchandise and China Goods, in the
Fire-proof Store on Xnuanu Street, under the Public
mil. 43-iyt
GEORGE G. HOWE,
Sealer in Redwood and Northwest Lumber,
Shingles. Doors. Sashes. Blinds. Nails. Faints, etc.
36 at his old stand on the Esplanade. lyi
E. S. FJOAGG,
CmX ENGINEER AND SURVEYOR,
Annsits Post-office Box No. 22, llonolnln. 2S-Cm
F. A. SCIIAEFER CO.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
38 Honolnlu, Oahn, II. I. Ij4
ED. HOFPSCHLAEGEE & CO.,
IMPORTERS & COMMISSIONMERCHANTS
4 Ilonolulu, Oahn, IL I. flyl
THEODORE C. IIECCK,
IMPORTER & COMMISSION MERCHANT.
I nonolnln. Oahn. II. I. fly
II. IUCKFELD fc CO.,
GENERAL COMMISSION AGENTS.
S Qneen Street, Honolulu, U. I. py
THE TOM MOORE TAVEEN,
BV JT. O'JVIEEE,
,yS Q Corner of King and Fort Streeta. t'J
CHAdVCEY C. BEX.M5TT,
SEALER IN NEWSPAPERS, MAGAZINES,
And Periodicals, Fort Street. Honolnla. 19-ly4
B. r. EHLEES. A. JAEGEB.
B. F. EIIEERS A: CO.,
SEALERS IN DRY GOODS AND GENERAL
MERCHANDISE,
Fire-proof Store on Fort Street, aboTe Odd Fellows'
tHalL 3My4
Ml CEEGUORIV,
WB6LBSALE AND RETAIL SEALER EN
- "GENERAL MERCHANDISE,
Fire-Proof Store, comer of Queen and Kaahumanu
Streets, Honolulu. Retail establishment on Xnuanu
street. 4-ly4
E- P. ADAXS. I.e. WILSEB.
ADAMS &. WILDER,
AUCTION & COMMISSION MERCHANTS
g Queen Street, Honolulu, IL L lyi
C. S. BARTOW,
AUCTIONEER,
Stleeroom on Qneen Street, one door .from Kaahu
mann Street. U-ly4
JOBS II. PATY,
Notary PubKc end Commissioaer of Seedi
For the State of California. Office at the Bank of
giahop A Co., Kaahunanncreet. Honolnla. 3-ly4
M. A. WIDEMA5H,
NOTARY PUBLI-C,
8 Once at the Interior Department. fly4
A. S. CLECHORN
RESPBCTFCI.I,X ealla Ute atten
tion oT LAMES to
HIS WELL SELBCTEB STOCK OF GOODS
- At 'His RctaU KstabHshimcnt
M On Ksoaas Breet. 3m
HAWAIIAN
VOL. V NO. 2.1
BUSINESS NOTICES.
nixxAx rrcx. h-a-t. caxtix.
C. BREWER & CO.,
SHIPPING AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
nOXOIiTJl.17, II. I.
AGENTS Or tbe Boston and Honolnla
Packet Line.
AGEVTS For the Makre, Wallnkn and
liana Plantations.
AGEVTS For the Pnrxhaie and Sale of
Island Prodnrr.
31. S. GRHV1IA17M c CO.,
IMPORTERS AND "WHOLESALE SEALERS
In Fashionable Clothlnc. Ilt, Caps, Boots. Shoes,
and every Tariety of Gentlemen's superior Furnish
ing Goods. Store in Makee's Block, Qneen Street,
Honolulu. IL I. P0-ly4
J. P. HUGHES,
IMPORTER AND MANUFACTURER
Of all kinds of Saddlery. Carriage trimming done
mth neatness and dispatch. AU orders prompt
ly attended to. Comer of Fort and Hotel
1G' Streets, llonolnln. Py4
F. II. & G. SEGELKES,
TIN, ZINC AND COPPEE SMITHS,
AND SHEET IRON WORSERS,
Nnuann Street, between Merchant & Queen.
nare constantly on hand. Stores, ripe. G al
vunlzed Iron Pine. Plain and Hope Bibbs.
Stop-cocks. India Bubber Hobe best 3-plr.
VSfcln lengtlis of 13 and SO feet, with couplings
and ripe complete. Batb-Tubs. and also a t
Particular attention giren to Ship-Wo k- Orders
front th it!iT Talamlsi wrlll rarfu.lv attended to.
Tbankfal to tbe Citizens of Honolulu and the
Islands generally for their liberal patronage in the
post, we hope bj strict attention to business to merit
tbe same for tbe future. 37-lr
J. II. THOMP.SO."V,
GENERAL BLACKSMITH,
Qneen Street, Honolnla,
Ills constantly on hand and for sale at the Loir est
Market Prices, a good assortmentnf the Best Kenned
Bar Iron, and the Beet Blacksmith's Coal. S8-ly
R. RYCROFT,
HOUSE AND SHIT PLUMBER,
Bong St, two doors west of Cutlo & Cooke's.
Has on hand, Batb-Tubs, TV ate r-floaets, Wash-Easing
Force and Lift Pumps, Lead and Galranized
Iron Pipes, and Plumber's Brass-work. Being the
only Plumber in tbe city, he will ca rente all orders en
trusted to him in a workmanlike manner. 3S-3m
JX0. S0TT. SAM'L SOTT.
join oTX &. co.,
COPPER AND TIN SMITHS,
Kaahumanu St, one door above Flitner's,
Beg leave to inform the public that they are pre
pared to furnish all kind of Copper Work, snch as
Stills, Strike Pans, Sorghum Pans, lVornm. Pumps,
tc Also on hand, a full assortment of Tin Ware,
which we offer for sale at the Lowest Marktt Prices.
All kinds of Repairing done with Neatness and
Dispstch. Orders from tbe other Islands will meet
with prompt attention. 3$-Sm
JA3IES E. LEWIS,
COOPER AND GATJGER,
At the Old Stand, comer King- & Bethel Sts.
A Large Stock of Oil Shooks and all kinds or Coop
ering Materials constantly on hand. He hopes by
attention to business to merit a continuance of the
patronage which he hm heretofore enjoyed, and fur
which he now returns his thanks. 3S-3m
MK. JT. COSTA,
JEWELER AIH) ENGBA.VEE,
Fort Street opposite Odd Fellows' Hall,
Is prepared toexecnte with promptness, all work in
his line of business ac0 Watch and Clock repair
ing. Manufacturing Jew rlry and Kngraving. S8-3m
GEOR WILLLUIS,
LICENSED SHIPPING AGENT,
Office on Janes Sob ins on & Co's Wharf,
Continues the business on hi old clan of settling
with officers and seamen immediately on their ship- !
ping at his ofUc. Having do direct or Indirect con- I
nection with any outfitting establishment, and allow-
lug no debts to be collected in his office, he hopes to 1
give a. good satisfaction in the future as he has in '
the past. 3S-3m
G. W. NORTON & CO.,
COOPEES AND GAUGEES,
At the lTew Stand on the Esplanade.
TTe are prepared to attend to all work in our line
at the Shop next to the Custom House, where we can
be found at all working hours. We have on hand
and fur sale. Oil Casks and Barrels of different sizes,
new and old, which we will sell at the very Lowest
Market Rates. All work done in a thorough manner
and warranted to give satisfaction. All kinds of
Coupering Materials aud Tools fur sale. SS-Sm
PIANOS TUNED,
PIANOS and other Musical
RIowtrnments Tuned and Repaired, br
nuiiAniAU uiatiii, at tne uawailaQ
Theatre.
Lcsaoni given on the Piano & Guitar.
The best of references given. 5l-ly4
VOLCANO HOUSE,
CEATEE OF ZLLAUEA. HAWAII.
V THIS ESTABLISHMENT IS Ss
3 new open for the reception of Tisitors to Zxf
volcano llonse. who mar relr on finding com.
furtable rooms, a good table, and prompt attendance.
Experienced grades fjrthe Crater alwajson hand.
STEAM AND SULPHUR BATHS !
Horses Grained and Stabled If Desired.
CHARGES REASONABLE.
Parties risitinc the Tolcano Tia Hila. can nrnrnm
animals warranted to make the journey, by D. 11.
AT THE PHOTOGEAPH GALLEEY
On Fort Street,
MAT BE SEEK THE VIE1VS taken
of the Late
Lara I'loiv at Kahtaku,
And tbe Effects of the Late
Earthquake at "IVnloUlnu, Kan.
. Tieva of EUacea and other nlaces. Also Cards
of the Kinza, Uneens. Chiefs, etc., all for sale at low
prices. Also, Oral and Square frames of all sires,
which will be sold cheap.
II. L. CHASE.
NOTICE.
jKESSES. DICKSON & SMITH,
House, Sign & Ship Painters,
King Street, near Snnann,
HAYCiG FORMED A CO-PAKT-
ncrshin for earrrine on the Paintine
Busueas, respeetTnllr solicit tbe public pat
rootge. They will endearor, by strict and
pnnetnal attention to business, to merit the
"esteem and confidence of their friends and the
public.
Graining, Harblis;, Gilding, Calsomising,
Ptper-Uanrinr. ic Ac. exeented on the
shortest notice and on the most reasonable
terms. il-3m
For Sale Cheap!
A NEW BOILER
OF lO-HOKSE POWER WITH
complete fixinrj. warranted neir and
with. all the latest iBicrOTemests.'to be had at
ft low figure at,,
3S-3m Ed. HOFFSCHLAEGEB & CO.
HONOLULU,
FOREIGN NOTICES.
H. If. KTXX15CX. C E. CUXX.
SEVERANCE, CLAEK & CO.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
AND SHIPPING AGESTS,
405 Front Et, comer of Clay, San Tranclsco.
Wo wfll attend to the tale of Snzar and all kinds
of Island Produce, alo to the purchasing and for
ward. rip or Jierchasdue. Ca&n JldTancei mane on
ConsigTimenU. 3$-Cm
J0H3T M'CRAII.f ,
Portland.
J. CXCTSXLL,
a. r. ul
M'CRAKEN, MERRILL & CO.,
FORWARDING AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
Portland, Oregon.
Having leen engaged in onr present boiineea for
upwards of twelve years, and being located in a Fire-
proui uncs. imiiuing. we are prepara 10 receive ana
dimre if Island Staples, mcb as ucar. SrroDa. Rice.
Poio, CoCee, etc, to advantage. Consignments es
pecially solicit e ror me uregon Market, in wntcn
penonal attention will he paid, and upon which cash
advances wui oe maae wnen requtrea.
air raisers
Charles Brroks San Francisco
J C Merrill a Co "
Fredlken
Badger a Lindenl-erger "
James Patrick a Co
Wm T Coleman i Co "
Stevens, Baker t Co "
Allen a Lewis Portland
LaddaTilton "
Leonard Green " l-lv4
E. M- VAIV REED,
COMMISSION MERCHANT.
'
Kanagawa, Japan,
Having the best facilities through an intimate con
nection with the Japanese trade far the past eight
years, is prepami to transact any business entrusted
10 ms care. tin aispatcn. li-iy
H. S. WILLIAMS, IL. r. BLAJfCHAtD, C- B. M0KGA5.
WILLIAMS. BLANCHAED & CO
SHIPPING & COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
31 305 Front Street, San Francisco. Cm
LANGLEY, CBOWELL & CO.,
WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS,
32 Cor. Battery & Clay S ts, San Francisco. (6m
mSUItATCCE NOTICES.
SAX FltACISCO
BOAED OF TJHDEEWEITERS.
TUB UNDERSIGNED haTlng been
appointed Agents fur the San Francisco Board
ol underwriters, comprising me
California Insurance Company,
Slrrchanta Ilntual Marine In. Co.,
Pacific Insurance Company,
California Lloyd, and
Home Mutual Insurance Company.
Beg leave to inform Masters of Vessels and th Pub
lic generally, that all Texscls and Cargoes, insured
by either of tbe above Companies against perils of
ine seas ana oiner riSKs, at or near tne sanawicu
Islands, will have to be verified by them.
3Mo H. HACKFELD t CO.
CALIFORNIA
INSUBANCE COMPANY.
fflllB UNDERSIGNED, AGENTS of
JL tbe above Company, bte been authnrized to
Insure risks on Cargo, Freight and Treas
ure, by Coasters, from Honolulu to all ports of
mf Hawaiian uroup, ana vice versa.
8-ly4 II. HACKFELD k CO.
MERCHANTS' MUTUAL
MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY
Or San Francisco.
THE UNDERSIGNED having been
appointed Agents for the above Company .are
prepared io issue roucieson v. argot a, .freignts
and Treasure.
TTALKEK 4 ALLEN,
3S-3m Agents, Honolnla.
lalRURGII-IIRElHEN
EIRE INSURANCE COMPANY.
THE UNDERSIGNED having been
appointed Agents of the abot Company, are
ippolnted Agents of the abot Company, are
ed to insure risks against Fire, on Stone and
prepari
trick ButlUlncs, and on Merchandise
stored therein, 011 the most favorable terms. For
particulars apply at tbe office of
S-ly4 F. A. SCHAEFER k CCL
Insurance Notice.
THE AGENT FOR THE BRITISH
Foreiirn Marine Insurance Comnanr. fLimit-
ed), has receired instrnctions to reduce tbe rates of
Insurance between Uonolnlu and Ports In the Pacific,
and Is now prepared to issue Policies "at the Lowest
Rattt, with .special reduction on Freight per Steam
ers. TIIEO. IL DAY1F3,
43-tf Jgmt Brit Far. Mar. Int. Co. (Limited.
SUGAR & MOLASSES.
I860
1869
IIII0, II. I.
Susmr and Hlolasses.
CROP COMLKO IN AND FOR SALE IN
quantities to suit purchasers, br
WALKER ALLEN,
3S-3m Agents.
ONOMEA PLANTATION.
Sngfar anil TIoIuhscs Crop 1S69
COMING IN, FOR BALE IN QUANTI
ties to suit purchasers, by
WALKER 4 ALLEN,
38-3m Agents.
PBIHCEVIXLE PLANTATIOH.
Sogar and lolasses Crop 1869
COMING IN, FOR SALE IN QUANTI
ties to suit purchasers, by
WALKER i, ALLEN.
3S-3m Agebts.
WATLTTKU PLANTATION.
-VTEW CROP NOW COMING EN. FOR
4 Sale in quantities to suit purchasers,
by 0. BREWER A CO.,
3S-3m Agents.
MAKEE PLANTATION.
TScyr Crop of Sugar c iolac
-VTQW COMING IN, AND FOR SALE IN
JLN quantities to suit purchasers by
0. BREWER A CO.,
3S-3m Agents.
FOR SALE!
RUINART, pere & tils Champagne,
Carte Blanche, in pints and quarts.
For Sale by t '
Hi HACKFELD A CO., ,4
Agents for Messrs. j " ,
3S-3m Ruin art, pere A.fils.Rheia'i,
WEDNESDAY, JANDA
A Toyago to the FJJilK.
SUMBEK rOCE.
Written for th. Gasette.
Some may very naturally ask and soaje
have already asked; the writer of these
sketches " Was it not rather impradent
to co so far into the interior of n confess
edly savage and cannibal country, as was
your river voyage of fifteen or sixteen
miles, and your subsequent sojourn and in
termixing among the people for daya!"
No; and for one very good reason, which
I will tell just here. ' There had been mis
sionaries at Rewa, some years previous to
the time of my visit, and onr captain knew
that wherever thete were missionaries re
ceived among, and who had acquired an
influence upon, a savage and uncivilized
people; he could venture without fear of
molestation. This has since been my own
experience among the many islands of the
Pacific which I have visited. Wherever
there were missionaries, one could safely
land. Tbe pioneer missionaries at the
Fijiis, belonged to the English Wesleyan
Society. They had several stations in dif
ferent parts of the group, nd were, appar
ently, a hard-working and sincere set of
men, though their efforts did not meet
with much real successs, at that time.
Since, however, and at tie present time.
I am informed that the principal chief of
the Islands has nominally become a con
vert, and a3 a consequence, tbe islanders
may be said to be Christianized. The
Rev. Mr. Jagger and wifs were the resi
dent missionaries at Rewa. They did not
live in the town, but had a neat and com
modious straw-thatched cottage on the
side of the river just opposite the King's
bouse, hidden amidst bread-fruit trees,
bananas, sugar-caDe, and all the nameless
varieties of tropical vegetation.
After Charley and I had left Phillips to
his potations be had somehow obtained
a bottle of New England rum from our
vessel Charley suggested that we should
make a call on the "Parson." This I glad
ly acceeded to, and we were paddled across
the river in one of the many canoes lying
in front of Phillips' house. We were po
litely received by the Missionary, whom I
found to be of the usual Methodist type
modest and unassuming, but evidently very
earnest in his mission. I mnst give Char
ley credit rough 'beach-comber" a3 he
was to say that he took off his hat and
bowed bis head respectfully as he entered
the ' Parson's" house. The missionary's
wife did not make her appearance during
our visit, being unwell from a fever that
sometimes attacks foreigners living on the
low, water-pervaded grounds of Rewa, but
which never, so far as I could learn, bad
proved fatal. Mr. Jagger had several na
tives sitting on the mats in the verandah.
who, on inquiry, I found were some of bis
pupils, each intently studying a little book
Catechism, a translation into Fijiian
of the "General Assembly" Catechism,
under which I had been brought up in my
New England home. Mr. J. "presented me
with a copy, and verbally translated to me
several of the first questions and answers,
giving me an insight into the construction
of the language, which was of much nse
to me afterwards in acquiring a considera
ble degree of skill in speaking and writing
it. I asked, what success he met with in
teaching and civilizing these people ? His
countenance fell fur a moment, as he re
plied ' but little," and then lighted up
again, as he added, "yet I have great hopes.
The time is coming, sure. During scenes
of war, carnage, and terrible cannibalism
all around us, we have been wonderfully
preserved from harm. The King and the
Chiefs have somehow given us their pro
tection, and no one dares to molest us or
make us afraid."
This man, so meek and modest, and yet
so confident of the ultimate triumph of
tbe canse to which he had devoted his life,
and for which he had exiled himself aud
his companion from the comforts of a civ
ilized home to spend his days among sav
age cannibals, made an impression on my
then youthful mind, that can never be ef
faced.
The missionaries, as I have observed, had
reduced the language to writing, and had
a printing press, and among the runaway
sailors had picked up a printer, whom they
kept at work whenever they could. I say,
whenever they could, for be was a wild,
erratic fellow, as a great many printers
unfortunately are, and whenever a ves
sel arrived at the islands, the printer
would immediately drop bis work and start
off for the shipno matter how many long
miles she was away to get rum. While
we were laying at Rewa, be left bis print
ing at Mbiwa, in an open whaleboat, and
rowed about one hundred and fifty miles, to
see if we had any. of the ardent. We
did for Salem merchants in those days,
always sent a little "venture" of that kind
on whatever voyage the vessel might be
bound and "typo" returned rejoiciag.with
a tea-gallon keg of "Deacon Giles'" best
New England ram, worth about eighteen
cents a gallon say S1.S0 for which he
gave a "head" of tortoise shell, worth in
Manila, abort ten dollars.
After leaving the missionary's hoase, we
returaed across-the river to Thau ftark-
nttia,7 (tfie'" breaJj-trait eater) or Phillips,
GAZETTEi
RY 27, 1869.
whom we found just preparing for a mid
, day meal. In this, we joined him, and
made a hearty dinner on baked taro, fish
' ducks, paroquetes a new dish to me, but
very fine eating and green turtle, all serv-
; ed screeching hot, as an Irishman would
say. The Fijiians believe in having all
food hot, except baked missionary, which
1 as Sydney Smith says, they prefer cold
' The only instance, however, in which
1 missionary had been killed at those islands,
I so far as I have ever heard, was quitp re
cently, an account of which was published
in the Honolulu papers. It was the result
of an imprudent attempt by a missionary
to penetrate into the mountain regions of
Yiti Levn, the elevated plateau of which
something like that of Hawaii, between
Mauna Keaand Manna Loa. but fertile and
well watered is inhabited by a wild and
extremely savage tribe, who never have
been conquered by the chiefs of the lower
lands, and who have no communication
with the people of the lower coa3t. Id
fact, the latter denominate the mountain
eers as savages, par excellence.
During the first day ashore in Rewa, I
. had not seen our captain, who had, how
ever, been busily in consultation with some
of the chiefs, about a suitable place to es
tablish a biche-te-mer station. All agreed
that the best ground where the so-called
"fish" could be found in most abundance,
was on. the coat of Vanna Levn, the sec
ond large island of the group, and lying to
the westward of Titi Levu. So in the
afternoon we got into our boat again, and
bidding good-bye to the people of Rewa
who crowded to the bank and almost
swamped our boat with gifts of fruits and
vegetables we proceeded down the river,
reaching the brig at sunset. Next day we
weighed anchor early in the morning, and
sailing out through the reef lined on each
side with foaming, thundering breaker;
bore away for Mbau, the residence of the
most warlike and powerful of the Fijii
chiefs, "Old Snuff," as he was familiarly
called by the foreigners. Hi3 native name
I have forgotten. After a night nt sea.
we anchored two miles off tbe little island
on which is situated tbe town of Mbau,
the inhabitants of which exercised so com
manding an influence all over the group,
and who have since reduced all the islands
to their sovereignty except the moun
taineers previously .mentioned. Proceed
ing on shore it was again my good for
tune to be one of the captain's boat's crew
we landed at a wharf, neatly built of
stones, where lay a number of canoes, both
single and double, some of the latter being
as large as one hundred feet in length and
six feet in depth, capable of carrying
three hundred men. On landing, a mes
senger met us from the king's eldest son,
who stated that his father was absent at
Ovalau, which was the island where most
of the foreigners lived. During the old
king's absence, tbe prince (and recognized
beir to tbe kingship) exercised the powers
and duties of regent. So we proceeded
'to his house, tbe usual great, barn-like
structure of a chief, situated near the cen
tre of the town. The only marked differ
ence between the appearance of Mbau and
that of Rewa, was the absence of trees.
The place wa3 little more than an eleva
tion of the surrounding coral reef, on
which sand had accumulated, and abont
the only vegetation to be seen, was here
and there a cocoanut or pandanus tree.
But the people of the place lacked for
nothing. Canoes were constantly arriving
from tbe different islands subject to the
king of Mbau, bringing the abundance of
the land to feed tbe haughty and fierce
cooquerors.
We found Thakomban (literally, "the
Lord of Mbau") seated in naked majesty,
cross-legged, and surrounded by his attend
ants, male and female. A yellow com
plexioned and pleasing featured young wo
man, a native of Tongatabu known on
the charts as the Friendly Islands was
busily plying the fan. This was his favor
ite wife. The prince received ns with
easy dignity, and after we were seated,
food was placed before us, which it would
seem is always kept hot in a Fijii house.
First, however, tbe usual angona (awa)
was provided, but declined by us, where
upon the prince drank a cup-full, amid the
clapping of bands and singing of the re
tainers. The remainder of the contents of
the tanoa, or wooden bowl, were then
poured oat npon tbe ground, for by Fijii
etiquette, no one can drink after a chief.
Our breakfast over, tho captain opened
his business, by first presenting a large
whale's tooth. Whales' teeth, next to
muskets and ammunition, arc the highest
prized articles of trade in tbe islands.
This was received with a great deal of cer
emony, the clapping of hands being, led
by the prince himself, asd expressive of
his satisfaction. The retainers all followed
suit, clapping loadly in concord, and wind
ing op with a long, combined shout of
"Ndoa, Wohi" Tbe object of the cap
tain's call ob Tbakoffibau, was to procure
a chief to accompany og to tbe coast of
Vanna Levn, to remain on board as a host
age, while the trading party shoald remain
on shore that island being in subjection
to Mbau. This was. readily granted a
eefl jaf.Tbftkoai baa's, the brother of tbe
chief, ef '&berabe,,ofi ike Yaaas Leva
S6.00 PER YEAR.
coast was designated, aad accompanied as
on board. Should the people on shore
oner any violence to tbe traders attached
to, or belonging to the foreign vessel then
they expected that vengeance would be
wreaked upon the hostage. I bis was to
be our safeguard. So we sailed for tbe
bshinr cronnds. to touch at Libouka. on
the island of Ovalaa. on our way, to pro
cure laborers for the seek ndree, the catch
ing of biche-Ie-mer.
To tt continued )
Tbe Territory of the IladnoH
Hay Co 111 pa 11 3" aad the IVorlh.
West PassaRe.
From la Kerne des Deux Mondea.
The two parties shook hands in the most
cordial manner, then sat on the ground, in
a large circle, and proceeded to puff clouds
of the odoriferous weed. The pipes hav
ing been three times filled and smoked
the Indian Cree Chief rose up, and deliv
ered, with grace and easy elegance of man
ner, the following speech, which was trans
lated by La Ronde :
I and my companions have had our
minds troubled by things that were told
us by chiefs of the Hudson Company.
iney sam mat wnite men would soon
visit our country, and that we must be on
the alert. Now, I ask yon, Why have you
come hither? In your own land von are.
I know, great and powerful Chiefs, and
that yon have there plenty of blankets,
tea, salt, tobacco and rum. You have,
likewise, fine guns, shot and powder; but
there is one thing yon have not : yon are
deprived of bisons, and yon come here to
find them. I am, like you, a great Chief,
bnt the Great Spirit has not given' ns
equal shares. To you ho gave varied and
many presents, to me he gave tfio bisons.
by do you come to destroy the only
good thing I possess, in order to find some
sporting amusement! Nevertheless, as I
am certain that you are great, generous,
and good, I give you permission to go
wherever you like on my lands, and to
hunt, whenever yon please. When you
come to my camp, you will be welcomed
and well received."
The Chief's speech tonched upon some
delicate questions about which the future
member of Parliament deemed it prudent
not to enter into controversy. He merely
paid a flattering compliment to the Chief,
and snbstantiated his praises by a liberal
gift of knives and other presents, but he
failed to please the Indian, whose dis
course, freely translated, meant: "Give
me some rum.' The Indians gave way
to their disappointment by proclaiming
all over tbe prairie that Lord Milton was
a man of low birth, and without education
or manners.
It was now high time for our adventur
ers to return to Fort Carleton, as a fight
was becoming imminent; tbe season was
also cdvanced, and they had not yet pre
pared their winter quarters. They accord
ingly returned to the Fort, and thence
immediately proceeded towards tbe north
west, to the shores of the White Fish
Lake, in a country called by the half-castes,
' La Relle Prairie."
So far, everything had gone on success
fully, and the time they spent in their
winter quarters was not very hard. The
place was well selected. It looked almost
like some English park which had been
planned in imitation of nature itself.
Northward, was the boundless forest, in
habited by animals robed in the most pre
cious and costly furs; southward, at a
distance of two or three days' journey, the
vast and luxuriantly dad-prairies, fre
quented by numerous herds of buffaloes;
at the bottom of tbe valley, a clear, deep
lake, fall of silvery-scaled fishes ; and all
around them, a country covered with
shrubs and brushwood, favorable for small
game. In case of urgent necessity, tbey
were not too far from Fort Carleton. It
is only true to say that more than once
the centigrade thermometer marked 40
degrees below zero, but they were pro
tected from the fierce cold winds by the
log house constructed under La Ronde's
directions. Moreover, their neighbors were
not troublesome, for the Crees of the forest
lead a kind of sedentary and quiet life
with their families, and are' much more
peaceable than the Crees of tbe prairie,
who are always on horseback, bnffalo-
hunting, and whose warlike dispositions
are developed by those manly sports. The
Crees of tbe forest ears their living by
trading with the Company, to whom they
sell valuable furs in exchange for blankets,
fire-arms and provisions. The conditioa
of these poor people woald not be ro very
miserable if it were not for the climate,
and if tbe characteristic feature of a heat
er's life was not to pass, witbost transi
tion, from extreme abas deuce to extreme
famine. Bataltbosgh Lord Milton and
Dr. Cheadte do not lilu to eosfeea k, it is
very evident that nothing in the world
could have indseed them to spend another
winter in tbe territory of the Hashes
Bay Company. The bitterBesa of the
cold is ealy garpMCod by the Of
tbetr 80-Mtede ; aad Br, Cfcoadto, after two
days of eaap J.&, oaa Mi bear tee mUnoe
of the forest, wUle Xetd MHemr brief
ber recovered fomtm Brjaygiae e
tUtt t. J WB.1 tfc- fkSSsA,- - -I - - U
aAS AS AJSJLSSn . AjSmj nsrw snsTr'VVsJrsnssTVfATrB aTBr''l'fMK 4CTS7
litasBAa U s-us asTafssUMBV sMSasal MsasisaisfcsdAsW
JMUWUVl TT9 VrTsn aPb9b)scbb7 sDs WsM "'sT sTsaTsr.tyil
' 1!
BOOK AND JOB
raKVSAnrri" omcat
I now prepared to exeevta all onbrs for
wit in aiaflv tmwmtwif'im-
FI SH 111 HE rillllssV
isau mb 1 jura 1 xmaminm. m
er r.TMiT WB'Sstmo.
WITK WBATXjWMI A1TD BIjjTATCX
some Mow meatai'wu To tlwtf
of sotitwre, hi so aM aMtto at sate
or compWat: Ae rSJ howe being so nar
row, that ia a sw thsys, soilw tsVratsjd
by ihe refaee ef tAeir mesis. 'Swt
tbe. life they were nbWijsa t&letsi, aad
their only asirciy wm to eJevi the 1
hv which ther mwat oocopo death
starvation.
Large game, at tint aeoson of the year,
..
is very scarce. jo jwruaissu, . r
half-caste, ever takes the large deer of
Canada byserprise. He eaa be chastd
with dogs only la the spring, when lee
night frost, sacceedfcjt; the warn day,
hardens tho snow iato a this, kf eras,
which breaks awkr his weigirt, aatl i
which he remains eataagM s igV .
Ice and snow also svfferd thriajslf
ing mantle to the ashes, while the eaiar
ducks and Other fowls will not retwn.be-.
fore the spring. They seat to Fort Carte-
ton, and even to Fort Garry, far pro
visions, and went huatlag the bafaloee,
with the temperature at 40 degrees below
zero, with a result, however, unequal to
their efforts. The means of conveyance.
are wanting. The snow, reduced to a mi
nute dust by the cold, covers the groaei
to the depth of several feet, and carnages
and horses are perfectly Melees. Thay
resort at last to sleds drawn by dogs, bat
the condition of the nnfortunate Miniate
is lamentable. They are the first to feel
tho tortures of hunger; if they are not
fed, they are not able to pull, aad if they
are, they soon consume all the provisions
tbey have been able to carry. Bat this is
not the only difficulty to beovercomo:
tbe way must be prepared for the sleds by
treading down the snow. Yon have also
to push vigorously up the steep hills, and
to check the sled, when on a descent, by
dragging yoar legs in the snow, aad yoa.
have also to pick up the provisions when
your sled has been overtarned. Whea
you return from a successful expedition,
you have about as much food as when yoa
started : what would it have been if yoa
had not met any garnet
Here we must remark that plenty of
money, and what money can buy, has fol
lowed our Intrepid travelers in the soli
tudes of America.".. They lead an Indian,
savage lire in the same style as the owners
of proud castles fancy that they live a
country life. They have plenty of blankets
and provisions ; tbey have men to shoot
for them, and women to mend their
clothes. As far as tbe resources of the
country permit, they hire dogs and sleds,
and surmount, thereby, the greatest diffi
culty in a solitude the difficulty of con
veyance. We must, therefore, jndge by
what tbey suffered, despite all the means
at their disposal, of what the poor Inhab
itants of those countries must suffer.
It is very gratifying to read in their
book, written without any philosophical
pretensions,' a favorable account of the
character and manners of those miserable
Indians, who have fled before the progress
of Civilization. Lord Milton and Dr.
Cbeadle have remarked that In the dread
ful time of famine, the men were thinner
and more attenuated than tbe women and
children, because tbe last pieces of food
were given to tbe latter. In the most
bitter cold, tbey have seen children strip
off their blanket to add it to that of their
sleeping father, and resist sleep and fa
tigue, that the fire should not go ont.
Never does a trapper visit the snares
which be has not laid : never does a hunter
take the game which another has wounded.
During the six months that they spent In
the log boose, with no other protection
ban public faith, no theft was committed.
They relate tbe instance of an Indian
stopping In the house daring their absence ;
a piece of meat was on the table, and tho
Indian had not eaten for three days, yet
he did not toach It. The Indians, it ap
pears entertain a kind of scornful opinion
of the Europeans, wfao, with legs of the
same length m their own, make strides by
009 third shorter, and who, instead of go
ing In a straight line In the dark, turf'
round, because tbey Incline a little to the
left.
Tho Indian does sot get Intoxicated on
account of an excessive lore of fiooor, but
to obtain a momentary fofgctWaeas of
his misery. The taste or qaatitf of the
drink Is of no coasequence wlktf MaThe
only wants it to eoetais tuu'sajw at atoo
hol to make it bars, like reach, and they
call it, fer thte reason, water of Sre. It is
difficult to indorse Dr. CTsaaVa fhix,
when fe eeeecee as teeA tae iaoBeia ae
their powers ef eadaraaee aatl pstiiais aa
the fact that white info, tW art Ma
by their mothers, day after day, t aspsaawl
to a tree is a kind of eraaV Bsaste af
branches aad meea. We are aio Isahaii
to believe that daring; their wittier aaasoa
in the Belle Prune. Lord Milton aadDr.
Cfeeadie mi sot eoae m contact with raat
savages; bat wtta ibomm lasjsm w aae -Hadee
Bay Cospaoy, taaail aad txaaa-
forawd by a perMTerioff WWtU' Otoe, lk
haaMfH that Dr. aiiiWiail yMr
wrta aH IodaM wfco cnHajaaf Ma aajaaae
haeewad him fawa,aai ihialaaiii to MB -Mai
with Ma katfe. bat who rslaaaed him.
gsr. " If 1 we a Ore af te prekiI
wtmm IMre mtTM yoa.- r learaaawwea
lis Bwetor, "h. ym ar Cfrtatst a
whiea was mi a'lal to tartar.
Taw Kve at ite'tatritoiy of tsts Uosaaij,
aatl oa stoatr last, m aa aaawiaiwaw
-Hii'r'""ii'T

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