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The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, February 03, 1869, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1869-02-03/ed-1/seq-1/

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PUBLISHED
Every Wednesday JCorning,
AT S8.00 PER ANXCjr.
Hailed to Foreign Snbaeribra at S?-"".
Office On Merchant street, west o
he Post Office, Honolulu, H. L
Printed MdwiMtohed by J. Mot? Smth. at the
Government Printinj- OOee. to wnom all bnslnws
commnnlcatlons must be aaarewed.
BUSINESS NOTICES.
JOICV T- AV ATKKIIOTJ.se.
IMPORTER AND DEALER IK CKHEEAL
MERCHANDISE,
2 Qcren Street, Honolnln, TL L lr
J. G. IICKSO?f,
Importer, Wholesale and Hetall Dealer
In tanbrr and Bundint: Materials. Tort. Klnej and
Jlerchaut Streets, Honolnln, II. L lj4
W. X. CREES,
GENERAL C0JOIISSI0N AGENT &BBOKER
Office in Fire-proof Headings on Queen Street,
SS Honolaln. II. X Qjj
C. . SPZSCin. H, KiCFAltLiXE.
CIIXS. . SPEXCEB & CO.,
GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
31) Queen Street. Honolaln. II. I. jlrt
HcCOLC;UC fc JOIEVSOIV,
MERCHANT TAILORS,
10 Fort it., Honolulu, opposite T. a Head's. Iy4
C. E. WILX.IAMS,
MANUFACTURER, IMPORTER & DEA1EE
In Pornltnr. of every description. Furniture Ware
Jloom on Vort Elreet, opposite Chae' Photograph
Gallery. Workshop at the old stand on Hotel
Street, near Fort. Orders from the other
all lland promptly attended to. lyS
IV. BEVXETT,
BOOT AND SHOE MAKER,
41 King Street, next to the Bethel. Honolulu, flyi
31. T. DOiAEUi.
CABINET mattfe AND UPHOLSTERER,
.King Street, Honolnln, opposite Levis' Cooper Shop.
41 Wm buy and s.11 second-hand Furniture. lyS
JOH J TTSBETS. THOS. SOBZSSOX.
TIBIiETti &. SOKESSOS,
SHIPCAItPESTEES&CAUIKEaS
At D.roiter&Co's Old Stand,
CTj Near the Uonolula Iran Vorta. lijS
TIIEO. II. DAVXES,
Lin Jmox, Guts k Co.
IMPORTER & COMMISSION MERCHANT,
am Aotar toe
Lloyd's and the Liverpool Underwriters,
British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co.. and
Northern Assurance Oompapj. 5-ly4
HV3IAA UKOTI1EKS,
IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS
In Fashionable Clothing, Hats. Caps, Boots, Shoes,
.nit evprr T&rlrtv of f?entlimen'a Fnrnlsbine Goods.
Snow's Building, jlerchant Street, Honolulu. 50-lyi
J. 8. WAX.XEB. I. C. ALLEX.
WALKER fc AEEi:,
SHIPPING & COMMISSION MEECHANTS,
19 Queen Street, .Honolnln. II. I. t'y4
W. E. TORBERT.
DEALEB IN LUMBER AND EVERY SXND
OF BUILDING MATERIAL.
IS Ornci Corner Queen and Fort streets. Iy4
1IOEEES Sc CO.,
SHIP CHANDLERS AND COMMISSION
MEECHANTS,
Queen Street, Honolulu. Particular attention paid
to the purchase and sale of Hawaiian Produce.
bztiju 2T rauciasio? to
C L Blcharts a Co, III Uackfeld a Co,
C Brewer a Co, C L IUchards a Co,
D 0 Waterman Eeq, Castle a Cooke. 2-lj4
IRA ItlCIIAIEDSOX,
IMPOETEB & DEALEB IN BOOTS, SHOES,
And Gentlemen1. Furnishing Goods, corner of Fort
and Merchant Streets, Honolulu. 9-ly4
EBWIS JOSEH,
GBOCEB, AND SHIP CHA1TDLEE,
Lalialnm, Maut.
Money and Recruits furnished to Ships on the most
10 faTorahle terms. ly4
CUEING MOOS.
Commission Merchant and General Agent,
Importer of "Teas and other Chinese and Foreign
Goods, Wholesale Dealer In Hawaiian Prodnce, and
Agent for the l'ankaa and Amaunlu Sugar Planta
tions. Flre-projtf Store on 2funann Street, below
King. 21-ly4
AFOXG &. ACmjCIt.
Importer!, 'Wholesale, and Retail Doaleri
In General Merchandise and China Goods, in the
Fire-proof Store on Kuuanu Street, tinder the Public
Hall. 43-ly4
GEORGE G. XIOWE,
Dealer in Bedwood and Northwest Lnmber,
Ehlngies, Soon, Sashes. Blinls, Nails, Paints, etc..
G6 at his old stand on tie Esplanade. ly4
F. A. SCIXAEFER fc CO.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Honolaln, Oahu, II. I.
Py
ED. HOFFSCHLAEGER & CO.,
IMPORTERS & COMMISSION MEECHANTS
41 Honolnin, Oahu. IL I. Ijl
XHEODOKE C. IIECJCK,
IMPOETEB & COMMISSION MERCHANT.
1-1 Honolulu, Oahu. II. L fly
IX. IIACUFELI Jc CO.,
GENEEAL COMMISSION AGENTS.
$4 Queen Street, Honolulu, U. I. ly
THE TOM MOORE TAVERN,
BV J. O'.MELL,
COCorner of Klug and Fort Streets. Iy4
CIIAVCEY C. BESSETT,
DEALEB IN NEWSPAPERS, MAGAZINES,
And Periadicala, Fort Street, Honolulu. l-ly4
,
S. T. EHLEBS. A. JAEGEB.
K. F. EIIEERS & CO.,
DEALERS IN DST GOODS AND GENERAL
MERCHANDISE,
Fire-proof Store on Fort Street, aboTe Odd Fellows'
HaU. 37-ly4
A- S. CEEGIIOKA,
WH0LB6ALE AND EETAIL DEALEB IN
GENERAL MERCHANDISE,
Fire-Proof Store, comer of Queen and Kaahumanu
Strseta, Hoaolula. BetailEstabllshtnentonXunanu
Street 4-ly4
z. r. asaxs. 8. e. wilder.
ADAMS Sc W1XDER,
AUCTION ft C0KMI9EI6N MERCHANTS
g Qneen Street, Honolulu, g. I. ly4
C. S. BARTOW,
AUCTIONEER.
Salesroom on Queen Street, one door from Kaahn
xnaou Street. 17-ly
JOHrV IX. PATV,
Notary Public and Comadlsser of Deeds
For tha SUte of California, Ofice at the Bank: of
Bishop a Co, Kaahamaaa Etreet,.Hctnolaln. 2-14
M. A. mBEHANX,
NOTARY PUBLIC.
6) Ofice at the Interior Department, (lyt
J. I. HPUHES,
IXP88TIX ANB MANSTACnTEEE
Of all kinds juf Saddlery. Carrlaga'arhnmlTtg done
with neatana and dispatch, AH ovdars prompt
ly attended to. Corner of Fort aa4 Sotel
V) . . IUa. 14
HAWAIIAN
VOL. V NO! 3.1
.BUSINESS NOTICES.
SBtxaui rice. ' K. A. P. CaKTCX.
C. KRE1VEU & CO.,
SHLPPINO AND
C02OHSSI0N MERCHANTS,
IIOXOI.TJL.17, 11. I.
AGE.VTS Or the CojtonJand Ilonoluln
Packet I.lnc. lt
AGEXT5 For the 3Iake1VUnku and
' liana Plantations. ''
AGCXTS I'or the Parchise and Snle of
Island "PrcKiucc. - My4
M. S. GRIXBAirai fc CO.,
IMPOETESS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS
In Faslnonable Clothing. Hata, Caps, Boots. Shoes,
and erery variety or Gentlemen's superior Furnish
ing Goou. Store In Makee'a Block, Queen Street,
Honolulu, H. I. 10-ly4
E. S. FLIGG,
CIVIL ENGINEER AND SDBVEYOE,
Assuts-rost-OOc. Box No. 22, Honolulu. 28-6m
F. A. SCIIAEFEK,
AGEST tor the UltEMEX BOARD
of rSIIEKHEIIEKS.
Ageat for the Preeden Board of Underwriters,
Agest for the Vienna Board of Underwriters.
7-4 Pr
F. II. & G. SEGELKEA,
TIN. ZINC AND COPPER SMITHS, !
AND SHEET LEON WOBEEBS,
Nnnan: Street, between Merchant & Queen.
Hare constantly on band. Stores, Pipe, Gal
Ifcgv ranlzed Iron Pipe, Plain and Hte Bibbs, '
lnazr Stop-cocks. India Bnbber Hoso best S-ply. !
Kffijhbj lengths of a and SO feet, with couplings
fS and pipe complete. Batb-Tobs, and alsoa
yery larp1 stock of Tinware of erery description.
Fartlnlar attention giren toStiip-Wo-k. Orders
from tlf Xber Islands wilt be earefntly attended to.
ThanUal to the Citizens ofHonolulu and the
Island -enerally for tbtlr liberal patronage in the
past, w, aope by strict attention to bnsineis to merit
the samt fjr the future. . 37-ly5
J. IX. THOMPSON,
GEiVEEAL BLACKSMITH,
Queen Stroet, Honolulu.
Hu estantlr on hint and far wile at the Lowest
Mavrket Price, a cood aMortmeotiftb Bent Refined
Bar Iras and the Best Blaclumith't Coal. 1 j5
VOLCANO HOUSE,
CRATER OF KILATTEA. HAWAII.
1
AT- THIS ESTABLISHMENT IS gQj
reg now open for the reception of visitors to
the Volcano Ilotue, who may rely on finding com
furtable rooms, a good table, and prompt attendance.
Experienced guides fur the Crater al.ayson hand.
STEAM AND S0LPHUB BATHS !
Horses Grained and Stabled if Desired.
CHARGES UEASOXABLE.
rartlef visiting the Volcano rla Hilo, can procure
anlmali warranted to make the journey, by B. H.
IlrrcBCoei, Esq.. 37-ly5
PIANOS TUNED.
m PTATgflg nd other Mnalcal
dHBiv Instruments Tuned and Bepolred, by
JiPfTf CHARLES DEBBT. at the Hawaiian
I'll' 'Theatre.
Treasons given on the Piano & Guitar.
The best of references given., 51-ly4
II. BYCUOFT,
HOUSE AND SHIP" PLUMBEB,
King St, two doors west of Castle & Cooke's.
Hu on hand, Bath-Tubs, VTaier-Closets, Wasb-Ba-sins.
Force and Lift Pumps, Lead and Galvanized
Iron Pipes, and Plumber's Brass-works. Being the
only PI amber In the city, he will execute all orders en
trusted to him in a workmanlike manner. fi-3m.
ISO. XOTT. SAM'L SOU.
JOICV ROTE & CO.,
COPPEE AND TIN SMITHS,
K&ahnnanu St, one door afcove Flitner'a,
Jteg leare to inform the public that they are pre
pared to furalib. all kinds of Copper Work, snch as
tills, Strike Pans, Sorghom Pans. Worms. Pumps,
etc Also on hand, a fall assortment of Tin Ware,
which we offer for sale at the Lowest Mark it Prices.
All kinds of Repairing dona with Xeatnes and
Dispstch, Orders from the other Islands will meet
with prompt attention. l-3m
JAJIES JL. LEWIS,
COOPER AND JGATJGEB,
At the Old Stand, comer King & Bethel Sts.
A Larjre Stock of Oil Shoots and all kinds of Coop
ering Materials constantly on hand. He hopes bj
attention to business to merit a continuance of the
patronage which be has heretofore enjoyed, and for
which he now returns his thanks. l-3ai
MR. J. COSTA,
JEWELER AND ENGRAVES,
Tort Street opposite Odd Fellows Hall,
Is prepared to execute with promptness, all work In
his line jf business, such as Watch and Clock repair
ing, MtnnfactnrinR Jeelry and Engraving. 1-Sm
GEORGE WftlaXVAJIS,
LICENSED SHIPPING AGENT,
Office on James Eobinson & Co'i 'Wharf,
Continues the business on Ms old plan of settling
with officers and seamen immediately on their ship
ping t his office. Having no direct or indirect con
nection vlth any outfitting establishment, and allow
ing no dVbts to be collected In his office, be hopes to
gire sj good satisfaction in the future as he has in
the pat l-3m
g. w urouTorv & coM
COOPERS AND GAUGERS,
At the Kev Stand on the Esplanade.
We are preps red to attend to U work In onr line
at the Shop next to the Custom House, where we can
be found at all working hours. We hare on hand
and frr sale. Oil Casks and Barrels of different sizes,
new and old, which we will sell at the very Lowest
Market Rates. All work done in a thorough manner
and warranted to glre satisfaction. All kinds of
Coopering Materials and Tools for sale, I-3m
AT THE PHOTOGRAPH GALLEBY
On Fort Street,
Tf"AY BE SEE.V THE VIEWS taken
iU of the Late
Lava I'loiv at Kaktikii,
And the Effects of the Late
Earthquake at IValohlnu, Kau.
Views of Kilaaea and other places. Also Cards
of the Kings, Itueens, Chiefs, etc all for aale at low
prices. Also, Oral and Square Frames of all sizes,
which will b. told cheap.
1-Jm II. L. CHASE.
MESSES. SICKS01T & SMITH,
House, Sign & Ship Painters,
King Street, near Xuuanu,
aSM HAVING FORMED A CO-PART-HBQnenbip
for carrying on the Painting
Bonnets, respectfully solicit tha public pat
ronage. They will endeavor, by strict and
punctual attention to business, to merit the
esteem and confidence of their friends and the
public.
Graining, Marbling, Gilding, Cahtomining,
Paper-Hanging, Ac," 4c, executed on the
shortest notice and on the most reasonable
terms. 51-?ra
TO EST KSGLISII BoUed Paint Oil.
JLM
1'or sale by
1-Sm
BOLLES a Ca
BEST FAJUZ.T P6KK,
per IOLAM, In U and i barrels. For sale
hj (l-3m) ' BOLLES 00.
BOXES EASTERN CODFISH,
per KHJtSL ttxuitbj
Mm , V BOIXE? t ca
HONOLULU, WEDNESDAY
EOREIGN NOTICES.
E. W. lITZaMXCX. C. K. CUIS.
SEVERANCE, CLARK & CO.,
COMMISSION MEECHANTS
AND SHIPPING AGENTS,
405 Pront St, corner of Clay, San Francisco.
We will attend.to the sale of Sugar and all kinds
of Island Produce, also to the purchasing and for
warding of Herchandise. Cash Advances mad. on
Consignments. SS-6m
JOES X'CUXXX,
Portland.
LCMimi.
S. F.CaL
M'CRAXEN, MERRILL & CO.,
TOBWABDLNG AND
COMMISSION MEECHANTS,
Portland) Oregon
Htring Leen enpged In our preeent tmsfoesi for
cp ardi of twelve jean, and being located In a Fire
proof Brick Building; we are prepared to receive and
dispose f Island Staples, such as Supar, Sjinps. Bice,
Pulu. Coffee -tc to adrantace. ConsicnmenU e
j pecialtj solicited for the Oregon Market, to hich
I pemonal attention will he paid, and upon which cash
advances will be made when required.
BXTEHxacx
Charlei "W Brpoki Sta Frandico
JO Merrill a Co
Fredlken , "
Badger t Lindenberger
: james rairiCK a uo..
j Wm T Coleman k Co .. "
j Sterent, Baker a Co...
I Allen a Lewlj Portland
1 LaddaTilton "
j Leonard a Green l-ly4
E M. VAIV REED,
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
j Kanngawa. Japanf
narinft the bet facilities through an intimate con
j nectton with the Japanese trade for the ptut eight
I years. Is prepared to transact any holiness ea trusted
I to his care, with dispatch. 17-1 j 4
l 1
o. b. wmuns, n- r. eluchaid, c. b. sirasix.
WILLIAMS. BLANCHAED & CO..
SHIPPDfG & COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
31 305 Front Street, San Francisco. Cm
LANGLEY, CBOWELL & CO.,
WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS,
32 Cor. Battery & Clay Sts, San Francisco. Cm
INSURANCE NOTICES.
SAX FRAIVCISCO
BOARD OF UND2EWEITERS.
TUB UNDERSIGNED having lie en
appointed Agents for the San Franosco Board
of Underwriters, comprising the
California Insurance Company,
3Ierchant' 3IutnaI JUarlnc Ins. Co.,
Pacific Insurance Company,
California JAoytVi, and
Home Mutual Insurance Company
Beg leare to inform Masters of Teasels and tie Pub
lic generally, that all Vessels and Cargoes, (nsnred
by either of the abore Companies against perils of
the seas and other risks, at or near the Sandwich
Islands, will hate to be verified by them.
I-3m II. UACKFELD i CO.
CALIIOKIA
INSURANCE COMPANY,
TUB UNDERSIGNED, AGENTS of
the aboTe Company, hare been antLorized to
Insure risks on Cargo, Freight and Treas
ure, by Coasters, from HonUulu to all ports of
the Hawaiian Group, and tice rersa.
8-lj4 II. 1IACKFZLD t CO.
7IERCHAXTS' SIIITUAIs
MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY
Of San Francisco.
THE UNDERSIGNED hawing been
appointed Agents fur the abOTe Com j any .are
prepared to lsue Policies on Cargoes, Freights
and Treasure
WALKER t ALLEX,
l-Zm Agents. Honolnln,
FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY.
TUB UNDERSIGNED having been
appointed Agents of the abore Company, are
prepared to Insure risks against Fire, on Stone and
ISrlcIc Buildings and on Merchandise
stored therein, ou tiie most favorable terms. For
particulars apply at the office of
5-lj4 F. A. SCHAEFEK k OX
Insurance Uotice.
TUB AGENT FOR TUB BRITISH
Foreign Marine Insurance Company, (Limit
ed), has received instructions to reduce the rates of
Insurance between Honoluluand Ports In the Pacific,
and is now prepared to issue Policies at the Ltnout
Jlates, with a special reduction on Freight per Steam
ers. THEO. II. DATIFS,
43-tf Jgcnt BriL For. Mar. Int. Co. (Limited).
SUGAR. & MOLASSES.
1809
1869
Snprar and 3IoIaties.
CEOP COMING Df AND FOB SALE IN
quantities to suit pnrcbasers, by
WALKER 4 ALLEN,
1-Sm Agents.
ONOMEA PLASTATIOH".
Sugar and Molasses Crop 1S89
COMING IN, FOR SALE IN QUANTI
ties to fait purchasers, by
WALKER A ALLEN,
l-3ra A genu.
PBIKCBVILLE PLAHTATIOff.
S u ST11 r and Molasc Cs-op 1888
COMLNO IN, FOR SALE IN QUANTI
ties to suit purcnasers. by
WALKER 4 ALLEN,
Um Agents.
WAILtnnT PLANTATION.
NEW CROP JfOW COMLNO IN. FOR
Sale in quantities to mil purchasers,
by C. BREWER & CO.,
l-3m Agents.
KAKEE PLANTATION".
IVcw Crop of Sugar Jk M olasses
VTOW COMINS IN, AND FOR BALE IN
L quantities to suit purchasers by
C. BREWER A CO.,
Agents.
CHOICE SUGAE
J7B0M KAALAKA ANB LAIE PLANTA.
Jl! HONS, n!oaiisgiaaBd for sale by
theo:h..davies,
Sl-3snl " . Agent.
(JJMKITS OF .TCKPESTIXP,
1 iWU CO.
FEBRU
A Coy acre to tlfe Yijii.
Written tat th. Gketta.
Among the many very tognlar customs
among these singular peoplj, the strangest
of all that came under nv oh3erration,
was that known in their latuage as rastu
There is no corresponding jord in Eoglisli,
bat I will endeavor to oshun and illus
trate its meaning.
While we were at Mbaa, splendid, large
double canoe, which had jat been Iannch
ed, and at the launching o which a num
ber of slaves had been aacri ced they lit
erally made the ways slippdv with human
gore was lying mooreilnjar the shore.
Her dimensions were almost ark-like.
stood in her hold, and cosU just reach the
gunwale with my hand. Ste had been
three years in building, and skilled car
penters had come all the way from Tonga
to supervise and assist in her construction.
She was justly the pride of 7hakombau.
The day before we left 3(ban, Ehillips, the
brother of the king of Bewa, arrived in a
single canoe, with about thirty of his fol
lowers, and quietly, in a very business-like
manner, proceeded on board the big canoe,
as she laid at anchor, and hoistiig the im
mense three-cornered mat sail, vent back
to Bewa with hi3 prize. One wcnld natu
rally think that this was an act sf war or
piracy, but it was not. Phillips wa3 sim
ply exercising the privileges of rcuu. He
was related, on his mother's side, to the
king of Mbau, and according to Fijii cus
tom, whatever he could find in Mbau that
he took a fancy to, he had a perfect right
to appropriate. It is related of hin, that
oq one previous occasion, when he was ac
tually at war with Mbau, and had teseiged
the town, he got out of powder, and order
ing a truce, sent a message to the ling of
the beleagured place, demanding a keg of
powder, of which he knew the king had a
good supply. So powerful was the influ
ence of the vasu custom, that the powder
was at once sent, and Phillips again open
ed fire upon those who had supplied him
with ammunition. In the case of his
taking the canoe, above mentioned, it was
done in broad day, and in plain sight of
the chiefs and people of Mbau, but no one
interfered, but seemed to take it as a mat
ter-of-course.
After leaving Mbau, we anchored for a
day and a night off the small island of
Mbiwo. lying near the coast of Yiti Leva.
The chief was a grey-bearded old man,
named Misomalua, who was a zealous
and apparently sincere convert to Method
ism. The E3v. Mr. Hunt,-one of the
AVesIeyan missionaries, was stationed here,
and had succeeded in making quite a num
ber of, at least, nominal converts. Here
also, was the printing press, from which
had been issued the catechism, and one of
the Gospels St. John, I think. I spent
the night on shore, and while Capt. Wallis
slept at the missionary's house, I found
supper and a mat with the kind old chief.
After supper, Misomalua called in his re
tainers, and a regular, old-fashioned Meth
odist prayer-meeting ensued. One of the
younger men read a chapter of the New
Testament, then a hymn was sung, to the
tune of "Old Hundred," and the voices were
quite musical and then, ail kneeling, the
venerable chief made a long prayer, which,
although I could not understand, appeared
to be fervent. It sounded strange to me,
to hear these naked and long-bearded sav
ages groaning and amen-ing in the real
Methodist style, with now and then, nn
ejaculation of "Io, Salca" "Yes, Lord!"
It was a novel bcene to me, and in wide
contrast with other scenes that I after
words witnessed among these islands.
The nephew of the old chief was a
young man of about twenty-five years, the
only name for whom, both among the na
tives and foreigners, wa3 "France." It
seems that several years before, a French
trading brig had visited the islands and
been cut oft", and the crew massacred
by the Mbiwa people. The first blow
was struck by the nephew of Misomalua,
and by the orders of the latter. He got
the captain to look shoreward for an ap
proaching boat, and then with one blowijH
a war-club from behind, cleft his skullkln'
two or three minutes the brig was In pos
session of the natives the crew being all
knocked in the head. The brig was then
run ashore and stripped. This circum
stance gave France his name, which, ever
afterwards, stuck to him. When I first
made his acquaintance, he was the mildest-
mannered savage I ever saw, and had so far
become a convert to Methodism, that ho
had parted with all bis wives but one. He
often afterwards told me that he deeply
regretted having killed the captain, but
that he knew no better at the time. It
was strange, that on the very island, the
people of which bad committed such a
sanguinary outrage as that I have mention
ed, the missionaries bad met with the most
success.
Some time after the brig was cut off, a
French mao-of-w&r arrived at the Wands,
and landing at Mbiwa, burnt the town, but
the natives bad Bed to the main land, and
the asiij"-, barHiBg ef the thatched bosses
all th j eattslaetietv thai was obtained.
After the ship of wac bad left, the satirea
nlwMd, aad ia a few weeks bad their
GAZETTE
ART 3, 1869.
town better built, than before. i
France was a oear relative of Thakotn- j
ban, and at the request of Captain Wallis, j
he accompanied us to the Yanua Leva !
coast his influence being great all over i
the group, and a few words from him would j
?nrlnr trin nnnnln tn pmniw in thft fi3hin!T !
for bicheJc-mer.
Weighing anchor from Mbiwit we ar
rived, towards evening, at Libonko, on the
island of Ovalau the principal place of!
residence of the foreigners, there were
about thirty of them, all sailors, who had
mostly run away from ships, or soraenow
floated to these shores. The principal
man among them, and the one that had
most influence with the chiefs and in fact
was n very respectable and steady man
was David Whippy, who, thirty years be
fore, had left a Nantucket whaler, and
making friends with the chief of Liboukn,
had settled there. He had a number of
wives, as a matter of course, and a consid
erable progeny. The rest of the foreign
ers were a harum-scarum, rum-drinking set,
and drinking awa when they could not get
ram. As soon as we dropped anchor, the
white men swarmed on board, with tortoise
sheli and various articles of trade. These
they bartered with the captain for first and
foremost rum, pipes, cloth, powder and
shot, pig-lead, axes, knives, red ochre, scis
sors, small looking-glasses, etc. Some of
them imbibed considerably while on board.
One fellow, who had procured a box of
Hunt's axes, was standing in the bow of a
boat, while another passed the box to him
over the vessel's side. The combined
weight of the box and the New England
mm, was too much for him, and npset his
equipoise. Overboard he went, still hold
ing on to the box, but shortly afterwards
reappeared, minus the box, of course, but
still holding between bis teeth his pipe,
and scrambled into the boat, somewhat
sobered by his voluntary bath. The hand
lead was immediately thrown over, with a
buoy to mark the spot where the axes
went over. The water was twenty-two
fathoms 132 feet in depth, and the Fijii
men, though good divers, could not reach
bottom. A native of the Caroline Islands,
who had somehow drifted to Libouka, was
sent for, and after two attempts, succeeded
in the third, and fastening a rope around
the box, it was recovered. Before diving,
the man stipulated for his compensation,
which was to be as much rum as he could
drink! After returning on board, the
captain gave him a bottte of the coveteil
ardent, when ho immediately sat down on
deck, and in abont half an hoar had finish
ed the whole and fallen over dead drunk.
Procuring a foreigner at Libouka for a
pilot one familiar with the many reefs and
sand-bars which abound among the islands
and several othera to act as interpreters
and trading masters, we sailed from Libou
ka, and in one day's sailing arrived off a
small island near the coast of Vanua Leva,
called Tavea, where we established our
first bicJie-U-mer house. This was a long,
roughly-thatched house, on one side of
which a trench was dug the entire length,
for the purposo of building a fire to euro
the fish. Over the trench were two shelves
constructed of reed3 laid upon cocoanut
logs'. One was four or five feet above the
other, and, spread over them, the fish under
went the process of drying, a constant fire
being kept up in the trench, night and day,
while the doors were kept closed. But
first, the fish were boiled in large iron pots,
resembling sugar pots in shape, and then
the entrails removed by running a stick
through them, after which, they were taken
in baskets to the biche-lt-mer house and
spread on the "batters," as the shelves
were called. H generally required-three
days to perfect the drying and smoking
process, nt which time the fish were ready
to be bagged and taken on board.
The fishing was done entirely by the
natives, at low tide, when the water on the
reefs was about two feet deep, and one
could wade for miles in every direction.
The canoes frequently returned laden to
the gunwale with the queer-looking slugs
abounding most at the full of the moon
and then ensued a lively scene of traffic
The natives, tn their way, were keen on a
trade, and would sometimes stand and hag
gle about the price of the basket or bar
rel full of fish, before they would accept
the cloth or other article offered by the
trading master. This person, with his
chest of trade, was seated on an elevated
platform, out of reach for these people,
like most of the Pacific Islanders, will pil
fer when they cam The principal chief
very naturally monopolized the principal
share of the business, the object of. his
aspirations being muskets and ammunition,
as well as whale's teeth. The latter were
highly prized, being U3ed for presents to
pass from one chief to another at the con
clusion of a war, in token of friendship.
And whea one chief desired the co-operation
of another ia a war against some third
tribe, a special messenger was sent bear
ing a tooth the larger the better whieh
was offered to the chief whose allk&ee wag
wished, with great cereaaony aad speeeh
raakisg. If it was accepted, awa was
drank and the treaty ws-sa feKf and
completely a tona fit WstHng eee ss
thoagh mas of feofcetp aflalMrts of
6.00 PER YEAR.
ink had been used up in protocols and ne
gotiations. The usual price paid for a musket the
commonest kind, worth two dollars and a
half in the United States was ten casks
of fish. The casks ased by us as meas
ures, were of -the capacity of fivoorsix
barrels. There was one of these at each
station, besides barrels and tubs for the
smaller traders. The chief who had bar
gained for a musket, would, with his follow
ers, generally produce a cask full each day,
so that at the end of the tenth day, he got
his musket. The fish, when thrown into
the cask for measurement, by voiding the
salt water with which they are filled, de
crease very much in size, and it was amus
ing to notice the eager haste with which
the people would fill a cask, and on the
instant that it was fall, pour it into the
large tank an excavation in the ground
in front of the pots, and lined with cocoa
nut logs for fear they wonld be called to
put in more on account' of shrinkage.
Sometimes an ungonia lewa a young wo
man would come with her basket, neatly
braided of cocoanut leaves, and hesitatingly
ask to sell her fish for a pair of scissors, a
looking-glass, or a paper of red paint. Bat
with the men the common people axes,
hatchets, iron hoops, knives, and cloth
maro3, were tho favorite articles of trade.
(To It contintm!.')
Stbasqe Freaks or LionTsiso. Light
ning, like light, furnishes another wonderful
succession of marvels. How delicate, how
subtle I It performs Its work sometimes
with scarcely a touch. Enameratln; a num
ber of Instauces, the author calls upon us to
modify our vulgar notions of thunder and
lightning. He says it is a most extravagant
idea to compare the causes of thunder and
the effects of lightning to the noise and ef
fects of cannon and cannon balls. Wc aro
face to face with an essentially superior
force. It may be said that It constitutes
a transition between this world and a better
one: in fact, lt Is really subject to trans
cendental laws, which our weak Intelligence
can not grasp. This little volume Is are per-"
tory of facts, some of them of the most
amusing, and some of them of an abundantly
terrible character. Illustrating this, he strik
ingly entitles one of his chapter, "How did
the bird get out of the cage !" He derives
the expression from Plutarch. When we see
men or animals cease moving, thinking, or
living, suddenly, without any appreciable
change in their appearance or the mechanism
of their organization, it snggests the image
of a cage, the door still closed, no damage
done to a single wire, and yet the inhabitant
gone. How did it get out? The Instances
aro numerous. Bodies have been killed re
peatedly by lightning, without giving the
slightest trace of any wound or scar, no
slight touch of a barn or a contusion, no
hint of the way in which the bird sprang
from its confinement. Delicate and most
subtle, wc have said,- has often been Its work.
Think, of it melting a bracelet from a lady's
wrist, yet leaving the wrist mi touched;
think of Its melting instantly a pair of crys
tal goblets without breaking them. Nay, as
we said above, some of Its achievements are
most humorous. Anigo tells how the light
ning one day visited the shop of a Suablan
cobbler, and did not touch the artisan, but
magnetized all bis tools. One can well Im
agine the Immense dismay of the poor fel
low : his hammer, pincers, and awl attracted
all the needles, pins, and tacks, and nails,
and caused them to adhere firmly tn the tools.
The amazed shoemaker thought that every
thing In the shop was suddenly bedeviled, ot
else that ha was dreaming. And there are
several well-autbcutlcated cases like this,
showing that Iron can be rendered magnetic
by the electric current. We read of a mer
chant of Wakefield, who had placed In a
corner of his room a box of knives and forks,
and iron tools, destined to be sent to the
Colonies. In came the lightning, struck
open the box, spread all the articles on the
floor, and it was fonnd when they were
picked np, that every one bad acquired new
properties they had all been affected by the
subtle touch of the current. Some remained
intact, others were melted, hut they had all
been rendered more or less magnetic, so that
there was not a single nail in the box that
might not have served the purpose of a mar
iner's compass. Such anecdotes excite the
sense of the marvelous, and lu popular sci
ence they become windows through which
the young inquirer U able to look abroad
Into the astonishing fields of nature. A
great deal of scientific material has of course
been reduced to such a matter of routine
that, although there Is not much scientific
education, in any high sense of the word,
some of the outer facts arc known, and peo
ple may be prevented from making very
.grave mistakes. Congregational Jiartew.
IUtiiek Oblitiocs At a revival excite
ment in Connecticut, a respectable old lady
was struck with conviction and became a
convert, and was proposed for membership
of the church. There was a meeting held
for the examination of candidates, ofwhom
there were several In attendance. "Well,
my dear sister Rogers," said the venerable
examiner, addressing our venerable friend,
"please relate your experience."
The old lady, on being (bus addressed,
lifted up her voice. "Well," said she."!
don't know what to say, as I told my hus
band, Mr. Rogers, before I came here, but I
believe I have experienced a change, as I
told Mr. Rogers, my husband, after I came
home from meeting, when I became con
vinced that I was the moat sinful creature
In the world, as I told my husband, Mr. Ro
gers, and says he, I think so, too.' Then I
told Mr. Rogers, my husband, that I was go
ing to lead a different life, was going to trim
my lamp and have it burning agin the bride
groom came. Then Mr. Rogers, my hus
band, said be didn't see what I wanted of
another, but be didn't make no objection.
Then I told Mr. Rogers, my husband, that I
wonld join the church, and prepare myself
for the place where the worm dleth not, and
the fire Is not qnencbed, and my husband,
Mr. Rogers, told me I'd better."
The Secbets op the Deep, What has be
come or tbe Innumerable bones, and teeth,
and scales of fishes that, for all the year
gone by, have died in the broad Atlantic?
Where are tbe remains of tbe many ships
that have been swallowed up in Ha waves?
Where are the gravel heaps left behind by
tbe icebergs that have been melted In float I Bg
down from the Polar Sea? Where, alo,
tbe substance drifted across by the ObIT
Stream, and other currents that traverse tbe
ocean? Nothing net one solitary ladleaw
tlon of all these; but la their place a floe,
Impalpable, tenacloM.)ad, everywhere ex
tending, and made ttf ot little, partletes ot
carbonate of lime, secreted by cosittleoe
myriads of animalcule, tbe fooi, perhaps,
of whale and Sabe of the aarface, but more
probably the sole iattabVURts of taoe great
depths which other avhaali, mere highly or
aauiized, would la Tain attempt to penetrate.
Tralr may we say that the seersur a Use
ineki aew are mntenoa aw imam, saw i i
tbe search of tfcwo amply rnpsiya t a- . . .
berof taveaga4kL Vs. Amhd. T aeatw oCaassrtaaaag as) SjMJB?
A revlTeHat saeotiBir a rme-tiA AW- I eSs a me saj. MBfc&Slk
reV . -"MJv, mMt f SbmjSjmM M tj;
BOOK AND JOB
IMTIMfi JfTlKsBHHHTI
the "aizr" oma
la new prepared to eaU all il ar
mi jii riiT mm
WITH JTEATJCBM AJTD SWAKS
'Tbe Win er Snr is XxrK."V4tt
thl caption, mi 3m MalM (Totst sje te
following aeeoatrt of Hie career of ei Baa wfce
was formerly known to many elttM of Cal
ifornia: The man wlto w that sad mortaiiy
wounded while ta tbe act ot comanittiBg a
burglary la a rmtMnwt ia 8m TraaKfeea. a
short time ago, died' frosMs wornd ta tbe
hospital. The natortaaate bm gave, kis
name a Calhoaa. We say aaforraMte asM,
from the fact, that from oar kowlJaf uf
his antecedents, we feel justified Is eauaitig
him among the aafortuaates 'of tMHferaia.
The man's name wa James H. CrWsaMr.aaa
In early days he was quite a protntoeait aasl
respected citizen of Placer county. Ia IflK-t
and 3, he kept a flrst-clan reaaavraat 1
Auburn, where by the labor of hisntutf aasl
wife, he acquired considerable vreverty. Jfc
told out bis Auburn bulnee fa IBs, w be-"
Here, and went to Iowa Ifil!, where W Mlt
and furnished a flee hotel, which irss ttmm
afterward burned to the ground, wtwtehr
Creamer lost nearly everything be hu!. m
afterward started a rtslaaraBt ia Sea Fraa
cisco, bat did aot aeceed to his Hsdwr, aad
some difficulty of a domestic character oeevr.
ring about thl time, the retoartat waa
closed, he and hi wife separated, mee whie
time, the once dashing Creamer, sd fcr a we
know, bas never engaged in any leajrtlaaaW
business, but gave himself up to dtaslysrtlooi
and petty crlraea. In 18ft or 3, he euHstat
in the army, or joined some volaeteer com
pany, and was sent to Lo Angeles or soeee
wbere in tbe lower country, at which piae
he was discharged upon the grevnd sf ia
sanity or general disability he hi the means
time having nearly lost hk voice. After Ml
discbarge he found hi way back to Su Fran
cisco, and from there to Leavltt'a reach, at
Ravenswood, in thl county, where he wott
ed for some month or tws a cook. TUs
was tbe last time wo ever saw poor Creamer,
but since then, we heard of his cearieMoB
at Napa or Sonoma fur .stealing a pistol, aed
have had a general knowledge of his down
ward career, up to the time of his closing
act which ended hi miserable career.. Cream
er, in bis days of prosperity, was a whole
souled, genial, affable gentleman, very popa
lar as a hotel keeper, and hi wife wa gay,
good-looking, and .easily flattered. The tale
Is now summed up in these few word.
Creamer, while burglariously In search of
something to satlsfy,tbe cravings of beBcer,
was shot and mortally wounded, aaa alter
llogerlng for several days la the greatest
agony, died, while his former wife, at tke
same time, was an Inmate ofa bouse of pros
titution In the same city of San Francisco.
Can a more melancholy picture be lsaaglaed,
tnari tbe above brief recital of actual deprav
ity In man and wife. The troubles and mUr
cry ot one are ended, and lt may be a question
of doubt, as to which of the two had seak
the lowest In vice and degradation.
"TerilT, th. wages of sin Is death.'
Tbul Trip op the tibst Locomotive.
Major Horatio Allen, the engineer of tbe
New Tori and Erie Railroad, gives the fol
lowing account of the first trip made by a
locomotive on this continent:
When was lt? And who awakened Its
energies and directed it movement? It Was
in tbo year 1823, on tbe banks of the Lacfca
waxen, Penn'a, at tbe commencement or the
railroads connecting the canal ol tbe Dele
ware and Hudson Canal Company with their
coal mines and ho who addressee yoa wo
the only person on that locomotive The
circumstance which led to my being alone
on the road were these: The road bad
been built In tbe Summer, and the structure
was of hemlock timber, and rails of large di
mension notched In caps placed far apart.
Tbe timber had been cracked and warped
from exposure to the sun. After about 388
feet straight line, the road crossed Laeka
waxen creek on toe trestle-work abont 360
feet blgb, with a curve of 855 to 400 feet
radius. The Impression was very general
that tbe Iron monster would either treat
down the road or It would leave the track at
the curve and plungo Into the creek.
My reply to such, apprehensions was that
it was too late to consider tbe probability
of such occurrences; theie wa no other
courso than to have a trial made of tbe
atrange animal which bad been brought here
at a big expense: but that lt was not Becet
Bary that more than one should be involved
In Us fate: that I take the first ride alone,
and tbe time would come when I should
look to tbe Incident with great Interest.
As I placed my band on tbe throttle-valve
handle I was undecided whether I wouM
move slowly or with a fair degree of speed;
but believing that tbe road would prove safe,
preferring If we go down, to go handsomely,
and without any evidence of timidity, I star
ted with considerable velocity, j-eMed the
enrve over the creek with safety and wa soon
out of bearing of tbe vast assemblage. At
the end of two or three miles, I everbed the
valve and returned without accident, hawlsg
thu made tbe first rollrod trip by loeoasotire
on tbe Western Hemisphere.
New Satett Lahp. According to ths la
ventlon of Mr. W. Key, of Bristol, the lamp
Is constructed of a metal case, with an orifice
three Inches In diameter, through which tbe
light Issues. Tbe glass which fill this orifice
Is preserved from Injury by several crossings
of strong wire. The air la admitted tUrowea
an aperture in the bottom, and the hot ar
goes out through another at the top of the
lamp. Both these apertures sre covered
with gauze wire, protected In inch a way a
to put a stop to the dangerous practice of
miners lighting their pipes through the
gauze, which is often done with tbe lamps
now In use. Tbe lamp, made of common
sheet-Iron, would weigh about two pounds,
and Its price would not be greater than that
of tbo J)avy lamp, while It give at least
twice as much light, at a cost of about 3d.
for 13 hours' burning. One difficulty with
mining lantern ba been the breaking of the
glass when it is brought into contact with
the flame, bnt with Mr. Key' lamp tbe light
goes out Immediately the lantern I held la
such a position as to bring the top of the
flame under tbe glass. Held in say other
position, the light remain berBletr. An
other peculiarity of Mr. Key's invention is,
that aa coon a It It taken Into an atmosphere
of fire-damp, tbe flame begins to Acker,
more or less, according to the rjaeetHjrof
fire-damp, and eventually goes oat The
lamp ba been shown to several p motto!
men, who highly spprove of it Altogether,
Mr. Key' invention is a very !ngenie sM
useful one, and likely to prove a great lerviee
to collier In their dscgeroas calling. A.
Trait Journal.
A rhnue rna I.spaosT. We lean
India that tbe Matt Ooflar anBossea' tfcsrt a
Dr. BbM Dajee ba uncevere aa mwiiens.
remedy for leprosf, Be is M to sap
plied tbe remedy In tea dHfcrest cssmm
leprosy; aad tho care to dsesrttjul a eeta
pletelyHccesefal In these alL K toaMsl
that sevea or elgat other petfctrt ate sww
under hi treetaest, aad ttw crr
of tbe remedy sre io all assist; thins item
apparent.
Thbbe is a fBr feWow who ssBanasa
his Intention to publish a paswr eelM The
Comet, wMt a sew Isle erfery -weak. Be vrtat
hardly be aMe to coses it, ato he iMliasjs
with Cbiaeee authors, who eaa svfaatr mm
with tall oat of their owa besato. BSsTm
discovered the cm?
It nstt be fciarrtteJ that Jtmrnmprntt
safe a sixrp pint whsnit aa, la a sesHf .
to a re nark: tkat Monaoatstm astat -
cwabto MftwrrinttsoUoaa, wfceflws kis
to b feM ia Uve towM ts MStMC of
TJ
J 11 '
.-tta. il 'J v .

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