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The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, February 10, 1869, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1869-02-10/ed-1/seq-1/

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PCBUE8ED
Every Wednesday Morning,
AT lUN PKIt AXMJ3I.
Hailed to Foreign Snbacrlbir at J7-0O.
OrncE On Merchant Btreet, west o
he Post Office, Honolulu, H. I.
Printed ana pablished by J. Mott ExrtH. at the
Oontimeiit Prlntinr OBce. to whom aH business
commo.nl gallons mut be addreswrf.
BUSINESS NOTICES.
johx t. watekii ousr..
IMPOETEE AND DEALER TS GEJTERAL
HEBCHANDISE,
2 Qneen Street, Ilonolnln, TL I. ly
JT. G. DICKSOA,
Importer, "Wholesale and Betail Dealer
InLnmUrmndBolUinKlUterUb. Fort. Kin c and
25 Merchant Streets, Tlonolnle. IL I. Fly.
IV. I GKEEV,
C0MJOSS10K AOZKT ft BROKER
Ofice In Tlia-proof Ba&llnrs on Qneea Stmt,
8) Honolulu. II. I. lvl
c. k. n. vacraxLaxE.
CIIAS. ?f. SPKVCEK Jfc CO.,
GENEEAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
21) Qneen Street, ilonolnln, 11. 1. ftv4
JIcCOLA?f Jc JOIEVSOrV.
MERCHANT TAILORS,
10 Fort st. , Hooolnln, opposite T. C Ilenca's. lvl
C. K. WILLIAMS,
MANUFACTURER, IMPOETEE & DEALER
In Furniture of fiery description. Fnrnitnre Ware
Koont oo Fort Street, eppudte Chase's Photomfh
Cilery. WorksbepaltbeolJstawion Hotel
Street, near Fort. Orders from the other
411 islands promptly attended to. (lyo
W. lHi.M"I"I',
BOOT AHD SHOE MAZER,
II King Street, nert to tw BetheL Honolulu. flyS
31. X. I0EII.
CABINET Ttfgrni AED TJPHOLSTEBER,
Kin j Stmt, Ilonolnln, orpvite Lewis Cooper Shop.
41) WtU bay anJ sell second-hand rnrnltnrc- PyS
J OKI T1S1ETS. THOS. SORCMOX.
TIlIaJETra & SOKE.ASO,
SHIP CAKPESTZBS & CAULKERS
AtD.Eoiter ft Co' Old Stand,
57 j Sear tie Hoaolaln Iwa Works, lj.
XISEO. II. DAVIES,
Lati Juki, Gcxzx Jt Co.
IMPORTER & COinnSSION MERCHANT,
1XDA0OT rOE
Lloyd's and the Liverpool Underwriter.
British and Foreign Marine Insurance Ok. and
Tffortborn Assurance Company. 3-1 j4
IIV3IA BltOTHKES,
IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS
In Fashionable Clothing. I lata. Caps, Boots, Shoes,
and every variety of Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods.
Snow's llnUdins, Merchant Street, Ilonolnln. aO-lyS
J. S. WALKER. - 8. C. iUM.
AVAEICEK Sz ALLES,
SHIPPtKG ft COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
19) Qneen Street, Uouololn. II. L fly!
L. I.. TORLIEKT.
DEALER TS LUMBER AND EVERY ELND
OF BUILDING MATEEIAL.
13 Ornca Corner Qneen and Fort streets. Iy4
ltOEEES Jc CO.,
SHIP CHANDLERS AND COMMISSION
MERCHANTS,
Queen Street, Honolulu. Particular attention paid
to the purchase and sale of Hawaiian Produce.
kxtu zt rcaanssxox to
C L Richard a Co, III HactfeM a Co.
C Brewer a Co, C 1. Kichards a Co,
D C Waterman Esq, Castle a Cooke. flv4
IK.V RICHARDSON.
IMPORTER & DEALEB TS BOOTS, SHOES,
And Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods, corner of Fort
and Merchant Streets, Honolulu. 9-1 T
ED .VIA JO.ES,
GEOCEE AND SHIP CHAHDLEB.
LaJhalna, Maui.
lloney and Kecrults furnished to Ships on the most
10) farorable terms. (ly
CUIIAG HOOS.
Commission Merchant and General Agent,
Importer of Teas and other Chinese and Forehrn
Goods, Wholesale Dealer in Hawaiian Produce, and
Agent for the Paukaa and Amanulu Sugar Planta
tions. Fire-proof Store on Nuuanu Street, below
King. 21-ly4
AFOG &. ACIIUCK.
Importers, Wholesale and Retail Dealers
In General Merchandise and China Goods, in the
Fire-proof Store oo Xnuanu Street, under th Public
Halt 43-ly4
GEORGE G. HOWE,
Sealer in Bedwood and Northwest Lumber,
Shingles, Doors, Sashes, Blinds, NIl4 Paints, etc.
3)
B, UUUn, CUC, HJIW . ,
at his old stand on the Fsplanade. Iy4
F. A. SCIIAEFEK fc CO.,
COMMISSION MEECEANTS,
SS Uondulu. Oahn, H. I. ljl
ED. HOFFSCHLAEGEE & CO.,
IMPORTERS & COMMISSION MERCHANTS
41 Honolulu, Oahn, IL L Ij4
THEODORE C. HEUCE,
IMPORTER ft COMMISSION MERCHANT.
1-4 Honolulu, Oahn. H. L fly
II. lEtCKt'EEO & CO.,
GENEEAL COMMISSION AGENTS.
8-1 Queen Street, Honolulu, H. I. ly
THE 10M M00EE TAVEEN.
V J. O'AIEEE,
1 Corner of King and Fort Streets. flj4
CIIAlCEV C. BESSETT,
DEALEB IN NEWSPAPERS, MAGAZINES,
And Periodicals, Fort Street, Honolulu, jlj-ljl
. T. rHLERS. A. JAEGKB.
II. F. EHXEKS Sc. CO.,
DEALERS IN DBY GOODS AND GENERAL
MERCHANDISE,
Fire-proof Store on Fort Street, shore Odd Fellows'
1111. S7-ly4
A. S. CLEGHORif,
WHOLESALE AND BET ALL DEALER Uf
GKNKHAT. MFRCHANDISE,
Fire-Troof Store, ccraer of Queen and Kaahmsana
Streets, Honolulu. BetaH Estabtianment on uuann
Street. 4-ly4
s. r. avals. s. o. viueb.
ABAMS &. WIIiBEK,
AUCTION & COXXLSSIOIT MERCHANTS
37 Qneen Street, Honotuln, H. L lyl
C. S. BARTOW,
AU CTIONEER,
Ealesroom on Queea Street, one door from Kaaho
tnano Street 1T-1j4
J8H. H. PATT,
Sotxry Public and Commissioner of Deeds
For the State of California Omce at the Bank of
Bishop a Co Kaahttmann Street, Honolulu. 3-lyi
H. A. WE3U5n,
NOTARY PUBLIC,
6 Office aj the Interior lVpartment. lyt
J. I. MIJHES,
TXPOKTEB AND XAJreTACTURES
Of an kinds of Saddlery. Carriage trlnuning done
with neatness and dispatch. All orders prompt
ly attended to. Comer of Fort and Hotel. ,t
10) Streets,' Honolulu. p y4
HAWAIIAN
VOL. V m. 4.1
i
JLitSIiVESS NOTICES.
turjts rrca. n-a. r. caxTsx.
C. BREiVEK & CO.,
I SKIPPING AND
COMMISSION MEE CHANTS,
1 HOSOIiTJa.Tr,H. I.
AGENT'S Or the Boston suid Ilonolnln
ricketldnc.
AGENTS For the Jlnfce, "IVailukn and
liana Plan talons.
ACESTS For ttir Farchaac and Sale of
jiaml Prodncr. -ly4
3f. S. GRIA'IIAinil fc CO.,
LMPQ ITERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS
In Fwiouable Clothing. Hats, Cape, Boots, Shoes,
and etrr eariety of Gentlf men's superior Furnish
ing G-- Store In Makee'a Block, Queen Street,
Ilooob- H. 1. P0-ly4
,j E. S. EIIGG.
CIO ENGINEER AND SUBYEYOE,
Ansae Post-Office Box So. 32, Hoaolnlo. SS-m
F. A. SCII.VEFER,
ACtST for trie BRKMESf HOAUD
ttlSDEKnElTERS. 7
Ar t for the Dresden Board of Underwriters,
Aat tor the Vienna Board of Underwriters.
7-iY Pr
r. II. aV G. SEGEEIlEX,
TIS.ZINC AND C0PPEE SMITHS,
1 15D SHEET LEON WOEEEES,
Knnaa Street, betwees Merchant ft Qneen.
gfjl Hare couitantly on hand, SWres. Pipe. Gal
45 raniied Iron Pipe. Plain and Use Bibbs,
vSt-J Stop-cocks, India Bubber Hose best S-rly.
Kaee in lengtiis of 3 and M feet, with couplings
'if4! and pipe complete. Batb-Tubs, and also a
eery i"'" stock of Tinware of erery descr-tion.
Part Jar attention giren toShlp-Woik. Orders
from C 'ther Islands will Ue'carefully attended ta
Thsl. jl to the Ctireas of Honolulu and the
3 (land- -enerally for their liberal patronage in the
past, ' hope by strict attention to business to merit
the sw- fr the future. ST-lyS
J. II. TIIOMPSOA,
GE3EEAL BLACKSMITH,
Queen Street, Honolulu
lW sUntly on hand and tir sale at the Lowcct
Marit: ticw. a piod assortment nf the Bt Kefined
BarJEtx uJ ti? Bet Bbr kimitlt'tf Coal. 3S-ly5
-VOLCANO HOUSE,
CEAIEE OF SILAUEA. HAWAII.
tpj Fill IS ESTABLISHMENT IS
lEsg i m open for the recsptionf visitors to fcZ
the Vaano House, who may rely on finding com
fortable rooms, a good table, and prompt attendance.
xpeti .red guides for the Crater always on hand.
. , JSTlAlt AND SULPHUR BATHS !
Horsei Grained and S tailed if Desired.
CIIAKGES BEASOXABLE.
Parti visiting the Toleano via Hilo, can procure
.niwi.K varranted to make the Journey, by D. H.
IltrCBc :!, Esq. S7-Iy5
PIANOS TUNED.
" . PIAKrns and other Musical
fiasICIostruments Tuned and Repaired, by
WTVfll CHARLES DERBY", at the Hawaiian
Jii 'Theatre.
I,eaaons prlText on the Piano & Guitar.
The " st uf references given. Ct-Iy4
II. KYCKOFT,
H0USE AND SHIP PLUMBER,
King St. two doors west of Castle ft Cooke's.
Has a 'and, Bath-Tnbs, Water-Close Waih-IU-sins.F
and lift Pumps, Lead and Galranixed
Iron P and Plumber's Brass-works. Being the
only Pltaber In the city, he will execute all orders en
trusted t him in a workmanlike maoner. P-Sm
TT.
sam'l KOTT.
J7 JOICV 1VOTT Ac CO.,
COPPER AND TIN SMITHS,
Saahuntann St, one door above Elitner's,
Beg leave to inform the public that they are pre
pared " furnish all kinds of Copper Wort, such as
Stills, strike Pans, Sorghcm Pans, Worms, Pumps,
etc.. ' Abx on band, a full assortment of Tin Ware,
which we offer for sale at the Lowest Market Prices.
All a-ads of It pairing done with Neatness and
Dispatch. Orders from the other Islands will meet
with pTcmpt attention. l-3m
, JAJIES L. LEWIS,
COOPER ANDGr AUGER,
l4.1.A1a C..J 7;tf Daawail Cf
XV UK U1U OWtsaUj VU.UCi 4aaf3 M AVWUlVi Wese
A Larte Stock of Oil Shooks and all kinds of Coop-
exing MUeruIt coutanuy on nana, ue nope oy
attentica to business to merit a contlncance of the
petrona?e which he has hfretofbre enjoyed, and fur
vhich he nov returns bis thanks. lSm
a. COSTA,
JEWELER AM) ENGRAVER,
Fort Street, opposite Odd Fellowi' Hall,
Is prepared to execute with promptness, all work in
his Hoe bu-dnesJ, such as Watch and Clock repair
ing, Mtaciifjctnring Jewelry and Kngrarlng. l-3m
GEOB(. WIJJLIAI S,
LICENSED SHIPPING AGENT,
Office on James Robinjon & Co'i Whart
Contlaiics the bosineM on old plan of settling
with tfr and seamen Immediately on their ship
tuar at faia ufiace. HaTinc no- direct or Indirect con-
nectidrnwith any outfitting eUbUbment, and allow I
log no aetu U v coiiecira in cu cuace. at aUpes 10
gire at eood satisfaction Is tbe future as he has In
the p4vL l-3m
G. W. SOKTOX & CO.,
C00PEES AND ' GAUGEES,
q At the New Stand oa tiie Esplairade.
We are prepared to attend to all work In our Use
at tbe Shop next to the Cuntoca House, where we can
be found at all wcrking boors. We hare on hand
and for sale. Oil Casks and Barrels of different sixes,
new and old. hkb we will sell at the rery Lowest
Market Rata. All work done In a thorouzh manner
aad vsrranted to gtre satttiaction. All kinds of
Coopering Materials and Tools for sale. l-2zn
AT THE PH0T0QEAPH QAILEEY
On Fort Street,
MAT BE SEE.V TIIE "VIEWS taken
of the Late
Lara Floir at lauliulxx
And the Effects of the late
E art li quake at IV'alolilnu, Kan.
TiCIs of KIlaTie and ether places. Also Cards
of the tines, Uneens, Chiels, etc sH for sale at low
prices. Also, Oval and Square Frames of all sixes,
which win be sold cheap. c.
1-Srn " IL L. CHASE.
XESSES. BICESOH" & SMITH,
House, Sign & Ship Painters,
fiClntr Street, near Siuuanu,
SaSS HAVING FORMED A CO-PABT-BawBuership
for carrjing cn tbe FaioUse;
Uuiuiesa, rerpectfuUj solicit the public pat
ronage. Ther will endeavor, by strict and
punctual attention to basin ess, to merit the
esteem and confidence of their friends and the
public.
Graining;, Marbling, Gilding, Catsonuning,
Paper-Hanging, ic, c, exeeated on the
shortest notice and on the most reasonable
terms. 51-Jm
B
EST ENGLISH Boiled Paint OIL.
rorsalebr
l-3m BOLLES t CO.
BEST FAMILY PORK,
per 10LANL la Hand.K harrela. For sale
bj fUaa) - BOLLES CO.
BOXES KASTEKX CflDFISII,
perlOLASL For sale bj
l-3a ;- BOLLES k CO.
HONOLULU, WEDNESDAY. FEBRU
FOREIGN NOTICES-
H. tT. IXTXU3CX. c x. cxi me.
SEVEEANCE, CLAEK & CO.,
COMMISSION MEECEANTS
AND SHIPPING AGENTS,
405 Trent St, ccraer of Clay, San Francisco.
We will attend to the sale of Sugar and all kinds
of Island Produce, also to the purchasing and for
warding of Meitbaadise. Cash Adrancea made on
Consignments. SS-Ca
job x'cxjluy,
Portland.
1. CXISJUU,
S.F.CaL
M'CEAKEN, MEEEHL & CO.,
FORWARDING AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Portland, Oregon.
HsTlng been engaged In our present business for
upwards oftwelre years, and being located In a Fire
proof Brick Building, we are prepared to receive and
dispose f Island Staples, snchas Sugar, Syrups, Bice,
Pulu, Coffee, etc, to advantage. Consignment es
pecially solicited for the Oregon Market, to whfch
personal attention will be paid, and upon which cash
advances will be made when required.
arrririfTn
Charles W Brooks San Francisco
J C Merrill a Co "
Fredlken "
Badger a Lindenberger.. "
James Patrick a Co "
tVm T Coleman Co - "
Stevens, Baker a Co "
Allen a Lewis Portland
LaddaTUton "
Leonard a Green " l-ly4
E. 31. TAIY ICEEU,
COMMISSION MEECHANT,
Kanagaua, Japtu
IlaTinj: the bet tiliUes tlirough an Intimat cuo
nectlon with th JaaiteM traJe lor the past eight
jean, Lt areparru to transact any bnlaea entrusted
to hU care, th dispatch. 17lj4
B. B. VUIIsUCS, h. r. slisceikd, c s. XO&GIX.
W1XLIAMS. BLANCH AED & CO..
SHIPPING ft COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
31 30S Tront Street, San Francisco, do
LAKGLEY, CE0WELL & CO.,
WHOLESALE DETJGGISTS,
32 Cor. Battery ft Clay Sts, San Francisco. 6m
INSURANCE NOTICES.
SAX FItAACISCO
B0ABD OF UNDERWRITERS.
THE UNDEnSIGXED having been
appointed Ageuts for the San Francisco Board
of Underwriter, compruing the
Colirunila Iiiauraitce Company,
3Ierclmnta JIutual Marine Ina. Co.,
Pacific In arm nee Company,
California Lloyd'g, and
Home Mntnal Iiitaraiice Company.
Beg leaTe to inform Masters of Teasel and the Pale
lie generally, that all TcfeU and Cargoes, insured
by either of the ahore Companies, against perils, of
the seas and other riAf, at or near the Sandwich
Islands, will haTe to be verified bj them.
l-3m II. I1ACKFELD k CO.
CAEIEORXIA
INSUEANCE COMPANY.
THE TJXDEltSIGXED, AGEXTS of
the above Company, have been authorised to
insure risks on Cargo, Freight and Treas
ure, by Coasters, lrom Honolulu to all ports of
the Hawaiian Group, and vice versa.
S-ly4 II. UACKFELD t CO.
3IEUCIIASTS' 3HTTUAE
MAEINE INSUEANCE CO HP ANY
Or San Francisco
THE UNDERSIGNED having been
appointed Agents for the abore Company .are
preiared to issue Policies on Cargoes, Freights
and Treasure
WALKER k ALLEN',
l-3m Agents, ilonolnln.
FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY.
THE UNDERSIGNED having been
appointed Agents of the abore-Company, are
prepared to insure ri-k against Fire, on Stone and
li rick Buildings, and on Merc hand Ise
stored therein, ou tbe must farorable terms. For
particulars apply at the office of
My4 F. A. SCIIAEFER k CC
Insurance Notice.
THE AGENT FOR THE BRITISH
Forefgn Marine Insarance Company, (limit
ed), has receiTed Instructions to reduce the ratis of
Insurance between Honolulu and Ports in the Pacific,
and ts now prepared to issne Policies at the Lncest
Kale, with a special reduction on Freight per Steam
ers. THEO. H. DATIFS.
43-tf Jffatt BriL Ibr. Mar. Ins. Cb. (Limited).
SUGAR & MOLASSES.
I860
1869
1869
IIIL.O, II. I.
Suppar and Molasses.
CROP COJLLXG Kf AND FOR SALE IN
qnantittes to enit purchasers, bj
WALKER A ALLEN,
l-3m Agents.
ONOHEA PLANTATIOH'.
Snprar and 3Iorasca Crop IMS 9
COMING IN, FOR SALE IN QUANTI
ties to suit purchasers, by
WALKER A ALLEN,
l-5m Agents.
PEDTCEVILLE PLAHTATIQg.
Sugar and Jlolanticx Crop 1869
ZOOMING IN, FOR SALE IN QTJANTI-
J ties to snu purchasers, by
WALKER Jt ALLEN,
l-3m Agents.
WAILUKTJ PLAHTPATION.
VTEW CROP NOW COMING IN. FOR
LN Sale in quantities to snit "purchasers,
by C. BREWER 4 CO.,
I -3m Agents.
MAEEE PLANTATION.
XVcir- Crop of Sugar & Molasses
-VTOW COMING IN.-AND FOR SALE IN
jS quantities to suit purchasers by
C. BREWER CO.,
l-3m Agents.
CHOICE SUGAE
17IROM KAALABA AND LAIE PLANTA-
P TIONS, now coming in and for sale by
XHEO.H. DAVTES,
31-3m Agent.
SPIRITS OF TURPESTIXK.
For sal. br
l-9ta BOLLS8 (-
A Voyage to the I'JJils.
TtVXBZR SIX.
Written for the Gazette.
"We lay at Tuvea until either March or
April, I don't remember which, rhen the
usual blowy weather 'of those latitudes,
which accompanies the changing of the
trades more properly, perhaps, the mon
soons had set in. At the same time, or
rather two days before the gale began, we
saw, one evening in the western sky, the
immense comet of that year, about twenty
degrees above the horizon, with a tail of
thirty degrees in length. The natives were
much terrified at its appearance, and predic
ted either a great war, or some portending
misfortune. The next day, the wind began
to rise from the pastwanUn squalls, accom
panied with raic The captain ordered the
shore party at the biclte-le-mer house, to
return on board, which was done at once,
bringing with us onr trado and baggage.
The natives gathered around us as wo em
barked in the boats, in silence, and with
ugly looks. As soon as we got on board,
as the gala was increasing, the top-gallant
yards were sent down, and the top-gatlant
masts housed, while tbe best bower was
dropped under foot. By daylight in the
morning, the wind harj increased to such
a degree, that the topigallant masts were
sent down on deck as well as the topsail
yards, and the top-masts housed. There
was but very little swell in this inland sea,
as it might with truth ,be termed, but tho
wind blew in terrific i gusts, occasionally!
veering suddenly thre$ points on either
bow, making the brig occasionally heel
several streaks. About three o'clock in
the afternoon, she began to drag, and two
other anchors, tbe stream and a large
kedge, were let go. These seemed to
check her, but none too soon, for we had
dragged to within two cables' length of the
shore, where we could see the inhabitants
of Tavea, apparently in a good deal of ex
citement, evidently expecting that our brig
would strike at any moment. They were
running about between the cocoanut trees,
and dodging in and ont of the mangrove
bushes. The belief among these island
ers is, that whatever is driven on shore,
either a vessel or a canoe, is a direct pres
ent to them from the Gods, and they in
variably kill any living creature that may
survive the wreck. Our captain knew this,
and therefore, it is not to be wondered at,
that during the five days which the gale
lasted his anxiety was such, that he never
quitted the deck. "When at length the
wind subsided, lie was thoorougbly exhaust
ed, and giving the necessary orders for
sending aloft the spars and yards, and pre
paring to get nnderweigh. he retired to his
cabin, saying, as he went below, "Saved,
thank God!" This was the first that I
beard of any very special danger, beyond
the possibility of tbe vessel going on shore
on a mod-bank, where there were no break
ers. Expressing my surprise at the cap
tain's manner, the mate said to me, "Boy,
if our anchors had not held, the moment
the brig struck, there would have been
five hundred of those rascally Tavea men
on board, and we should all have been
clubbed." "How about the hostage ?" I en
quired. "He would have joined with the
others," was the reply. "And France f" I
added. "No doubt he would have been
killed with us, for they hate him because
he favors the white men."
After fair weather had again set in, the
the chief of Tavea came on board, and
was very anxious that we should resume
the fishing. He brought a canoe-load of
fruit as a present, consisting of bananas,
papaias. oranges, limes, shaddocks, ndaieas,
and other nameless varieties of tropical
sweets of nature. Another canoe was load
ed with young cocoanats, all nicely husked
and tied together in bunches. These were
piled np on one side of the brig's deck,
and tbe weight was such as to causa her to
heel a couple of streaks. JSuts b'ke those,
in point of size, are never seen on these
islands of Hawaii-Dei, nor have I met with
any among the other islands of the Pacific
which I have visited, that could compare
with them. Tni-Tavea the chief of an
island often assumes the name of his par
ticular locality, with the prefix of "Tui,"
which signifies, as nearly as may be ren
dered, "belonging to" also brought sev
eral turtle, hogs and some fowls which
last, ran wild in the woods, and like those
of these islands, may be heard crowing at
all hours of the night. Tbe chief, on
meeting our captain, greeted him with a
smiling face, and the usual, "Si yandra,
Saka," and sat down on the cabin companion-way,
to smoke his seluka. After tbe
presents were all on board, Tni-Tavea made
quite a speech to the captain, in which he
congratulated the "Kai papalangT liter
ally, "the native of Heaven," a term which
wa3 applied to all white men on tbe ces
sation of the storm, and expressed his ear
nest hope that a renewal of the fishing
woold be rewarded with abandant ssecess.
The captain listened nntil he was through,
and then turning to the mate," said in short,
sharp tones, "Mr. Hartwell. take sir men
with you in the boat, well armed, and go
ashore and bum that hiche-Ie-mer house.
Ill keep this fellow on board nntil yoa re
turn." Ic less than half an hour, tho boat
Teas on ita way back: to" the brig-, while Ae
GAZETTE.
AEY 10, 1869.
huge structure of logs, reeds and grass, in
which we had been curing our Esb, was
wrapped in flames. SicJie-U-mer traders
always burn these houses when they aban
don a station, in order that no one coming
after them should enjoy tbe use of the
building. It may, perhaps, strike one as
rather unchristian, but such is the custom.
VThen Tni-Tavea saw the flames leaping
np and devouring tbe house, and thus an
end put to his hopes of gain visions of
prospective muskets and powder, whales'
teeth and red paint, thus rudely brushed
away bis countenanco fell, and he sit
moody and silent, As soon, however, as
the boat was hoisted up, (we were already
underweigh) the captain presented him
with a new axe, a hatchet, a musket, a keg
of powder and a large whale's tooth. With
these he departed, smiling and showing his
white teeth, as, in response to the captain's
"Salago," "you are going," he replied,
"lo, sa tigo," "yes, you are remaining."
Thoso white teeth, thought I, those
beautiful white teeth, but for the holding
of our good anchors, would, ere this, have
been masticating my flesh 1
Leaving Tavea behind us, wo bore away
with a fine breeze, and towards night, an
chored in what the pilot called "Monkey
face passage," between a small island and
the main land of Vanua Levu. It (the
passage, or strait) derives its name from
the fancied resemblance to the face of a
monkey, of a high rock on the island. I
may state here, in this connection, that
vessels always anchor at night when cruis
ing among the islands, on account of the
vast number of detached reefs, shoals and
sand-banks, to be encountered on every
hand.
Near the place where we anchored, on
the main land, was a bold rock, that stood
isolated close by the shore, and which was,
I should judge, two hundred feet high.
This was known as "Savage's Bock." Tbe
tale connected with it, as related to me by
our grey-bearded pilot, who had lived on
the islands for many years, and who had
received the account from the natives and
from older residents than himself was,
that Charley Savage, a Swede, who, attach
ed to an American whaleship, had run away
from her at an island called Ngoro, lying
off the coast of Vanua Levu, and from
thence had got on to the main-land, where,
being taken under the protection of the
reigning chief of that side of the island,
Tui-Muthuata the missionaries have put
the letter c for the sound otth and being
a handy man at tools, he became armorer
tor the king, repairing and putting in order
all the old and dilapidated muskets. The
consequence was, that Tui-Muthuata be
came very powerful, and extended his
authority the whole length and breadth of
the east coast of Tanua Levu. This arous
ed the jealousy of the king of Mbau, to
whom the king of Mutbuata was tributary,
and he determined to despoil the latter of
his wealth. A whale's tooth was sent to
the king of Kewa, with the nsual formali
ties and message, inviting him to join in
the war, and it was duly accepted. So the
king of Bewa joined the king of Mbau
with two doable canoes, each containing
three hundred warriors, "men at arms,"
though without armor, but with clubs and
spears galore and joining their allies who
embarked in four canoes and numbered a
thousand men, they sailed from Mbau for
the doomed Muthuata. The terrible scenes
of carnage and cannibalism that followed
their arrival and landing there, can never
be depicted. Tui-Muthuata, who by tra
dition appears to have been a most respec
table and kind-hearted old savage, after
making a very gallant resistance, was brain
ed in his own house, and cooked in the
oven which his own people had prepared
for the baking of a hog. Those of bi3
people who did not escape a like fate, fled
to the hills and forests. Charley Savage
had two pistols and a musket, with a plen
tiful supply of ammunition in a belt strap
ped about him. With these arms he kept
bi3 assailants at bay, and managed to reach
the top of the rock which I have mention
ed to ascend which there was but one
path, and by which but ono man could as
cend at a time, it was so narrow. There
Savage remained, and at length fairly died
of starvation, the natives not daring to ap
proach his eyrie, and he not daring to de
scend amongst them to procure the neces
saries of life. Hence the name, "Savage's
Eock."
Early in the morning we were again under
weigh for Muthuata, with a fine breeze off
the land, laden with the odors of a thous
and flowers, and the fragrance of the for
est which clothed Yaaua Leva in all the
varied shades of green, from the mountain
tops to the mangrove-girdled beach. Jack
Vakataa, as the natives called our pilot I
never knew bis real riane was stationed
in the fore top-gallant cross-trees to look
out for hidden dangers of reef or shoaL
At half-past seven, when we had jast sat
down to breakfast, as the brig was slipping
tlirough the water at the rate of about four
knots, eaddealy there was a biimp bump,
that knocked over the Kan at tbe wheel
and caused a ratUiag of the pets and pans.
We had struck on a shoaL about a quarter
of a mile froflS tbe shore. It so happened
that oar coarse lay jast ia the glare of the
soaring ebb, whisk was the wapen wfcj
$6.00 PER TEAK.
old Jack had not discovered the sheal un
til we were right upon it As it to, we
were brought up ail standing. The sails
were immediately clewed down, and a boat
dispatched to ascertain the extent of the
shoal. It was found that a few yards ahead,
the shoal abruptly terminated, and that
there was deep water for a milo further on
at least Before we struck, hot a soul bad
been seen on shore, but before the boat re
turned, the natives were seen swarming
down from tho hills, and dodging in and
out among the mangrove bushes. They
doubtless fancied, like their friends of Ta
vea during tho gale in which the old Gam
bia so narrowly escaped touching the shore
that the gods had sent them a prizo,and
were probably gloating over the pleasant
idea of baked iai japalangi. But we
crowded on all sail, and after one or two
slight thumps, now starting ahead a little
and now stopping for an instant, the good
brig dragged herself over the shoal into
deep water and we went on our way rejoic
ing, much to tho disgust, it may be sup
posed, of our dusky friends on shore not
even leaving them a lock of hair.
About noon, wo anchored off the island
of Muthuata, the once favorite place of
residence of Tui-Muthuata, and where he
had onco a large town. It was now, how
ever, entirely uninhabited, having been
sacked and destroyed by tho people of
Mbau, in tho war before referred to. The
island is nearly circular in shape, and about
fifteen miles in circumference. Here we
were to establish our second fishing station,
tho chief of Eaberabe, on the opposite
main land, having undertaken to build the
necessary houses and furnish the canoes
and men for fishing. While tho houses
were in process of building, I enjoyed sev
eral rambles over the island. Near the
centre, on a Iovel space, had evidently been
built the town. Bread-fruit, bananas, (grow
ing wild) and ifi trees, embowered tho spot,
and in the midst, a beautiful spring of clear,
cool water, babbling up in a basin walled in
neatly with stonesind which raningingits
tiny tune.down to the beach. Everything
was luxuriant, betokening a soil of extreme
fertility. Sweet-potatoes and sugar-cane
grew wild the latter of the white kind,
of extraordinary size, and very tender and
juicy. Here were all tbe tokens that this
paradise of Nature had once been the
home of a numerous population. Bat
those sylvan woods that once echoed to
the voices of happy children and laughing,
girls, or perhaps the deep-toned notes of
the war-drum, were now silent and desert
ed. The horrid demon of war thrico hor
rid when his votaries are cannibals had
swept all life from this lovely spot, and
nothing but tradition tells of the late of
the king of Muthuata and his tribe.
(To U continued.)
Tlte President's few Year
Itcceptlon.
Wasdikotox, Jan. 1st The President's
reception this morning was attended by
members of the Diplomatic Corps, all the
army and navy officers in the city, the jud
ges of the Supreme Court, the members of
tbe Cabinet, tbe members of Congress re
maining in Washington, and many other
distinguished persons. Tbe general recep
tion was begun at twelve o'clock, and, not
withstanding the inclemency of the weath
er, the Executive Mansion was filled. The
President received visitors at the " Blue
Boom." Tbe President's family assisted
in tbe reception.
Among the prominent army officers were
General Dent and others of Gen. Grant's
staff now in Washington, Gen Heintzel
man. Gen. O. O. Howard, accompanied by
the officers of the Freedmen's Bureau,
Gens. Townsend, Williams, and Vincent,
of the War Department: Gen. Ramsey
and others, Gen Zeitin, commandant of the
Marine corps, with the officers of that
branch of the service, were present in a
body. The President was in good health,
and received his visitors with courtesy and
dignity. The Marine Band, which was
stationed at the main entrance, supplied
the music Later in the day seemingly
hopeless of better weather visitors began
to arrive in an almost uninterrupted stream.
Gen B. F. Butler arrived after 12 o'clock
alone, and at once went through the " Red
Room "to the " Blue Room," where the
President was, and, after cordially shaking
hands with Mr. Johnson passed over to
the ladies, and exchanged with them the
compliments of the season. He then pas
sed through the East Room." Senator
Morton was also prominent among the
visitors. He held a brief conversation
with the President The diplomatic corps'
were fully represented, excepting the Da
nish Minister and one of the Italian Dele
gation. They were attired in full court
dress, and were accompanied by their wives
and daughters, richly attired. Ex-Attorney
Gen. Stanbery arrived at 12 o'clock,
and was cordially greeted by the President.
The members of the Cabinet and many citi
zens also received their friends, and the re
ceptions were largely attended. Assistant
Secretary Seward was, visited by the most
distinguished personages in Washington, as
well as by many private citizens Bad stran
gers. Among the number were the repre
sentatives of Foreign Govern men ts.tbe Jus
tices of the SapretBe Co art of the United
States, tbe Judges of the Coerta of the
District of Columbia, oSeers of the army
and navy in uniform, and members of Con
gress. The Secretary was ia exeeUest
health. Secretaries cCsSoeii.BrowniBg
Welles and Scfcofierd, PoatrnevHor-Oeeeral
Randall and Attorney General Eratts alto
received company. Unnanal interest was
taken in tbe reception by Speaker CoMax
and his wife. The awaber teal paid their'
respects was very faMs,"irscisdiBg- Btaay
who attended tbe etker receptees, ana
nearly a8 the aoarboro of- CoBgrets ia
WssMiagtoa, wfcfcont digtisetkm at party.
Tbe gfeisfcer w3 the reeipieaC of tw Jfew
BOOK JlND JOB
PKDfTDfC IITsJUmmT!
IKK "SASsTfTm" OeVrCR
Is aew prepared to eseewt. ait stairs for
run ui nil.
OF SVBKY DBlrCJUrTlON,
WITH SSATXM8 AXD DISPATCH
Years pretento "a f4odid'crock lrom ike
American Ckxsk CoflspaBy, and a sjotfee
urn from a few of "hk pciwoal (Hjda in
Now York. Mayer Bewea, of 'Washing-,
.ton, was catted on by nnmoroas friends,
who were booBtifallT eetertaiBed. Other
ratleB opened their becees to the re
ception of visitors?
Snake Poisoning.
At i bmoUbk of tbe Royal Socewtf, OB tbe
37th or September 1888, Fretewar Hatfenl
remarked the following on snake-poieoolog:
It would bo reaet&bered (bathe bad sta
ted on a former occasion that be ootlced the
following points la casea of sns-BoiaasiDK,
namely, the prcsnce after death atMrgo odln
tbe total loss of flbrlne, a perfect SaM Mate
of the blood, au'd the apparent pervefeon of
oxygeu absorbed luto the sytieta. Subse
quent observations bad eooHrmed those facts,
liafoend, however, no (dmlkr oUs in tbe
poison of the snake, and cooieqnwtly, the
origin! of these cell was very mjsUrions.
Mr. Ralph, a Mead of bis, bavlsi; seen these
experiments, nude other ozpvflmQnts with
prussiuadd, and found the cells eotBewaat
similar to those which were noticed after
death by tiger-snake poisoning, lie (Profes
sor Hliioru) bad alto poisoned animuls with
hydrocyanic acid, and after an exaffilMtloB
he found that Mr. Ralph's statements were
perfectly correct; the condition of the Mood
resembled very much that ctTsaake-poiaoa-lag.
Tho origin or tbe cells bed eberefora
yet to, be discovered, and be bad nd dosM
that in time It would be foBBd. He would
say nettling more about this portion of the
question that evening, as he would bring the
subject more fully before the society oa a
future occasion. He would now comment
on an article In The Australasian of July 3E,
1S68. which he would rccommeud should bo
reprinted, for it contained a great deal that
was worth knowing. lie believed he could
detect tbe baud of the writer to be that of
Dr. Mitchell, professor of phlslology at
Philadelphia. The writer was tbe first who
had properly described the connexion be
tween the poison gland and the poison fangs.
Dr. Mitchell had sent to him some grains of
the poison; with a grain of It a doe was
poisoned In five hours. Dr. Mitchell de
scribed tbe recent poison as being perfectly
transparent and containing no ceils. lie
(Professor Halford) had found cells in tbe
tiger-snake poison, and In this dried poison of
tbe rattlesnake when lt was dissolved in
water and placed beneath a microscope be
found some cells and a large quantity of
granular matter. Dr. Short, of Madras,
lound the same characteristics In the poison
of the cobra. Dr. Mitchell went on to say
that rattlesnakes never 'poisoned each otber.
lie (Prof, tlalford) bad tried the experiment
with tlj-er-nike, and had even injected the
poison Into a snake, but never could produce
a fatal effect In tbe rattle-snake-and-cobra
poisonings severe wound and swelling re
sulted to the animal poisoned. In tbe tiger
snake poisoning there was no such wound ;
there was no inthunatlon, no discoloration of
tbe muscles, no putrefaction. It was not so
with the rattle-soakc or the cobra. The ti
ger snake had a weapon very much smaller
tbau cither of these: its venom he believed
was more deadly; it killed more by direct
action on tho blood than by disorganisation
of the tissues. Tbe man who died at Tan
kard's Hotel a short time ago snfferrod great
pain indeed, attention was first drawn to
him by his irroanlng while Mr. Drummond,
had no pain. Dr. Mitchell saw no altera
tion of the blood, even after an exatslnntlon
with the microscope; nor did Dr. Short
observe any alteration after bites by the rattle-snake
and the cobra respectively. Now
be Professor Halford bad tried the cxperi
'ment with both rattle-snake, cobra, tad
tiger-snake poIsoDlns, and he saw the cells
In all, and tho blood in a fluid state after
death, consequently, the point must have
been overlooked both in America and India.
He brought the question before tbe society
because be desired to state that all the obser
vations he had made previously were correct,
though the Inferences he drew were not
borne out. and because be wished that tbe
paper In 37k AustralaHan should be better
known. It would probably take' years- be
fore any result was arrived at by these expe
riments, and before we could understand
how death was produced by snake-poisoning
In the system, but he believed that in time -something
definite would ultimately bo
known.. JLuttralasian.
India-rubber. Inda-rubber is tbe con
creted Juice of a tree called In botany afjAo
nta elaxtica. Tbe tree Is very beautiful after
growing to the height of fty or sixty feet.
The juice, when first extracted, Is a milky
fluid. To concrete this juice wooden forms,
smeared with clay, are dipped Into It and
held over a fire, tbe process beln-; repeated
nntil a mass is obtained. The dried Juice Is
thus darkened by tho smoke, as well as dried
Into a tough, elastic mass. This form of rub
ber is not now extensively used in the arts.
As it is at present used, a large quantity of
sulphnr Is Incorporated with it, whlelaTfor
many purposes, greatly improves it The
? i roc ess called vulcanising consists In beaMse
he rubber, in which sulphur is incorporates,
in close chambers to a proper temperature.
This gives it tbe consistency of horn, and la
this state it is the material used In the manu
facture of bard-rubber goods, such as combe,
knife-handles, buttons, Ac. Rubber la not
as has been supposed, entirely waterproof!
This has been proved by extensive ex perl
ments, but lt is so nearly so, that for all
practical purposes, it may be so considered.
The principal sources of the rubber used in
this country are Central and South America.
The manufacture of India-rubber goods new
constitutes a large and prosperous tednatry.
3. T. Mareantili Jcmmal.
Pb-IlTTSG job CLrvxE-TEati. The annssl
festival called Ch'I-ch'iao, or "praying for
cleverness," took place recently. It Is a
very curious custom, and as it throws sene
light on the manners and inner life of the
Chinese, are here present it to onr reader Is
tbe words of the Foochow AnnaU: " Oa the
seventh night of the seventh moon, tbe la
dies, married and unmarried, (of the family,)
spread out for sacrifice seven sorts of gosf4s
and fruit, seven tea cups, and seven inceose
poU. They then squat down, and, Uklsg
seven threads of silk, try to thread seven
needles by tbe glare caused by the barahag
of a little paper, their respective sklil (is the
performance of female duties,) being evtnessl.
by the number of needles they can each
thread la this short space of time. Th;sJss
catch small spiders and shut tneas np ta
boxes UH the following merBrsg, we, K a
web is span In either of the boxes, lt is sea
sldered a proof that the Deity ha -rretd
to the fortenste '-ol'ner of the hex hr
" prayer for cleverness?' fteeAow AMttHtr.
Oahltojc, In a letter to the Boston Jerunul,
from Cfaba, says that be is ltrfonsed tttat
there are men in that cosatry rich snrmaj to
bay up half a dozen of sneh men as Astor, vaa
derbUt, Belmont and seek men as we, aaM
money-kings. Many Chinese msrehsats ate
much wealthier than the 'BMbtthM. Cart
ton has some apprehensions of the taslaiass
that populous and wealthy country will hare
upon tbe United States.
The old world is em Divine Its
as well as Hs crime into Kew Task
and Citr aos ioeaa u
burden. The Increase of nanperiisa
nag, ana ue proaitm atw k aean
rasMsy, growing snore jaasuK sc.
BttatrriBS often die eta ntsWs,
snsfc Tstee est thaaielaa asAtsaay
isr Wii
mm a jiiwisassr sum re nse hisstwbi m
Ascssawn can .sawkathr e us sett at.,
a wife who ia aH'aiS bcinr sees fcctisz
the slnnWnga 6f &
ataM OVMieMsl shsaMwtfaMaat la WeBVCt WtdOtflt ''
at

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