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The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, April 07, 1869, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1869-04-07/ed-1/seq-1/

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FUBUSilED
Every Wednesday Morning,
at so.oo rnit xsxax.
Mailed to Foreign Subacrllitra nt $7.00.
Office On Merchant street, -west of
he Post Office, Honolulu, II. I.
Printed and pnUlnhsd ly J. MOTT Smith, at the
OoTenunent rrinting Offlce, to whoa; all bnilntn
commnalcatloiKi tnmt be addressed.
BUSINESS NOTICES.
c. n. ixweiis. J. c. ijickjos.
LEAVERS Ai MCKSOJf,
UIPOETEES AUD DEALERS lit LUMBER,
And ill klnd of Building Material, Fort Street,
Honolulu. 2My
A. C. MIJFFUM, 31. I.,
POET PHYSICIAN OF HONOHUIU.
Offlce and Residence "Aldrlcta Honse," Fort Street,
Honolulu. 9-lyS
JOWX S.3IcGieEW, 31.
PHYSICIAN AND SUEGEON,
Office In 11. L. CIjim-'s IlulldloK. Fort Street. Offlce
hours, from Eijrht to Ten a. m., and from Three to
Tire P. M. Kesidence on Chaplain Street, between
2,'unanu and Fort Streets. 8-3m
AXLES & CHILLINGWORTH.
KJVWAIIIAE, HAWAII,
TTO1 continue the General Merchandise and Shipping
lratlneM at the abore port, where tbey are prepor
ml to furnish the jostlv celebrated Kawalhne Pota
toes, and aeh other Itecrulta as are required by
whaleslilr. ' 'he shortest notice and on the most
reasonable terms. Firewood always on hand. 8-ly5
.IOII X. WATERIIOIISE.
IMPORTER AND DEALEE IN GENERAL
MERCHANDISE,
I Queen Street, Honolulu, IL I. lyi
IV. t.. itEz:x,
GENERAL COMMISSION AGENT & BEOKEE
Office In Fire-proof Bnildinss on Queen Street,
JS) Honolulu, II. I. lyl
c. k. srnscER. n. macfablane.
cieas. sri:xci:ic & co.,
GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
54) Queeu Street. Honolulu, II. I. fly4
3IcCOI.A ft joicvsorv,
MERCHANT TAILORS,
JO Fort st Honolulu. opposite T. C. Uenck's. lya
C. 15. 1VIEIIA3tS,
MANCFACTUEEE, IMPOETEB & DEALEE
In Fnrni'ure of every description. Furniture Ware
Koom on Fort Street, opposite Chaw's I'hotoirrapU
(lallery. Workshop at the old stand on Hotel
Street, near Fort. Orders from the other
41 Islands promptly attended to. Iy5
IV. IIKATVEXX,
BOOT AND SHOE MATTER,
41) King Street, next to the Bethel, Honolulu. Qy5
3i. x. Dossnu.,
CABINET MAKER AND UPHOLSTERER,
King Street, Honolulu, opposite Lewis' Cooper Shop.
41 Will buy and sell second-hand Furniture. lya
JOIM TJBBETS. THOS. SOI1EKS0N.
TIISKETS fc SOStEXSOIV,
SHIP CAEPENTERS & CAULKERS
At D. Foster & Co's Old Stand,
Near the Honolulu Iron Works.
XIIEO. II. DAVIES,
Lati Jaxiox, Cues 4 Co.
IMPORTER & COMMISSION MERCHANT,
ASD A0E3T roR
Lloyd's and the Llrerpool Underwriters,
British and Foreign Marine Insnrance Co., and
Northern Assurance Company. 3-ly5
HY.IIAX KKOXIIEKS,
IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS
In Fashionable Clothing, Hats. Cajis, Boots, Shoes,
and erery rariety of Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods.
Snow's Building. Merchant Street, Honolulu. IS0-1)S
J. S. WALKER. 8. C. ALLEN.
1VAXKEII t ALLES,
SHIPPING & COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
19) Queen Street. Ilonolnln, U. L ly
Is. E. XOIIHEItX.
DEALEE IN LUMBER AND EVERY KIND
OF BUILDING MATERIAL.
13 Omcr Corner Queen and Fort streets. Iy4
IIOEEE.S fc CO.,
SHIP CHANDLERS AND COMMISSION
MERCHANTS,
Queen Street, Honolulu. Particular attrition paid
to the purchase and sale of Hawaiian Ptoduce.
UIFERS BT FCRMISSI03 TO
C L I'.ichards t Co, I II 1 lackfeld a Co,
C Brewer a Co, C L Bichards a Co,
1 C Waterman Esq, (Castle a Cooke. P-lr5
IKA KICIIAItISO.
IMPOETEB & DEALEE IN BOOTS, SHOES,
And Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods, corner of Fort
and Merchant Streets, Honolulu. P-lyS
Emvix JOKES,
GEOCEE AND SHIP CHANDLEE,
Lnhnlnn, Haul.
Money and Recruits furnished to Ships on the most
10) fatorable terms. lj
CHUING IIOOIV,
Commission Merchant and General Agent,
Importer of Teas and other Chinese and Foreign
Goods, holesale Dealer In Hawaiian Produce, and
Agent for the Paukaa and Amaualu Sugar Planta
tions, Fire-proof Store- on Xuuanu Street, below
King. "l-l?4
AFOKG .V; ACBIUCIC.
Importersi Wholesale and Eetail Dealers
In General Merchandise and China Goods, in the
Fire-proof Store on Xuuanu Street, under the Public
HalL . U-U
CEOUGE G. IIOWE,
Dealer in Eedwood and Northwest Lumber,
Shingles, Doors, Sashes, Blinds, Nails, Paints, etc,
36) at his old stand on the Esplanade. ljl
F. A. SCIIAEFEIt & CO.,
C0H14ISSI0N MEECHANTS,
39 Ilonolnln. Oahu, II. I. (Iy
ED. HOFFSCHLAEGEE & C0M
IMPORTERS & COMMISSION MEECHANTS
11 Honolulu, Oahn, II. J. P)i
XIIEOUOKE C. IIEECK,
IMPOETEB & COMMISSION MERCHANT.
1-8 Honolulu. Oahn. II. I. IT
II. IIACjKFEEO V CO.,
GENERAL COMMISSION AQENTS.
8-5 Queen Street, Honolulu, H. I. ly
C1EVUKCEV C. JIEKKEXX,
DEALEE IN NEWSPAPERS, MAGAZINES,
And Periodicals, Fort Street, Honolulu. 13-lj4
S. r. KBLEKJ. A. JAEGER.
II. F. EIIEEKS Az CO.,
DEALERS IN DEY GOODS AND GENERAL
MERCHANDISE,
Fire-proof Store on Fort Street, abore Odd Fellows"
HalL S!-1yi
E. P. ADAMS. S. O. WILDER.
AOAMS &; "IVIEWER,
AVCTION & COMMISSION MEECHANTS
g Queen Street, Honolulu, II. I. Py4
C. S. IIAltXOIV,
AU CTION EER.
Salesroom on Queen Street, one door from K Saha
ra anu StreeL
17-ly
II. A. 'VIIE3IAX?ii,
NOTARY PUBLIC,
6) Offlce at the Interior Department. ljS
THE TOM M00EE TAVEE1T,
BV J. O'lVIEEE,
25 Corner of King and Fort Streets. Pj-1
HAW
VOL. Y NO. 12.!
BUSINESS NOTICES.
8HCKXAX rtcx.
h. a. . casus.
C. BKE1VER fc CO.,
SHIPPING AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
HONOLULU, II. I.
AGEXT5 Or the Iloston and Honolulu
Packet Line.
AGENTS For the Mahee, Walluku and
liana Plantations.
AGEXTS For the Parcliase ond Sale of
Island Produce. My5
F. A. SCIIAEFEIt,
A'
GEXT for the UREMEJf HOARD
of UXDERWIUTEES.
Agent for the Dresden Board of Underwriters,
Agent for the Tieuna Board of Underwriters.
S Pj
M. S. ORKVRAEM Jc CO.,
I IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS
I In Fashionable Clothing, lints. Caps, Hoots, Shoes,
and every variety of Gentlemen's superior Farniih
' Inr Ootls. Store in Matee's Block, Queen Street,
Honolulu, IL I- jiu-iya
.IOIJ.A- II. PATY,
Notary Public and Commissioner of Deeds
For the State of California Office at the Bank of
Bishop k Co , Kaahumanu Street, Uonolnlu. 3-ly3
G. AV. SOKTOX,
C00PEE AND GAUGEE,
At the New Stand on the Esplanade.
He Ik prepared to attend to all work in bis line
at the Shop next to the Custom Ilonse, where be can
be found t all workiDK hour. He hai on band
and for !, Oil Casks and Barrel of different sizes,
new and old. hich be will sell at the Terj Lowest
Market Katw All ork done In a thorough manner
and warranted to pive hatisfactlon. All kind of
Cooperin;; Material and Tooli for sale. l-3m
IB. Jc . SKGKMK,
TIB", ZINC AND COPPER SMITHS,
AND SHEET IRON WORKERS,
Nuuanu Street, between Merchant & Queen.
Harecontantlyonbandj Stoves, Pfpe.Gal
Kju. Tamzel Iron Iije, Plain and Hone Uiths,
CyEB& Stop-cocks. India Habher Hose best 3-ply,
GiiZft ,u IcuSl- of IS an(1 w f- couplings
j and pipe complete. Bath-Tab, and also a
Tery large suck of Tinware of every description.
Partsttitur attention piren to Sbip-Woik. Ordera
from tbe other Island will be carefully attended to.
Thankful to the Citltena of Honolulu and the
Islands generally fur thtlr liberal patronage in the
past, we hope by strict attention to business to merit
the aatue fr the future. 37-ly5
COOPER AND GAUGER,
At the Old Stand, comer King & Bethel Sts.
A Large Stock of Oil Shocks and all kinds of Coop
ering Materials constantly on band. He hopes by
attention tt business to merit a continuance of the
patronage which he has heretofore enjoyed, and for
which he now returns hU thank. I3m
jr. ii. xiioiiii'sorv,
GENEEAL BLACKSMITH,
Queen Street, Honolulu,
Has constantly on hantl and for sale at the Lowest
Market Prices, a good assortment of the Best Kenned
Bar Iron, and the Best Blacksmith's Coal. SS-IyS
ISO. SOTT.
SAV'L XOTT.
IOIi:V JiOTT &; CO.,
C0PPEE AND TIN SMITHS,
Kaahumanu St, one door above FHtner's,
Beg leure to inform the public that they are pre
lred to furnish all kinds of Copper Work, such as
S1 tills, Strike 1'ans, Sorghum Fans, Worms, Pnmps,
etc Also on hand, a full assortment of Tin Ware,
which we offer for sal at the Lowest Market Prices.
AH kind of Repairing done with Neatness aud
Dispatch. Order from tbe other Islands will meet
with prompt attention. l-3m
IE. KYCKOFT,
HOUSE AND SHIP PLUMBER,
King St, two doors west of Castlo & Cooke's.
Has on hind, Bath-Tubs, Water-Cloeets, Wwh-Ba-Bins,
Force and Lift Pumps, Lead and Galvanized
Iron Pipes, aod Plumber Brassworks. Being the
only Plumber in tbe city, he will execute all order en
trusted to him in a workmanlike manner. I-3m
jut. a. COSTA,
. JEWELER AND ENGRAVER,
Fort Street opposite Odd Fellows Hall,
I prcjtared to execute with promptness, all work in
bis line of husincM, such as Watch and Clock repair
log. Manufacturing Jewelry and Engraving. l-3m
LICENSED SKIPPING AGENT,
Office on James Bobmson & Go's Wharf,
Continue the business on hl old plan of settling
with officers and seanirn immediately on their ship
ping at hi offlce. Having no direct or indirect con
nection w itb any outfitting establishment, aud allow
ing no debts to be collected in his office, he hopes to
give aa good eathtfaction in tbe future a he has In
the pa(. l-3m
SEVERE IEJHOUSE,
King Street, 3iSirs Near Fort.
fTIM I IS FAVORITE and well -known
JL Establishment is now open for Boarders and
Transient Visitors.
The Best tbe Market affords, cf every Tarietyt will
always be provided, with good attendance.
Board per week 0.00 up stairs. 4.00 down stairs.
S-3m AH HOX, Proprietor.
It. XKK3IIi:iE,
Piano-Forte Maker & Tuner,
Has Returned Aguln
AU order left at the Drug Store of
juj . ji. smiin & jo., corner 01 ori ana
I uvtri cii rr vi s i aaa. f uiun a
Furnitiir Itmim. Hfitnl Ptiwt will
meet with immediate attention. 9-6mc
House, Sign & Ship Painters,
Kln Street) near Xuuanm
f?C& QtttofaZm Marblhig, Gilding, Calsominlng,
K2jlIert4CInK c. Ac., executed on tbe
shortest notice, and on the most reasonable
term. 12-3m
VOLCANO HOUSE,
CRATER OF KILA.0EA, HAWAII.
THIS KSTAHI.ISIIMKNT IS
rizf now open for the rccrption of visitors to C.
tbe Volcano Hoose, who may Tty on finding com.
furtable rooms, a good table, anil prompt attendance.
Experienced guides for the Crater always on hand.
STEAM AND SULPHUK BATHS ! .
Horses Grained and Stabled if Desired.
CHAItGKS REASONABLE.
Parties Tisiting the Volcano Tia IIUo, can procure
animals warranted to make the journey, by S. II.
Hitch cocr, Esq. 27-135
PIANOS TUNED.
PIANOS and other Musical
Instruments Tuned and Repaired, br
Letsoni glrenontlie Piano t Gultart
The best of references giren. 5l-ly5
AT THE PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY
On Fort Street!
MAT BE SEEK THE VIE VS taken
of the I-ate
IiUva I'Iom' at Kaliuku,
And the Effects of the Late
Earthquake at 1Valonlnnf Kan.
Views of Silacea and other places. Also Cards
of the Kings, Uaeens, Chiefs, etc, all for sale at low
prices. Also, Oral and Square Frames of all sizes,
which will be sold cheap.
1-Im JI. L. CHASE.
A 1 1 A
HONOLULU,
POltEIGN NOTICES.
B. W. SETIUXCZ. C. E. CLAaE.
SEVERANCE, CLARK & CO.,
COMMISSION MEECHANTS
AUD SHIPPING AGENTS,
405 Front St, corner of Clay, San Francisco.
We will attend to the sale of Sogar and all kind
of Island Produce, also to tbe purchasing and for.
warding of jlercbaodise. Cash Adrances made on
Consignments. ll-6m
J0BX St'CaAClff, J. C. VEKRTU,
Portland. S. F. CaL
SI'CRAKEK, MERRILL & CO.,
F0EWASDING AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Portland, Oregon.
navinp been enpafted In our present business for
upwards of twelve rears, and being located In a Fire-,
proof Brick KniMinp, we are" prepared to receive and
difpooe f Island Staples, such a Sojcar.a-vnips, Rice,
Pnln, Coffee, etc, to advantage. Consignments es
pecially solicited for the Oregon 3Iarket, to which
jicrFonal attention will be paid, and upon which cub
advances will be made when required.
EErXKiscta
Charles V Brooks San Franciwo
J C Merrill a Co
Fredlken "
Bad per a Lfndenberger
James Patrick t Co
Wm T Coleman t Co "
Stevens, Baker a Co
Allen a Lewis Fortland
LaddaTHton 41
Leonard a Green 1-1 j5
e. m. TAR ici:r:c,
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
Kanagawo. Japan
Having the Wit faicilities through an Intimate con
nection with tbe Japanese trade for the past eight
years, is prepare, to transact any business entrusted
to his care, with dispatch. 17-lyl
n. b. wilua3, n, p. blaxchaep, c. b. xomix.
WILLIAMS. BLANCHARD & CO..
SHIPPING & COMMISSION KEECHANIS,
4c 305 Front Street, San Francisco. 0m
LANGLEY, CR0WELL & CO.,
WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS,
32 Cor. Battery & Clay Sts, San Francisco. 6ni
AMERICAN EXCHANGE
HOTEL,
Sanaome Street, San Francisco,
Extending from Sacramento St. to Ualleck Street.
HAVING BEEN IIECEXTI.Y REX.
orated and neal Furnished, makes it the
most quiet, economical and comfortable FAMILY
IIOTKL in the State. lMng centrally located, it of
fers erery inducement for Business Men and the Pub
lic Keneraliy.
The Tables will be constantly supplied with every
luxury the matket affords. Tbe American Excbauge
Coach, with Red Lights, will be at the WbarTes and
Depots, to convey passengers to the Hotel free.
My4 TIMOTHY SARGEXT, rrop"r.
SEEDS T SEEPS!
FKESII SUPPLIES OF
GARDEN, FLOWER, FRUIT,
AND TREE SEEDS,
Received by Every Steamer Also
CRASS & CLOVER SEEDS,
Of suitable varieties for this Climate, comprising
Xlie lsirct collection of Seed
To be found on this Coast. Orders by Mail or Ex
press promptly attended to in their turn. Address
GEO. F. SYIVESTKIt,
Seedsman
2-4mc 317 Washington Street, San Francico.
INSURANCE NOTICES.
SAA FKAACISCO
BOARD OF UNDERWRITERS.
TIIB UKDGRSIGNED liavlug been
appointed Agents for the San Francisco Uwd
of Underwriters, comprising the
California Iimirancc Company,
Ulercliant1 Jtlutual ?Iarlnc In. Co.,
Pacific Insurance Company,
Call Torn In Lloyd's, and
Home Mutual Insurance Company.
Beg leare to inform Masters of Vessels and the Pub
lic generally, that all Vessels and Cargoes, insured
by cither of the abore Companies against perils of
the seas and other risks, at or near tbe Sandwich
Islands, will hare to be verified by them.
l-3m II. HACKFELD A CO.
CAIJFOKAU
INSUBANCE COMPANY.
The: undersigned, agekts or
the above Company, bare been authorized to
insure risks on Cargo, Freight and Treas
ure, by Coaster, from Honolulu to all ports of
tbe Hawaiian Group, and vice versa.
S-lyS It. HACKFELD k CO,
MEKCUAiVrS MUTUAL
MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY
Of San Francisco
THE UNDERSIGNED having been
appointed Agents for tbe above Company .are
prepared to Issue Policies on Cargoes, Freights
and Treasure
WALKER k ALLEN,
l-3m Agents, Ilonolnln.
IIA3llIJIEGII-HKE3Ii;iV
FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY.
THE UNDERSIGNED having been
appointed Agents of tbe above Company, are
prepared to insure risks against Fire, on Stone and
liriclc Dulldlngs, and on 3Iercuandlee
stored therein, ou tbe most favorable terms. For
particulars apply at tbe offlce of
My5 F. A. SCIIAEFEIt k CC.
Insurance Notice.
THE AGENT FOR THE BRITISH
Foreign Marine Insurance Comjony, (Limit
ed), bas received instructions to reduce tbe rates of
Insurance between Uonolnluand Ports In the Pacific,
and is now prepared to issue Policies at tbe Zowest
Rata, with a special reduction on Freight per Steam
ers. TIIEO. II. DATIFS,
. 43-tf Jgcnt BriL Jbr. Jfar. Int. Co. (limilal).
BEST ENGLISH Rolled Paint Oil.
For sale by
I-am BOLLE3 CO.
BEST FAMILY PORK,
per IOLAM, InUuJiJ barrels. For sale
by (l-3m) BOLLES t CO.
BOXES EASTERN CODFISH,
per IOLAM. For sale by
l-3m BOLLES t CO.
CALIFORNIA TABLE FRUITS,
Assorted in cases and 2 lb cans. For sale
by rt-Cm) BOLLES i CO.
HUIIBUCK'S PATENT ZINC PAINT
Tbe best article or tbe kind imported. For
sale by (l-3m) BOLLES t CO.
HUNT'S HANDLED AXES.
Best quality. For sale by the case or ivta
by (13m) BOLLES t CO.
ROSENDALE CEMENT,
tbe genuine article, per I0LANI. For sale
by (1-Zm BOLLES t CQ.
STEERING OARS,
2 feet In length. For sale by
1-Sm BOLLES CO.
SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE,
For ale by
l-3m BOLLES k CO
WEDNESDAY, APBI
A Voyage to the Fiji is.
SCMBER POCBTEES.
Written for the Gazette.
I had not intended to signalize Phillips'
men with the canoe until some time in
Bickford's watch, or near the close of it
about midnight A little after nine o'clock,
Tiowever, I inadvertantly made the signal.
It was done in this way. I was sitting on
the end of tbe windlass, thinking, with
Tarying emotions, over the rash undertak
ing in which I was about to engage, and
its possible consequences; I was smoking
a. pipe, and at length, thoughtless of what
I was doing, knocked, tbe ashes out of my
pipe over the wde, and placing the imple
ment on the rail, weqjafto consult the
watch in tbe biunaclc, toascertain the hour.
Beturning forward, after tbe lapse of about
ten minutes, I mechanically went to tbe
bow, and leaning my arms on the rail,
peered out into the dim starlight. There,
right under the bowsprit, holding on to the
chain cable, was a canoe, with two naked
Fijiimen, silently looking up at me. They
were Phillips' men, and had taken the
dregs of fire which fell from my pipo as
the preconcerted sisnal, and consequently
bad come off. In such a case, delays were
dangerous, and I at once went below and
called Jim Bickford, and in a few whisper
ed words informed him of the state of af
fairs. Stealthily, and as noiselessly as pos
sible, we proceeded to hoist on deck my
chest, which contained all our joint pos
sessions in the shape of clothes, and they
were far from being numerous or valuable.
Indeed, bad a rat fallen into it, he would
have run the risk of breaking his neck.
But as cautious as we were not to make a
noise in getting the' chest up tho forecas
tle ladder, one of the crew was awakened,
and as wo were about lowering it into the
canoe, he came on deck. Ho was a Dane,
John Johnson by name. Now, thought 1,
it is all up with our expedition ; this fel
low will surely "blow" on us. And as he
instantly divined our purpose to abscond,
be threatened at once, to inform on us.
We entreated him to keep silent, and at
length, by bribing him with the gift of two
new flannel shirts from our poor stock of
clothing, and sundry plugs of tobacco, wo
prevailed on him to leave the deck and re
tire to his bunk.
A t length, the chest fairly placed on the
platform of tho little canoe, we swung our
selves down from tbe martingale and sat
side by side on the chest, our silent Fijii
men they bad not yet spoken a word
shoved off from the brig and paddled to
wards the mouth of the river leading to
Hewa-town. Jim and I were equally silent.
Tbe thoughts of the rash and perilous un
dertaking to which we bad now fairly com
mitted ourselves, were uppermost in our
minds, and precluded all inclination to con
verse. The brig lay about four miles from the
mouth of the river, and it was midnight
before we got in shore. There were some
eight or ten miles further to be passed over
before reaching tbo town. Instead, bow
ever, of proceeding directly up the main
river, our canoemen made a detour to the
left, and entered a narrow and shallow
creek or branch, which came out not far
below the town. Dropping the paddles,
the men took to poleing, and made good
headway. The banks of tbe creek were
not over six yards apart, and densely over
grown with mangrove.
The night, which, when wo left the ves
sel, had been a bright starlight, now be
came of a pitchy darkness, and soon the
rain began to fall. Gradually it increased
from a shower to a deluge. When it rains
at Kewa, there is no ignoring the fact that-
it rains in earnest. For two hours and a
half wo sat on our chest, the water pour
ing down upon our devoted heads in per
fect sheets and floods. Twice were our
oar natives compelled to stop and bail out
the canoe, not that she leaked, but actually
on account of tbe rain. Then tbey would
resume their poles, and send the little
craft shooting rapidly along through the
darkness and the silent, leafy solitudes of
the creek. It was
"Water, water everywhere
And not a drop to drink."
To say that this unpleasant commence
ment of our adventures made my compan
ion and I feel miserable, both in body and
and mind, would be but a mild way of put
ting it. Jim was thoroughly disgusted,
and more than once proposed that we
should tell the canoemen to turn back to
the brig. But I decidedly objected to any
retrogade movement. We bad fairly em
barked on what 1 acknowledged might be
a very foolish enterprise, but I had no idea
of going back to be laughed at by my ship
mates. Besides, I added, these two big
Fijiimen have got their ordes from Phil
lips to bring us up to his place, aod you
may depend they will do so, dead or alive.
Thi3 last argument silenced Jim.
At length, after four houre of alternate
poleing and paddling through the rain and
Cimmerian darkness, tbe canoe wa3 ran
upon the beach, and the natives, now for
the first time breaking the silence, said
"Sa tigo." We could just see the outlines
of Phillips' big house, and shivering with
cold, and cramped with sitting so long in
one position, we gladly jumped ashore and
1 proceeded to the house. Phillips was re
a i7i
U1VJJJJ
L 7, 1869.
clining on the mats, his head on the lap of
his "mamma." and greeted ns very cheerily.
"How d'ye do. Come aboard. You pretty
wet, outside, eh ? Well, s'pose we wet in
side, too?" His lordship was literally 'as
drunk as a lord," having possessed himself
of a keg of Deacon Giles' best. A "tanoa,"
or awa-bowl, stood near him, containing
about a gallon of the rum, which he press
ed us to partake of. As hot water and
molasses were at hand, we all took a swig
of the decoction, and Jim and I. having
got on dry clothes, and seeing the prepar
ations making for a hot supper, began to
feel comfortable. He, however, wa3 always
"borrowing trouble." and a3 I inquired of
him looking around at the comfortable
scene, the women bustling about, setting
on the smoking hot yams, pork and fish
whether he was not glad he had come?
"Yes," he said, "it was all well, so far; bnt
wouldn't the "old man" be mad when he
found we were gone, and wouldn't he get
us back again?" "Oh, nonsense." replied
I; "he can't get ns without Phillips' con
sent, and there's no fear of his getting
that."
After a hearty supper and a smoke, Phil
lips showed us where we were to sleep,
and where we were to remain concealed
until the brig should have sailed. This
was inside of a large tapa mosquito bar,
ivbich wa3 stretched along on one side of
the house, and was itself, roomy enough to
contain twenty or thirty persons. Our
chest was placed out of sight, high up on
a wide shelf at one end of the house a
place of deposit for mats, ropes and oth
er matters, and known in Fijii as the
"bata." "Now, boys," said Phillips, get
inside of that 'tau namu,' and there you
will be safe." As we lay down on the lux
uriously yielding piles of mats and tried to
compose ourselves to rest, it was a long
time before "tired Nature's sweet restorer,
balmy sleep," lulled us into forgetfulness.
Even then, in dream1", I was at one time
again in the canoe, threading tho dark
windings of tbe creek, and at other times,
I was once more on board the brig, having
been captured, and was about to receive a
justly dreaded lecture and a thrashing from
the captain.
About nine o'clock in tho morning we
awoke, and immediately the servant women
of tho house on whom the duty devolved
of closely watching us, and providing for
our wants brought us water for the morn
ing ablution, and pieces of new, white tapa,
for towels. Th'i3 over, they inquired "Sa
kana?" would we eat. Then came a
warm breakfast, served up on freshly pluck
ed leaves of the breadfruit, washed down
with wai catacata hot fish-broth, served
in polished cocoanut-shells the feast con
cluding with a profusion of the various
tropical fruits of the country. Luxurious
fare, was it not, on which to regale two
runaway sailor-boys? Whilo we were eat
ing, squatted in our rear were two of the
female servants, plying, for our comfort,
each a huge fan, and occasionally saying,
in persuasive tones "kana, kana" eat,
eat. Youthful appetites and good diges
digestive powers did not require much urg
ing, and we made a breakfast fit for a king.
After the remains of the repast had been
removed, Phillips came inside of the "tuu
namu" to bid us good morning. To my
surprise, he was quite sober. He inform
ed u3, not a little to onr alarm, that a canoe
had arrived from tho brig but a few min
utes before, with a message from the cap
tain to the king, informing him of our
having absconded, and offering to pay n
musket and a keg of powder each for our
capture and return on board. "Just as I
expected," whimpered Jim. "Won't we
catch fits from the 'old man' when we get
on board!" I acknowledged that we prob
ably should. "Never you fear," said Phil
lips ; "the 'old man' no take you out of my
house." So our lears were partially re
moved, and we lay quietly down and went
to sleep again, our chief, on leaving U3, re
peating frequently, "never you fear."
Judging from the lapse of time, it was
somewhat past mid day when Jim and I
were again awakened by the dusky houris
who presided over the culinary department,
with an invitation to eat. While we were
performing the task of taking dinner. We
heard Phillips' voice, as he entered the
house, talking with some one in English.
The women, mysteriovsly putting their
fingers to their lips, motioned ns to keep
silence. Presently, we heard a foreigner i
say, in reply to some remark of the chiefs,
"Yes, I'd like d d well to know where
they are stowed away. I'm blowed if I
woaldn't have them muskets and them
there keg3 of powder afore night." Phil
lips laughed, and said, "Me, too." Then
the rum-keg 'was brought out, and the two
sat down to serious drinking. Peeping
through the "tau namu," we saw and recog
nized the stranger. It was a fellow known
in Rewa as "Gipsy Jim," one of the low
est type of "beach-combers." Some said
he wa3 a cockney-jew, but from his com
plexion and features, he certainly had to
me, the appearance of a gip3y. He was
black-haired, with black eyes that were
large, sparkling and almond-shaped, and
his complexion was coffee-colored. Short,
too. of stature. The most remarkable fea
ture about him, however, was his eyes
wild, piercing and restless, that hurriedly
Tl
$6.00 PER YEAR.
glanced hither and thither, and took note,
apparently, of everything in tho house.
The principle subject of conversation be
tween him and Phillips, appeared to be
the two runaways from the brig Jim and
myself. He expressed a great curiosity to
know where we had gone to. "Do you go
for to think," said he, "that the 'Long Fel
low' has been and stowed them away?'
(This was the name of Phillips' younger
brother, Nagoriungio, as applied to bim by
the foreigners, on account of his extreme
height and slimness ot build.) "Yes," re
plied Phillips, draining off a pot of rum,
"I think be got them two fellows down at
Nukuluku. He like wbite man very
much." Tbe contrary was tbe case, as
Gipsy Jim must have very well known,
for Shark's Tooth, unlike most of the
chiefs of Rewa, had no foreigners living
with him. In fact, he was tbe least inclin
ed to sociability, as well as being tbe poor
est and less powerful of the royal family of
Kewa all of which might have resulted
from tbe fact of his being the youngest of
the three brothers constituting the said
tatnily of Kewa, and its tributaries.
After imbibing pot after potfull of the
rum, Gipsy Jim and Phillips rolled over
on the mats, both apparently badly drunk,
but the latter was cunning enough to pre
tend inebriation, while with the gipsy it
was a real fact, and he lay out on his back,
dead drunk. Iu a few moments Phillips
arose, and coming over to the opposite side
of the "tau namu" from where the gipsey
lay, he whispered to us to the effect that
he understood that fellow's object. It was
to spy out whether we were in the neigh
borhood. He had, however, fooled and
got him drunk. On our expressing sur
prise that the large quantity of liquor that
he had drank had produced so little appar
ent effect upon him, while it had laid the
foreiguer so completely out, he replied,
with a smile of conscious triumph "Oh, I
always drink three or four white men drunk,
then I begin to feel littlo drunk too, my
self." A native one of the chiefs confidential
attendants hero made his appearance and
whispered some words to his master, who
then said to us, "Somebody come to see
me, good-bye, for a little time." Peeping
again beneath the mosquito bar, I saw
enter the house, a person who had all the
appearance of a young Fijii chief. He
had the usual large, flowing maro around
his waist, and the "naisala" or turban, of
white tapa ou hist head, but no other cloth
ing. Except that tbe color of his skin
was extremely light for a native of the
country, he would pass easily for one of
them. Sitting down with Phillips, they
commenced to converse in English, much
to my surprise, for I had never heard that
there was another native, besides our host,
who talked English. My astonishment
was increased as I listened, aud heard the
new-comer using as good language ns one
could expect to hear in any place where
the English language is spoken. Where,
thought I, could that almost naked savage
have learned to speak English with so pure
and faultless an accent? Occasionally, he
interlarded his speech with a fow words of
Fijiian, with which language he wa3 evi
dently quite familiar, and once, to my utter
astonishment, he repeated u Latin adage,
and then, after a laugh at Phillips' puzzling
as to what tbe meaning was, explained
that tbe words inculcated the idea that
one should speak no ill of the dead.
After the two had spent half an hour in
chatting, drinking rum aud smoking seleu
kas, Phillips whispered a few words to the
other, pointing at tbe same time at Gipsy
Jim who still lay stretched out in drunk
en insensibility and then the pair came
in behind the mosquito bar. "Boys," said
Phillips, "this one of your country people.
But he no belong to 'Merica now ; be big
man in Fijii." Thus introduced, tbe stran
ger, who had so aroused my curiosity, pro
ceeded to satisfy it, by giving me a short
account of his adventures, which I will re
late in my next.
To U continued.
As iRisnuAs's Will. I, Timothy Doolau,
of Balljdownderry, in the County Clare,
farmer, being sick and weak In me lees, but
of sound head and warm heart, glory be to
heaven, do make this, my first and last Oold
and Xew Testament.
First, I give me scul to Him who gave It,
whin it pleases Him to take It, and sbure no
thanks to me, for I can't help It thin, and me
body to be buried In tbe grounds in Ballj
downderry cba pel, where all me kit and kin
have gone before me, and those who live
afthnr me, belonging to me are burrled,
peace to their ashes, and may the sod
not rest lisbtly on their bones. Bnry me
near me godfather, Felix O'FIagherty, be
twixt and between him and me father and
mother, who be seperated altogether at the
other side of the chapel-yard.
I lave tbe bit of ground, containing ten
acres, rale ould Irish acres, to me eldest son
Tim, after tbe death of bis mother, If she
survives him.
Me daogbter Mary and her husband. Faddy
O'Regan, are to get tbe wbite cow that's
going to bare the twelve black pigs five
weeks before the first of next June,
Teddy, me second boy, that was kilt In the
war in Amerikay, might have bis pick of the
poultry, bat as be Is gone I lave them to his
wife, who died a week before him.
I bequate to all mankind tbe fresh air of
heaven, ill tbe fishes of the sea they can take,
and all the birds of tbe air they can shoot.
I lave to them all tbe sun, moon, and stars.
I lave to Peter Bafferty a pint of potheen.
I can't finish, and may God be merciful to
him 1 Amen. Traonrr Soolax.
Somz mouths ago a paper appeared in
Madrid called The Democrat. A few num
bers only were printed but the editor,
being a man of ability, said enough to find
himself sentenced to one hundred and two
years imprisonment. The recent revolution,
however, set him tree.
innnnTn
BOOK AND JOB
PRINTING ESTABLISHMENT I
THE "GAZETTE OIFICE
Is now prepared to xecot atll orden for
U MS WY n.
OF EVERY DEhCKIITIOX,
WITH NEA.TNEB3 AND DISPATCH
What CossTmrrss LawitoMabruoe.
A remarkable case has Jnst been tried in
Westchester county, before Justice Gilbert.
Some years ao William Taylor, formerly a
resident ot New Tori, and subsequently of
Rye Neck, In the town of Rye, and in the
same county, died and was buried, leaving
the whole of his property, amounting to
more than half a million, to three daughters
and one son, as bis heirs. In addition to
these there appeared other claimants In the
person of Mrs Catherine Panline Taylor,
whose maiden name was Kate A jl wird, and
hertwo children, as the widow and offspring
of the deceased William Taylor; and to test
the Tallditv of this claim. Mrs. Marr Van
Tuyl, one of the married daughters of
Mr. Taylor, commenced a suit against
the other claimants, for a partition of
the property. The deceased. It appears, died
intestate, and hence no other course than
this was open to the claimants. Eminent
counsel appeared for both the contestants,
and tbe leading features of tbe case having
been presented to tbe Court, it was decided
mat the delense snonia proceed to prove toe
legitimacy of the children alleged to be the
otbprlne of the deceased. Tbe case was
opened by Samnel E. Lyon, on behalf of tbe
children, aud Mrs. Catherine Taylor deposed
to the circumstances which led to her inti
macy and subsequent marital relations with
Mr. Taylor. She was engaged in bis bouse
as a seamstress and chambermaid, and first
made bis acquaintance in March 1835, In
Kew York. Alter the death of his wife, and
in May of the same year, when tbe family
removed to Rye, she accompanied them.
She was then if years of age, and Mr. Tay
lor about 50. lie' began his courtship by
paving marked attentions to her, and as he
did not live very happily with his family, he
came to see her very frequently, and finally
made proposals to her in her own room, tell
ing her that he wanted somebody to be more
of a companion to him than bis daughters
were. He spoke of marriage, and the said
she did not think rich and poor should go
together. He wa6 very urgent and very af
fectionate, Insisting that tbe marriage cere
mony was not necessary In their case; that
tbe tact of their intimate relations would be
sufficient proof of their marriage, and that,
as to rich and poor, he married bis first wife
in a calico dress, and so she finally consent
ed to stand In those relations with blm, espe
cially as be offered to have tbe marriage sol
emnized at the expiration of two years if she
should then desire it. She bore three chil
dren to him, one of whom died. He visited
her regularly two or three times a week,
taught his children to call him "papa," and
was very fond of them. She had introduced
him as her "husband" to friends, and he
never objected and be frequently called her
"wife" and "Kate." He bought a bouse at
Harlem for her to live In, and she received
him there a few days before bis death. He
was very weak, and she had to support him
on her arm across tbe bridge. Sbe heard of
his death through an anonymous hand. He
was always very kind to bcr, and provided
her with every necessary she required.
The jury returned a verdict to the effect
that Mrs. Taylor was the lawful wife, and is
the lawful widow of the late William Taylor,
and that tbe children are bis Issue by ber.
Ex-Judge Nelson asked to have proceedings
stayed to give time to carry the case to the
general term of the Supreme Court, and SO
days were allowed for that purpose. Mrs.
T. received the congratulations of her
friends on tbe result. Sea York Sun.
The Daedaselles. These celebrated cas
tles, four In number, are on the confines of
Europe and Asia, on the shores of the Hells
pont. They are on opposite sides of the
Straits, which Is some 13 leagues long, and
named from the strong towers which fiank
its shores, the Strait of tbe Dardanelles.
These castles arc eo situated as to protect
tbe approach to Constantinople, of which
city tbey are regarded as tbe key, although
the day has not always been efficient In pre
serving Inviolate tbe metropolis of the Tur
kish Empire. Tbe name "Dardanelles" Is
supposed to have been derived from the
ancient city of Dardanum. The entrance
to tbe Hellespont Is guarded by two castles,
built in tbe middle of tbe seventeenth cen
tury, by Mahomet the Fourth, as a means
of protection to tho Turkish fleets against
the enterprising Venetians. The forts are
well armed but poorly manned. A littlo
distance from tbe town of Schenekalcssl a
narrow strip of land projects Into the sea.
This was the spot where the ancient Abydos
was situated, and there is a corresponding
projection on the Europern side of the Helles
pont, made memorable by being tbe locality
of Sestos. It was between these projections
that the enamored Leandcr crossed to visit
his beautiful Hero; here, too, It Is supposed
that the imperious Xerxes built bis bridge,
and crossed with bis immense host to bis
contemplated subjugation of Greece, and
here, also, was where tbe great Alexander
passed to accomplish bis wonderful Asiatic
conquests. Lord Byron, in emulation of
Leander, swam across tbe Hellespont at tbe
same point as bis romantic prototype, though
the feat is not one of difficult accomplish
ment, as the distance between the two points
Is only about seven-eights of a mile, and
since Byron cangbt UU ague in tbe attempt,
It bas been successfully performed by many
others, unnamed and unnoticed.
The Hellespont the classic name of the
Dardanelles takes its title from Hclle, a
mythological personage, said to be the daugh
ter of Atbamas and Nepbalc. She fled from
her father's bouse, with her brother to avoid
the persecution of ber mother-in-law, Ino.
Some of the ancient poets relate that tbe
was carried through the air on a golden ram,
which her mother had received from Nep
tune, and, becoming giddy, sbe fell Into the
sea, which, from that circumstance, took
its name; others assert that she was borne
on a cloud, or a flying-ship, from which the
fell into tbe sea and was drowned.
It bas been a delusive Idea of the Turks
that their capital was to protected by the
fortifications on tbe shores of tbe Dardanelles
as to be impregnable, for in several instances,
enemies' ships of war have passed these
fortifications and without material injury.
This occurred In 1770, when the Russian
Admiral Elpelnstone passed and re-passed
tbem; Commodore Balnbridge, In 1S01, In
the frigate George n'tuhlnglon , did tbe same
thing, and it was also done in 1807, by the
English Admiral Duckworth. If, In the
crisis of her fate, Turkey has not, in the
hearts of her population, the energy requi
site for her preservation, tbe fortifications on
the shores of the Dardanelles will not save
ber from becoming a Russian province
A Cbitio Outwitted. Hiram Powers, tho
famous sculptor, will visit his native country
the coming summer, it is stated, and spend
some months with his relative In Cincinnati,
He is a native of that city, and lived there for
many years, having first shown his genius by
making some excellent wax figures for Dor
feuifs Museum, a well-known place of amuse
ment in the West at that. time. Among other
figures, be made one of Alexander Drake, a
popular comedian In that section thirty years
ago. Some of Powers' friends Were to much
pleased with his work that tbey Invited the
Queen City journalists to look at It, among
them, one notorious for his bypercritldsm,
and believed to b something of a pretender
withal. The particular critic came In tbe
evening, when the Mnsentu was dimly light
ed, and took his position before tbe glass
case. After gazing at the figure very intently'
for five minutes, he said to Powers, who was
at his elbow: "There are tome good point
about this, Hiram; but it bas tome extraor
dinary defects. The nose Is too long entire
ly, and tbe mouth bas a queer twist. One
arm is somewhat longer than tbe other. The
position, too, is very unnatural; sa man
conld stand that way If he tried; I don't tee,
Hiram, bow yon could bave made inch a
blander." Powers laughed, and Inquired of
the figure: "What do yon think of it Drake?"
The figure immediately stepped out of the
ease, and bursting Into a loud laugh, said :
"I thinlc tbe position pretty natural, myself."
The critic did not bear the last of the jest to
his dying day, and never afterward spoke to
the facetious sculptor.

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