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The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, April 28, 1869, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1869-04-28/ed-1/seq-1/

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HAWAIIAN
GAZETTEi
BOOK AND JOB
PRINTING ESTABLISHMENT !
THE "OAZETTi:" OFFICE
Ii now prepared to execute ill order fur
M Ml hey mm.
OF EVEKT DEhCKHTIOX,
WITH NEATNESS AND DISPATCH
PUBLISHED
Every Wednesday Morningi
AT SS.00 PER AS SUM.
Mailed to Foreign Subscriber! at ST.OO.
Office On "Merchant street, west of
he Po3t Office, Honolulu, II. L
Printed and published bj J. Mott gxrrs, at the
Oorernment Printlsjc Office, to whom all business
communications mnst be addressed.
VOL. V NO. 15.1
HONOLULU, WEDNESDAY, APK1L 28, 18G9.
$6.00 PER YEAH.
BUSINESS NOTICES.
FRANC EROWX. OODrRET BB0WI.
BROWIV & CO.,
IMPOETEES & WHOLESALE DEALERS
In Wines, tplrits, Ale, Porter, It, Merchant St.,
Honolulu. lS-ljr
31. C. CnALLAVr.L. X. A. BLEHE.
CILVILAMEl. A; CO.,
MFOETEES AKD BEAIXES IN WINES,
Ppirits. Ales Ac, No. 8, Xonann Street, opposite
Merchant Street, Honolulu. 12-1 j
C. n. LEVERS. J. O. DICKSOX.
LEIVEItS fc mCltSOIY,
IJIPOETEES AND DEALERS IS LUMBER,
And all kinds of V.oildlnc Materials, Fort Street,
Honolulu. 2My4
A. C. BVFFOr, 31. .,
POET, PHYSICIAN, AND BUEGEON.
Oace and Residence "Aldrlch House," Fort Street,
Honolulu. 0-lj5
.TOICY S.McGKirtV. M. I).,
PHYSICIAN AND STIBGEON,
Office In II. L. Cliaae'i Banding. Fort Street. Office
hours, from Elf ht to Ten AM., and from Three to
Five r. m. residence on Chaplain Street, between
Nnuann and Fort Street. 8-3ra
ALLEN & CHILIINGWOETH,
1CA1VAIIIAE, HAWAII,
Will continue the flcncral Merchandise and Shipping
business at the abore port, where they are prepar
ed to furnish the justlr celebrated Kawaihse Pota
toes, and auch other Recruits as are reqnired bj
whaleships at the fchortest notice and on the most
reasonable terms. Firewood always on hand. 8-1 y5
"jOIIS X. 1VATEKIIOIJSK,
IMPOETER AND DEALEE IN GENERAL
MERCHANDISE,
2 Queen Street, Honolulu, II. I. Ij5
IV. I-. r.REE'.
GENERAL COMMISSION AGENT & BROKER
Office In Fire-proof rinildlnz on Queen Street,
IS Honolulu, II. I. fly4
C. X. FrEXCER. H. XACrARLAXE.
ciias. . spiacuit & co.,
GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
!4 Queen Street. Honolulu, II. I. Iy4
MERCHANT TAILORS,
10 Fort st., Honolulu, opposite T. C Henck's. Ij3
C. K. WHXIAJIS,
JIANUFACTUEEE, IMPORTER & DEALEE
In Furniture of every description. Fnrnitnre Ware
Ituoni on Fort Street, opposite Chase's Photograph
Gallery. Workshop at the old stand on Hotel
Street, near Fort. Orders from the other
41 islands promptly attended to. 1?5
IV. BESSCTT,
BOOT AND SHOE MAKER,
41 King Street, neit to the rtethel. Honolulu. PyS
m. x. uo,.m:li,
CABINET MAKER AND UPHOLSTERER,
King Street. Honolulu, opposite Lewis' Cooper Shop.
41 Will buy and sell jecond-hand Furniture. Ily5
JOn.X TIBBETS. THOS. SOItEXSOX.
XIItltETS Jfc SOKESSOS,
SHIP CAEPENTERS & CAULKERS
jj! At D. Foster &Co's Old Stand, Sg
37 j ear the Honolulu Iron Works, iy6
Til CO. II. IIATIES,
Late Jaxiox, Qun t Co.
IMPORTER & COMMISSION MERCHANT,
ASK AGENT FOR
Lloyd's and the Lirenool Underwriters,
British and Foreign Marine Insnrance Co., and
Northern Assurance Company. 3-ly5
IIYJIAIV ItUOTIIEItS,
IMPOETEES AND WHOLESALE DEALERS
In Fashionable Clothing, Hats. Caps, Boots, Shoes,
and every variety of Gentlemen's Furni-bing Goods.
Snow'a Unilding, Merchant Street, Honolulu. 50-ly5
J. S. WALKER. S. C. ALLEX.
WALKER fc ALLE3',
SHIPPING & COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
19 Queen Street, Honolulu. It I. flv4
E. E. XORIIERX.
DEALEE IN LUMBER AND EVERY KIND
OP BUILDING MATERIAL.
13 Ornci Corner Queen and Fort streets. Iy4
ItOEEES .V CO.,
SHIP CHANDLERS AND COMMISSION
MERCHANTS,
Queen Street, nouolulu. Particular att'ntlon paid
to the purchase and sale of Hawaiian rrodu.ee.
REFERS BT rERMISSloX TO
C L Klchards Co. Ill Harkfeld A Co,
C Brewer a Co, C L Richards a Co,
I) C Waterman Esq, ICastle a Cooke. 2-lyS
IRA ICICIIARDSOA,
IMPORTER & DEALEE IN BOOTS, SHOES,
And Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods, corner of Fort
and Merchant Streets, Honolulu. My
KOWH JOES,
GROCER AND SHIP CHANDLER,
X.aUatnn, Jtlaut.
Money and Recruits furnished to Ships on the most
10 favorable terms. ly5
CIIEG IIOOX.
Commission Merchant and General Agent,
Importer of Teas and other Chinese and Foreign
Goods, Wholesale Dealer In Hawaiian rrodnce, and
Agent for the l'aukaa and Aniaunlu Sugar Planta
tions. Fire-proof Store on Xuuanu Street. Iielow
King. 81-ly
ArOG V ACIIECK.
Importers Wholesale and Betail Dealers
In General Merchandise and China Goods, in the
Fire-proof Store on N'unanu Street, under the PubUc
Hall. 4ly4
GEORGE G. HOWE,
Dealer in Eedwood and Northwest Lumber,
Shingles, Doors, Sashes, Blinds, Sails, Taints, etc.,
36 at his old etand on the Esplanade. Iy4
F. A. SCIIAEFER fc CO.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
3S Honolulu, Oalin. II. L pr
ED. HOFFSCHLAEGER & CO.,
IMPOETEES & COMMISSION MERCHANTS
41 Honolulu, Oahu, It X, P?5
THEODORE C. IIEl'CK,
IMPORTER & COMMISSION MEECHANT.
IS Honolulu, Paha. H. 'i. PT
II. IIACKPEEU Az CO.,
GENERAL COMMISSION AGENTS.
8- Queen Street, HonotoN, II. I. fly
CIIAUSCEV C. KIUV'EXX,
DEALEE IN NEWSPAPERS, MAGAZINES,
And Periodicals, Fort Street, Honolulu.
E. r. EHLERS. A. JAEGER.
II. F. EIIX.ERS &. CO.,
DEALERS IN DRY GOODS AND GENERAL
MERCHANDISE,
Fire-proof Store on Fort Street, above Odd Fellows
Halt
THE TOM MOORE TAVERN,
BY JT. O'AIEEE,
35 Corner of King and Fort Street!. (Iy4
BUSINESS NOTICES.
W.1I. RYAA,
TXTENPIKE STORE CHOICE GROCERIES
Corner of K uuann t Pauoa Valley Roads. 12-1 J
SnC&MAX PECK.
If. A. P. CAXTES.
c.
ISREWER Jc CO.,
SHIPPING AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
IIOXOL.TJ1.U, II. I.
AGEXTS-Of tbe Boston and Honolulu
Packet Line.
AGnXTS For the JIaliee, IVnlluku and
Hnna Plantatlona.
AGEVTS For the Purchase and Sole of
Island Produce. My5
F. A. SCIIAEFER,
ACEXT for the IlItEJIEX HOARD
of UNDEKWrUIfiES-
Agent for tbe Dresden Board of Underwriters,
A pent for the TIenna Board of Underwriters.
7-S ly
E. T. ADAVS. S. O. K1LDER.
AIA.1IS A: WIEOER,
AUCTION & COMMISSION MERCHANTS
27 Queen Street, Honolulu, II. I. Iy4
C. S. BARTOW,
AUCTIONEER,
Salesroom on Queen Street, one door from Kaaho
manu Street- 17-ly4
II. A. WIIEJIAIV,
NOTARY PUBLIC,
6 Office at tbe Interior Ieparttnent. flyo
m. s. ;t:iAi vi .ii as co.,
IMPOETEES AND 'WHOLESALE DEALERS
In Fa.hionalile Clolhln- Hats, Caps, Boots, Shoes,
and erery variety of Gentlemen's euierior Fnrnisb
inc Goods Storo In 31akee's Block, Queen Street,
Honolulu, ILL 10-ly5
JOin II. I'ATV,
Notary Public and Commissioner of Deeds
For tbe State of California. Office at the Bank of
Bishop a Co., Kaabumanu Street, Honolulu. 2-ly5
. W. AOKTOrV,
COOPER AND GAUGER,
At the 5ew Stand on. the Esplanade.
He Is prepared to attend to all work in lilt line
at the Shop next to the Custom Home, where be can
bo fmnd at all working hours. He ha on hand
and for sale. Oil Cks and Bftrrel of different sizes,
new and old, which lie will Ml at the Tcry Lowest I
Market Bates All work done In a thorough manner
and warranted to give Mitinfeiction. All kinds of
Coopering Materials and Tools fur sale. l-3m j
i ii. A: a. si:iri.Ki;,
TIN, ZINC AND COPPER SMITHS,
AND SHEET IE ON W0KKEHS,
Kauanu Street, between Merchant & Queen.
Have constnntly on hand, Stores, npc. Gal
vanized Iron 1'ipe, Main and IIoe llihtf,
Stoit-cocks. India Kuhtter Hose best 3-plr,
fffffrip lengths of 5 and &0 feet, with couplings
H'Tand pirw c-tmnlete. IJatb-TuU. RnJ Ioa
Tery large rtock of Tinware of every description.
I 'articular attention given to hipWo k. Orders
from the other Inland will be carefully attended to.
Thankfnl to the Citizens of Honolulu and tbe
Iriant i generally f.ir their liberal patronage in the
past, we hope by strict attention to business to merit
the same for the future. C7-lj5
JAJII'.S I.. LEWIS,
COOPER AND GAUGER,
At the Old Stand, corner King & Bethel Sts.
A Large Stock of Oil Ebooks anil all kinds of Coop
er! lie Materials constantly on Land. He Loes lj
attention to business to merit a continuance of tbe
patronage srbich he bas heretofore enjoyed, and for
which he now retnrns his thanks. " 1-Sui
I. II. XII03IISOX,
GENERAL BLACKSMITH,
Queen Street, Honolulu,
Has constantly on band and for sale at the Lowest
Market Trices, a good assortments the Best Refined
liar Iron, and tbe Best Blacksmith's Coal. 3S-lyS
JXO. SOTT.
SAJI'L xott.
.IOIIA SOTT & CO.,
COPPER AND TIN SMITHS,
Kaatumanu St, one door above Flitner's.
Beg leave to inform the public that they are pre
pared to furnish all kinds of Copper Work, such as
tiUs. Strike Tans, Sorghum Pans, Worms, Pumps,
etc Also on band, a full assortment of Tin Ware,
which we offer for aale at the Lowest Markvt Prices.
All kinds of Kepairing done with Neatness aud
Dlfpetch. Orders from the other Islands will meet
with prompt attention. l-3m
ic. itvcicorx,
HOUSE AND SHIP PLUMB EE,
King St, two doors west of Castle & Cooke's.
Has on hand, Bath-Tabs, Water-Closets, Wasb-Ba-slns,
Force and Lift Pumps, Lead and Galvanized
Iron Pipes, and I'lomWr's Brass-works. Being the
only I'ltunlrerm the city, he will execute all orders en
trusted to him in a workmanlike manner. l-3ni
3111. .1. COSTA,
JEWELER AUD ENGRAVER,
Fort Street opposite Odd Fellows' Hall,
Is prejiaredtoexecutewithprnmptness, all work In
his line of business, such as Watch and Clock repair
ing. Manufacturing Jewelry and En craving. l-3m
j;i:oit.K xviB.i-iA.ns,
LICENSED SHIPPING AGENT, j
Office on James BoMnson & Co's "Wharf.
Continues the business vn his old plan of settling
with officer and seamen immediately on their ship
ping at his office. Having no direct or indirect con
nection wiiu any ouiniting estaii(tnment, ana allow
ing no debts to be culjected in his uffice, he hopes to
give as good satisfaction in tbe futore as he has in
tbe pant. l-3m
EEVEEE
King Street,
t2i HOUSE,
Near Fort
THIS FAVORITE and welLknown
IUttishment is now oen for Boarders and
Tranient Visitors
The Bent the Market affords, of every Tariety, will
always be provided, with gxd attendance.
Board per week $6.00 up frtairs. 14 00 down stairs.
S-3tu All II OX, Proprietor.
II. XIIKM11IC,
Piano-Forte Maker & Tuner,
Hai Returned Again.
Allord.
jLJ. M. Smi
"Tl Hotel Sti
1 Fnrtiltnr.
All orders left at the Drug Store of
Smith at Co., corner of Fort and
ftreets. or at Wru. Fischer's
Furniture Rooms. Ilotel Street, will
meet with Immediate attention. 9-6mc
IICKSO KOI.SXKIC,
House, Sign & Ship Painters,
King Street, near Xuuanu.
m ii- Graining, Marbling, Gilding, Calsomining,
felIer-hangiog, Ac, tc executed on the
-hr t notice, and on the moat reasonable
terms. 12m
VOLCANO HOUSE,
CRATER OF KILAtTEA, HAWAII.
THIS ESTABLISHMENT IS ggfr
fcj-j now open for the reception of visitor to E?
the Volcano House, vho may rely on finding com
fortable rooms, a good table, and prompt attendance.
Experienced guides for the Crater always on hand.
STEAM AND STJLFHUB BATHS I
Hone Grained and Stabled if Desired.
CHARGES REASONABLE.
Parties visiting the Volcano via IIIlo, can procure
animals warranted to make the Journey, by D. U.
UrrcHcocx, Esq. 37-lyS,
FOREIGN NOTICES.
LEON R. VETES&. JAKES X. BLOCK.
LEO.K R. MEYERS A. CO.,
1 IMPOETEES AND MANUTACTUEEES OF
ITALIAN 4 AMERICAN MARBLES,
Mint els, Gmtrt, 3IoDnmeDtt, Jlmlstoors. Tombs,
lVwbstanJ. Bureau nd Counter Tor. Billiard Bed.
Fire Bricks, 1'U-Ier, Ac. At. 930 Market Street, op
posite Catholic Church, an Francisco, Cat ISCmc
B, tr. rrauxcr.
SEVERANCE, CLARK & CO.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS
AND SHIPPING AGENTS,
405 Front St, corner of Clay, San Francisco.
We vill attend to tbe sale of Fnear and all kinds
1 of Island Produce, also to tbe !urcbalng and for-
warain? ox .Merchandise. Casn Advances made on
ixmslKuments. ll-6m
JOH X'CEAEEST,
Portland.
nvm , J. C WIEJULL,
a. t. uai.
M'CEAKEN, MERRILL & CO.,
F0SWAEDING AND
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Portland, Oregon.
Having been engaged In our present business for
upwards of twelve years, and being located In a Fire
proof lirtr t iiniiding, we are prepared to receive and
dispone ..f Island Staples, such as Sutrar. Smiw. Rice.
Tniu, Coffee, etc., to advantage. Consignments es
pecially eonciieu lor toe uregon Jiarket, to which
tersooal attention will be paid, and upon which cash
advances will be made when required.
EErEEE5C?M
Charles W Brooks San Francisco
JU Merrill Co....,
Fred Iken
Badger k Ltndenberger
James Tatrick a Co ,
T Coleman a Co ...
Stevens, Baker a Co
Allen a Lewis Portland
LaddaTilton
Leonard t Green " 1-Iy5
k. ji. r,jv i:r,ri,
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
Knnagana, Japan,
Having the best facilities through an Intimate con
nection with the Japmefe trade f..r the rnt eijrht
years. Is prepari to transact any bu-ines cntrnnted
to his care, with dispatch. 17-ly4
IL C WILLIAMS, H. P. BLAXClTATtP, C. B. JI0E0AX.
WILLIAMS. BLANCHARD & CO..
SHIPPING & COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
c 305 Front Street, San Francisco, cm
LANGLEY, CR0WELL & CO..
WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS,
32 Cor. Battery & Clay Sts, San Francisco. Cm
AMERICAN EXCHANGE
33:01? 313 Ij,
Sansomc Street, San Francisco,
Extending from Sacramento St. to Halleck StreetJ
HAVING HE EX RECENTLY REX
ovated aud newly Furnisbeil, maken it the
I mot qniet, economical and ctmfortaUe FAMILY
j HOTEL In the State, Being centrally located. It of
fers every Inducement fr Buniuetis Men and the Pub
lic generally.
The Tables will be constantly supplied with every
luxury the mat ket affords. The American Exchange
Coach, with Bed Lights, will 1 at the Wharves and
Deiuts, to convey paiencers to the Hole! free.
7-ly4 TIMOTHY S AUG EXT. Prop'r.
SEEDS ' SEEDS!
FRESH SUPPLICS OP
! GARDEN, FLOWER, FRUIT,
AXD TREE SEEDS,
Received by Erery teamrr Also
CRASS & CLOVER SEEDS,
Of suitable varieties for this Climate, comprising
XIic largest collection ol" Seeds
To be frund on this Coast. Orders by Mail or Ex
press promptly attended to In their turn. Address
GEO. K. SYLVESTER,
Seedsman.
2-4 mc S17 Washington Street, Pan Francisco.
INSUUANCE NOTICES.
MERCIIVAXS' JIIITUAI
MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY
Of San Francisco.
THE UXDERSIGXED hnvinp been
appointed Agents fur the above Company .are
prepared to itne Policies on Cargoes, Freight.
and Treasure
WALKER t ALLEX,
l3m Agents. Ilonolulo.
iiAmtui:;ii-iii:i:Mi:
EIRE INSURANCE COMPANY.
THE CXDEUSIGXED havlnp lieen
appointed Agents of the above Company, are
prepared to insure risks against Fire, on Stone and
Rrlck ISuildlngK, and on Merchandise
stored therein, on tbe twt favorable terms. For
particulars apply at the office of
Wy5 F. A. SCIIAEFER 1 CC.
Insurance Notice.
THE AGENT FOR THE BRITISH
Foreign Marine Insrrance Company, (Limit
ed), has received instructions to reiuce tbe rates ol
Inuranc between Ilonolulo and Ports In the Pacific,
and is now prepared to isue Policies -at the Lowest
Jialtt, with a special reduction on Y reicht per Steam
ers. TIIEO. II. BAVIFS,
43-tf Agtnt Brit For. Mar, las. Co. (Limited).
IS T-ECXS SO?
Sound Health to b'c obiaiut'tl at last 1
The way to obtain Sound Health !
1ST CL.EANSE the Stomach from
all offensive accumoladons, which so usually pro
duce functional deranirement vitiating tbe fond.
2nd Purify the Blood from all acrid and corrupt
humors, and you will remove the causes of the great
est mass of the diseases which afflict so many of the
human ftmilr
A REMEDY, proved by thirty years experi
ence, capable of eflVctine such a desirable and 1m
portaut purpose. Is still before the public in
WHELPTON'S
VEGETABLE PCRIFYIXG PILLS.
This Famoos Mrdicine bas proved its Talne in Dis
eases of Ihe HEAD, CHEST, BOWELS. LIVER, aud
DIGESTIVE OKOAXS. KID.NEVS, ic Also, in
RHEUMATISM, ULCERS, SORES, aod SKIN DIS
EASES it beipg A DIRECT I'UllIFYEE OF THE
BLOOD aud other fluids of tbe hamaa bodj.
Set RandWU ffirtn avay hy Agenit.
Prepared and sold, wholesale and retail, in boxes,
price "J4d. Is. and 2a. 9d. earb, br C. WHELP
TON 4 SON. 3 lime Gmrt. Fleet Street, I.mdon,
And mar l had of Mr. J. T. WATERHOUSE, Honi
lolu, and of all Chemist and Medicine Vendors In
Great Britain and the Colonies.
The undersigned has beard so mnch in praise of
WUELPTON'b SAFE VEGETABLE PILLS from par
ties who bare used them, that he can recommend
theni with perfect confidence.
MtS J0HK THOMAS WATEEHOUSE.
BOXES EASTEIIX CODFISH,
perlOLASL, For sale by
1-Sm B0LLES CO.
CALIFOItXIA TABL.E FRCITR,
Assorted in cases and A & cans. For sale
bj (l-3m) BOLLES k CO.
HCUBUCK'S PATEST ZINC PAIS'T
Tbe best article of the kind imp. Hied. For
sale bj (l-2m) BOLLES t CO.
A Toragc to the FIJIIh.
XUITBER SEVESTEEJT.
Written for the Cazctte.
In the words of the old sea-song "As
we sailed, as we sailed," over the broad
bosom of the placid Pacific, I often imagin
ed to myself the galleons of the early
Spanish navigators, groping their way by
'dead-reckoning," over the same track we
were now pursuing, with an advantage,
however, that they cid not possess an
instrument generally is true as the needle
to the pole the chrorometer. It is, how
ever, really surprising to observe the accu
rate judgment of experienced seamen in'
estimating the rate of speed at which a
vessel travels on a rivea'course, and.arrfcp
ing at a conclusion as to the-latitude and
longitude. 'When it is'remembered that
leeway, currents of the ocean, and varia
tion of the compass, have all to be consid
ered in this connection, it mast be allowed
that it is something wonderol. Thus, fre
quently on our passage td .Manila, while
taking the observation at noon for the lat
itude, I have heard tbe captain say to the
mate, "We are in about so and so." This,
too, after we had been steering a half a
dozen different courses during the twenty
four hours, in order to avoid ihe inlands
and shoals in our track, and had observed
various currents setting in various direc
tions. When the altitude wis obtained
and the latitude worked out.it would be
found that the -old man" was generally
within a milo or two, one way or the other,
of the true fil'Hre near enongh for safety,
if we had been unprovided vith instru
ments. As an illustration of the remarkable de
gree of skill in navigation to which our
seamen arrive, after long yea-s of experi
ence, the hardy whalers may be instanced,
who crui;-e nmons the foss ard around the
shoals, and through the ice field? of the
Xorth Pacific; where, often fur weeks,
they get no sight of either sun. moon, or
stars. Scarcely ever tlionjh. is a vessel
lost in those dangerous seas, except through
very heavy stress of weather.
I have heard it said, that the skippers
of the Xew London craft that used to
trade to the West Indies, always found
their way home again by the shingles which
they had dropped overboard, at intervals
of a mile or two. on the passage out But
I don't believe this is true.
A few weeks after leaving the Fijiis. we
came up with the Philippine Islands.
Passing through the scrait that separates
the island of Luzon cn which Manila is
situated from another and smaller island
of the group, we cane at length to the
bay of Manila. It is truly a magnificent
sheet of water, second only, in my opin
ion, to that of Rio Janeiro. Xarragan
sctt Bay, in Rhode Island, and the Bay of
Islands, in Xew Zealand, may compare fa
vorably with it.
Before reaching our anchorage, we were
hailed from a "guarda costa" a lousr, clum
sy looking row-boat, with thirty rowers,
double-banked. The rowers were all Ta-
galees aboriginal natives of the Philip
pines and in the stern-sheets were two
Spanish officials, with cocked hats, epau
lets and gold lace. In the bow of the boat
was a brass six-pounder. The hail was in
Spanish, which our captain understood
pretty well. The order was for us to an
chor at a certain place, until the port phy
sician should board us and examine our
condition as to health. This was done
early the next morning a grizzly, mous
tached, gold-laced, spectacled and pom
pous little Spaniard, making bis appear
ance in another great, clumsy, thirty-oared
boat, similarly armed as the guarda costa.
lie was received by the captain with Cas
tillian politeness, and conducted to the
quarter-deck. AH hands were called aft,
and we were each subjected to a critical
examination, which extended to running
out our tongues and exposing our teeth to
inspection. After pronouncing everything
"bueno," the doctor delivered a written
paper to the captain, which was our clean
bill of health, and entitled us to enter the
canal as the lower part of the river is
called on both banks of which, Manila is
built It was not. however, until the day
had nearly passed, that the officer came on
board, whose duty it was to rise our bill
of health without which red-tape cere
moriy,we could not have passed the battery
and gunboats which were stationed at the
mouth of the canal. Early the next morn
ing, we hauled into the canal, and after a
great deal of tugging and pulling with
lines, at about three o'clock in the after
noon, we were moored in our berth on the
side of the stream opposite to that where
the natives mostly lived. Xo ioreigu ves
sels were allowed to anchor on that side,
but were invariably ke it on the S'panish
side. The Spaniards of Manila, with but
few exceptions, live or herd together on
one side of the ri?er. Here are all the
palatial residences of the government offi
cials .he princely merchants, and the
planters. Here are also several cathedrals
and numerous churches, and among them
are some noble specimens of architecture.
Ui-ery morning and evening, the chimes
from a hundred bells rung out melodiously
on the air, rendering, with touching effect
even to the ears of a Protestant, born
and bred tbe time-honored strains of Ro
man Catholic sacred music
Soon after we arrived, a number of Chi
nese merchants came on board to examine
our cargo of biche-le-mer. They were short,
stout, round-faced men, dressed in silk
clothes, with little round caps on their
beads, surmounted with a gold .button,
their faces adorned with grey moustaches,
a tail banging behind which reached to the
ground, and they were all cbewing betel
nut at a great rate. The hatches being
taken off, specimens of the fish were hand
ed np, and carefully examined by these
celestial connoisseurs. They seemed to
be quite satisfied with the quality, and
closing the bargain with our captain as Iji
. afterwards 'heard; aUan average
24 per picnl bought the whole cargo of
1,000 piculs. This was at once put into
bags and discharged into boats, and carried
to a store-house of a firm of American
merchants, there to be weighed.
I was detailed by the captain to stay on
shore at the warehouse, and keep tally
of the bags and of the weights. There
was, perhaps, a slight suspicion that the
Chinamen might slyly appropriate a bag
or two of the valuable gelatinous substan
ces, and so I was kept on watch at tbe
warehouse. The Chinese merchants were
frequently around, looking at the opera
tions of their experts, and chattering to
them in what was to me, of course,
quite Greek. Often they would come to
me, and by sigii3, and a few words of Eng
lish, imperfectly spoken, invite me to eat
with them. Although my meals were sent
to me, three times a day. from the house
of the agents of our vessel, yet out of curi
osity, I often accepted the invitations of
my Chinese friends, "and joined them in
their repasts. In the variety of their
dishes, they reminded me of the French
a little of this, and a little of that but their
stand-by was rice. Sainschoo a very fiery
liqmir, made from the bamboo, a petit rtrre
wound up the dinner. Once they gave
me a diih of soup, made of biche le-mer ;
it certainly wa3 very delicious. I never
could have dreamed, that the ugly looking
sea slug, which I hail been helping to catch
and enre. could be so appetizing. Vanou
queer looking condiment-i and questionable
looking articles of food were placed before
mo during the repasts, to all of which, as
politeness required, I gave due attention,
although I must confess that some went
extremely against my palate. Their lea
was grand. The nearer one gets to China,
the better the tea. and the farther off from
China, the poorer the quality. Ever since
I drank tea among the Chinamen in Ma
nila, I have felt a desire to go back to
drink tea again, for I have never drank any
real tea since. The decoction that "cheers,
but not inebriates," can only be found in
perfection in China or the Indies. A trans
portation over the sea spoils it. Unlike
coffee, it wants no age, and must be taken
in its youth.
After having got rid of our cargo to the
Chinese merchants, we proceeded to clear
out tbe ship ready for the homeward cargo.
This wa3 to consist of bales of hemp and
boxe3 of indigo. Tho first is, a3 almost
everybody knows, composed of the fibre3
of a tree of the genus Cannabis. Thi3,
the fertile soil of tbe Philippines produces
in immense quantities, and Manila rope is
found in every part of the world. From
the proceeds of the Fijii cargo, enough
cash was realized to load, not only the brig,
with a return cargo, but also to charter
and load a large Boston ship. Our owners
could not have netted less than $30,000
for the voyage of twenty-four months,
which was the time of our absence from
home.
We lay at Manila about a month, and
during that time I enjoyed several very
pleasant rambles on shore, and visited
many of the trrand old churches and mon
asteries on the Spanish side of tbe river.
In some of them were to be found rare
paintings by the old masters, and many
curious relics of olden times, when Spain
was the proud mistress of the seas of the
Indies.
By an error in the calculations of the
early navigators in crossing the parallels of
longitude, it happened that Sunday with
us was Saturday with them. This made
things a little awkward, as regarded the
work of the ship. We had taken out cur
mainmast it bein? decayed and on the
Manila Saturday night, the new mast was
brought alonjside. Our practice while in
port had been, to keep the Sunday after
the custom of the country, and accordingly
on this occasion, we had worked all the
day. expecting that the next would be a
day of rest. We were not a little surprised,
therefore, and a good deal indignant
when, in the morning, tbe mate ordered all
hands to "turn-to," and hoist in the new
main-mast. The seamen demurred, and
appointing as spokesman, an' intelligent,
though a rough and wild sort of a fellow,
who had been mate of an Indiaman. went
aft in a body and boldly demanded the
Sunday. They wanted'one day out of sev
en as a day of rest, and one they must
have it mattered not whether it was one
day or another. The captain stormed and
raved, the mate was ready chorus and said
it was Monday, but tbe men were firm.
Jim Bictford and myself,1 being boys, had
of course, nothing to say tn this'- matter,
and were mere lookers on. The upshot
of it was, that the crew gained their
point and had their day of Test Bat the
spokesman, who was looked upon by the
captain as the ringleader and fomenter of
the disturbance, was discharged from the
vessel; We had shipped him in Xew Zea
land, where he had lived in the lawless
style of a veritable beach-comber, and the
exacting duties of a seamen were not to
his taste. But he was right in wanting
one day of rest out of seven.
At length, having completed our lading,
we hauled, out of the canal, and set sail for
'home again." Passing through tbe straits
anca, where we anchored onoo- or
gsfqatrnttof adverse wfndsiand
currents, we came to the celebrated Anjier
Point, the place of departure for ships
bound home from the Indies. Here we
anchored, it being calm, and the current
against us. Two or three large proas, full
of the femenine-looking Malays, came off
to us, loaded with pigs, fowls, eggs and
fruit, which they offered for sale extremely
cheap. Our captain bought several barrels
of eggs and had them packed in salt. The
rigging was lined with bunches of bananas,
baskets of oranges, mangosteens and man
gos, and the long-boat was one crowded
mass of chickens and ducks. For a month
or more after that, the unusual spectacle
could be witnessed, of Jack Tar, enjoy
ing boiled eggs and broiled chicken for
breakfast, chicken soup and roast duck for
dinner.aud cold boiled fowl for supper. It
may souud something like extravagance,
but it wa3 seally cheaper than to feed the
men on salt provisions. Jack knew this,
too, and not fail to exercise his privilege
of gmwling at being kept entirely on what
he termed -sick men's grub.''
We got undur-weigh several times from
Anjier, endeavoring to get out into the
Indian Ocean, but were forced to come to
uii anchor again, on account of winds and
currents. One day, lying becalmed off a
conical inouiituiu know n as Cockatoo Point,
there were no less than fifty sail of vessels
in sight, all like ourselves, trying to get to
sea. The captain was restlessly pacing
the deck, ever and anon-sweeping the hor
izon with his glass, .inxiously looking for a
breeze. Suddenly he paused, as he looked
in the direction of the mountain, and turn
ing sharp round, he shouted "(.'lew up
and clew .down! be lively there I" In
prompt obedience to the orders, in a very
short space of time, the brig was under
bare-po!e3. A few minutes sufficed to ex
plain the mystery, lor a "white-squall"
came down upon us. For a short time
only, the wind blew a perfect hurricane.
A French ship, which lay like us. becalm
ed about two miles in shore of as, was the
first to catch the Equall. Having all sail
out. shb took the wind on her broadside
and lay over for a moment to the wind,
nearly on her beam ends, and when she
righted, all three top-masts, yards, gear,
bowsprit and jib-boom, were over the side.
The squall over, the ship was towed in
shore and anchored, and the crew went to
work to put up jury top masts. The wind,
coming off shore the same day, took us
out of the straiu, and we were once more
on the broad ocean the Indian Ocean.
Southward we sailed, towards the Cape
of Good Hope, past the Isle of France,
and sighted the rocky isle of St. Paul's
a favorite re3ort of sperm whaler3, the ad
jacent waters abounding in fish. Making
table .Mountain, the southernmost point
of tbe continent of Africa, wo steered
away for St. Helena, from whence a short
time before, the remains of tne great Xa
poleon had been conveyed to France.
But before we got into the S. E. trades,
and while just off the cape, we experien
ced a severe gale. It came on just at
night, blowing in squalls, and with a heavy
rolling sea, the latter peculiar to that lat
titude. All hands being called to reef
topsails. I clambered aloft I was a3 ac
tive as a kitten then and reaching the
nmin-top-inast cross-trees, slidetl down on
the leeward lift to the earing of the sail.
The brig, under reduced canvas, was roll
ing heavily, and just as I had got astride
of the end of the yard, the lift parted,
and with a sudden jerk I wa3 flung, head
over heels, into the inky hued bosom of a
great wave. Overboard in mid-ocean!
Only for a moment beneath the surface, I
looked up to find myself already a long
distance astern of the brijr, by the reced
ing li-rhts from which I could di-cern that
I could have but little hopes of ever get
ting on board airain. Ah. what thoughts
then passed through my mind! Death
and eternity were leforii me. However
capable I was of swimming, my exhaus
tion was only a question of time. That
time elapsed slowly enough. Xow on the
crest of an immense wave, now in tbe
depths between two I kept myself on the
the top of the water, mechanically, having
given myself np for gone. Ready, throush
weariness to sink, all my sins and follies
were plainly brought liefore me. but I
gradually began to feel sense of resigna
tion to what seemed an inevitable fate, a
tnnili In the deep, deep sea. But some
thing struck me on the bead, a blow that
instead of stunning me. put new life into
me. and then I was for a moment aware
that somebixly had caught me by the hair
of the head, and that I was hauled into
the boat Then I became insensible, until
I found myself in the cabin of the brig,
and the captain teaming down my throat,
a Bpoonfal at a time, hot rum and water.
After a couple of hoars, I was as well as
ever.
I will not continue this Fijii story any
longer, of the recital of which, I fancy my
renders are quite tired. After a two years'
voyage, with various adventures, among
various kinds of people! I arrived safely
home amongst purenU and kindred, but
only with an appetite, not only nnsatiated,
but sharpened, for fresh, excursions to for
eign lands.
Amcrlcaa licet Root Sugar. -''
Many causes are now at work to Interest
the capital of tbls country in the production
of beet root sugar. Among these may be
enumerated, first, the depression of the su
gar trade of the West Indies consequent up
on the competition of European beet root
sugar, which threatens jto compel tbe aban
donment of, the business on many planta
tions. Second, .tbe changed condition of
allalre In the sugar growing districts of the
United States on account of tbe abolishment
of slavery and tbe Increased cost of labor re
sulting therefrom. Third, tbe recent Intro
duction and success of tbe diffusion process
In the East Indies, which renders It extreme
ly probable that tbe same process will very
much cheapen the production of beet root
sugar. Fourth, the success which bas been
achieved by some establishments already de
voted to tbls industry In this country, which
demonstrates tbe feasibility of a further ex
tension of the manufacture.
We have not yet learned the success which
tbe Roberts diffusion process has met with
in its application to beet root sugar extrac
tion'ln Germany, -where It Is now undergoing
a term of probation ; but whether It succeeds
or fails, we do not entertain a doubt that the
beet, and not the cane. Is to be tbe chief
source ofsngar supply for the future.
The beet has tbe advantage that It can be
raised on a very much mure extended cordon
of the earth's surface; it can be worked for
a long time after It Is harvested, a very great
advantage over the cane; and, with labor at
equal rotes, It will yield a given wlegbt of
sugar ol equal quality at a less cost than
cane. These arejacU capable of demonstra
tion. Our attention was called to this sub
ject at a time which presented much less
lavorooie auspices than tne present lor ine
establishment of this Industry In America,
the period when the bllgbt of civil war was
resting upon tbe land. At that time wo ob
tained from some gentlemen, one of whom
had become familiar with the matter by long
practical experience as superintendent of a
Dcel root sugar manulactory in .11 rope, esti
mates of tbe cost, expenses and probable
profits of a similar establishment here, which
we may at some iulure limp, aner some
changes to suit tbe altered condition of
affairs, lay before onr readers.
Very lew are aware of the enormous quan
tity of sugar used in this country, aud the
extremely small proportion grown here.
ine reports 01 tne uoinmieeioners 01 Agri
culture, show that tbe United States con
sume over one billion of pounds of sugar,
and forty-five million gallons of molasses
annually. Of this great total not one per
cent. Is of home production, while every
pound ought to be grown on our suit.
The fact has long been established that,
owing to peculiarities of our soli and climate,
beets grown in this country contain from one
or two per cent, more saccharine matterthan
those grown in Europe. In the manufacture
of beet root sugar circumstances are all in
our favor except tbe one item of labor, but
as labor only represents 34 per cent, of the
cost of production, tbe difference between
Its value in this country and In Europe Is
nearly counterbalanced by the cheapness of
our lands and the increased product, so that
without taking Into account the tariff on
sugar, we could nearly compete with French
and German producers.
1 lie amouui 01 revenue receivea oy r ranee
from tbe sugur industry Is greater than from
any other one source. In this respect It Is to
trance what the inalt tax is to England.
Now possessing advantages superior to
France In every particular except cheap labor,
It is, e think, impossible to show why tbls
industry should nut spring at once Into
healthy activity, If capitalists would open
their eyes to the promise of profit It offers.
SUOOTINO EXTItAOKOlNAnT AS OLD MlN
of Eioirrr Yeahs takes a Pop ok two with
HIS GlUXDSONS AND SOS IN LAW. All old
family feud came to a shooting focus last
Monday at Abbeyvllle, In Lafayette county,
Miss., about GO miles from Memphis, which,
from the disparity of the parties engaged.
and their peculiar relations, ratber takes tbe
lead of all the shooting scrapes we bave bad
tbe mournful pleasure of recording in many
jears. Tb'.re Is something so incredible and
solemnly ludicrous In an old man with win
try hair, and little of It, turning back lrom
the open grave to have a deadly conflict with
his grandchildren, that we would not tell
such a story without the most satisfactory
evidence of the fact But yesterday we met
a prominent citizen from Mississippi, who
gave us the following authentic statement:
Last Monday one John Clarke, aged eighty,
of Lafayette county, Mississippi, and his son,
a man of years and family, had a difficulty
at Abbeville with William Wimberly and
! imoerly's two sons, uotn young men.
Now, Wimberly, senoir, is tbe son-lh-law of
Clarke, senior; hence the young Wlmberlys
are the grandsons of old Mr. Clarke. The
fracas they had was tbe result of un old fami
ly feud, which has been 011 band fur many
years, but the history ol It we are unable to
give yet They met in town perhaps by
a concenea pian; anyway, iney met, tney
skirmished, they flourished revolvers and
bowleknires, find several shots at each other
and slashed igorouely with their knifes. It
Is to be regretted that tbe spectators Inter
fered before any work was made for tbe Cor
oner. When the smoke of battle cleared
away It was ascertained that there was killed,
none; wounded five. Every one engaged
was wounded, uranulauier tlarke revived
a shot in the bead that might bave killed a
younger man. But he will probably recover
and live yet to kill his man. Ills affection
ate son-in-law, 01a man wimueriy was wen
shot in tbe neck; he also may recover. Tbe
three young men, Clarke r., his nephews,
the two Wlmberlys, were sliced and backed
with tlie Knives, but not dangerously, ills
said that tbey all Intend to recover as soon as
convenient and finish tbe battle. Tbe Clarke
family became famous lu the line of tragedy
many years ago. Not long before tbe war,
old inun Clarke bad two sons, John and
William, killed by a neighbor named Thorn-
ason and two sons. Tbe peculiar feature of
that tragedy was that one 01 the Clarkes Killed,
was Thomason's son-in-law. In the fracas
Thomason was beaten nearly to death, but
bis sons came to his relief and the two
Clark'- were shot down like beeves. The
TI101111 son Ned tn Arkansas, and never re
turned to Mississippi. I lils makes a lamlly
Uislury .vu.cn ail put together that is without
a parallel. Match It.
Editorial Notisos. Characteristics tell.
A Gotham girl is known by her dash, audac
ity, and nonchalance; a Boston girl by her
full eyes, elongated gait, and a copy of Em
erson and Lowell under each arm; a Phila
delphia girl by ber fresh face, gold eye glass
es, a predominance of drab in her costume,
and a nowhere to pother hands and arms;
a Baltimore girl for bewitching iigbtoess, a
lore 01 reneraiea 0100a, Killing Kids, and a
belief that the Monumental City will eventu
ally be tbe centre of the universe; a Wash-
t.. -!! r t ! J l!
iiiiou Km i" suuw to urcea, cuicanerr in
manners, pale cheeks, sentiment, and an
early market; a Chicago girl, a "bet" that
Crosby's Opera House is tbe best In tbe
world: the St Louis girl for her hearty
speech, taking ways, adoption of Xew York;
styles; and a New OrKans girl 1 belief that
the source of tbe ocean Is the Mississippi
river.
Don't Case joe his Toe. While tbe
morning train from Hartford to Providence
was at Moosup station, Saturday, the ex
pressman dropped an axe which happened
to hit tbe foot of a bystander named Bennett
badly cutting bis big toe. The wounded
man made things lively for a while, using
adjectives not found lu Webster, but amus
ing tbe crowd by asserting that he " did not
care for bis toe, but it made fcfei mad to see
a new pair of boots which cost eight dollars,
thus spoiled." He evidently felt much like
tbe old negro wbo carried hi bat under 111
arm during a storm because "bU bead was
owned by raasia, but tbe hat cost him tea
dollars." Tbe negro saved bis bat, but by
so doing caught cold in bis bead and thereby
lost his' life We hope tbls will not bo tbe
case with pur Moosup friend. A'ew Luukn
Aper.

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