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The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, June 02, 1869, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1869-06-02/ed-1/seq-1/

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HAWAIIAN
GAZETTE,
PUBLISHED
BOOK AND JOB
Every Wednesday Morning, '
AT SC.00 PER ANNUM.
Malletl to Foreign Subscribers at S7JUO.
Office On Merchant street, west of
lie Post Office, Honolulu, II. I.
I PRINTING ESTABLISHMENT I
THE "GAZETTE" OITICB
Ii sow prepared to execute til orders for
mil in hky nun.
Printed and published by J. JIott Exite, at the
Government Printlns; Office, to whom all business
communications must be addressed.
VOL. V NO. 20. i
HONOLULU, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2, 1869.
$6.00 PER YEAE.
0? EVFJIT DESCEirnON,
WITH HEATNES8 AND DISPATCH
BUSINESS NOTICES.
IILXIXGIIA3I &. CO.,
IKP0ETEB3 t DEALERS IN HARDWARE,
Cutlery, Pry Quods. Paints and Oil!, and General
Merchandise, Ko. B5, King Street, Honolulu. 151 j
TRASS SHOWS. OODFBET J ROWS.
BROTO A: CO.,
IMPORTERS WHOLESALE DEALERS
In Wines, Spirits, Ale, Porter, tc. Merchant St.,
Honolulu. 15-ly
M. C. CnALLAMEL. 5. A. LLCKE.
CI&lsLTuaJIEI. & CO..
IMPORTERS AND DEALERS Df WINES,
Spirits, Ales, lc, No. 8, Xnuanu Street, opposite
Merchant Street, Honolulu. 12-ly
C. U. LEVERS. J. a. DICI80.1. .
i-uiveus &. dicksoa-,
importers and dealers in lumber,
And all kinds of Building Material., Fort Street,
Honolulu. 25-ly4
a. c, jmnFFinnvai. .,
PORT PHYSICIAN, AND SURGEON.
Once and Eesidence "Aldricu House," Fort Street,
Honolulu. Myi
JOICV S.McGKEW, 31. I.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
Office in II. L. Chase's Bulldinc, Fort Street. Office
hour, from Klcbt to Ten A M., and from Three to
Fire p. M . Residence on Chaplain Street, between
Nnuanu and Fort Street. 8-Sm
ALLEN & CHILLLNGWORTH,
KA1VAIIIAE, HAWAII,
Will continue the General 3ferrhandlse and Shlpplnc.
business at the above port, where they are prepar
ed to fnrnifb the Justly celebrated Kawaihae pota
toes, and such other Recruit. a are required by
wbalesblps, at the shortest notice and on the root
reasonable terms. Firewood alway. on hand. 8-ly5
joiirv cr. WATEKnorsE,
IMPORTER AND DEALER IN GENERAL
MERCHANDISE,
S Qneen Street, Honolulu, n. I. Iy5
IV. Jj. GREEX,
GENERAL COMMISSION AGENT & BROKER
Office In Fire-proof Tlulldln-s on Queen Street,
5S Honolulu, II. I. Tly4
C. K. SPEXCEIt. n. XACFARLANE.
CHAN. IV. NPEXCER fc CO.,
GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
24 Queen Street. Honolulu, II. I. Iy4
McCOEGAIV fc JOILSO.,
MERCHANT TAILORS,
10 Fort it., Honolulu, opposite!. C. Henck's. Iy5
C. JE. WILLIAMS,
MANUFACTURER, IMPORTER & DEALER
In FuraUnre of every description. Furniture Ware
Ruom on Fort Street, opposite Chape. Photograph
Gallery. Workshop at the old .tand on Hotel
Street, near Fort. Order, from the other
41 Islands promptly attended to. Iy5
XV. BEXETT,
BOOT AND SHOE MAKER,
41 King Street, next to the Detbel, Honolulu. lyi
31. T. DOASELL,
CABINET MAKER AND UPHOLSTERER,
King Street, Honolulu, opposite Lewi.' Cooper Shop.
41 Will buy and sell econd-hand Furniture. lyS
JOOS TIBBET8. THOS. SOREitSOK.
TIIIItETS A: BOIEEXSOIV,
SHIP CARPENTERS & CAULKERS
At D. Poster & Co'i Old Stand,
& j ear the Honolulu Iron works. Ilyo
TIIEO. II. UATIES,
Late Jaxiox, Ctrrv A Co.
IMPORTER & COMMISSION MERCHANT,
asp aoent roa
Lloyd, and the Liverpool Underwriters,
British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co., and
Northern Assurance Company. S-ly5
IIY3IA1V IIROXIIERS,
IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS
In Fashionable Clothing, Hats. Caps, Boots, Shoes,
fcnd erery variety of Gentlemens Furnishing Goods.
Snow's Building, Merchant Street, Honolulu. iO-lyS
1. t. WALKER. 6. C. ALLEN.
AVALIalllt Sc AI.LEA, j
SHIPPING & COMMISSION MERCHANTS, '
18 Qneen Street, Honolulu, 1L I. Iy4
I. lu TORBEBT,
DEALER IN LUMBER AND EVERY KIND
OF BUILDING MATERIAL.
lSOrrici Comer Queen and Fort streets. Iy4
UOLX.ES & CO.,
SHIP CHANDLERS AND COMMISSION
MERCHANTS,
Qneen Street, Honolulu. Particular attention paid
to the purchase and sale of Hawaiian Traduce.
EEr EES BT PHMISgloX TO
C L Bicharda a Co, I II Uackfeld a Co,
C Brewer a Co, O L lUchards a Co, .
D O Waterman Esq, (Castle a Cooke. 2-lyS
I It A RICIIARD.SOZY,
IMPORTER & DEALER IN BOOTS, SHOES,
And Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods, corner of Fort
alia Aiercnam c-treetl, Honolulu. v-iya
EDWIiV JOXES,
GE0CEE AHD SHIP CHANDLER,
liahafna, Slut.
Money and Becraits furnished to Ships on the most
iuj laroraoie terms. jiyo
CIIUZG HO OA.
Commission Merchant and General Agent,
Importer of Teas and other Chinese and Foreign
Goods. Wholesale Dealer In Hawaiian Produce, and
Agent for the Paukaa and Amauulu Sugar Planta
tions, irire-proot ciore on auuanu ctreet, ueiow
xvlng. ii-ij
AFOXG &. ACIIUCIa.
Importers, Wholesale and Retail Dealers
In General Merchandise and China Good., in the
Fire-proof Store on Xuuanu Street, under the Public
11 ail.
GEORGE G. IIOIVE,
Dealer is Redwood and Northwest Lumber,
Shingles, Doors, Sashes. Blinds, Kails, Faints, etc,
36 at his old stand oa the Esplanade, lj4
F. A. SCHAEFER & CO.,
C0HMISSI0N MERCHANTS,
S8 Honolulu, Oahn, H. I. py4
ED. HOFFSCHLAEGER & CO.,
IMPORTERS & C0MUISSI0NMERCHANTS
41 Honolulu, Oahn, IL L lya
TIIEODORE C. IIEUCK,
IMPORTER & COMMISSION MERCHANT.
1-8 Honolulu. Oahn. II. L py
II. IXACKFELU fc CO.,
GENERAL COMMISSION AGENTS.
8-1) Queen Street, Honolulu, H. L ly
CIIAIKVCEY C. IIEXIVETT,
DEALER IN NEWSPAPERS, MAGAZINES,
And Periodicals, Fort Street, Honolulu. PMy4
B. r. EBLIRS. A. JAEGER.
B. F. EI1XERS &. CO.,
DEALERS IN DRY GOODS AND GENERAL
MERCHANDISE,
Fire-proof Eton on Fort Street, abort Odd Fellows
HalL ST-ly -
i BUSINESS NOTICES.
D. H. HTTCHCOCE,
XOTABY PUBLIC,
11 llilo, Hawaii, lj
A. S. GLEGnOKX,
WHOLESALE AND BET AIL DEALE
In Merchandise. Fire-proof Store, corner of Queen
and Kaahumanu Street.. Retail Establishments, on
Xuuanu Street, and on the corner of Fort and Hotel
tires Is.
DOUGLAS PAAEE,
HOUSE AND SIGN PAINTER,
King Street, between Dufiin's Market, and Camp
bell's Tailor Shop.
14-ly
EnrRx&v rzcx. n. a. p. caktie.
C. KKEWER. & CO.,
SHIPPING AND
COMMISSION MEKCHA1STTS
HONOLULU, II. I.
AGENTS )f the Boston and Honolulu
'Packet Line.
AGENTS For the Malice, IVnllnku and
Ilnnn Plantations.
AGENTS For the Pnrchase and Sale of
Island Prodnre. 5-lyS
I A. SCIIAEFEIE,
L GGXT for the BREMEN BOARD
ft. of nXDEltWKITEES.
Agent for the Dresden Board of Underwriters,
Agent for the Vienna Board of Underwriters.
r-5 it
e. p. adaxs. s. o. wilder,
AIA3IS fc WILDER,
AUCTION 4: COMMISSION MERCHANTS
27 Queen Street, Honolulu, II. I. Iy4
C. S. BARTOW,
AUCTIONEER,
Salesroom on Queen Street, one door from Kaahn-
tnun street. ifij
ir. a. winraura,
NOTARY PUBLIC,
6 Office at the Interior Department. Iy5
31. S. GItl.-MtA.J.TI &, CO.,
IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS
In Fashionable Clothing, Hats, Ops, Boots, Shoes,
ana erery variety ol uenilemen superiiT nrnlsn-
Ing Goods. Store In Makee's Block, Queen Street,
iionoiuiu, u. l. iiu-ija
1V3I. ItYAIV,
TURNPIKE STORE CHOICE GROCERIES
Corner of Xuuanu 1 Pauoa Valley Boads. 12-ly
JOII.-V II. PATV,
Notary Pnblic and Commissioner of Deeds
For the State of California. Office at the Bank of
Bishop a Co., Kaahumanu Street, Honolulu. 2-ly5
g. iv. :vorto:v,
COOPER AND GAUGER,
At the New Stand on the Esplanade.
He Ii prepared to attend to all work In Lis Hoe
at tue chop next to tlie Custom House, where he can
be found at all working boars, lie has on hand
and for sale. Oil Caki and Barrels of different sizes.
new and old. which he will bell at the verj Lowest
Market lsatea, All work done in a thorough manner
and warrnnted to fire satisfaction. All kinds of
Coopering Material and Tools for sale. l-3m
i ii. a. sb:ki.ii;,
TUT, ZINC AND COPPER SMITHS,
AND SHEET IE0N "WOEKEES,
Nananu Street, between Merchant & Qneen,
Hare constantly on hand. Stoves, Pipe. Gal
ranized Iron Plain and Ilorie Uitbs.
T Stop-cocks. India Ilnbber No.e Wet3-tilr.
in lencTQs 01 no ana leei. wun conpiines
and nine complete. Itath-Tubs. and also a
Terr larpefiocK ui iinwareoi ererj aescription.
Particular attention giTen to Ship-Work. Orders
from the other Islands will be carefully attended to.
Thankfnl to the Citizens of Honolulu and the
Islands generally for their liberal patronage in the
!ar. we hope by strict attention to business to merit
me same lor me luture. Ji-ljo
.TA3II2S It. I.E.VIS,
COOPER AND GAUGER,
At the Old Stand, corner King & Bethel Sts.
A Large Stock of Oil Snooks and all kind, of Coop
ering Materials constantly on hand. He hope, by
attention to busioes. to merit a continuance of the
patronage which he has heretofore enjoyed, and fur
wuicu ne now returns nis inanK.. l-3m
J. II. THOMPSON,
GENERAL BLACKSMITH,
Qneen Street, Honolulu,
Has constantly on hand and for sale at the Lowest
Market l'rices, a good assortment of the Best Befined
Bar Iron, and the Best Blacksmith's CoaL 38-lyS
ISO. K0TT. SAm'L !OTT.
JOIUV AOTT afc CO.,
COPPER AND TIN SMITHS,
Kaahunann St, one door above Flitner's.
Beg lea . e to Inform the pnblic that they are pre
pares jo inrnisn ail juuas oi copper oric, sncti as
cunt, sinkerans, rorpuum raus, .tonus, lumps,
etc Also on Land, a full assortment of Tin Ware,
which we offer for sale at the Lowest Market Prices.
All kinds of Impairing done with Neatness and
Dispatch. Orders from the other Islands will meet
wltn prompt attention. 1-Cni
It. KYCUOFT,
HOUSE AND SHIP PLTTMBEE,
King- St, two doors west of Castle & Cooke's.
Has on hand, Eatb-Tubs, Water-Closet. Wash-Ba
sins, force ana iaii ramps, ieaa ana uaivamzea
Iron Pipes, and number's Brass-works. Being the
only Plumber in the city, he will execute all orders en
trusted to him in a workmanlike manner. 1-Zm
MIC. a. COSTA,
JEWELER AND ENGEAVER,
Port Street, opposite Odd Fellows' Hall,
Is prepared to execute with promptness, all work In
his line of business, such as Watch and Clock repair
jpfc MannfActoriog Jewelry and Engraving. I-3m
oi:oic;i: M'ii,LiAn.s,
LICENSED SHIPPING AGENT,
Office on James Eobinaon & Go's Wharf,
Continues the business on hit old plan of settling
with fleers and seamen immediately on their ship
ping at his office. Having no direct or Indirect con
nection with any outfitting establishment, and allow
ing no debts to be collected in his office, he hopes to
give as good satisfaction in the future as he has in
the past. l-3m
KEVERE
King Street,
aX ROUST!.
: Near Fort.
THIS FAVORITE and -ivcll-knoivn
Establishment Is now open tor Boarders and
Transient Visitors.
The Best the Market affords, of every Tariety. will
always be provided, with good attendance.
Board per week J6. 00 up stairs, (4.00 down stairs.
All HON, Proprietor.
Piano-Forte Maker & Tuner,
Has Returned Again.
All orders left at the Drug Store of
hlM J. M. .Siiiith at Oo corner of Fort and
uorei streets, or at tim. iiscners
Furniture Booms. Hotel Street, will
meet with Immediate attention. 9-6mc
DICRSOIY & BOLSTER,
House, Sign & Ship Painters,
ICIng Street, near Snnanu.
Graining, Marbling, Gliding, Calsomlnlng,
rDr-hsjirinir. etc. ti. executed on the
slibrtest notice, and on the most reasonable
1
FOREIGN NOTICES.
uo5 s. xrrzu.
JAHCS X. BLOCX 1
LEOi It. 3IEYERS &. CO.,
IMPOETEES AHD MANtJFACTUEEES OF
HALT AN & AMEEICA2T MARBLES,
Mantels, Grates, Monuments. Headstones. Tombs,
Wa&hstand, Bureau and Counter Top, Billiard Beds,
Fire Bricks, Plaster, Jfcc, 4c., 930 ilarket Street, op
posite Catholic Church, San Francisco, CoL flme
H. W, SITZRaXCZ.
C X. CUBX.
SEVERANCE, CLARK & C0.f
nnTirTiTTciciTrsvr TmnnTr,rmn occurrence, lrcatles are onen reported with
LUMM1SSI0N lRCHANTS amendments, and sometimes without reconv
ATITl RWTPPTWfj irmrc , mendation; but I do not recall an instance,
AHD SHIPPING AGENTS, i since I came into the Senate, where such a
405 Front St, corner of Clay, San Francisco, i treaty has been reported with the recom-
Ti- .. . . , ' mendatlon which Is now under considera-
of Island rSSSi JStTfi':ai' tIon- The character of the treaty seemed to
?2$XtKEJm the exceptional report. The Com
Consignments. 11-em ' 'Uee "'d not hesitate In the conclusion
j that the treaty ought to be rejected, and tbey
JOBS MTCKAEXt
Portland.
J. C KEHEIXX,
a5. r. uau
M'CRAXEH, MERRILL & CO.,
FORWARDING AND
COMmSSION KEROHANTS
Portland, Oregon
Having been engaged In our present business for
upwaras oi iwejve years, ana i-eing located in a Fire
proof Brick Building, we are prepared to receive and
iiir,ir-r iM4uu clihct, eiicu m eugar, ryrnps, iijce,
Pulu. Coffee, etc. to adruntare. CoritioriTr.4ii.rsi
pecially solicited for the Oregon Market, tn which
ersonal attention will be id, and upon which cash
auvaiices win ue maae wnen requirtnl.
Charles TV Brooks San Francisco
JLJierriiuuo
Fredlken
Badger a Undenberger
James ltrick k Co
Wm T Coleman a Co
Stevens, Baker a Co ,
Allen k Lewis Portland
LaddaTilton ,
iLeonaraaureen l-iyj
E. M. VAX REED,
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
Itnnngaiva, Jnpnn,
HitIue tlie best facilities thronirli an Intlm.t. mn.
nection with the Jajianese trade for the past eijrht
years, is Drenareu to transact in, imdnM, nint.i
m uia tre, wim aispaicn. 17-ly4
I. ft. wnXtAlfS, H. p. SLA5CBAES, c a. xoasax.
WILLIAMS. BLANCHAED & CO.,
SHIPPING & COMMISSION MERCHANTS
305 Front Street, San Francisco. fCm
LANGLEY, CEOWELL & CO.,
WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS,
32 Cor. Battery b Clay Sts, SanFrancitco. Cm
AMERICAN' EXCHANGE
HOTEL,
Sansorae Street, San Francisco,
Extending; from Sacramento 5t. to Halleck Street
inr avixg iiEnx kecexti.y rex.
JUL orated and newly i'nrnislied. makes it the
most qufet, economical and comfortable FAMILY
HOTEL in the State. Beinir central! v located, it of
fers eyery Inducement for Business Men and the Pub
lic cenerally.
The Tables will be constantlr snnnlled with ererr
luxury the market affords. The American Exchange
wtu, wiui x.eu ugms, wtii oe at ine w narres and
XMots, to conrey passenfrs to the Hotel free.
iyi iiMOTtiir kakoest, Prorr.
SEEDS! SEEPS!
FRESH SUPPLIES OF
GARDEN, FLOWER, FRUIT
ASD TREE SEEDS,
Received by Every Steamer Also
CRASS & CLOVER SEEDS,
Of suitable varieties for this Climate, comprising
Tlie largest collection of See tlx
To be found oa this Coast. Orders br Mail or Ei
press promptly attended to in their turn. Address
GEO. F. SYLVESTER,
Seedsman,
2-4mc 3U Washington Street, San Francisco.
INSURANCE NOTICES
SAN FRANCISCO
BOAED OF UKDEKWRITERS.
HpIIE UKDERSICXED Having been
JL appointed Aeents for the San Fi-ansLico Board
oi underwriters, comprising the
California Insurance Company,
Merchant Mutual Murine Ins. Co.,
Pnclflc Insurance Companyf
California Lloyd, and
Home Mutual Insurance Company,
Bee leave to inform Masters ,( YwU and f he hnK.
Uccenerallr. that all Vessels and CareiMm. lnsnre.1
by either of the above Companies, against perils of
u n aim oiuer nsas, at or near me feandwich
isianas win nave to be verified by them.
I-3m
IL HAL'KiKLDiCO.
C'ALIl'OIOIA
INSURANCE COMPANY.
rjlIIE U.VDERSIG.VED, AGENTS of
-SA. tne Above Ittmnanr. have been anthnrltMl tn
insure risks on Carzro. Freicrlit and Treas
ure, by Coasters, from Honolulu to all porta of
iuc Hawaiian, uroup, ana vice versa.
0-114 JL UACKFELD i CO.
MEKCIIAIVTS' MirTirjUL,
MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY
Or San Francisco.
THE UNDERSIGNED having been
appointed Agents for the abore Comnanr .are
prepared to issue Policies on Cargoes, Freights
and Treasure
WALKER t ALLEX.
l-3m Agents, Honolulu.
CALIFORNIA
INSURANCE COMPANY.
THE UNDERSIGNED, AGENTS OF
the above Company, have been authorized to
insure risas on Cargo, Freight and Treas
ure, from Honolulu to all ports of the world, and
vice versa.
15-ly H. nACKFELD CO.
FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY.
THE UNDERSIGNED having been
appointed Accnts of the above Comnanv. are
prepared to insure risks against Fire, on Stone and
llrlck Bulldlncs. and on Merchandise
stored therein, oii the most favorable terms. For
particulars apply at tne omce or
o-iya r. a. sciiAtnui a cc.
Insurance Notice.
THE AGENT FOR THE BRITISH
Forelm Msrine Insurance Comnanv. rT.lmit.
ed), has received instructions to reduce the rates ot
Insurance between Honolulu and Ports In the Pacific,
and la now prepared to Issue Policies -at the Lowst
jaua, wltn aspeoal redaction on Freight per Steam
ers. THEO. II. JJATIFS.
43-tf Jigad. Brit. Far. Mar.lni. Co. ItAmitt&l
THE TOM MOORE TAVERN,
BY J. OWIELI,,
SS Corner of Kins; and Fort Streets. lyl
pimAxiru rice.
"TO. 1 and COOLIE RICE
alvrars
on hand and for sals by
l-3m WALKER A ALLEN'. Agents.
TIIE aiuiajia treaty.
Speech or Charles Sumner against Its
Ratification.
The following Is the speech of Charles
Sumoer, of Massachusetts, In the executive
session of the Senate, April 13, 1SG9, on the
Johnson-Clarendon treaty for the settlement
of claims, the Injunction or secrecy having
ucen removed Dy oraer oi me senate:
Jr. Prttidmt: A report recommending
that the Senate do not advise and consent to
a treaty with a foreign Power, duly signed by
the plenipotentiary of the nation, is of rare
uiitcciuubu. iuuuui uisuim: iuc lUipurL
nnce of this act; but I believe that In the
interest of peace, -hicu everyone should
JiaTe at heart,, the treaty must be rejected.
A treaty which, instead of removing an ex
isting grievance, leaves It for heart-burning
and rancor, can not be considered a settle
ment of pending questions between two na
tions. It may seem to settle them, but does
not. It is nothing but a snare. And such is
the character of tlie treaty now before us.
The massive grievance under which our
country suffered for years is left untouched;
the painful tense of wrong planted in the
national heart Is allowed to remain. For all
this there is not one word of regret, or even
of recognition ; nor Is there any semblance
of compensation. It can not be for the in
terest oi cither party that such a treaty
should be ratified. It can not promote the
Interest of the Uniten States, for we naturally
seek justice as the foundation of a good un
derstanding with Great Britain ; uor can it
promote the interest of Great Britain, which
must also seek a real settlement of all pend
ing questions. Surely, I do not err when I
state that a wise statesmanship, whether on
our side or on the other side, must apply
itself to find the real root of evil, and then,
with courage, tempered by candor and mod
eration, see that it is extirpated. This is for
the interest of both parties, and anything
short of it is a failure. It is sufficient to say
that the present treaty does no such thing,
ana mat wnaievermay nave ucen tue dispo
sition of the negotiators, the real root oi evil
remains untouched in all its original strength.
I make these remarks merely to characterize
tue treaty, ana prepare ine way lor its con
sideratlon.
THE PESD1SO TKEATT.
If we look at the negotiation, which im
mediately preceded the treaty, we find little
to commend. You have it on vour table. I
think I am not mistaken when I say that it
suows a uasie wnicn nnas lew precedents in
diplomacy, but which is explained by the
anxiety to reach a conclusion before the ad
vent of a new Administration. Seward and
Reverdy Johnson both unite in this unprece-
dentcd activity, using the At untie cable freclv.
I should not object to haste, or to the freest
use of the cable, if the result were such as
could be approved; but, considering the
character of the transaction, and how com
pletely the treaty conceals the main cause of
oiTense, it seems as if the honorable nego
tiators were engaged in huddiiDg something
out of sight. The treaty has for its model
the claims convention of 1S53. To take such
a convention as a model was a strange mis
take. This convention was for the settle
ment of outstanding claims of American
citizens on Great Britain, and of British sub
jects on the United States, which had arisen
since the treaty or uhent, In 1815. It con
cerned individuals only, and not the nation.
It was not in any respect political; nor was
it to remove any sense of national wrong. To
iaKe sucu a convention as tue model tor a
treaty which was to determine a national
grievance of transcendent importance in the
relations of the two countries, marked on
the threshold an insensibility to the true na
ture of the difference to be settled. At
once, it belittled the work to be done. Au
Inspection of the treaty shows how, from
beginning to end, It is merely for the settle
ment of individual claims on both sides, nut
ting both batches on an cqualitv so that the
sufferers by the misconduct of England may
be counterbalanced by British blockade run
ners. It opens with a preamble, which,
instead of announcing the unprecedented i
question between the two countries, simply
refers to individual claims wmcu have arisen
since 1S53. which was the last time of settle-
ment some of which arc still pending and
remain unseutea. n no would believe tuat,
under these words of commonnlace. was
concealed that unsettled difference which has
already so deeply stirred the American peo
ple, and is destined, until finally adjusted, to
occupy the attention of the civilized world ?
Nothing here gives notice of the real ques
tion. I quote the preamble, as it is the key
note to tue treaty:
wnereas, Claims nave at various times
since the exchange of the ratifications of
tue convention Detwecn ureal Britain ana
the United States of America, signed at Lon
don ou the 8th of February. 1S53, been made
v. .. l . t ,.e 1 1 . Tii. I- if.
Jesty on the part of citizens of the United
states, una upon tue government oi the
united states on tue part oi subjects oi iter
Britannic Majesty; and whereas some of
sucn claims are sun penalng and remain un
settled. Her Majesty, the Queen of the United
Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and
tne rresident oi me united states or Amer
ica, being of opinion that a speedy and
equitable settlement of all such claims will
contribute much to the maintenance of the
friendly feelings which subsist between the
two countries, nave resolved to make ar
rangements for that purpose bv means of a
Convention."
The provisions of the treaty are for the
trial of these cases. A Commission is con
stituted, which is empowered to choose an
arbitrator; but in the event of a iallure to
agree, the arbitrator shall be determined " by
lot," out oi two persons named oyeacusiae.
Even ir this aleatory proceeding were a
proper device In the umpirage of private
claims, it is strangely inconsistent with the
solemnity which belongs to the present
question. The moral tense Is disturbed-by
such a process at any stage of the trial : nor
is it satisfied by the subsequent provision for
the selection of a sovereign or head of a
friendly State as arbitrator, ilic treaty not
merely makes no provision for the determi
nation of the great question, but it seems to
provide expressly that It snail neveT hereafter
be presented, ine petty provision lor indi
vidual claims, subject to a set-off from the
individual claims of England, so that in the
end our country! may possibly receive noth
ing, Is the consideration for this strange sur
render. I borrow a term from an English
statesman on another occasion. If I call It a
capitulation." For the settlement of a few
individual claims, we condone the original,
far-rcachinir and destructive wronrr. Here
are the plain words by which this is done:
The high contracting parties engage to
consider the result of the proceedings of this
Commission as a full and final settlement of
every claim upon either Government arising
out of any transaction of a date prior to the
exchange of the ratifications of the present
convention, and further engage that every
such claim, whether or nut the same may
have been presented to the notice of, made,
preferred, or laid before the said Commission,
shall, from and after the conclusion of the
proceedings of the said Commission, be con
sidered and treated as finally settled and
barred, and thenceforth inadmissible."
All this I quote directly from the treaty.
It Is Articlea. The national cause is handled
as nothing more than a bundle of individual
claims, and the result of the proceedings
under the proposed treaty is to be a " full and
nnai settlement," so mat nereaiter an claims
shall be considered and treated as flnillv
settled and barred, and thenceforth inadmis
sible." Here is no provision for the real
question, which, though thrust ont of sight,
or declared to be "finally settled and bar
red," must remain to plagne the two conn
tries. Whatever the treaty may say in terms,
there is no settlement in tact, and until this
is made there will be a constant menace of I
discord. ior can it be forgotten that there
is no recognition ci tne rule oi international
duty applicable to such coses. This, too.
lett unsettled. While doing so little for us,
the treaty makes ample provision for all
known claims on the British side. As these
are exclusivelv "individual." they are com
pletely covered by the text, which has no
limitations or exceptions. Already It Is an
nounced in England that even those of " Con
federate bondholders" are included. I have
before me an English journal which describes
the latter claims as founded on "immense
quantities of cotton, worth at the time of
tneir seizure nearly two shillings a pound,
which were then in the legal possession of
those bondholders," and the same authority
auas, -inese claims wiu oe urougnt, in
differently with the others, before this de
signed joint Commission whenever it shall
sit." From another quarter I learn that
these bondholders are "very sanguine of
surcess, nnaer me treaty as H 18 worded, ana
certain it is that the loan went up from 0 to
iu, as soon. as it was ascertained that the
treaty was signed." I donbt If tlie American
people are ready just now to provide for any
such claims. That tbey have risen in the
market is an argument against the treaty.
Tin! CASE AdAJXST ENGLAND.
Passing from the treaty, I como now to
consiaer oneny, nnt wun proper precision,
the true ground of complaint: and here.
again, we shall see the constant Inadequacy
oi me remcay now appneu. ti is wun tc-
Inctance that I enter nnon this statement.
and I do it only in the discbarge of a duty
which can not be postponed. Close upon
the outbreak of our troubles, just one month
alter me bombardment oi rort Sumter,
wuen me reoeinon was still undeveloped
when the National Government was berfn
ning those gigantic efforts which ended so
triumphantly, the country was startled by
me news mat me isrinsn uovernmcnt had
intervened by a proclamation, which accord'
ed belligerent rights to the rebels. At the
early date when this was done the rebels
were, as they remained to the close, without
ships on the ocean, without prize courts or
other tribunals for the administration of
justice on the ocean, without any of those
conditions which are the essential pre
requisites to such a concession; and yet the
concession was general, being applicable to
the ocean and the land, so that, by British
fiat, they became ocean belligerents as well
as land belligerents. In the swiftness of
this bestowal, there was verr little consider
ation for a friendly Power, nor does it appear
uiai tncre was any inquiry into mose condl
ttons precedent on which it must depend.
Ocean belligerency being a "fact," and not
a "principle," can be recognized only on
evidence snowing its actual existence, ac
cording to the rule first stated bv Canning.
and afterwards recoznlzcd bv Earl KnsselL
But no such evidence was adduced; for it
did not exist, and never had existed. Too
much stres3 can not be laid upon the rule
mat oeingercncy is a "iact," and not i
"principle." It is, perhaps, the most Im
portant contribution to this discussion, and
its original statement, on the occasion of the
orceu devolution, does honor to its author,
unquestionably the brightest genius ever di
rected to this subject. According to this
rule, belligerency must be proved to exist,
and it must be shown. It can not be im
agined, or divined, or invented: it must
exist as a "fact" within the knowledge of
the world, or at least as a " fact" susceptible
oi prooi. JNor can it oc interred on the ocean
merely from its existence on the land. From
the beginning, when God called the dry land
earth, and the gathering of the waters called
He seas, the two have been separate, and the
power over one has not necessarily Implied
power over the other. There Is a dominion
of the land and a dominion of the ocean
But whatever power the rebels possessed on
the land, they were always without power
on tne ocean, itamitiing mat tncy were
Deuigerents on me ianu, mey were never Dei
liferents on the ocean:
The oak leviathans, whose bnge ribs make
Their clay creator the vain title take
Of lord of thee, and arbiter of war;
these they never possessed. Such was the
"fact" that must govern the present ques
tion. The rule, so simple, plain and Intelli
gible, as stated by Canning, is a decisive
touchstone of the British concession, which.
when brought to It, Is found to be without
support. Unfriendly in the precipitancy
with which it was launched, this concession
was more unfriendly in substance. It was
the first stage in the depredations on our
commerce. Had It not been made, no rebel
snip coma nave oeen Duiit in England.
Everr step In her building would have been
piracy. Nor could any munitions of war
nave oeen lurnisuea. ineairect consequence
of this concession was to place the rebels on
an equality witn ourselves in ail Airitisu mar
kets, whether of ships or munitions of war.
As these were open to the National Govern
ment, so they were open to the rebels. The
asserted neutrality between the two began
bv this tremendous concession when rebels.
at one stroke, were transformed, not only
Into belligerents, but into customers. In at
tributing to that bad proclamation this pe
culiar influence. I follow the authority of the
law lords or England, wno, according to
anthentic report, announced that withont it
the fitting out of a ship In England to cruise
against the United States would be an act of
piracy, inis conclusion was clearly stated
by Lord Chelmsford, ex-Chancellor, speaking
for himself and others, when he said: "If
the Southern Confederacy bad not been re
cognized as a belligerent power, he agreed
with his noble and learned friend (Lord
Brougham.) that, under these circumstances.
11 any Englishman were to fit out a privateer
lor tue purpose oi assisting the southern
States against the Mortliem States, he would
be guilty of piracy." This conclusion is
only according to analogies of )aw. It is
criminal for Brrtish subjects to furnish bombs
or band-grenades to be employed in the as
sassination of a foreign sovereign at peace
with England, as when Bernard supplied
from England the missiles used by Orsinl
against the life of the French Emperor, all
of which Is Illustrated by Lord Chief Justice
Campbell, In bis charge to the jury on the
trial of Bernard, and also by contemporane
ous opinions by Lord Lyndhnrst, Lord
Brougham, Lord Truro, and at an earlier day
by Lord Elicnboro, in a case of libel on the
First Consul. That excellent authority, Sir
George Cornwall Lewis, gives a summary
drawn from all these opinions when be savs :
"The obligation incumbent upon a State of
preventing ncr sou irom being used at an
arsenal, in which the means of attack against
a foreitm Government may be collected and
prepared for use. Is wholly independent of
tne lorm ana cnaracteroi tne uovernment."
(On Extradition, page 75.) As every Gov
ernment is constrained by this rule, so every
Government is entitled to Its safeguards.
There can be no reason why the life of our
llepnblic should be less sacred than the life
of an Emperor, or should enjoy less protec
tion from British law. That England be
came an " arsenal" for the rebels we know,
bnt this could not hare been unless the pro
clamation had prepared the way. The only
Justification that I have heard for this extra
ordinary concession, which unleashed upon
onr country the furies of foreign war to com
mingle with the furies of rebellion at home,
is that President Lincoln nndertonk to pro
claim a blockade of the rebel ports. By the
use of this word "blockade," the concession
is vindicated. Had President Lincoln pro
claimed a closing of the rebel ports, there
could have been no such concession. This Is
a mere technicality. Lawyers might call it
znapa jurit; and yet on this sbarppolnt
England hangs her defense. It is sufficient
that in a great case like the present, where
the correlative duties of a friendly power are
in question, an act fraught with such por
tentous evil can not be vindicated on a tech
nicality. In this debate there is no room for
technicality on cither side. We must look
at the substance, and find a reason in nothing
short of overruling necessity. We can not
be justified merely on a technicality; nor can
the concession of ocean belligerency to rebels
without a port or prize court Such a con
cession, like war itself, must bo at the peril
of the nation making it. The British assump
tion, besides being offensive from mere tech
nicality,. inconsistent with the proclama
tion of the President, taken as a whole.
which, while appointing a blockade, Is care
ful to reserve the rights of sovereignty, thus
putting foreign Powers on their guard against
any premature concession. Alter declaring
an existing insurrection in certain States, and
the obstruction of the laws for the collection
of the revenues, as the motive for action, the
r resident Invokes not only me law or nations.
but the "laws of the United States," and, In
iurtucr assertion oi tne national sovereignty,
declares rebel cruisers to be pirates. Clearly,
the proclamation must be taken as a whole,
and its different provisions eo interpreted as
to harmonize with each other. It they can
not stand together, then it is tne " DIocKade"
which must be modified by the national
sovereignty, ana not me national sovereignty
bythc blockade. Such should have been the
interpretation of a friendly Power, especially
wuen it is consiacrea mat mere are numerous
Brccedcnts of what the German authority,
eillcr, calls "pacific blockade," or blockade
without concession of ocean belligerency,-as
In the case of France, England and Bnssla
against tnrney, trance against .Mex
ico, 1837-39 : France and Great Britain against
the Argentine Republic, 183S-4S; Russia
against the Circassians, IS31-S7, illustrated
uy tne seizure oi me twn, so lemons in di
plomatic history, (Uautefeullle des Droits
et des Devoirs des Neutrcsl. Cases like these
led HefTler to lay down the rale that "block-
aac" does not necessarily constitute a state
or war, (Droit international, sees, liz, laij,
as was assumed br the British proclamation.
even In the lace of positive words bv Pres-
iUtUb .LilUtUlll, OSBClklUg LUC liailUUKl BUVC
relguty, and appealing to the "laws of the
United States." The existence of such cases
was like a notice to the British Government
I .1 f t 1 . ! 11... . 1 ,
against the concession so rashly made. It
was an all-sufficient warning, which this
Power disregarded. So far as is now known,
the whole case for England Is made to stand
on the use of the word "blockade" by Pres
ident Lincoln. Had he used any other word,
the concession of belligerency would have
been without justification, even such as Is
now Imagined. It was this word which.
with magical might, opened the gates to all
those bountiful supplies by which the hostile
expeditions were equipped against the United
States. It opened the gates of war. Most
appalling it is to think that one little word,
unconsciously used by a trusting President,
could be caught up by a friendly Power, and
maae to play sucu a part.
I may add that there Is one other word of
ten invoked for apology. It is " neutrality."
which, it is said, was proclaimed between
two belligerents. Nothing could be fairer.
always provided that the "neutrality" pro-
ciatmea ata not Degtn wun a concession to
one party, without which this party would
be powerless. Between two established na
tions, both independent, ns between Russia
and France, there may be neutrality; for the
two are already equal in rights, aud the proc
lamation would be precisely equal In its op
eration. But where one party is an estab
lished nation and the other Is nothing but an
odious combination or rebels, the proclama
tion is most unequal in operation : for it be
gins by a solemn Investiture of rebels with
all the rights of war, saying to them, as was
once said to the yong knight, " Rise; here Is
a sword; use It." To call such an investi
ture a proclamation of neutrality is a misno
mer. It was a proclamation or equality be
tween the National Government on the one
side and the rebels on the other, and no
plausible word can obsure this distinctive
character, then came the building or the
pirate ships, one after another. While the
Alabama was still in the ship-yard It became
apparent that she was intended for the rebels.
Onr Minister at London and our Consul at
Lirerpool exerted themselves for her arrest
and detention. They were put off from
dav to day. On the 24th of July, 1BC2.
Adams "completed his evidence," accompa-
t...i ! ! r . i. .. i . i i -
iiicu uy au upiuiuu iiuui tue cunutu, minis
ter. Collier, afterward Solicitor General, de
claring the duty of the British Government
to stop her. Instead of acting promptly by
the telegraph, five days were allowed to run
ont, when at last too tardily the necessary
order was dispatched. Meanwhile the pirate
ship escaped from Liverpool by a stratagem.
Here, bevond all anestlon. was negligence.
or, according to the language of Lord Broug
ham on another occasion, "crass negli
gence," making England Justly responsible
for all that ensned.
The pirate ship found refuge In an obscure
harbor of Wales, known as Jlocirra Bay,
where she lav In British waters from half-
past seven o'clock A. it., July 39tb, to about
three o'clock A. m.. Jnlr 31st. being upwards
of thirty-six hours, and during this time she
was supplied with men from the British
steam-tug uereuut, wmcn louowca ner irom
Liverpool. These thirty-six hours were al
lowed to clapeo without any attempt to stop
her. Here was another stage os " cross neg
ligence." Thus was there negligence In al
lowing the steam-tug to proceed, negligence
In allowing the escape from Liverpool, and
negligence in allowing-the final escape from
the British coast- Lord Russel, while trying
to vindicate his Government and repelling
the complaints of the United States, more
than once admitted that the escape of the
Alabama was a "scandal and rcproacn,"
which, to mr mind, is very like a confession.
Lammaze could not be stronger. Surely
such an act cannot be blameless. If dama
ges are ever awarded to a friendly Power for
Injuries received, it is difficult to see where
tbey could be more strenuously claimed than
is a case which the first Minister of the of
fending Power did not hesitate to character
ize so strongly, ine enlistment oi me crew
was not less obnoxious to censure than the
building of the ship and her escape. It was
part or the transaction, me evidence is
explicit. Not to occupy too much time. I
refer onlr to the affidavit of William Pass-
more, wno swears mat ne was engaged wun
the express understanding mat the snip was
"to fieht for the Government of the Confed
erate States of America;" that he joined her
at Laird's yard at Birkenhead, near Liver
pool, remained there several days; that he
found obout thirty old man-of-war's men on
board, among whom it was "well known
that she was going out as a privateer for the
Confederate Government to fight under a
commission from Jefferson Davis." In a list
of the crew now before me, there Is a large
number said to be Irom tne "royai navai re
serve." I might add to this testimony.
The more the cose is examined, the more
clearly do we discern the character of the
transaction. The dedication of the ship to
the rebel service, from the very laying of the
keel and the organization of her voyage with
England as her naval base, from which she
drew munitions of war and men, made her
departure as much a hostile expedition, as if
she had sailed forth from her Majesty's dock
yard. At a moment of profound peace be
tween me united states ana r.ngtana. lucre
was a hostile expedition against the United
Slates. It was in no just sense a commer
cial transaction, bnt an act of war. The case
is not yet complete. The Alabama, whose
building was in defiance of the law, interna
tional and municipal, whose escape was a
"scandal and reproacn," and wnose enlist
ment of her crew was a fit sequel to the rest.
after being supplied with an armament and
with a rebel commander, entered upon ber
career of piracy. Mark now a new stage of
complicity. Constantly the pirate ship was
within reach of British cruisers, and from
time to time within the shelter of British
ports. For six days unmolested she enjoyed
the pleasant hospitality of Kingston, in Ja
maica, obtaining freely the coal and other
supplies so necessary to her vocation. But
no British cruiser, no British Magistrate ever
arrested the offending ship, whose voyage
was a continuing "scandal and reproach'' to
the British Government. The excuse for
this strange license Is a carious technicality,
as if a technicality could avail n this cue at
any stage. Borrowing a phrase from that
master of Admlrallty jurisprudence, Mir Wil
liam Scott, it is said that the ship " deposit
ed" her origional sin at; the conclusion of
her voyage, so that afterward she was blame
less Thi Alabarrui never coccluded her
voyage nntll she sunk under the ffnns of the
Kmrtage, because she neTer had ft port of her
own. She was no better than tne Hying
Dutchman, and as long as she sailed was lia
ble for that origional sin which had impreg
nated every plank with au lndellbla dye. No
Hrltlsh pralser rnnlri allow her to proceed.
no British port could give her shelter with
out renewing the complicity of England.
The Alabama case begins with the fatal con
cession by which the. rebels were enabled to
build ships in Fngland, and then to sail them,
without beinir liable as pirates: it next
shows Itself In the building of the ship, in
the armament and la the escape, with so
much negligence on the part of the British
Government as to constitute a suffrance. If
not a connivance; and then again the case
reappears In the welcome and hospitality ac
corded by British cruisers and by the Mag
istrates of British ports to the pirate ship,
when ber erosion from British Jurisdiction
was well known. Thus at three different
stages the British Government Is comprom
ised; first in the concession of ocean bellig
erency, on which all depended ; secondly, in
the negligence which allowed the evasion of
the ship in order to enter upon the hostile
expedition for which sue was built, manned,
armed, and equipped: aud thirdly, la the
onen comnllcitv which, after this evaslon-
Sive her welcome hospitality and supplies in
ritlsh ports. Thus her depredations and
onrnings, malting tue ocean oiaze, an proceed
ing frotu England, which by three distinct
acts, llghtad the torch. To England mnst
bo traced, also, all the wide spread conse
quences which ensned. I tako the case of
the Alabama because it Is the best known,
and because the building, equipment and
escape ol this ship, were nnderclrcumstancea
most obnoxious to judgment ; but It will not
be forgotten that there were consort ships,
built under the shelter of that fatal procla
mation, issued In such an eclipse of just
principles, and, like the ships it unloosed,
"rltrired with curses dark." One after the
other, ships were built; one after another
they escaped on their errand, aud one after
the other they enjoyed the immunities of the
British ports.
Audacity reached Its bight when Iron-clad
rams were built, and the perversity of the
British Government became still more con
spicuous by Us long refusal to arrest these
destructive engines of war, destined to be
employed against the United States. This
protected hesitation, where the consequences
were so menacing, is a part of the case. It
is plain that the shins which were built un
der the safeguard of this ill-omened proclam
tion, which stole forth from British shore and
afterward enjoyed the immunities of British
ports, were not only British In origin, but
British in equipment, British In armament,
and British in crews. They were British la
every respect, except In their commanders,
who were rebel, and one of these, as his
ship was sinking, owed his safety to a British
yacht, symbolizing the omnipresent sup
port ol England. British sympathies were
active in their behalf. The cheers of a British
passenger ship Tossing the path of the
Alabama encouraged the work of piracy, and
the cheers of the House of Commons en
couraged the builder of the Alabama, while
he defended what he done, and exclaimed,
In taunt to blm, who is now an llustrlous
member of the British Cabinet, John Bright,
that be " would rather be handed down to
posterity as the bnildcrof a dozen Alabamai"
than be the author of the speeches of that
gentleman " crying up" the Institutions of
the United States, which the bnilder of the
Alabama, rising with his theme, denouced
"as oi no value wnatever, ana as reducing
the very name of liberty to an utter absur
dity," while the cheers of the House of
Commons echoed back bis words. Thus
from beginning to end. from the fatal pro
clamation to the rejoicing of the accidental
ship and the rejoicing of the House of Com
mons, was this hostile expedition protected
and encouraged by England. The same spirit
which dictated the swift concession of belli
gerency with all Its deadly Incidents, ruled
the hour, entering Into and passing every
pirate ship.
There are two circumstances by which the
whole case is aggravated. One Is found In
the date of the proclamation which lifted
the rebels to an equality with the National
Government, opening to them everything
that was open to us, whether shipyards.
foundries or manufactories; and giving
them a flag on the ocean coequal with the
flag of the Union. This extraordinary mani
festo was Issued on the day befor the arrival
of ourMinister in England, so tbatwben, after
an ocean voyage, be reached the British Gov
ernment to which he was accredited, he found
this great and terrible indignity to his coun
try alrcaty prepetratcd, and the floodgates
opened to infinite woes. The Minister had
been announced; he was daily expected. The
British Government knew of bis coming.
Bnt in hottest haste tbey did this thing. The
other aggravation Is found In its flagrant.
unnatural departure from that anti-slavery
rule which, by manifold declaration, legis
lative, political and diplomatic, was the avow
ed creed of England. Often was this rule
proclaimed, but, if we except the great Act
of Emancipation, never more pointedly than
in the famous circular of Lord Palmerston,
while Minister of Foreign Affairs, announc
ing to all nations that England was pledged
to the universal abolition of slavery. And
now, when the slaveholders, In the madness
of barbarism, broke away from the National
Government and attempted to found a new
empire with slavery as its declared corner
stone, anti-slavery England, without a day's
aeiay, witnoui even waiting tne arrival or
our Minister, who was known to be on bis
way, made hasto to decree that this shame
ful and Impossible pretension should enjoy
equal rights with the National Government
In her shipyards, foundries and manufacto
ries, and equal rights on the ocean. Such
was the derree. Rebel slaveholders, occu-
Eled in a hideous attempt, were taken by the
and. and thus with the official protection
and Good-speed of anti-slavery England
commenced tneir accursed worst. A close
this part of the argument by the testi
mony of Brirht. who. in a speech at Roch
dale, among bis neighbors, February 3, 16C3,
thus exhibits the criminal complicity of
England :
"I regret, more than I have words to ex
press, this painful fact, that of all the coun
tries In Europe, this country is the only one
which has men In It who are willing to take
steps In favor of this intended slave govern
ment. We supply the ships ' we supply the
arms, the munitions of wir; we give aid and
comfort to the loulest of crimes. English
men only do it" Blight's Speeches. toL
1, 239.
Tire Fins or Fisnzs. In a naner addresser!
to the French Academy of Sciences, M.
Gourlet treats of the fins of fishes, and en
deavours to determine their swimming qual
ities. Thus, he states that a sharply pointed
fin aids the fish to swim raplply, especially
if it be bent In a scythe-like shape. If the
no oe deeply scalloped, tne resait is tne
tame ; and, conversely, fins that are rounded
off generallrdenoteslowswimraers. Again.
rapidity is determined by the comparatively
large size and number of these appendages;
and In the case of fish, the centre of gravity of
which lies nearer the head than tie tall, the
fins are inserted nearest this spot in order
the better to support it
Httocbist. Thweatt, the littlt Ben ate r
from Tallapoosa, telegraphs from Washington
as follows : "WuhingtsB, Sept. ZQ, Jj m.
The Secretary of War sends orders to General
Meade to diitriVnte, at ence, the troops of his
command, with an especial eya to the protection
ef the loyal men of Alabama. " The Govern
ment is pledged to a fall, fair, aad free ballot.
The Secretary of War never did anything of
the kind, and Thweatt U very impudeat when
he talks about the Government being pledged
to anything that is free aad fair, espseUUy &
ballet, ilonlxmtr MaiU
Bbaix wetakea'bwuBBroadwiTt" soU
a young New Yorker, who was showing Ms
country cousin aboat town, "Oh dear, M,"
said the alarmed girl, 'T wouldn't ttetbet
in the etreet"

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