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The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, January 07, 1874, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1874-01-07/ed-1/seq-4/

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HIDES, SKINS, TALLOW.
nUIE IWDERSIGNKD CONTINUE tc
L pay tbe hlgkrft market price for Dry Hide,
Goal Skin ana Coat Tallow.
J.3m C. BRKTVim COi
T
ron sale by
TO WOOL GROWERS.
iin GxncnsioED continue to
fcrryWeoU it rood rriees. Wools cornier to
zaertet this Srrlcc rarticulerly dtfired to make I
frirbt (rnjai C. BREWER A CO.
JUST RECEIVED!
NEW GOODS
From CJiiixDLd I
VTA SAX FRAXCISCO.
PEE BASK "J. W. SEAVER,"
TINE JEWELB.Y for Ladies,
Kartj ai NfciUc-! ud Bracelets, Carriers and Brooches,
xnadrof Cr-ratal, Cornelian, Tortolaefenell. Gold
id SErrr mad Bird's Head Style.
SILK FOE DEESSES,
recur, nu, Striped, GtectKL &nd assorted colon.
MOSQUITO NETTING! JEFFREY
rnrc Wliite (TRASS HLOTHL
'"V
Colored Eabroidered Silk Scarf.
Lidiet' Xicqcered Work Boxes.
Pine Carved Sandalwood & Ivory
CAES CASES.
Taper Critters, Boxes,
All kinds or Fans,
Pearl, Cornelian nnd Ivory Sleeve
Italian and Stttdn.
And oiler Curiosities too nnraerons to mention.
. ALSO
WHITE QUI Wm
TEAS.
piefruItsand pTcklesi
Fresh French Olive Oil,
AJTD AN
Extensive Assortm't of other Groceries
H. HACKFELD A Co.
HAWAIIAN GAZETJ E
SALMON
Colombia River Red Salmon!
Of the Packing of 1873.
rorSaleby Idltf IL HACKFELD 4 00.
DelHnger's Pilot Bread !
IX BOXES,
Just Seceived per J. A. Falkinryarg.
For Sale by 4 tf) H. HACKTEXD A CO.
China and Japan
fcc, &c fcc fc
Tor klr by
CUy
Afong & Achuck,
Knot-en trtre-tt, nm Else
& CO.'S EDINBURGH ALE,
IN QUARTS AND riSTS.
onvriA- Ai.r, isr QrAirrs asd
riNTs.
German Ale, Key Brand, In gcarts and prnta.
Holland Gin, stone Jurs in baskets,
norland Gin, square bottles In cases.
Stronx Roto, la barrels.
Aloobol, tn tins and demQohna.
Claret of different cnantiea,
Llobfrauenmilch, Rhino Wlno 1
.Vllicr Water, In Stone Jnp.
rorSaleby lUIli H. UACKXTLD dt 00.
A Small Lot of Westphalia Han s,
A Prime Article,
Just Beceived ex B, C. Wylie, f..
And far Sale In c. can titles to suit, by
4S1 tf II. HACKTXLD A
IX 100 lb, TlXCS,
NOTICE TO CAPTAINS
lorcnxo at
The Sandwich Islands.
run; rxDEEsjcxED trux cite a rnusT
JL .JUTi; P1UCE for the
Following Live Animals Landed Here,
Namely:
A Lion and Lioness or Cubs,
A Spotted Leopard,
A Tiger,
A Variety of Deer,
A Zebra,
BESIBl
4M las
ANYTHING ALIVE, RARE OR ATTRACTIVE
Apply to
aonxTirosiAS WATEimorsE,
jBanTernandez'VEla.tCnnam Valley.
ESTABLISHED, 1851!
fTIOn SALE BT
1 jitr
H. nACKITLD A CO.
LUMBER, LUMBER!
LUMBER!
ALL SORTS, SIZES & IE3CRIFTI0NS
BUILDING JATERiALS !
The Yard and on the Wharf!
coirriusixG
iVor'Wcst Scantling, Timber!
PLANK, EOAEDS,
Battens.
Flooring,
Laths,
Pickets, &c.
REDWOOD SCANTLING, TIMBER,
Plank, Beards,
Battens, Flooring,
Moulding, Pickets,
Laths, Posts,
Wainscotting,
&C cCC, &c,
Wliite Cedar and Redwood Shingles
White Fine Boards,
Doors, R. P. lmo.,2mo. &Sash
SASH AND BLINDS,
NAILS AND GLASS,
Wall Paper and Border
In L&rgc Variety-.
PAINTS, OILS, TURPENTINE, VARNISH,
-Point and iVrxItetrnab. Hmsltea,
Locks, Hinges,
ButU. Ecrews,
Sash 'Weights & line.
AIPUULOASALT, ETC., ETC
FOR SALE WHOLESALE OR RETAIL,
AT
Queen Street Wharf Store!
EVEET
VARIETY OF GOODS!
SUITABLE FOB
The Island Trade. Islands of the Facifio
OR SORTIItTESTERX TRiDS,
ooNEtsriNo or
DRY QDDS. &RDCERIES
Hardware,
SLOPS, CLOTHING, HATS, CAPS,
Shirts of every kind and Quality,
E2x, Prints,
Gnxs, Pistols,
Powder, Shot, Capi,
CUTLERY OF EVERY KIND,
And rerj suitable for Trading psrpotes, riit;r,
Tvine. Ac, Ac 1
"Whalemen's Infits and Outfits !
Anchor. Chain. i
VTnr Kofc. Hsbbsek's Paint,, Ucbbnck"! BoDed Oil,
TotP- ! GOODS DELIVERED IN TOWK FREE OF CHARGE,
GROCERIES OF ALL KINDS! rt, rt
y A any Port la this Kingdom as per
Borrth end Bif Barrel I coutrrt.-
Rne Red 1873 Columbia River Salmon.' B
the WILDER & CO..
EX BEX V01KUCH. JUST LAXDED.
CornT Fort and QttMm Sirttf
DOWXER'S KEROSEKE OIL, CARD BATCHES
jiff tie Card HaU&a to arrive per i?yrnu
PORTLAND CEMENT
Tbe sevest and Wft Portland Cetnest is tbe Mar
Vet, raractecd sot enlr teniae Cement, bet resn
iac Portland Cement, tbe same qcalhr as ssed bf
tbe Brititb Garersmefit; andvQl.wben nsed, remain
trm as a reek, bue tbe hr kinds will, wben most iim r nniTn itin OfllT CTrtrtl I '
wanted. b fennd foil of HOnt. and tie tanks ecp-i nttALt DUAlO AIlU OlIAl olULM:
extent me.
A. W. PEIRCE & CO.
Offer for Sale
SHIP CHANDLERY
it, at a most ineocTecie:
THEEE IS ALSO THE LATEST IXVEXTED I
YANKEE RAT-TRAPJ
KrtxU Prie Cadi.
TtU tnxt 1&U ZL tbe prTi. ud ene of al&c
c&scbt ac old fow4egttd nt tbe otter trap cesld !
uot c&tcb. It vai tit Lxiiei SecjcirT; Mid there
rj Ttrj grext jTtiTtr tbe erf tt- Tbe nt wu tn-
&wx 0 of j
Hy sons J. T. WATERHOUSE, jr.,
and H. WATERHOUSE, i
AtUai to tb bniieu, xai will icrre all cutnsen
OS THE VEKT SEST
ASD MOST LIBERAL TEEMS. '
Coon try Orden EnpeetnUw InTltctl.
JOHN THOS. WATERHOUSE
GROCERIES,
lETLo-uur e2 Bread. !
Lime and Cement,
California
Hay,
-ASD-
By steamer froa Saa Francisco,
Potatoes, Onions, &c.
Water! Water!
C.M1L III1HLK SOntX, THE 1IOCBS
TOE TTUUOATIOy wC be
Praai 7 to 8 A. M &ad frca 4 to 5 P. H.
THOS. 1BSG. Srpt. VTater Vorta.
leoats for
Brand' Boob Lsxcei,
Perry Davis' Painkiller,
Pnnlca Salt "Worki
Trom tie JJalle 'Wrestb.
A Trip to the Summit of Mauna Loa.
Bt W. W. Hali., Esq.
IIoxolultj, Dec 22d, 1873.
Deaii EorroKS: Having been often
urged by friends to write an account of
my trip to the top, and into the summit
crater of Mauna Loa., made a few months
since, I have endeavored to do so, and
trust that the result may bo of interest to
the readers or hearers of the Jlatfe
Wreath.
It was Thursday, the ISth of September,
that I left Mr. Reed's pleasant ranch at
Kapapala, accompanied only by Johnnie,
a half-caste, who was well acquainted with
the mountain and who acted as guide.
He was well mounted on a sorrel horse,
acenstomed to chasing cattle over rocks
and ravines ; while I rode a little brown
mule, with a pair of tremendous cars,
whose crowning virtue was his power of
endurance.
It was a beautiful day; the sun was
bright, and the top of Mauna Loa, stood
out clearly defined against the 'Western
sky. The rays of the morning sun lit up
the side of the vast dome-shaped moun
tain with a rich golden hue, which con- j
tra5tcd charmingly with the light, fleecy
clouds that hung like a wreath just above
the line of woods. From the top could
be seen the faintest column of white
smoke, indicating the direction of the
fires above; while a little to the right,
but near a score of miles away, we could
see the thick smoke constantly rising from
Kilauea, and passing off towards the
Jth. Our road lay through pleasant
.a".. land for a distanco of seven miles,
tiirTSTtached Ainapo,-Mr. Reed's tipper
ranch. We had now reached an altitude
of over four thousand feet, and the air,
even at midday seemed cool and invigorat
ing. Mr. Henry Gandle, who has charge,
kindly furnished us with lunch and all the
milk we could drink ; also a Lirge canteen
full which we took up the mountain with
us.
We started from Ainapo at two o'clock,
accompanied by a native from Kilauea
riding a knock-kneed horse, and driving a
pack mule carrying a tent, provisions and
blankets. The ascent was now quite rap
id, and our road led through open woods,
filled with wild cattle, and over patches
of strawberries, in some places, covered
with fruit. "We passed on through the
woods, then over tedious bls of pahoe
hoe, where only stunted ohia and bunch
grass can grow, pausing once or twice
only to' water our animals at the holes
along the road. Johnnie caught a young
goat among the rocks, which he killed,
taking the choicest cuts along to roast at
our camp fire. At four o'clock we reach
ed the place where former parties had
camped. The place was well marked by
the ashes of camp fires, and the numerous
empty cans and bottles lying round. As
it was so early, I asked the guide if we
could find grass and wood farther up the
mountain, and as he replied in the affirma
tive we continued on until half-past five.
"We halted in a sheltered spot with a leveL,
sandy bottom, and plenty of grass and
wood near by. It did not take long to
build a roaring fire, pitch our tent, tether
our animals, prepare and eat our supper;
and by seven o'clock we were all rolled
up in our blankets and fast asleep. At
three in the morning the guide was up to
rebuild the fire; and he soon found that
his horse 'and the pack mule had left for
parts unknown. It was very dark, but
Johnnie started down over a path that I
could hardly follow in the day light; and
by sir o'clock he returned with both, hav
ing gone below the camping gronnd be
fore he found them. As so much time
had been lost, I had almost given up the
idea of going to the top and back the
same day. But when I saw him return I
could have embraced him on the spot for
joy. We hurried through our breakfast,
then taking all that we needed for the ter
rible jaunt before us, the guide and I
started at half-past six. The native was
ordered to carry the tent and baggage
down to the lower camp and there await
our arrival at evening. We toiled on
over the dreary wastes of rough pahoe
hoe and scoria for miles, with nothing to
break the monotony of the scene. The
ascent became more steep as we went
higher, until within two miles or so from
the crater, where it seems to be quite lev
eL When a short way from the top we
passed over two short arms of an old a-a
flow, where it would teem impossible for
animals to go. "We reached tbe eastern
verge of tbe great crater at half-past ten,
four hours from our camp. I beliere this
is the best time that has ever been made
in ascending Mauna Loa. "We left our
animds on the brink, nearthe crack where
ice and water are to be found. Moku
aweoweo in all its solitary grandeur lav
at our feet. It is truly a grand old crater,
measuring about two miles from north
to south, and a mile and a half, perhaps,
across from east to west, and in depth
varying from five hundred to eight hun
dred feet On the eastern side, directly
below us, is a broad step or shelf, extend
ing round the wall of the crater from
north to south, and varying in width from
a quarter to half a mile in widlb. It is a
very striking feature of the crater, and is
midway between the top and bottom, re
sembling in some respects, the old "Black
Ledge" in Kilauea. The volcanic action
is confined to a lake situated in the south
western extremity. It is crescent shaped,
and the most action is seen in the point
directly under the western bank. From
where we stood, a distance of over a mile,
we could see the molten lava, of "blood
red hue, in constant action, tossed and at
times thrown in glowing jets far above
the banks of the lake. The heat from the
bottom of the crater, which has been en
tirely covered by the eruption of 1872, is
very great; and the sulphurons smoke
and steam can be seen rising from numer
ous fissures and blow holes, especially in
the southern part. After viewing this
wondrous, scene for a short time, and tak
ing a lunch with a drink of ice-water from
the crack, we started on an exploring ex
pedition toward the north. I had expect
ed to be troubled with mountain sickness,
as almost every one is, but fortunately no
symptoms appeared, and I felt as well and
strong as when on the sea shore ; bnt no
ticed that respiration was fuller and more
frequent than at the sea leveL "We fol
lowed the edge of the crater for over a
mile, until we came to the brink of the
"North Gap." This is a depression di
rectly north of Mokuawcoweo and con
nects it with the smaller north crater,
which lies in the direction of Mauna Kea.
From this point we could look across
Mokuawcoweo toward the south and see
partly into'the smaller but deeper crater
of PohakuohanaleL My object was to de
scend into the crater if possible; and as
we felt so well and had so manv hours of
day light before us, I felt that we could
do it, provided only we could find a way
down. As far as the eye could see the
sides of the crater presented an almost
perpendicular wall of rock, and in many
places the beetling crags actually hung
over the solid wall beneath. I do not
wonder that former visitors to the summit
have considered it impossible to descend
into the crater since the eruption of last
vear. After going down the side of the
gap for a short distance we found a shelf
of pahoehoe, the lower end of which had
been broken off thus forming a pile of
debris and loose rocks, which extended
from the bottom of the crater to within a
few feet of the shelf, say five hundred
feet in height, and pitched at an augle of
about sixtv decrees. I asked Johnnie if
he would go down this path with me, and
he answered that he would if I was not
afraid, so we took each a piece of ice, to
cool our heads, and started. We crawled
n hands and feet, let ourselves down
gently over huge boulders, and picked
our way with cautious tread among roll
ing stones ; then slid down over masses
of broken pumice and scoria, resting ev
ery few minutes to catch our breath, until
after half an hour of toil, we stood on the
black and heated lava at the bottom of
the great crater.
As we looked toward the south, in the
direction of the lake of fire, it was through
an atmosphere all quivering with the heat
from below. We could hear the surging
of the molten lava in the lake, more than
a mile distant, and occasionally a report
like the booming of some distant gun.
On our left, and three hundred feet above
us lay the long, black ledge, running to"
the south and round to the fiery lake;
and still three huudred feet above and far
beyond was the upper edge of the crater
where our animals stood, looking like
specks revealed against the sky.
" The first thrill o'er.
And the teste serre, again at eife relaxed,
Louk we with close ducriminatisn round ;
And with obserrant eje, and ear attect.
Delighted range. How delicately formed.
And with what nice attenuating skill
Those capillarj threads are all drawn ont!
And mark again, with what peculiar art.
Von twutei rounds of well laid cabfe fora,
Are snugly i to wed, in oblong coils away 1
In siie, to suit some ponderous Admiral ;
And quantity, tancient to eqoip
Tbe congregated nary of the aorld.
Mark, je, yon turtnoas seam? Its either e 3ge,
Enerutted o'er with sulpharous discharge ;
And from within, but scarce a yard below
Its glowing sides tend up a rirld beat.
How tbe blood patt tails circling How,
And tbe flesh creeju, as we o'erstep Us boand I
With quickened tread we leare the hideous spot.
And safety seek, in distance- far remote."
As it would have taken more than an
hour to reach the lake aud return to the.
place of ascent, we spent about half ah
hour in examining the bottom of the cra
ter, and went about a third of the dis
tance to the lake of fire. The formation
of the lava, the steam cracks, the cones
and ridges, fromten to thirty feet in
height, alternating with deep chasms and
smooth pahoehoe, is just the same as cau
be seen on the recent flow in Kilauea. As
the eye glances round the entire circle ot
the .crater, it does not rest on a single
point where it would seem possible to
make an ascent. After collecting a num
ber of specimens, some of which were so
hot they could not be held in the hand,
we clambered up again over the same
road we had descended.
When we stood again upon the brink
and looked down over the steep path we
had climbed, we felt truly thanklul that
no accident had befallen us, and that our
strength had not failed us while in the
crater. I found that the soles of both
my feet were blistered by the heat of the
lava in the crater.
In retracing our steps along the brink
to where our horses were, we came upon
Commodore Wilkes' camping ground of
1S41; the plan of which can be seen in
the 4th volume of his Exploring Expedi
tion, page 145. The walls, built of blocks
of loose lava, stood in some places two or
three feet high. The outer wall of the
camp seemed well defined, and the shape
of some of the houses could be seen.
: While examining the place I came across
! an iron eye-bolt, seven inches long, half
concealed in the volcanic sand, and a small
j piece of white pine. These had been ex
j posed to the snows and storms of over
, tnirty years, and i brougnt tnem away as
i souvenirs, of the trip. "Pendulum Peak,"
as this point was named, is 13,440 ft. high,
and the highest point of Mauna Loa, on
the western bank of the crater, is 13,760
feet above the ocean. Water will boil
here at a temperature of 187. We
reached our horses at half-past two, where
we refreshed ourselves with lunch and
and some ice water from tho crack, Tho
ice was thick enough to hold my weight,
and it seemed odd to mo to bo standing
on ice in Hawaii ncL I wroto a short
sketch of our jaunt, directly under that
of Dr. Adams and his wife, the last visit
ors to the summit crater, then replaced
the paper in tho tin can for the benefit of
future travelers. So far as I can ascer
tain, the following are the only parties
who have ever been into tho crater
of Mokuawcoweo : A party from Wilkes'
expedition, including the lato Dr. G.
P. Jndd, in 1841; in 1851, a Mr. Saw
kins is reported to have gone into tho
crater; and in 1865, Mr. Charles Hall of
Kona, and a Mr. Wormer, entered tho
crater from the western side, passing out
through the gap or depression where we
descended. During all that time there
was no action in the crater, and it was
not until last year that Madam Pcle again
visited Mokuawcoweo ; since then it has
been the scene of her most brilliant per
formances. I believe Johnnio and I are
tho only ones who have ever found Madam
at home,- and she gave us a warm recep
tion. Wtr took one last look at the grand
old crater, and the surging lake of fire be
low us, then turned our backs upon it all
and started for tho foot of the mountain
and companionship again. There is some
thing awful in the solitude and desolation
of Mauna Loa'a summit. Stand upon the
brink of that crater and know and feel
that the only thing with life or motion
within six miles in every direction, is tho
molten lava in constant motion tossed;
and the only sound to break the death
like stillness, is made by the heaving of
those waves and the escaping gasses from
the bowels of the earth. For six miles
from the top there is not a single blade of
grass or a leaf of fern, or bit of moss to
be seen. Not even an insect or bird ever
disturbs the silence that there reigns su
preme. Below that the. ferns begin to show
themselves in the cracks, and farther
down the bunch grass and ohia begin to
grow, getting larger as you descend, un
til you reach the' broad belt of woods. At
five o'clock we found ourselves surround
ed by a very thick and cold fog. Wo
pushed on as fast as we could go, for an
hour longer, when we reached the old
camping ground. Our man with the tent,
&c, was just starting down the moun
tain, thinking we had missed him and
gone down. We .soon had our tent up,
and were warming ourselves by a good
rousing fire. The fog cleared off and tho
night was bright and cold.
The fires of Kilauea shone brightly
below us, and from the summit of the
mountain could be seen the light of
the upper crater; while all tho heavens
above were studded with stars, which ap
peared through the clear air of those up-
per regions far more bright than they
ever do to us on the sea shore. The next
morning Johnnie and I took an early
start, and after a charming ride through
the woods, reached Mr. Gandle's house in
time for breakfast. After resting a short
time we rode to Kapapala, arriving at Mr,
Reed's house about ten o'clock, having
accomplished all and more than I had ex
pected to.
Califoexia Prospekitt. The cotton
crop of California has been this year a suc
cess beyond the expectations of everyone.
Tobacco has also given a larger yield than
anticipated. The wheat crop, though
scarce in some sections has been good in
others, and has afforded a fail general
yield, while the present high prices have
made the crop in value the equal of pre
vious years. Grain of other characters
raised in California has yielded full up to
the usual supply. Hay and vegetables
are generally .gooiL -Fruits have been
more or less, affected by the season,
but the careful husbanding 3nd mproved
prices have rendered them in a monied
view fully equivalent to last year. We
have no reason to complain. Every
branch of industry has been represented
in our State, and universal prosperity is
discovered in all our surroundings. Cali-
jornia paper.
How to cleax Paint. Provide a plate
with some of the best whiting to be had,
and have ready some clean, warm water
and a piece of flannel, which dip into the
water and squeeze nearly dry, then take
as much whiting as will adhere to it, ap
ply it to the painted surface, when a little
rubbing will instantly remove any dirt or
grease. After which, wash well with clean
water, rubbing it dry with soft flannels,
changing the water as often as necessary.
Paint thus cleansed looks as well as when
first laid on, without any injury to the
most delicate colors. It is far better than
using soap, and does not require more than
half the time and labor.
Carriage Painting.
IIATIXd FOR
tbe preeeut enraged tbe"
serrbes or air. TliUJIAS ,
II. PAEKE. a CarrUce '
Fainter whose work bas been for sereral rears before tbe
pubUc, and wnlcb for fineness and durabUltr has nerer
been excelled la this place, we are prepared to execute all
orders In tbe line of
Carriage Painting in a Superior Manner
We do not wish to boast, yet we bare no hesita
tion In saylne: that we can do as fine and as durable a job of
CABEIAUE P-IIKTIG
AS CAH BE DONE IH HONOLULU,
Outside of Oar Own Establishment.
All persona harlnr coed Carnages tbat requtra FamUnr
or VamliMnt. wis do wen to Eire cs a can.
PARTKUUR ATTOITISH PAID TO CAK8IAEE REPAIltlMG
In every brascb.
Prices to Salt tbe Tlmri,
Vtr A First-class Carrtafe Fainter Is enzated for oar
basieM, and Is expected from fcaa Frandsro per December
Steamer.
C. WEST,
Hbn Tl and TtKlnc Street, Honolulu.
SOLE & SADDLE LEATHER,
Tanned Goat and Sheep Skins,
COSSTAXTLT OX IIASD and for Sale,
from tb. wsU-known
WAI.1EA TA3HEKY, C. SOT1.ET, Prop'r
433-17 A. 5- CUGHOBS i CO., Jfsnta.
NEW GOODS! NEW GOODS!
JXJST RECEIVED
PER SHIP SYREN, FROM BOSTON
AND FOR SALE BY
E. O. HALL & SON.
ASSORTED MERCHANDISE.
PLOH'S-Parii. Esgl. 270. 2 and 20. SB and lit Steal
Plows Uof. XO andTCOO Awotled Plow Points.
CULTIVATORS and Hona noes. PI.nL.tI.. ..j .t.
'tttl Garden Hoes, Spades and Sboreli, IUkti and Oot.
OX BOWS, 1J.1J and 2 Inch.
YANKEE COKX SHELLERS.
Agricultural Implements of all kinds.
nOLLOW-WAItE. Vis ; Saucepans, Tea Kettles. Fry Pans, Iron PoU. Oatranixed Iran Tnhi and
Buckets, all sites. Best Freneh Tinned Saocepant and Kitchen Utensils of many kinds.
WO ODEM WARE Chopping Trays, Round Bowls, Wash Bowls, Rollins Pins, Tabs, Brooms, Mops,
llingbam Buckets and Boxes, Ac.
KEROSENE OIL Downer's and Deroe'f, Genuine and Fresb.
CARD MATCHES Bysm's S-Card.
FISH HOOKS The beat Assortment la tbe Country.
FISH LINES AND SEINE TWINE A FlneAiiortment soon expected, from Eajtand and Boston.
FAINTS White Lead, Hubbuck's No. 1 and Pnrej Hubbnek's Whitt Zine, Best Parlor Zioi Palais
ground in Oil, of alLcolors ; Dry Paints, alio of all colors ; Litharge, Patent Dryer, best Uloe. Chalk. Whit
ing, Soap Stone, Uoltea Stnne. P amice Stone, lc. Ac.
Turpentine, Faint Oil, Boiled and Raw j Tarnishes, assorted.
Carbolic Soaps Toilet, Medical, Bath, Dsnta!, Sharing, Medicated, 4c.
Toilet Soaps A Flna Assortment of Colgate's make.
Brushes-Paint, Horse, Tooth, Whitewash, Sash, Varnish, Dust, Centriiofil. Shoe, Olas, Is.
Handles Piok, Ax ctiereral qualities. Plow, Rake, Hammer, Chisel, Awl, Patent Mop. it.
Shoe Blacking Army und Nary, Peerleii, Day and Martin.
Harness Oil, Leather PreserraliTe, Axle Grease.
Lcnther HarneM, Russet Skirting, Oak Tanned Sole, Sheep Skiai, Lining Skins. Alio, a Insist of
French Calf Skin j in perfect order.
ReTOlring Hose Sprinklers An article that should he'med In arery garden la Hoaolnla.
Lawn Mowers Tho best kind for cutting Maninnta grass plats.
Charcoal Irons Blisses' Pattern, largo slio. Spurs Mexican and Tinned, assorted.
Bridles, Wooden Stirrups, Girths, le. Carriage nn'd Tire Bolts, a full assortment.
Horse Shoes and Nails English and American. Cut Nails Clinch, Finish, Clout, and all kinds.
Screws-Ircn and Brass of all descriptions. Wrapping Poper-Asiorted sixes.
j
i
SHOEIiF IIAllIIWAllE;
Including a very large and choice assortment of Goods wanted by
every body.
Don't Forgetto OcOJL and. TnTrilTio
Our Assortment of Elegant Siher-PIateS Ware
COMPRISING MANY ARTICLES
Suitable for Christmas and New Year's Gifts, Wedding and Birthday Presents
ALL USEFUL AND ORNAMENTAL,
DRI dOOD?
Amosketg and Engllah Denims. Bleached and Unblesched'Coltons, Cotton Ebeologand Pillow Case Cottia
'-' is "Linen Table Damask and Napkins, Tickings. A few eases ef
PRINTS-fllaliiFigM Canary and Light Ground of Fine Quality
And Fast Colors. Plaid Shawls. Also, Silk Handkerchiefs.
A SPLENDID ASSORTMENT OF COOK STOVES !
INCLUDING THE FOLLOWING VARIETIES.
Harp, Xo. 1 to S,
Bay State, ?fos. 0 nnrt 3,
X.Uly Dale, So. e,
Farlor Franklins, r--
Inltern Coolc, Xos. 3 and 3,
;
Xodel CooU, Xos. S, 3 and 4.
. t
Darltow Cook, Xoa. 3 and 2,
Sample Cook, ZTo. 3,
Ship's Cabooses, Nos. O, 1,2, 3 and 4.
Onr Stores are from one of tho largest and best Store Foundries In tho United States, and hare Tery
complete sets ol Iron and Tin Furniture.
Store ripe and Elbows, of all slid on hand. American Broilers sola at cost to thosa pur
chasing Stores. Farmer's Boilers A few left, sold ebeap.
All the above Goods -will be Sold on tbe most Reasonable Terms
And all parties wishing to purchase Goods In onr lino will bo win in giving el the firit call
At the Brick Store, Corner of Fort and King Streets.
l 2m
CHINA GOODS
THE UNDERSIGNED
HAVE JCST HECEIYKD
And Now Offer for Sale the Cargo I
PER
BRITISH BASK BBS YOIErJCH,
FROM HONCKONC.
g2 25T eabtiixbx tizxs
610 Bolls Matting,
440 Camphor Wood Trunks,
372 Bales Twine,
514 Pkgs Tea,
178 Cases Packages,
159 Boxes Cigars,
167 Packages Chairs,
122 Cases Wine,
74 Packages Eire Crackers.
200 Boxes Oil,
55 Jars Soy,
61 Bales Paper,
30 Boxes Tobacco,
26 Pkgs Ironware,
477 Coils Manila Bope,
20 Boxes Vermicelli,
801 Pakages Sundries.
CHULAN & Co.,
lTonolnln, Oct- 6, 157J- Wra
TTnnanri St.
HAWAIIAN MESS BEEF,
FacUed Toy
C. BEBTLEMABH, KAUAI-
AxlcS. w arronted.
For Bale by
tli Jm A. TV. PORCi; & CO.
SPERM OIL,
TTJARRANTED PURE, AND VERT LIGHT
! Color, r or isls Dy
S BOLLES i CO.
F
U. 8. Postal Cards,
OR SAXE (TRICE 3 CE5TJI EACH.! BT
7 IL at. WUIT3KY.
PRICE JL.XST
CHELSEA LAUNDRY!
IIosroLCur, IL L, Jo!y T, 1171.
OX Alf D AFTER THIS BATE THE FOL
LOWISO HATES will be cbarred on all work eooe
attbialAundrxt
Gentlemen Ust, Cesta
Wnlte or Colored Shirts. FoHafaed. each I
Whiu or Colored Sblrta, plain, each.
White or Colored Collars, FoHabed, eacn
wmu or colored couara, nam, eacn
Wblte or Colored cuffs, PoUalied.1i pair
wnlte or colored cum. Rain, r pair
Wblte Coats, each
Wnlte Pants, cam
Wnlu Vesta, earti ,
-t.S'
.. 4
- IV
. 4
-tH
JPX
-II
il
Cloth Coats, each.
Cloth Pants, each
Goth Vestf, each .
TJndersblrts, eaeh.
Drawers, each.
Klzbt Sblrta, each-
:it;ht rants, eacn.
Handkerchiefs, each.
Eodta or Stocainrs, pair--
- m
s
I
4
LauIleV
Cnderclotblnr. Plain, eacb
Cnderckitbtaa;, Starched. ach
. lit
. .1
TJnderdotxunff. Starched and fluted, for each Kc5 1
Eklrta, Plain, each la
SUrta, Tucked or Fluted, (and IOC for each Bnate) eaea"3
Wabta, Plata W
Wal4ta,Tucked or fluted, (and 10c for each BaaVJ earn.!
Waists. Tucked or Fluted, and extra with lace, (and 19
f,t ft.anrfh,n,iiiii ii i
Dreaaies. White or Colored. PIsIti , H
Dresses. Tucked or Fluted, (and 10 cents for each
llnae) earh 10
Dresses, Bnmed with lleadlnr. and extra with Laea.
(and Zi eenta for each Kafile) each i . i V
Mrbt Dresses. Plain, earh W
?f!jht Dreaaes, with Fluticx, (I cw. for each Enale) each IX
Cttllitren'a list.
CTrhtrowna, Plain, 4
Drawers. Plain, "- 4
rw-.. ntnt, t;(
Waists, Plain, -" 4
KVlr. TJ1.It., ...h t
Sams, Tucked or Fluted, each. i and 13c for each ItaZailS
Blip., Pl.In.M. I!.'
Slips, Tucked or Fluted, each, (and 10c for each -") IX
ui rsK, x-uuD, earn , ,.. a !
i:sf
Dresses, Tocked or noted, each, (and loe for each Baf
fle).
Bocks or Smcktscs. V parr
Uoruebolrt list.
Table Cloths, Larr e, Plata. each-
Table Goths, Larce, Starched, eaeb-
Table Gctha, Uedlnm. Plata, each.
Table Cloths, Uedlum. Starched, tach-
-jaue uotna. ernao, stain, each.
Table Gotha, small, Htarched, each.
Sheets, Untie, ""
Sheets, Double, each ,
Towels, each.
yapklns, each
Pillow SBpa. Plain-
Pillow Klips, Starched..
Pillow supe, Flutad..
K
ll
IV
IX
4
4
li
M
Counterpanes, Larce, each.
Counterpanes, Small, each.
xuanietx, Larce, earn
Hlanketx, Uedluco. each..
Blankets, ftman. each-
Window Curtains, Lars. V f"
Window Curtains. Medium, tt pair-
-XBt
Window Curtains, SmaD, fl pair
Uoaqulto 31 eta,
.11
ST 3 OTTO What la worla doing; sis aB. ts
worth doing; well.
XT UTUTIOX-To srtTetetlataetlant (a aU.
MY TERMS Cash on Delivery.
I Respectfully Solicit tb e Pablie PatTO
- OXct at Messrs. H. X. WcTXTTRE MB I Sr
eerr. Feed Slore and Bakery, Ccrorr of Tort aod 2X
Waton caCs for all Orders.
4IMy W. IT. WALLACE, Ifrk.
ewaku.

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