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The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, January 19, 1881, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1881-01-19/ed-1/seq-4/

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(General ttTtlandisc.
$6,000 ' $6,000
ELX:OXJTTS JL V.L-J OIESKTI3NrC3-
OF THE
MAMMOTH STOCK:
OP KEW
DRY GOODS, FANCY GOODS, CLOTHING,
CENTS' FURNISHING GOODS,
ALL DIRECT FROM SEW YORK, PHILADELPHIA. AXD ECBOPE.
POPULAR PRICES AND SQUARE DEALING!
I fcrite the fcblie to rraminc rxy JUsnifictnt Stock of Earopcan and American Dry Goods, which is
Largest and Eest-Selcctcd Stock in the City of Honolulu.
MjprioiwforiwxfertJrFKESIl :KW FAURIUf are positively lo-rer than are charged by
otbrrUocnaforOI.D. MIOMVORS, KOILKn CUODS under the gniso of Ni:i.l
rxc off:
Don't be Deceived, Come and Examine for Yourselves.
EXAMINE MY liE-VCTIFUL ASSORTMENT OF
Dry Goods, ITnderwcar, Hosiery, Pancy Goods, Trimmings, Clothing
and Gents' Furnishing Goods.
IS- CENTS' NEW CLOTHING AT GREAT BARCA!NS.-1
I xsm a aortal insertion of ray Goods and Price. XO TEOOBLE TO SHOW GOODS. Orders
tareibeeacotrycaitftilly executed.
CTTAS. J. FISHEL.
CALIFORNIA ONE PRICE BAZAR,
1 coitM:it fort axis iioti.i. str.
WILDER S CO.
Importers and Sealers in
LUMBER
BUILDING MATERIALS !
or AU.N1XDV
JUST RECEIVED
EX
LATE ARRIVALS!
SEVETiiL
URGE AND WELL-SELECTED CARGOES
C01OXIIJfQ
AZL TEE USUAL STOCK SIZES
SCASTLUTG,
TIXBEB, PLAKK, BOARDS.
ISHCI5Q AB PICKETS
ALSO. OrV HVIVD
A Xost Complete Stock of
DRY REDWOOD!
Settling Plant, surfaced and rough,
Boards, rertacni and rough ; Battens,
Pickets, Bcttic, Lattice, Clipboards.
The Passage of the Season
118 Days from Glasgow !
tiie Titrate currEn
CITY OF NANKIN
HAS JUST ARRIVED
To onr ctmfifTjrncnt, from GU?o with a fall cargo of
ocDcnii AK-rctincite which is
Now Being Offered to the Trade
also. iar STOCK,
A FflfE ASSORTMT OF WALL PAPEF
LATEST STTEES.
SAILS, LOCKS.
SUTIS. HUTGES,
BOLTS. SCBEWS. Etc
Paint and Whitewash Brushes
WHITE I .EP.
WHITE ZTXC
VAIXT OIIJ
METALLIC AND OTHER PAINTS!
Class,
Salt,
Firewood,
DODRS SASH BLINDS
A EX. fclZES.
Of Eastern and California Make.
FOR S1LE LV QUAXTiTIES TO snT
AJO AT
am iU
XES. D. B. GETJFFUST.
NO. 103 FORT STREET,
rccprrSg wKrcj'ui Y th Utf Xr. Black, bc to in
lonn tfc Uiv rf Horxslnla. mud ct the fc&tcenl
lsvBd, ttuU br iX3 Vttp canfUatlr
fee mIc a rptentiid aad aoet
TASHIOKABLE ASSORTMENT
MILLINERY GOODS
Hals Trimmed in the Latest Styles'.
A fit execmledlx; the Daft
Srilliast tad Delicate ITicety of the Art
Sie lore a standtEC order with her agents to con
etastly
IXlBWiBJ) EXE, BY TfTP. STEAMEBS
the
ZA TEST MOST AD VA XCED STTLES
la tlw Arl r Il!l-rJ.
y otwtehrta nffi v the extra uwaf. of ertlinr Goods
tatu 3zrd- UEE CHAKliEb WILL BE AS J!UI
ZEXIC u Um of tic ltllfiners on the Coast.
She win also keep a Select stock
'OF LADIES" A5CD CHILD KEN'S
BEAD1 MADE CLOTHING.
HEAL ESTATE!
PesinMe Property on Fort St. For Sale.
THE THXL KN'OWX IOT S1TIT
ted cs Fort Mrrei abort Berrtisls. Ttlc lot Is
3U fed froetac Fed vtrcct. aad 1M feet rear. There
1 a twtvotocy 4welUnr; hospe oa the lot, nearly erw;
TLh cok hocM. fexxh tow-p axnl priix. and tm o" tJ1i
M lr-n wHl Loortf cp from the oouoa lor ewrr-
a?e iuym. ibrwer uju m in xocr oiscreni
jtlarr. and pi pine all In jrood coodttlon. There 1
TV men for & erectioa of m lirre coUarv. The
Xaactrx 1 aI3 im-v. Thl 1 oae of Hit mt htaJthj acd
rtrixy lacalrd t lor a roioVuc of any la the city
m UewohLla. The above sale oCerv a rood opportocitj
tar the penaancst XrrriCiaent of capiiaL
Title fMirffCi. 1V4 at the rxpcnw of ihr porche.
A pars f the ptrchae raoney xsay remain wenral Vr
mertcace on the premi. Porfcrtbrr partictiUrAp
jrfT to G. VT. StACT. on the premifea, or
A.J-CAErWRlGUTVEe).
"Where a plan of the lot can be rn- fc3 7
VERT LIBERAL TERMS.
THE CAEGO CONSISTS ASTOLLOWS:
DPIT" GOODS
In Lsrre Variety, Embncicr
IViCt-, Cottons. Linens, Woolen. Clothing,
Jlisnket. Towels, MoMjnlto Set. nindl.e?:bteri.
Tweeds. Denims, Lone Cloths, Victoria Lawns.
rilotJid.ru. Crimean hhlru, ic,ic
GALVANIZED ROOFING,
Fenee WIre.o. t, S and : noop Iron. KiretN
CalranUrd Backets and Tub, Tots and Covers,
IUr Iron, a full assortment of lze:
Xnts and Washers. Babbitt JIclaL Cast SteeL
Anrils and Alces, Mintinr J cut, 4c ic.
A LARGE ASSORTMENT.
IX BEAUTIFUL VARIETT.
Brussels Carpets and Rugs
ELEGANT FATTEE2CS.
PAINTS!
57'S fa. TH 2inc. Red Lead, HIscl. raint,
lUed l'alnts in all rolors lkiiW UmeedOll.
lUw Linseed OiL and Bed Comi.osllicm.
13ars"iii2- and 33n
SUGAB. BAGS AKD BICE BAGS
A LARGE VARIETT.
COAL BAGS A Splendid Article, and Large
Sue
WOOL BAGGING AND SEWING -TWINE,
Leather Belting-,
Ancliors efc Chains
OF ALL SIZES AND FULL TEST.
WjLNES AND SPIRITS:
rEan' Ale and Stont, Blood. Wolfe i Co Ale,
rig Brand Moot, v esls and es llranesrj , t, S and S
Mar Rniidr.
S?i2rp iledlnm Brtndle. es and baskets Gin,
Old Tom, Imh and t-cotth Whiskies,
AM) A FEW CASES OF AXRT FIXE
SHERRY, PORT, HOCK & CORDIALS
ALSO, THE CELEBRATED
CACHET BLANC AND GREEN SEAL
CHAMPAGNES
3 Sets of Stocks and Dirt; for Plantation nse,
SUrdraslic Jacks, 4 C and t ton lift.
Two Hundred Tons Coal,
SCOTCH SPLINT.
Fire Bricks, rortland Cement, Fire Claj, ri; Iron,
and also, from
BGrrlees, Tait & Watson,
Six rmmllcn Steam Clariiers.
Ore rlr Centrifnpal mschines,
OneaM Mllf.nd Gearinc,
TsropalrComponnd Boilers. t ft diameter,lSfl6in lon-
Conntry Orders Solicited.
For farther particnlars, apply to
C- W. Macfarlane & Co
AS
THE "BIG COLLAR"
HARNESS SHOP
C. HAMMER,
. m Kixt; srritr.irr.
PRACTICAL HARNESS MAKER!
Fine Sing! and Double Vuogy Earnest,
Concord and Melt Harness
Plantation Earnest cf all sorts,
-Riding Bridlrs, SaddUs, IVJiips
Currycombs, Brushes, Sade Oaths,
And erery Xetessarj for Suble nse at
BED EOCK PSICES FOR CASH.
- "i (.rrcnpuoa cone in ice Dest
possible msnnte, with the best materials, at lowest
workmen c rates.
Ill Work Cmrantced or Exchanged.
lOOK Ftn THE BIG COI.I.AK ! 80
Gr
OLBEX GATE riiOTJB.
Exsm Faralrr Flocz,
Ekiorado Fleer.
Bran, laeocad Barley, Whole Barley,
CkimeaL Car JieaL
Oackedwheat is lOIb. ba-s.
All tics and ew.
For sale by
BOLLESiCo
SALAMANDER FELTING
-FOB
CoTeriB Boilers, Sieaa Pipes
ETO, ETC
Saves 25 per Cent, of Fuef.
PEICE REDUCED T.O 87.50 BL.
THEO. H. OAVIES.
1ST MODtTS I II E BUS.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 1881.
Bran and Oats-
Shall MlsalVancea Vote?
yjIFTICCLTIES IS THE WAT OF BJXOMINO A
GOOD CITI I EX.
(From the New York Examiner and Chrcnleie.
bt trenxna p. iutje.
Mis Ilester and Miss Francos Willett li-ed
on tlic very edge of the sotrarba. Indeed, tlicir
honse lay" acro tlio division lino. As the
front door actually opened npon the road that
bcloncxd to Stransct, Miss Heater considered
that she lived in Svranset, nnd did pay her
taxes there. But Miss Frances's mom was in
the back win;; of the lionsc, and looked out
npon the bit of Stvansctthat had been annexed
to Boston, with the rest of that rcsion. She
claimed a preference to livinp in Boston. She
felt a eenso of protection in the policeman, and
had an idea that he micht keep the boys off
their cherry tree, and be a firm rock in the
case of burglars. Then she thought it would
be pleasant to havo the nephews come to stay
with them, in order that they might go to a
Boston school, and sbare the advantages of a
city education in the new brick grammar
school established just over the line. There
wss a back door, with a porch that opened up
on Boston, aa fine as the front door, and Miss
Frances always used this it had a bell. The
S wansct front door had an old-fashioned knock
er. Miss Hester did not think so ranch of these
city advantages. She was not at all afraid of
burglars, and had no idea of being indebted to
a policeman. For many years she had slept
with her front door unlocked. Once when there
had been an alarm of burglars in the neighbor
hood, she had set all her silver on the broad
front sUir opposite the front door.
" I don't want to have tjicm hunting around
the houso in the middle of the night ! " she ex
plained; "like as not thev would chloroform
Frances, or make her tell where the key was.
I had rather make it easy for them." She did,
on this occasion, take up to bed with her a
little old-fashioned silver teapot, of a grand
aunt's of her own name.
" I don't think they'll miss it, " she said,
"and there's the value of it in them new
spoons I gave Frances last Christmas, that
they are welcome to. "
Nor did Miss Hester think much of the school
advantages. She thought they were counter
balanced by having so many schoolboys turn
ed on to the cherry tree. Of conrso she conld
not now let the doors go unlocked, with the
city line passing through the house, but she
had strong bolts put on, and went around every
night to see the window-fastenings herself.
Not that Miss Hester was at all strung
minded herself. She believed in a snprcmacy
of men in certain things ; she had a man to
chop the wood, and boys to take in the coal,
andwasveiy much shocked -when she heard
that the little girls in Egypt " 100,1 in " the
coal for tho Nile steamers. She put all her
business matters into the hands of her brother,
having no idea that women conld lie expected
to understand about such things. Indeed, she
was thankful that there was a sex that could
pretend to master the complicated system of
banks. Men had invented them, and if they
were willing to wicstle with their intricacies,
she was- not one to relieve them ofthe burdens
they put npon themselves. She could fill in a
check, and Miss Frances could go into town
to cash it.
Miss Hester called it "going into town."
Miss Frances spoke of such an excursion as
" going down town." If Miss Hester ever
did go into-town, it was a matter of prayer
and fasting the day before She rose early,
had steak for breakfast, gave Hatty her orders
tho night before, and would have made her
will, if it bad not already been signed and
sealed. But it was long since she had becu
into town. Poor Miss Hester, she was a little
blind, and very absent-minded, and the last
time, on her return, she had mounted into the
back of an express-wagon, taking it for the
horse cars, and had not discovered her mis
take till she came to hand out her ticket to
the astonished expressman, while lie stopped to
lift on a trunk from the walk at Cambridge
port. Of course it would not dofor Miss Hester
to go into town alone again, and she never wes
willing to go -with a guardian. She liad always
been the head of their little family. It was
she who bad the property, for it was left her
by the grand-aunt i hose name she bore, and
m hose silver teapot she valned. She was will
ing to share this fortune with her sister, but
she would not give her the rcsponsibiliiy of it.
There -was the trouble of paying the taxes.
Frances was " a young thing, " at least ten
years younger than herself, and what could
she do with taxes and rents ?
Miss Frances had been called "Fanny"
once. Indeed, the nephews and nieces called
ber aunt Fanny now, for she was their favorite
aunt. She always had cherry tarls for them,
and jams of all kinds, and always happened to
have just been baking bard gingerbread. Then
she could guess conundrums, and aunt Hester
hated to be bothered with them. !
But the last thing that Miss Hester would
have expected of Miss Frances (she'never her
self called her "Frances" orlcftoff the "Miss"
till after the servants were in lied), tho last
thing that could enter her head was, that Miss
Frances should think of voting !
Miss Frances tried to explain to her that.
mere was a new law, by winch women were
permitted to vote for members of the school
committee. In vain she explained that she
never was nor cauld lie a Woman Suffrage
woman, but she had been in to visit the new
school-house, and she was interested in the
school question.
" It is a privilege, " pleaded Miss Frances,
"that I oughtnot to neglect. I have heard you,
time and again, scold Herpian Willctt for not
voting, and on this very question, you have
told him he ought to be ashamed of himself
that he did not go and vote.for decent, respect
able committee men-"
"Because a man, especially a young roan,
has nothing better to do -than vote, " replied
Miss Hester. "It is just what they are equal
to. Ton havo better things to occupy your
time with. This very minute you might be
finding out whether those Norfolk strawber
ries, that man is crying at 15 cents a box, are
woith preserving. If the lam is short next
winter, I don't believe your nephew or the
next generation will thank you, even if von
nave chosen a Moses in the school committee."
" YVhv should T vole for a Mnpson thomm-
mittee? asked Miss Frances, laughing, "why
not some sensible woman, ynu or Mrs. Sturte
vant. Miss Frances ran off to tho strawberry
man to aroid Miss Hester's wrath. But Miss
Hester knew it was hoiieloss to arcue : Frances
did always have her own way, after all, and
tlicro were other obstacles in the path -more
annoying than Miss Hester's objections. In
deed, these obstacles vere something of a red
rag for Miss Hester, and roused even in her
an active interest in the question, which be
fore bad disgusted ber, shall Miss Frances
vote ? Certainly, if M iss Frances wanted to
vote, and the law said she might, why should
she not. Some of the newspapers said she
must have her name legistered directly, if she
wanted to vote in December. Others said she
could not be registered till she paid ber taxes.
Butshe could not pay her tax till she had
been assessed before September I5th, or other
authorities said, but she could not be register
ed till after then. Then should she vote in
Swanset, or in Boston? Miss Hester thought
she ought to vote in Svransct, and accompanied
Miss Frances on a visit to the town-clerk to
inquire about the law. But when she lound
the town-clerk be declared he could not tell
when Miss Frances ought to be assessed, or
whether she ougnt to be assessed before she
was registered, er if it would do to wait till
the fall, or where she oucht to be registered, and
said, "Maybe they'd know at the city hall."
miss ilester indignantly pulled her sister out.
"If he's such a born fool, there's no sort of
use in encouraging him to think you'll patron
ize him so far as to vote in Swanset. You are
right You are living in Boston, and we
might as well go into the city hall to inquire
about tl.e voting." It was necessary to have
answers to these questions soon, for it was '
now June, and Ansa Jr ranees was to accom
pany ber neices to the seashore, way down on
Passamaquoddy, in Maine, and they would not
be back till October. Then father and mother
were going abroad, and aunt Fanny was to
tsatronize the girls iu this quiet seaside place.
It was true that she must be assessed before
September 15th, it must be done this very
week, as the next week she would be rone for
the summer.
Some friends of Miss Hester's were coming
out from Boston to spend the-summer with
her. There was this advantage in Miss
Hester's living in Swanset, that she could talk
about her friends coming into the conntry to
stay with her, while it they came to stay witn
Miss Frances, they could hardly say they had
left town.
Miss Hester accompanied Miss Frances into
town. She did not think it would do to let
her co to tho city hall alone. Indeed, she did
not prove an infallible guide herself, for they
went first to tho State house, by mistake. But
they met with a gentlemanly official, who
gave them their right direction. Another lit
tle tnistako led them into the court-house at
the back of tho city hall, and they came near
being dracgeu in as witnesses in a picKpockct
case that was being tried in tho police court.
But at last they were nshcred into the proper
room in the city hall, under tho escort of a
policeman. Hero all went well. Miss Hester
did all the talking, and camo near making the
the necessary signature to tho document
presented, as she instructed Miss Frances in
tho proper answers to be made. She made ac
count ot the amount of property she owned
herself, but explained how it was that Miss
Frances was not a property-holder, whilo sho
herself was an inhabitant of Swanset. When
it came to the time for Miss Frances to swear,
Miss Hester discreetly tumod her bead the oth
er way, and appeared to be occupied in study
ing what the clerks on the other sido of the
room were busy with while Miss Frances com-
miiica mis impropriety, ine Assessor in
formed them, in answer to their questions,
that Miss Frances conld not be registered till
she had paid her poll-tax, when sho should go
with her receipted tax-bill to the .Registrar s.
Miss Hester offered to pay the tax on the spot,
out ine Assessor relused to accept it.
"Suppose we go the Registrar's office now,'
said Miss Hester to Miss Frances when they
nan icil. It seems a pitty not to settle the
matter up at once. I dare say he will see it
in the same light as we do. It will save hi
bother hen the fall comes I "
But they found tho registrar immovable He
would net accept the two dollars.
So Miss Frances went down to her nieces.
far, far down beyond 31 1. Desert in Maine, to
such a qnici place on tno nay, where ihe girls
could go on with their reading, and havo a
healthy swim or a walk or a drivo every day.
A quiet summer? It did not qtiilo seem" so to
Aunt Fanny. A set of friends were "in tho
next house, and another set down in the vil
lage, and there were boatinir parties, sailim
parties and rowing parties in the sunset, by
rnoonlight, and such nice, pleasant yonng
men as camo aronna lor croquet in the morn
ing. They explained the new law about
young to Aunt Fanny. They brought her
newspapers. She had never been in the habit
of reading tho newspapers before, but sho
louna tnem very interesting. She read all
ab-mt tho schools, sho read about women's
voting, she picked up n great deal of intcicst-
ing nilonnation. At times she was anxious
about that tax-bill, and when it would come,
and where she should pay it, but she could
find out from the papers when she was at
home again, now she had learned where to
look tor things in the newspapers, where lliev
kept their jokes, and where the serious part
in large type that you always were to believe.
Meanwhile, many interesting things were
going on about her. It was pleasant to bo
waiiea op ana aown tno bay on a summer s
altemoop, under a soft breeze, with the livelr
prallle of the girls and the young men. It
was pleasant to go across to St. Andrew's, in
the Queen's dominions, and buy pretty pack
ets of needles, and boxes of spools for presents
to Miss Hester and other friends. Sometimes
she had qualms as to whether this was not
indulging in smuggling, which she as a voter
ought not be guilty of. But it was all on such
a small and agreeiblo little scale that her
conscience did not prick her much. Only ono
:.-niDg lucre aia suaacniy ana unexpectedly
arise n pricking in that organ. It was in
straying back from the boat, across the fields,
after one of these afternoons on the bay. Lily,
the oldest of tl.e girls, was walking in front
of her. " How pretty and graceful she is."
Aunt Fanny was thinking. She liked her
dress, her clinging red tinted skirt, and her
figured "satin" Dolly Vardcn draped over
it, and her jaunty hat with its deep-red rib
bons. It all suited Lily's graceful figure so
well. It was a sight that could nat bnt-givc
tfr pleasure. .Near to her, earnestly talking
to ucr, was i.icn.nu uiciiara who always
followed her, set off for a walk when she did,
sat by her side on the poJch, when sho was
there with her book. Aunt Fanny liked to
sco him with her. They suited each other:
they looked well together, and so it pleased
her. And now, how Lily looked up to him as
he drew near her, and then again how she
looked down ! How earnest there talk seemed
of a sudden!
And then Aunt Fanny stopped suddenly in
the middle of the field. What was she doing?
What was she allowing? Sichard was not
the right one I
Her sister-in-law, Mrs. Willett, before
leaving, had taken especial pains to explain
to her how they were all hoping something
might come abont between Lily and her third
cousin, John Maynard. The two youog people
seemed to like each other, and both families
would bo equally pleased, and Aunt Fanny
was to do everything she could to help it on,
without of course speaking of it to any ouo.
And John had come down before Kichard did,
and had been on all their parties and sat in the
moonlight on the porch. Bat all of a sudden,
a week ago, he had left. He came to bid her
good-bye, and said he had a letter fromliis
grand-mother that called him away. Sho had
wondered a little. She did not know the mail
was in, and asked Lily if there was anything
serious about John's grand-mother, and Lily
had looked very sober, and said he thought
it was serious. And the other girls said they
supposed he would be back again, and Rich
ard and the other young men said something
about his going up to study and look up his
law-office. And Aunt Fanny had thought it
all right and that ho would be back before the
end of the summer, ready to carry out the
plans of the parents.
The younger girls now camo up bohind
Aunt Fanny and wondered why she was stop
ping. Dear Aunt Fanny, what is the matter ?"
Bertha cried. "You have not lamed your
foot I"
Aunt Fanny murmured inaudibly, "It is
the wrong one !" But they could not under
stand her, and insisted on holding her nmbrel
la for her, and almost lifting her over the
grassy humps in the fields.
That evening there was great confusion,
Lily whispered to Aunt Fanny .in tho comer
of "the little parlor, in a very happy tone at
first, and then besetching. She was sure her
mother would like it, though it was different
from the way she had planned. She could
not help liking Richard. Aunt Fanny shook
her bead, she was sure it was all her own
fault; she ought to have managed better, and
have insisted on Lily's goiug more with John
in bis boat.
' jt could not have been managed at all,"
Lily said, much injured. ''It was not the
wrong thing : all had gone right, Richard's
happening to come down there, instead of go
ing out in a yacht, and so on.
But she was willing be should go up to
Boston next day, his leisure time was over,
and they were willing to wait till letters could
go to Mr. and Mrs. Willett, and come from
them. They felt so sure that they did not
mind tho waiting, and aunt Fanny staid on
with her nieces late into the autumn, much
stirred up by all these events. And when they
finally went up iu the boat, and she knew
Richard was to meet them at the pier, she had
but a restless night. The steam engine thump
ed up and down. Sometimes it seemed to say,
"Shtdl Miss Frances vote?" Sometimes it
thumped out, "It is the wrong one! It is the
wrong one 1 "
Miss Hester awaited her at her own Boston
door when she reached home.
" The Taylors and the Morses have got their
tax-bills, but nothing has come for you!" was
her first startling piece of intelligence. The
next was still more startling. Miss Hester
had decided to vote too!
" When I found the men were all so weak
minded about the law, " said Miss Hester, "I
felt it was time for the women to do something
about it. But the worst of it is, that ridiculous
town-clerk don't yet know whether I must
pay my poll-tax too, or whether I have a right
to vote now, because I have paid my taxes
steady the last seventeen years. He thinks he
can find oat the day of the election, and I mean
to be there!"
So the matter was still undecided. Miss
Frances bad not got ber tax-bill, though she
had given ber name to be assessed, and she
could not vote till sho had paid her tax-bill
And Sliss Hester" was not to know whether sho
need to pay her poll-tax till the day of election
should come, but in Swanset there was the
advantage of one town officer, whilo a great
deal of geography was necessary to icarn tno
nmner nreeinct for pavinc the tax, rcJHster-
ing and voting. Miss Frances went with one
of her friends to one of the school-rooms ap
pointed for tho receipt of taxes. The gentle
manly clerk concluded there had been somo
mistake in tho rccordine of names, whilo Miss
Frances showed him tho dato in her diary of
tho day in which sho had given her name at
tho city hall. Miss Hester said they would
remember it at the Stato house, for they had
seen a number of people there that same day,
who would testily to the lact. ino cteriyoi
fcred to rcceiro tho tax, and Miss Frances
ventured to leavo tho money, though Miss
Hester demurred.
But that very afternoon tho receipted tax
bill arrived, and tho next day Miss Frances
took it to tho Registrar's office. She read tho
passage from tho Constitution required by tho
law clearly and distinctly, asking, however,
permission to put on her glasses, and sho
gave her ago without hesitation. She signed
her name, and then learned in what precinct
sho was to vote on tho appointed day.
Before this day tho election at Swanset camo
off. It was decided on that day Miss Hester
and some other ladies could vote, on proving
they had duly paid their taxes. And the day
that Miss Frances voted, Miss Hester had an
election-cake made. AH the nephews and
nieces came to the entertainment, and Lilly
brought Richard, for letters of parental assent
bad been received. The young people must
wait, ot course, it was not tho plan intended,
but it would do. It was at this festivity Miss
ilester announced Blie should join tho woman
suffrage movement. ' They do need somo ad
vice, " sho exclaimed. "The men aro so help
less and so weak about making the laws, mid
then explaining how they aro to be carried
out.
(Qtncml 3rrthandisc.
33erls.s33J.3r Figs
schooner, AT JIODKKATK 1'KICES.
Person itlhlnc to ntrt with Ihe Tint Ktoek
or to improve units tney unvr nitte,
can buy In fintrt not nsitn.
S3I S A. HERBERT, Hawaiian Hotel.
WM. F E NN ELL,
SUCCESSOR TO
PETER DALTON.
SADDLE & HARNESS MAKER
NO. S3 KIXJ 1ST., IIONOLVXU.
IX nm'RMXiTIIAMif FOR-rilE Kixn
MtmnantU'hl'h T )iivamwaIi-h1 tVtv tnonv Y
TvihU to etate thai 1 hire on band, or am reauj to maVe
tu vrun,
DOUBLE OR SINGLE HARNESS
Of tlK Best Material and Workmanship.
Concord Harness,
Espies Harness,
Plantation Harness,
Flow Harness,
AH made of the best Stock; no Convict Work or
Hemlock Leather.
Villi. BEAR INSPIXTIOX !
Poablc-ollted Trees ssd Snrlnr IUr. All Sattill.
will be rt-tufled if required, six months sfler purchase
without charge.
A FULL ASSORTMENT OF
Whips, Bridles, MartingsJct, Saddle Bags, Spars,
Bits. Saddla Trees, Stirrups, Girths, &c.
reUr TETER DALTON-.
PIONEER LIXE
FROM LIVERPOOL.
THEO. H. DAYIES
OFFERS TOR KALE
Tlx Cargoes
CITY OF 3IAD11I1) AND OBEROX,
(I0S naya Passage)
JUST TO TT A TVTT-i
Consisting of the usual assortment of
DRY GOODS & CLOTHING
Galvanized Iron Roofing and Fence Wire,
Portland Cement (White's),
Fire Bricks, Blue Mottled Soap,
Best Welch Steam Coal,
Galvanized Iron Ware, Siddlery,
3 pair Mirrlees, Tait & Watson's Centrifugals.
Wines, Liquors, da ic 0.
ALSO
To Arrive per LIZZIE IEEDALE
duk ix ii:i:.uni:it,
GO Tons Railroad Iron, T Rail,
Rooting Slates, ic. &c.
631 1
THEO. U. DA VIES.
WATER PIPES!
WATER PIPES !
PAnnrs ix want ok altamzi:ii
riplriKtoUr cm from the new Mslns. will do wll
to clre Ui uoderslcned a call. W bare
10,000 Feet of Galvanized Pipiir
On hAml. Jost Received AIsIm" sn.l "nuntrTnr
and can offer It at
THE LOWEST POSSIBLE FIGURES
Rt tb " Morro Gut. Inst at hand. rmtrA
a Full Unc ot
HOUSE PLUMBING MATERIALS
seen as
Earth Closets, Cast Iron Sinks,
Enameled Cast Iron Washstands,
Marble tops and Basins for Washstanda,
with Corks and Chains for same,
IIoso Bibb Cocks,
Sewer ami Sink Traps, Urinals,
Kitchen Slop Sinks, Sink I'lugs,
Light Cast iron Soil Pipe, 2, 3 & 4 inch.
All Work in the Above Line
Will beattetided to with dmpatch. Also, J tat
at hand, a new let of
UNCLE SAM RANGE,
Three different Stri,-of four aixea each. AUo,
Opera, May, Quartette and Ting Hou
IE. ixxx& & al
Together with the
Cotton Plant, Sunny South
Magna Charta, Osceola,
Demand, Buck's and
Charter Oak Stoves.
SUPERIOR FRENCH RANGES,
For Prirate FsmOles, or Hotels.
Ships' and Schooners' Cabooses,
tiaunary stoves, b.erosene Stores
IF TOO Alts; UI KEEP OF
AXYTIIING LN THE ABOVE LINE!
OO OB SEXTl TO
NOTT'S.,
If. B In ordrrinr Siotm thraarh the man. truf Ut.
for the matter of choice to na, please atate limit, and the
no cnbr of people yon wish to coot for.
uooomio, Jane IS, ifiiff. B14
1000 GALLONS OF SPEKM OIL.
TUC 1TBE ABTICXK OF BODT Ull.jrKT
on fhore from the "Tropic Bird." The Oil If
trained, and li u dear and white aa water. For aale try
V IWliLlsO x
general ferrhaniise.
MESSRS. CASTLE & COOKE
OFFER FOR SALE
AT THE LOWEST MARKET RATES,
X' MriOlVI
THEIR STOCK OF NEW GOODS
RECEIVED TElt LATE ARRIVALS, A2SD TO AOTUVE PER
W. H. Wfiiton, from New York, City of Madrid and City of Nanltfn, from EngiaN
THESE GOODS ARE ADAPTED FOR
Plantations. Country Stores and Families
And bought from FIRST HANDS FOR CASH, and trill be sold for CASH, Trith best discount fw
same, or on usual terms to parties approved. Wo offer on hand and to arrire.
Palace Water White High Test Kerosene Oil,
Vulcan Water White Ahove Standard Kerosene Oil.
Lard Oil, Castor Oil, NcntsFoot Oil, Cylinder Oil. Flax Steam racking,
India Rubber Flat Packing, 1-lfi, 1-8, 3-1G, Ac: Asbestos Strum licking. Asbestos BoSer Cortriaa
Babbit Metal, Canal Barrows, Laco Leather. Leather Belting, 3, . 6, 8, 10 and II inch ;
Weston's Centrifngal Belting, a superior article ; Disston'a Cane KniTcs,
Bash Scythes and Snaiths, Ox Bows, Mule Cart AxlesuMule Collars and Hameav Male Shoes,
Heavy uarden Hoes, Lane's Flan ten' Hoes. Axe and Fick Mattocks, Paris Breaking Flown,
L6, the old farorito and tm excelled Moline Steel Breaking Flow. X0 and XI Steel Horse Flows.
Eagle No. SO Tlows Flanet jr. Horso Hoe,a few MOLINE GANG FLOWS,
John Deere mako Qlt Hose, 3-1,1,1 1-4, 1 1-2 and 2 Inch ;
Best Standard Weston's Centrifugal linings, 12 and 1 1 inch, best quality ; Fortabl. Force,
Baldwin Feed Cutters. Eanlo Anvils, Spear A Jackson's ; Disston A Stubbe' Assorted Files,
Disston's celebrated Saws, all sizes; Marhinsts' Masons' and Blacksmiths Hammers.
Saccharometers and Syrup Thermometers, Cot Nails, all sites ; Cut Spikes, Wrought Nails, ;
Horse Shoes, Horse Nails, Finishing Nails.
A FULL LINE OF SHELF HARDWARE
sera as
Locks, Butts, Screws, Hinges, Augers, Auger Bits, Chisels, Saws, Braces, Bolts, Catches At,
Machine and Carriage, Bolts, best munttfacture ; Smooth, Jack and Jointer Planes,
Flows and Match 1'lanes. A Full Line of
Paints and Oils of the Best English and American Brands I
STAPLE GOODS, SUCH AS
Amoskeag Denims. 8 and 9 ox. Tickings, A C A B and D Bleached Cottons, 4-1 wide, best make s
Unbleached Cottons, Chcrp. Medium and Fine ; Brown and Blue Drills, linen Drills, heavy ;
Bnvua Diaper, Po.ro Linen Sheeting, Fine Mosquito Laco, Blue Flannel, Scarlet Flannel,
A Superior Assortment of American White Flannels.
STAPLE GROCERIES :
Golden Gate Extra Family Flour, Hawaiian Pit. Corn Starch. Japan, Comet and Cheap Teas,
Culw Sugar, Hawaiian Sugars. Com and Fias, Condensed Milk. Corned Beef and Tongues,
Sirdines, Oxford Sausages. McMnrray's Ovsters, Evans A Leschcr's Finest Spices,
Tho Favorite Fancy and Washing Soaps. California and Eastern brands ;
Hams, Com Meal, Arena, Graham Flour, Ac., Ac Ac
On OoiiJsiiiiiierifc :
The Geo. P. Blake TUfg. Co's Steam Feed Irrigating; & Vacuum Pumps
Walon's Patent Caitrifvgalt,
Woodtcard ct Brotm's Celebrated Pianos,
A'eto Haven Organ Co. Parlor Organs
WasJilurn tf Moen Mfg. Co. Barbed Wire, the Best Barbed Wire manvfactura
Portland Cement, Sugar Bogs, Oats and Btan, California Hay,
Columbia Biver Salmon, Ibis, and hf. blis., Salmon Bellies in Kits T'ctw Fine.
WATCHES, WATCHES
s3a
4
0
i&bs?
M. McIJffERNT
HAS JUST RECEIVED AN IMMENSE TXYnirR OP
Tho Finest Gold and Silver Watches ever brought to Honolulu!
Consisting of " Chrono
grapl.,""r.S.15artlctt," "Wm. Ellcry," "Ap-
plcton, Tracy & Co.,"
" Sterling," "IIome,,
anil tho "Broadway,
(all Waltliam move.
mcnts), as well as all
tho Newest and Finest
Styles from tho best
manufacturers.
STEM WliMDINC GOLD AND SILVER Wathmpq
To Buit all tastes and ages, and
ALL SIZES, FOR LADIES, GENTLEMEN ANDJ BOYS.
Ho has also on hand an Extensive and Elegant
LIJsTE OF THE YERY BEST JEWELRY,
Such as Finger Itings, Ear Rings, Breastpins, Studs, Amulets, and all classes of Goods ia
tho Jewelry Line. Tho Diamond Scttincs aro tho unrest ami bout in il. ..v.s ...1 ,v.
styles tho most superb ever offered here.
ALSO. A FVIX MXC OP
Tlie Best and most Elegant Silverwnro
KUOM THE CELEBRATED GOKHAM MANUFAUTUKING CO..U. S. A-
THE UNDERSIGNED BEING
Sole Agent on these Islands
For tho above Goods, and as he imports direct from the
manufacturers on his own account for Cash, he is prepared
to sell
WATCnES, JEWELRY AND SIT. VEB WA BE
AT A MUCH LOWER PRICE than they can be obtained
-ygg' good terms, aod a Liberal Discount allowed for CjsU.
ttl tf mm ....o.nuv
MRS.POOLE'S
PARISIAX AXI) AMERICAN
DRESS MAKING ROOMS
Corner Fort and Hotel Sis., Up Stairs.
MHS. POOIE WOUIiB IJESrF.CT
FUIXT call the attention or Ladles to her very
Superior System of Measuring and Cutting,
n hich cannot fall to sire the Deceit ary ease and erace
eo essential In fitting every fijrnrer
SPECIAL ATTENTION WILL BE GIVEN
Mourning, "Wedding and
Traveling Suits.
LADIES' HIDING HABITS A SPECIALTY.
Latest Psrislsa and other lmullnw Fa.Mmi PnV.llp.
Hons on hand for customers reftrrnce.
tSOrders from the other Islands will receive prompt
attention. 4 SB It or
IShip Chandlery.
A LARGE AsiSOItTnEsrr. ISCLCDISa
Cordage, Hemp and Manila,
cotton Dock. Hemp Canvas, Flax Canvas,
Flax Sail Twine. Cottnn Sad Twin
Blocks, Oars, Mux. Hoops, Jib Hanks.
Tar, Pitch, Coal Tar. .
For sale by B0LL2 S t Co.
'-TElJE iVOTIOJE !
J. & C.LANE'S
MARBLE WORKS,
BLTJIEI, SiTUKCT, SCAB KIXU.
MANUFACTURERS OF MONUMENTS
Headstones, Tombs,
Tablets, Marble Hantels,
"Wash stand Tops, and
Tiling in BlacVJacd "White Marble.
MARBLE WOROF EVERY DESCRIPTIOS
MADE TO ORDER
AT THE LOWEST POSSIBLE BATES.
Monument and llesutsione Cleaned sad
Beocl.
Orders from the ether Islaads preaatly sites ded Us.
til .

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