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The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, January 19, 1881, Supplement, Image 6

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1881-01-19/ed-1/seq-6/

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Qjcnml JJJcreJinndisc.
$6,000 ' $6,000
Hi X CLTJSl V JbJ OJJHiyZTJSrGc
OF THE
MAMMOTH STOCK:
OF NEW
DRY GOODS, FANCY GOODS, CLOTHING,
CENTS' FURNISHING GOODS,
ALL DIRECT FROM NEW TOBK, PHILADELPHIA AND EUEOPE.
POPULAR PRICES AND SQUARE DEALING!
I im-xte the yxiblie to mtmhic ray Magnificent Stock of European and American Dry Goods, which is
vitbfxxt question tho
Largest and Best-Selected Stock in the City of Honolulu.
My prices for rwfertlj FRESH ntEW FAItRICS are porftivFly lowr than arc charf-cd by
other Homes for OII. MIOP-WOUS, KOII,i:i GUODN, nnder the fuise of KEI1
i .:; oft:
Don't lie Deceived, Come and Examine for Yourselves.
EXAMINE MT UEACTTFUL ASSOHT1IEST OF
Dry Goods, Undenrear, Hosiery, Fancy Goods, Trimmings, Clothing
and Gents Furnishing Goods.
SS CENTS' NEW CLOTHING AT GREAT BARCAINS.a
I invite a earrf rd infraction of my Goods and Priced. XO TKOUBLK TO SHOW GOODS. Orders
from the rxrcntrj cartf clly executed.
CTTAS. J. FISHEL.
CALIFORNIA ONE PRICE BAZAR,
K9 roRM:n I'ort axii nori:i. kts.
mmnmx
EST MODUS IS BEBCB.
WILDER CO.1
Importers and Dealers in
LUMBER
uo
BUILDING MATERIALS !
or ILL KIXOS.
JUST RECEIVED
LATE ARRIVALS 2
SEVEUAI
URGE AND WELL-SELECTED CARGOES
ALL THE USUAL S10CK SIZES
SCASTLIKG,
TIBBKR. PLA5K, BOARDS,
FES CIS G ASB PICKETS
A Jttwt Complete Stock of
DRY REDWOOD!
Scutliag ; PlinV, icrbced and rough,
Boards, eurtactsj and rough ; Bailee,
ficieU, Hat lie. Lattice, Ulapboardi.
The Passage of the Season!
118 Days from Glasgow !
THE Tltrjli: t'UITER
ALSO. IX STOCK.'
A FINE ASSORTMT OF WALL PAPEP
LATEST STTKXS.
SAILS. LOCKS.
BUTTS. HISGES,
BOLTS. SCEEWS. Etc
Paint and Whitewash Brushes
WHITE X-EAIl.
M IIITE ZISC
PAIVT OII.1
METALLIC AND OTHER PAINTS!
Class,
Salt,
Firewood,
DOORS SASH BLINDS
AUMtES,
Of Eastern and California Make.
For sile is qeixtities to suit
am U4
3IES. D. T3. GrEIEJFJJST,
NO. 103 FORT STREET,
Tornx-rtf ocrBpled hr the late Mrs. Black, beta to in
form Uk Udir of Honolulu, and of the adjacent
Inlands, tbat be will keep constantly
lor sale, a rplcndld and dm
FASHIONABLE ASSORTMENT
CITY OF NANKIN
HAS JUST ARRIVED
To our conelpilnrnt, from Glasgow w ith a full cargo of
ocncral Merchandise, which is
Now Being Offered to the Trade
VERY LIBERAL TERMS.
THE CAEGO CONSISTS AS FOLLOWS:
3D 33. "2" GOODS
In Larie Variety, Embracing
Tnnt Cotton?. Linens, Woolen. Clothing,
Itlanlet-. Tow el, Mot-qnUo rfrt. Ilandlcrcblerc,
Tweeds. Denims, Loii Clothe, Victoria Lawns
Pilot JacLeU. Crimean hirt, tc, Ac
GALVANIZED ROOFING,
Fence Wire, "No. 4, 5 and fi; TIoop Iron, Illvetf,
Galranlzed Bucket e and Tnb, Pots and Cot err,
liar I roil, a full atportmcut of flies;
Nat and Wither. Babbitt itcul. Cast Steel,
An rile and View, .MJntinc Metal, Ac, 4c
CROCKERY
A LARGE ASSORTMENT.
GLASS WA. DR. E
IX BEACTIITL VARIETY.
Brussels Carpets and Rugs
ELEGAXT rATTEKSS.
PAINTS!
White Lnd. White Zinc. lied Lead, Black Taint,
Mixed l'aint. in all colors. Ilollcd UnrcdOll,
llaw Linseed Oil, and Kcd Compoeition.
38;i jr-iii and Bnjjfsj.
STJGAB. BAGS AND BICE BAGS
A LARGE VABIETV.
COAL BAGS A Splendid Article, and Large
Size.
WOOL BAGGING AND SEWING -TWINE,
leather Belting',
Ancliors cfc Clia.lias
OF ALL SIZES AND FULL TEST.
WINES AND SPIRITS:
McEwan'e Ale and Stout, Blood. WoUe Jt Co Ale,
rig Brand Mont, or ctks and C8 II canes y 4. 2. 5 and 3
i-tar Brandy,
F.!.CJ!,'P Med'oni Brandies, ee and baskets Gin,
OMTom, Iri.haridbcotchWliitlJes,
AD A TEW CASES OF VEItT FIXE
SHERRY, PORT, HOCK & CORDIALS
ALSO, THE CELEBRATED
CACHET BLANC AND GREEN SEAL
CHAMPAGNES
3 Sets of toe lap and Dies for TlinUtlon ntc,
MI jdraulic Jade, 4 C and b ton lift.
Two Hundred Tons Coal,
SCOTCH SrLINT.
Fire Bricks, Portland Cement, Fire Clay, Tig Iron,
and affo, from
Mirrlees, Tait & Watson,
SixtrtVjrs.llon Steam Clarifierc,
One pair Centrif neat machine,
OnriGiM Mllfand Gearinc,
One lClnrh f'Tllnrler Slesm hTnrlne.
Two ralrCom pound Boilert,bndiameter,I9 ft 6ln lon
Countiry Orders Solicited.
For farther particular, apply to
G- W- Macfarlane & Co
MILLINERY GOODS
Bats Trimmed in the Latest Styles.
And cxecatedlc lie most
Szilli&st and Delicate Hicety of the Art
bc cares a alandirg order vith Ler agents to con
aunUj
FOEWAED HER BY THE STEAMERS
the
LATEST Jt MOST ADFAXCED STVLES
In the Art millinery.
3Cotwtttaadiiirthentra expense of ratline Goods
tnttil. Bacdora. OEKCHARGE WILL UE AS ilOD-
ATi aa uiove ox ute jiuuncn un ue i.ouu
She will also keep a Select Stock
"OF LADIES' AXD CHILD ItEN"S
HADE CLOTHING.
HEAL ESTATE!
pMairable Property on Fort St. For Sale,
THE "WKI.Ii ICNWVX roT SITU
atei on Fort Streel abore Beretanta. This Jot Is
lot) feet IronUc on Fort ttreex, and 1M feet rear. There
it a tvo-etorr dweUlcc Iioum on the lot, near! j new,
wii cook bocre. bath fcoate and priTT, and two wells
yi Aj- wll tainned ttii from the bottom for fewer-
&rv pur?. The water is laid on in four difftrrent
najw p 1rr ereetion of two lxre cottage. The
Tfpeinr 1 ail new. This If one of the mtt healthy and
eentrxlrr lcaxed ou for a residence of any In the dty
of noMtala. The alore sale oCers a cood opportonlty
tor the pennanetit tcTeUnent of capital.
Tttie irfecx. Deads at the cxxcne of the parcluses,
X pri I the psrehave snonej- may remain vecsred by
Talr to - x. on me prrmises, or
JL J. CAITTWIUOUT, EJ
Cbcr a rIin of the lot can be gem. S3 ?
OIBES GATE FLOUR
" Extra rarallr alocr,
Eldorado Flsmr.
Erin, Uraand furley, rnole Barley,
Cora Jt eat. for feed.
Oatmeal, Cora XcaL
Ctactod VVleit In SU lb. blfs.
All frcUi and new. For wlc by
BOLLES A Co
THE "BIC COLLAR"
HARNESS SHOP
C. HAMMER,
. SC HIMi STREET,
PRACTICAL HARNESS MAKER!
Fine Single and Doullt Vuggy Harness,
Concord and Male Harness
Plantation Harness cf all sorts,
Eiding Bridles, Saddles, mips
Currycombs, Brushes, Saddle Cloths,
And CTcry 2feecetary for Stable nae at
BED EOCK PEICES FOR CASH,
ZJT Hepairfnc of every description done In the beft
poible manner, with the beet materials, at lowest
All Work Guaranteed or Exchanged.
LOOK FOlI T1IE Bid COLUH I 803
SALAMANDER FELTING
FOB
Covering Boilers, 8km Pipes
ETO, ETC.
Saves 25 per Cent, of Fuel-
PEICE SEDUCED TO S7.50EBL
THEO. H. DAVIES.
S3! lm Axent.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19, 1SS1.
Bran and Oats.
LtDI iAMPSOJf," THIS DAT.
1X3)
BOLLES A Co.
Shall Miss France Vote?
DITTICCLTIES IS THE WAT OF BF.COMIKO A
GOOD CITIZEN.
(From the ew York Enmlner and Chronicle.
et zxcsmx t. nxxx.
lli8 Ilestcr and Miss Frances 'Willctt lived
on tlic very edge of the soborbs. Indeed, tlicir
bonso lay across tbe division line. As the
front door actually opened npon the road that
belonged to Stvansct, Miss Hester considered
that she lived in Swaneet, and did pay licr
taxes there. But Miss Frances's room was in
the back wing of the house, and looked out
npon the bit of Swansctthat had been annexed
to Boston, with the rest of that rccion. She
claimed a preference to living in Boston. She
felt a sense of iirotection in the policeman, and
bad an idea that he rnifibt keep the boys off
their cherry tree, and be a tirra rock in the
case of burglars. Then she thought it would
lie plcaBant to have the nephews come to stay
with them, in order that they might go to a
Boston school, and share the advantages of a
city education in the new brick grammar
school established just over the line. There
was a"back door, with aporch thatopened up
on Boston, as fine as the front door, and Miss
Frances always nsed this it had a bell. Tho
Swansct front door had an old-fashioned knock
er. MiBS Hester did not think so much of these
city advantages. She was not at all afraid of
burglars, and had no idea of being indebted to
a policeman. For many years she had slept
with her front door unlocked. Once when there
had been an alarm of burglars in the neighbor
hood, she had set all tier silver on tbe Droaa
front stair opposite the front door. .
" I don't want to have tiem hunting aronnd
the liouno in tbo middle ot the night I "sue cx
plained; "like as not they would chloroform
Frances, or make her tell where the key was.
I had rather make it easy for them. " She did,
on this occasion, take up to bed with her a
little old-fashioned silver teapot, of a grand-
aunt s of her own name.
" I don t think thoy II miss it, she Baid,
"and there s the Talue of it in tliem new
spoons I gave Frances last Christmas, that
thev are welcome to. "
yor did Misb Hester limit much ot the kcuooi
advantages. She thougnt they were counter.
balanced by having so many schoolboys turn
ed on to the cherry tree. Of course she could
not now let the doors go unlocked, with tho
city lino passing through the house, but she
bad strong bolts put on, and wept around cvery
niglit to see tho wiudow-lastcnings ticrselt.
ot that Miss Hester was at all strung-
minded herself. She believed in a supremacy
of men in certain things; she bad a man to
chop the wood, and buys to take in the coal,
and was very much shocked when she heard
that the little girls in Egypt " took in " the
coal for the Kile steamers. She pnt all her
business matters into the liar-ds of her brother,
having no idea that women could lc expected
to understand about such thiugB. Indeed, she
was thankful that there was a sex that could
pretend to master the complicated system of
banks. Men had invented them, and it they
were willing to wrestle with their intricacies,
she was not one to relieve themof-the burdens
they put npon themselves. She could till In a
check, and Miss Frances could go into town
to cash it-
Miss Hester called it " going into town.
Miss Frances spoke of such an excursion as
going down town. It Miss Hester ever
did go into town, it was a matter of pray r
and fasting the day beloro. aha rose early,
had steak for breakfast, gave Hatty her orders
tho night before, and would have made her
will, if it had not already been signed and
scaled. But it was long sinco she had been
into town. Poor Miss Ulster, she was a little
blind, and very absent-minded, and the last
time, on her return, she had mounted into tho
back of an express-wagon, taking it for the
horse cars, and had not discovered her mis
take till she came to band out her ticket to
the astonished expressman, while lie stopped to
lift off a trunk from tho walk at Cambridge
port. Of course it would not do for Miss Hester
to go into town alone again, and she never wes
willing to go with a guardian. She liad always
been the head of their little family. It was
she who had tho property, for it was left her
by the grand-aunt Nho60 name she bore, and
whose silver teapot she valued. She was will
ing to share this fortune with her sister, but
she would not give her the responsibiliiy of it.
'I here was tho trouble of paying tho taxes.
Frances was " a young thing, " at least ten
years younger than herself, and what could
slio do with taxes and rents r
Miss Frances had been called "Fanny"
once. Indeed, the nephews and nieces called
her aunt Fanny now, forshe was their favorite
aunt. She always had cherry tarts for them,
and jams of all kinds, and always happened to
have just been baking hard gingerbread. Then
she conld guess conundrums, and aunt Hester
bated to be bothered with them.
But tho last thing that Miss Hester would
have expected of Miss Frances (slio'ncvcr her
self called her "Frances" or left off tho "Miss"
till after the servants were in bed), the last
thing that could enter her head was, that Miss
Frances should think of voting !
Miss Frances tried to explain to her that,
there was a new law, by which women were
permitted to vote for members of the school
committee. In rain she explained that she
never was nor could be a Woman Suffrage
woman, but she had been in to visit tho new
school-house, and she was interested in tho
school question.
"It is a privilege," pleaded Miss Frances,
"that I ought not to neglect. I have heard you,
time and again, scold Herpian Willctt for not
voting, and on this very question, you have
tnld him he ought to be ashamed of himself
that he did not go and vote.for decent, respect
able committee men."
"Because a man, especially a young man,
has nothing better to do. than vote," replied
Miss Hester. "It is just what they are equal
to. You have better things to occupy your
time with. This very minute you might be
Eliding out whether tho6e Norfolk strawber
ries, that man is crying at 15 cents a box, aro
xvoi th preserving. If the jam is short next
winter, I don't believe your nephew or the
next generation will thauk you, even if vou
have chosen a Moses in the school com
mittee."
" Why should I vote for a Moses on the com
mittee? asked Miss Frances, laughing, "why
not some sensible woman, you or Mrs. Sturtc
vant. Miss Frances ran off to the strawberry
man to avoid Miss Hester's wrath. But Miss
Hester knew it was hopeless to argue ; Frances
did always have her own way, after all, and
thero wero other obstacles in tho path more
annoying than Miss Hester's objections. In
deed, these obstacles wero something of a red
rag for Miss Hester, and roused even in her
an active interest in the question, which be
fore had disgusted her, shall Miss Frances
volo? Certainly, if Miss Frances wanted to
vote, and the law said she might, why Bhouid
she not? Some of the newspapers said she
must have her name i egistercd directly, if she
wanted to vote in December. Others said she
could not be registered till sho paid her taxes.
But'slie could not pay her tax till she had
been assessed before September 15th, or other
authorities said, bat she could not be register
ed till after then. Then should she vote in
Swansct, or in Boston I Miss Hester thought
slio ought to vole in Swansct, and accompanied
Miss Frances on a visit to tho town-clerk to
inquire about the law. But when she found
tho town-clerk he declared he could not tell
when Miss Frances ought to bo assessed, or
whether she ought to be assessed before she
was registered, er if it would do to wait till
the fall, or where she ought tobe registered, and
said, ".Maybe they d know ot the city ball.
Miss Hester indignantly pulled her sister out.
"If he's such a born fool, there's no sort of
use in encouraging him to think you II patron
ize bim so far as to vote in awanset. lou are
right- Km are living in Boston, and we
might as well go into the city hall to inquire
about the voting." It was necessary to have
answers to these questions soon, for it was
now June, and Miss Frances was to accom
pany her neiccs to the seashore, way down on
Fassamaqaoddy, in Maine, and they would not
be back till October. Then father and mother
were going abroad, and aunt Fanny was to
matronize the girls iu this quiet seaside place.
It was true that she must bo assessed before
September 15th, it must be done tiis very
week, as the next week she would be gone for
tbe summer.
Some friends of Miss Hester s were coming
out from Boston to spend the-summer w'
her. There was this advantage in 41
Hester s Imng in Swanset, that she could fc
about her friends coming into the country
stay with her, while if they came, to stay w
Miss Frances, they could naruiy say iney i
left town.
Miss Hester accompanied Miss Frances i
town. She did not think it would do to
her go to the city hall alone. Indeed, she i
not prove an infallible guide herself, for tl
went first to tho State bouse, by mistake. I
they met with a gentlemanly official, vi
gave them their right direction. Another !
tie mistake led them into tho conrt-hous
the back of the city hall, and they came n
being dracged in as witnesses in a pickpoc
case that was being tried in the police coi
But at last they were ushered into the pro,
room in tho city hall, under tho escort c,
policeman. Hero all went well. Miss Hcs
did all the talking, and came near making
tho necessary signature to Hie docum
presented, as sho instructed Miss Frances!
the proper answers to be raado- She made I
count of the amount of property she owi
herself, but explained how it was that M
Frances was not a property-holder, while I
herself was an inhabitant of Swanset. W
it camo to tho time for Miss Frances to swe
Miss nostcr discreetly turned her head tho o
cr way, and appeared to be occupied in sent
ing what the clerks on tho other side of
room were busy with whilo Miss Frances cc
mitted this impropriety. The Assessor
formed them, in answer to their questic
that Miss Frances could not be registered!
she had paid her poll-tax, when sho should
with her receipted tax-bill to the Rcgistra
Miss Hester offered to pay the tax on tbo h;
but the Assessor refused to accept it.
"Suppose we go tho Registrar's office no!
said Miss Hester to Miss Frances when tl
had left. "ItBecms a pitty not to settle
matter np at once. I daro say ho will set
in the samo light as we do. It will savel
bother when the fall corneal "
But they found tho registrar immovable,
would net accept the' two dollars. ,
So Miss Frances went down to her niec
far, far down beyond Mt. Desert in Maine,
such a quiet place on tho bay, where the gi
could go on with their reading, and hav
healthy swim or a walk or a drivo every d
A quiet summer? It did not quite seem ac
Aunt Fanny. A set of friends were in
next house, and another set down in the y
Iagc, and there were boating parties, sail
parties and rowing parties in the sunset,
moonlight, and such nico, pleasant yut
men as camo around for croquet in the mo
ing. They explained the new law ab
voting to Annt Fanny. They brought
newspapers. She had never been in tho ha
of reading tho newspapers before, but I
found them very interesting. She read
about tho schools, sho read about womo
voting, she picked up a great deal of intcie
ing information. At times she was anxii
about that tax-bill, and when it would coi
and where she should pay it, but she coi
find nut from the papers when she was
home again, now she had learned where
look for things in the newspapers, where tl
kept tlicir jokes, and where tho serious p
in large typo that you always were to bclio
Meanwhile, many interesting things w
going on about her. It was pleasant to
wafted up and down tho bay on a summc
aiirrnonn, imuer a soft brecxo, with tho liv
prattle ol the girls and the young men.
was pleasant to go across to St. Andrew's,
the Uuecn 8 dominions, and buy pretty pat
ets of needles, and boxes of spools forprcso
to Mis Hester and other friends. Somctin
she had qualms as to whether this was '
indulging in smuggling, winch she as a vo
ought not be guilty of. But it was all on st
a small and agreeiblo little scale that i
conscience did not prick her much. Only (
c cmng there did suddenly and unexpcctci
arise a pricking in that organ. It was
straying back from tho boat, across the fiel
after one of these afternoons on the bay. Li
the oldest of the girls, was walking in fn
of her. " How pretty and graceful she i.
Aunt Fanny was thinking. Sho liked 1
dress, her clinging red tinted skirt, and j
figured "satin" Dolly Vardcn draped o)
it, ami her jaunty hat with its deep-red r
bons. It all suited Lily's graceful figure
well. It was a sight that could not but g
bj-r pleasure. ,Noar to her, earnestly talk!
to her, was iiicliaiJ Bich'ard who atwt
followed her, set off for a walk when sho d
sat by her side on the poach, when sho v
there with her book. Aunt Fanny liked
sco him with her. Thev suited each otb
thev looked well together, and so it plcaj
her. And now, how Lily looked up to him
lie drew near her, and then again how I
looked down 1 How earnest there talk seen
of a sudden !
And then Aunt Fanny stopped suddenly
the middle of tho field. What was she doiii
What was she allowing ? Itichard was )
tho right one !
licr sisier-in-iaw, Mrs. nnicit, teti
leaving, had taken especial pains to cxph
to her how they were all hoping somethi
might come about between Lily and her th
cousin, John Mayuard. The two youpg pco
seemed to like each other, and both famil
would bo equally pleased, and Aunt Fan
was to do everything she could to help it
without of course speaking of it to any o
And John had comu down before lticbard d
and had been on all their parties and sat in t
moonlight on the porch, lint all of a sudd
a neck a co. he had left. He came to bid 1
good-bye, and said he had a letter from".
grand-mother that called turn away, sno t
wondered a little. She did not know the re
was iu, and asked Lily if there was anythi
serious about John's grand-mother, and L
bad looked very sober, and said i-ho tliouj
it was serious. And the other girls said th
supposed he would be back again, and Kit
ard and the other young men said somethi
about his going up to study and look up I
law-office. And Aunt Fanny had thought
all right mid that ho would be back beforo
end of tho summer, ready to carry out t
plans of tho parents.
The younger girls now camo up bold
Aunt Fanny and wondered why sho was sl
ping.
' Dear Aunt Fanny, what is the matter
Bertha cried. " You havo not lamed y(
foot J"
Annt Fanny murmured inaudibly, "It
tho wronir one I" But they could mt undi
stand her, and insisted on holding her uuibr,
la for her, and almost lifting her over)
grassy bumps in tho fields.
Tbat evening mere was great coniusi'
Lily whispered to Aunt Fanny .in tho con
of the little parlor, in a very happy tone
first, and then beseeching. She was sure 1
mother would like it, though it was differ)
from tho way she had planned. She coi
not help liking Richard. Aunt Fanny sh
licr head, sho was suro it was all licr q
fault; she ought to havo managed better, I
havo insisted on Lily's going moro with J
in his boat.
'Alchemy and Chemistry.
LECTTBK BEFORE THE ACADEMY oi SCIXXCES
BT TOOT. BOLTON, or TRINITY.
The winter course of seven lectures beforo
the New York Academy of Sciences, at Ni
12 West Thirty-first street, was inaugurated
recently by Prof. H. Carripgton Bolton, of
Trinity Uollege, liartiora, wno aiscusaea me
subject of alchemy and chemistry, illustrating
bis remarks witu ine siereopucon. J. no smau
lecture room of the Academy was filled with
ladies and gentlemen, mostly members of tho
Society,, who listened with intelligent appre
ciation to a very interesting lecture. The
BDeaker traced the origin of chemietry t
alchemy, and gave a long list of names of
those who bad been identified with the early
days oi alchemy, lie also presented the port
raits',' through" the.stercopticon, of many who
had been "distinguished in their search for the
philosopher s stone and the elixir of life, with
those of a later day, who had placed chemistry
on a Bcieuuuu uanis.
The lecturer began by saying that accordin
to an ancient proverb, alchemy was an art
begun in labor, continued in deceit and ending
in penury. It had also been held to be the
father of chemistry. It had been enveloped
in superstitions and unaccountable phenomena
The doctrines ot toe alchemist had been .con
Bidered akin to tho black art. The search for
gold was the stimulating power which impel
led the ancient philosophers in their costly ex
periments. The philosopher's stone was also
the obiect of their search. This mythical sub
stance had been described as a solid body of
the color ot a ruuy, transparent, flexible, and
yet as brittle as glass. Ripely, the English
alchemist, gave an account of various acids
with which he had experimented, together with
salts, lie was something more than- a necro
rnancer, nd warned his disciples acainst
certain elements, but failed to give an account
of the result of his efforts, winch he claimed
had been successful. The urst written word
of alchemy proceed from Arabic sources. In
the eighth century, when the Arabians had
made tlicir Eastern conquests, they cultivated
philosophy, art, literature, and tho sciences,
and laid the foundation of chemistry. The
lecturer produced a portrait of Gaba, an emi
nent Arabian alchemist, which he miormei
the audience could not by any means be
correct likeness, na at the time in which he
lived it was against the religious faith of the
Arabians to copy the human face. Gaba was
followed by manv of his own race, who be.
came also eminent in chemistry. They defined
chemistry as tho scicnc of combustion. Al
bcrtus Magnus, born in 1193. was a Dominical
monk who devoted himself to medieval science,
astronomy, alchemy and necromancy. Ho
died in 1232. Finding that his ecclesiastical
duties, interfered with the pursuit of science
ho resigned his sacred office, and gave himself
up to Ins art. lie was Baid to bo creat
magic, (.reater in philosophy, but ereatest in
theology. "Others were accounted great alchem
ists in their time. To t lammel is attributed
tho art of making gold out of baser metal
secret which he claimed to have discovered
about noon on January 17, 1314. Pharaselsus
introduced chemical elements into the scionce
of medicine, and claimed that the province ol
cnemisiry anu aicuemy was not to discover
gold, but to compound medicines for the cure
ot disoascs. Hermes irisiuegistus first taught
tuu jvj I'uunn writing, astronomy, mainemat
ics.'aud other science. Some emblematical
pictures were exhibited by the lecturer signi
fying the fusion of metals. A wolf devouring
a King signified the fusion of antimony with
gold. A King on his throne swallowing his
son stood for tho fusion of gold with some
baser metal, the use of tbe blow-pipe and
other methods of tho ancients showed that thv
wero familiar with many processes now em
ployed. Among other pictures shown was one
representing the magician in art, with the
King, his patron, and the dignatarics of the
court. Another represented the interior of a
laboratory in the sixteenth centurv. in whir
was shown tho process of the distillation of
vapors. In ancient times chemical science ex
isted side by sido with tho superstitions of
aicuemy.
In the pursuit of the mysteries of alchemy
epmo experimenters throw off the trilling decep-
uuim surrounding i ne art and devoted them
selves to tho legitimate pursuit of chemistry.
The writings of John Becker wero referred to
and his picture was shown to the audience.
Ho was born iu 1G35. His father was a learned
Lutheran clergyman, who died when John was
very young about the closo of the ThJrtv
Year's War, leaving his son an inheritance of
poverty. John liecker connected all known
chemical, facts, and deduced from them oue
general principle. Joseph Priestley was bom
in 1733, noar Leeds, England, and dove.!oped
a taste for science and languages at a very
early ago. Ho mastered Latin, Greek, Hebrew,
French, Italian, and the Chaldee, Syriac, and
Arabian languages. Ho studied for tho min
istry, and for recreation turned to natural phil
osophy and chemistry. He discovered a num
ber of gasos, such as oxygen, nitrons oxide,
hydrochloric acid, aud others. He did much
to advance the science of chemistry, and to
strip it of Ihemyslorios which had formerly
surrounded it. In concluding his remarks the
speaker said that alchemy was worthy of free
recognition for what it had done. Alchemists,
through their researches and experiments, bad
conferred lasting obligations upon posterity.
They had accumulated a miss of evidence
without which later investigators would havo
labored in great difficulty. He thought tho
scientists of this day micht hope that the npo-
ple of tho noxt century would look back upon
the present state of learning and investigation
and sco as much progress from our stand. noint
as wo could see from the days of the past of
which ue ii.m spoken.
I SOW .
Oiler JPqv Sale
fBTTHK ITXS
AMERICAN BARE AITTul
rrEWELL, Master, aow about die from Botfan
Hie Following List of! Merc!iafcj
H.HACKFELD&CO. 0, BREWER
Invoices of new goods
TO ARRIVE FEB
GERMAN BARK ' G. F. HAENDEL
AND PER
"ATALAJiTA," FROM BREMEN,
(To bo followed by the "Kile" and "Iolani,")
And per Steamer, via Panama.
INVOICES OF
The roUowinie Goods
Are now in our possession :
DAKK BLUE DENIMS :
New Prints. Star Pads. Ac-
Brown Cottons Horrock's White Cctton.i,A k B
l nr.ey itea latum. iicKings,
Blue Cotton Drill, Bine and Fancy FLANNEL,
jjasiings. itauan i;iotn, liepps,
Fancv White and Black DltKSS GOODS.
Jacquard. Mohair. Mousselina, Jaconets, tic.
Barege, Curtains, Lambrequins, Table Covers,
xc iic iVC xc
TAILORS' GOODS:
Buckskins, Doeskins, Coatincs, Diagonal,
Printed Moleskins, Brown Cords,
"White Linen Drills, dee.
An Assortment of Shirts,
Woolen, Ffcmnel and Cotton Mixed,
Merino and Cotton Undershirts.
Wool Jackets, Shanls, Blankets, Towels, Ac
HOSIERY:
Socks and Stockings, Balbriggaxt,
Children's Ac.
Silk Handkerchiefs Foulards,
T. B. and Fancy Cotton Handkerchiefs,
Neckties, Wool and-Silk Braids,,
Ribbons, Thread, Buttons, Ac.
India Rubber Coats and Overalls
Fancy and Toilet Articles : Florida Water.
Uenume iau do Cologne, Philocome,
Combs, Tooth Brushes, Ihbin's Extracts,
Feather Dusters Harmonicas,
Violin StrinRs, Flavins Cards
Looking Glasses, Vienna Chairs.
1 b9btV
STATIONERY:
Blank Books. Ledgers, Journals,
Day Books, Copy and Receipt Books,
Gold Leaf, WBAPPING PAPER,
superior ITinting Paper, two sizes,
Manila Kope all sizes Spnnyam.
t and Hemp Packing,
Flax i
Sugar cfc Coal Bag:s
Woolpnck, Burlaps Sail Twine,
India Rubber Packing,
SalDDLESSydney and English.
Powder, Lead and Zinc Paint,
HARDWARE :
Fence Wire. 4, 5, 6: Hoop Iron, Rivets,
i . 1 1 v. . i -.ii.l I, piiu. t ' 11 : t-
i eliow Metal 16 to -JC oz.. Nails Steel Rails
Perforated Brass, Backets Cutlery, Scissors,
Butcher and Pocket Knives
Razors, bheep Shears, Saw Files, Ac
CROCKERV In Assorted Crates. Also,
Dinner, Breakfast and Tea Sets
BowLj, Rice Dishes Cnps Flower Tots.
GROCERIES :
Sardines, Vinegar, Dnret's OUto Oil,
German Sansage,
Ultra Wash Blue, Blue Mottled Soop,
Table Salt, Stearine Candles 47. Ac
LIQOORS :
BoutelLin Brandy, Gin, Rum, Alcohol,
ou i ui a .ue, dinner s imager uier, champagne,
ju. xuiro itau uiuaiccs ury aronopoie, xc.,
Empty Demijohns Market Baskets,
Molasses and Tallow Barrels
CEMENT :
Stockholm Tar, Fire Clay, Fire Bricks,
j-u uncas lues oiates rwais.
Blacksmith's Coal, Steam Coal, J
Ac
STEAM CLARIFIERS,
AN
ALSO-8
Pianos from L. Neufeld. Berlin
FOU SALE BT
t ii. ini urEi.n co.
ASTOR HOUSE
DINING AND
LUNCH PARLORS,
Xos. 70 and 78 Hotel Street,
HART BROTHERS, Proprietors.
Steam Coal in bullfi
Cnroberland Coal in casks and bulk, '
Stove Coal in bisks and balk
Oak Plank, 1 inch" to S inch, 1
Barrels Tar. Fitch and Rosin,
Canal Barrows with Iron Wheel,
(ELECTBIC B&JXD.)
Turpentine, Paint Oil, LarrI Oil,
.baa tern Pine Barrel Sliooki,
Boston Card Matches.
NEW STYLES OF PTJSNITTIB3:
Parlor and Bedroom Sets.
A Fine line of Groceries :
Tomato and Mock Tnrtle Soup, Irish Stew
Stewed Calves' Head, llarricot Mutton,
Lobsters, Clama, Corn, Peas, Tomatoes,
Sausage, Clam Chowder, Lard, Family Pork
Cotton Duck, Nos. I to 10
Oatnm, Boat Boards, WhaleboaU,
A choico selection of Boston Crackers in Jib
tins,
Manila Cordage, all sizes from G thread ta
4J inch,
Spnnyam, Marline.
Oxxt 3JJ"aUs,
Oars, Washboards, Bad ets.
-eausJl Plnril,
Hair Mattresses and Pillows,
Curled Hair, Excelsior,
Iron Safes, assorted sizes,
,. . . J,ic,,'San Pine Lnmcer,
Hoe Handles, Wood Seat Chairs,
Hide. Poison, Sugar Bigs
'Rolling Top Office Dexks
Office Chain, Baby Carriage.
Jump Seat Extension Carriages,
Brewster Buggies,
1 Browneiri Baggy.
An Invoice of Refined Iron, assorted..
Corrugated Iron. Fence Wire, RuLUr Belting
AX I.WOIt'K or
Burnett's Extracts,
AM) COLOGNE.
Downer's Kerosene Oil
MULE CARTS,
Sew itjle, sot np eipeciallj for riantatlcn ne for cart
Extra Wheels and Axles for Male Carls.
tVAll of the abo,e Gooimlll be offered to ta- traifa
at prtcet that will be idii to nit.
c-H 1 C. IlkEWER co.
BY THE LATEST ARRIVALS
rilJI HAH FIIAMIMI)
WE HAVE KECKIVED A ia.KGE
addition ta air tnrwnr .fnb - Dkl.r It
Shlpstoru, rrotUloai, Ac, Ac, which ctrea as ti
Greatest Assortment of Goods
Kept on th.t Ilnd.. all .f which will be roM it Ik.
Lowest Mirk.l Tr!r. .an.n.l n. ... i . ...
t"i.Dl!c.S,lera"7 n'PecUollT lnrltM lo amlae.
8I BOLLES CO.
PAINTS AND OIL&
A TtASTIC I.tUDl.', IMCli.lliuoriTO
Board by-tlio Day, Week or Transient
zinc White. Hobbnck Lead,
Boiled Paint Oil In bulk aa3 ia S nllon drm.
A fall aortment Fancy Color Pi int..
115 OOLLKS a CO.
" it could not havo been managed at al
Lily said, much injured, y It was not
wrong thing: all had gono right, Kichac
happening to come down there, instead of
ing out in a yacht, and so on.
But she was willing he should go up
Boston next day, his leisure time was oj
and they were willing to wait till letters cm
go to Mr. and Mrs. Willctt, and como fri
them. They felt so suro that they did il
mind tho waiting, and aunt Fanny staid j
with her nieces lato into the autumn, niu
stirred up by all these ovents. And when th
finally went up iu tho boat, ami she k5
Richard was to meet them at tho pier, she h
but a restless night. Tho steam engine thun
ed up and down. Sometimes it seemed to B
"Shall Miss Frances vote?" Sometimes'
thumped out, " It is the wrong one! It isj
wrong one I " f
Miss Hester awaited her at her own Boat
door when she reached home.
"The Taylors and the Morses have got th
tax-bills, but nothing has come for yonl'
her first startling pieco of intelligence il
next was still moro startling. Miss Hes
had decided to vote tool $
"When I found the men were all so vei
minded about the law, " said Miss Hester,1
felt it was time for tho women to do somethi
about it. But the worst of it is, that ridiculi
town-clerk don't yet know whether I m
pay my poll-tax too, or whether I have a A
to vote now, because I have paid my ta:
steady the last seventeen years. He thinks
can find out tbe day of the election, and I ini
to be there!" K
So the matter was still undecided. W
Frances had not got her tax-bill, though sue i
bad given her name to be assessed, and she
INTO BISTCa-ITNTB
Should be without tbe fr-fmed
American Cylinder Cup
, Of whlchoTer Ten Thousand are now in ue.
THE AMERICAN
Is the only
LUBRICATOR IN THE WORLD
That can be relied npon.
'AM) IS WAmuXTEl)
To perform
All th&t is Claimed For It,
a certain nnmopror (iron rwr
ml note or per hour (visible to
the ere), will kpepyoiirCjIlnder
luuuicjucu ruimsuongij, vine
old ftyle or cops do not feed
con tin uontly.)
It will par for Iterlt In foci
every inn monint; in oil every
teven to ten mcnthm: In mp.
packing and labor every four
month .
The above, also Caps for
Basis ueannci, t-y linger Oil
and LtibrtcatlneComponnd may
be had of the Acrnt,
DILLlXuIIAM Jt CO
6M Ct m
JUST RECEIVED
-AT
LYNCH'S BOOT FACTORY
A5EW STOCK OF
Ladies' Misses' and Children's Shoes
WHICH WILL UK
SOLD VERY CliriP FOR CASH.
sn
BILIiTARDS,
Cigars, Cigarettes and Tobacco,
Soda Water and other Iced Drinks.
Meals Served, in First-Class Stylo
AT ALL HOUrtS.
HEMtY J.HART, 82.10 ELLIS A. HART.
LUBRICATING OII5.
Cantor OH 3 and oration tin.
3 BOLLIS A CO.
WIICE RIGGING.
S'sSJ"051 ,,tn TO3 IXCHFJ. FOB
KJ sal. bj ut i r v o .
ams
MANILA COKDAGE.
a n i l. lucnnTH.v w.
" BULLS Jk CO.
Desirable Maui Property
Jt UK. SALE.
miiK i-iu.si.sr.H iiwk.vti.v occrriEn
i i "'e""r H. I). Alexander at MAKAWAO,
tintiboufi,Ac,in-itoat30icreof land well lor..
ten ror l)Ulneii, and for a residence. Tbe nropetlt la
cent out look with an Incomparable climate.
ror futlier parttculara apply to Her. James JI. Alex
ander at Mkiwio or at Honolulu to
castle ii.vrcn.
N fipujjiit. Maine. KatHa,
BOLLES CO.
LADIES'
FASHIONABLE DRESS MAKING !
Mils. D. B. GRIFFIN
Wishes to Inform the ladles of Honolulu that the ha
"-"ocncj a Children and Ladle' Fafhlonable. Dre
im V I i.' 'u i rear ot ner ailimctT stor
11 Fort Mreet. Uressea trimmed In the latest and no
approreil stales. - ta j m
For Sale.
FIVE H. 1. KIPP'S lUntlGHT
Engine and IViller.
1 Circular tavtjvrtth Table.
3 15-Inch Stulhow's Pumpt, capacity 250 to W) calls,
each per minute with pipe, stralnere, and check
valrea.
1 8-lnch Sluthon'a. Force rump, capacity 10 to 60
Call ner mmnte.
1 TusuVe Hore Power.
HEMP COKDAGE. AND BOLT ROPE.
Inch to S lnek ai.a u -.. .. ...
t "is"'' JU,",ie' nir. .
1JLOCKS AND .MAST HOOPS.
Alr.,?5.T. ,no rVt-IMI-rEn BUCIIl
ruin llushlnx, a full assortment of tliea.
via I. if . fa & m
GItOCEHIES.
IAirtn V I. tit i is t'AIJA a 1.1V.
' each. Uotler In J... ...i v T'T., '
Assorted Table rrnlls. Canned Meall jsmTTd
Honey tu Oi;.,. M' "S offtA'SI "uo
Kert of Pl f,.r family .., Ba of I
and raddle, of Finest Tea, eWlneTln or .niT'f tlV
KeSuJir' tVr.riSyrMv.'fe
Kriourar. UOLLESACo"
liUEAD.
medium bread. !a o.rt... . ..... "i?r.i"
in Boxes and Tins, a JuSbTeT 8 c.ai
s BOLLIS t CO.
EXTRA .MESS BEEF.
ers
4c. 4c
For Sile bv
PKIJIF. PORK.
BOLLES CO
HAMS AXD BACON.
1 T,iV.J!ke,f?.'i",?S4 bT MI- Bnu": ianter .T?,7,AT . For Sale by
t li-feet AtWOOd' Patent K.lf.W.nlI.I OT.Jm I . BOLLSS CO
with .....Ih-. mr . i-. .. .V .
with heiry frame to feet htint wilf stand any
EXPECTED.
" wt r
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE.
T,sIATi.Ini'FATtF.r?ACT 0F "SI' SITUATED
Tf rnatsli.1 lfVXT ti . ' . . .
Mw.uo nwiun ib wen watered, nartnf manv
fPttf ?f nr rWe? . fltte "ream nnln2 tnronrli
It. and la well adanted far th. -nTtiti . -t
rnfTan vwHt4vu MUtj V(
Aportl olthe land iFweH wooded
uinuEB urne trees prowin
Title. ipSitnnU Ynwfnt
Oro,eIUnch.M.ui.1t.y,,86?.ILL,Aa0-8MS11
sais
BOLLE3 X CO.
POTATOES AND ONIONS.
RfrfS.. VKa C"T OP SEW YOKK.
tbe Finest Ut In tie Market.
BOLLES CO,
or
and there are
In? on 1L
irtber particulars Inaulre of
GOLDEN GATEELOITIL
BAKER EXIRt. E3CTBA r A B I rTT M
quarter and half .ut. 13
Eldorado Flour to quarter sacks
Cora Meat 0t Meal. Cracked 'wheat l 10 Ik
;5",.ei'11,K, from the MIItaJTery oai
4 o,5 ""Mated fresh, and of the best quality.
1 BOLLS!) CO.
strained, and Is'u clear and white a water. For ial by
TV! BOLLES A COJ
Tar, Pitch, Coal lar.
For eale by
BOLLES A Co.

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