OCR Interpretation


The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, January 07, 1885, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1885-01-07/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Silver! Silver! Silver!
GREAT SILVER GIFT SALE!
Commencing
Saturday, November- 29, 1884,
$5,000 WORTH OF SILVER PRESENTS
Will be CIVEH AWAY during this Sale !
Batter Knives, Butter Dishes, Castors,
Xtc tc Every Customer Porchising S2.50 Worth of Goods.
TOYS. TOYS,
$2,500 WORTH OF TOYS $2,500
Asd Xaas Fresiits trill be snv a nway during this Sale to
Custom rs bnyini' 81 worth or more.
Don't Buy Toys for Christmas, but call at
CHAr. j. KISHEL'S
mm Corner Fort and Hotel Streets.
GRAND OPEWSI
New Millinery 600 ds
104 Fort St., --- - Honolulu
i;l..iniv.
On Saturday Next. October 25
i 1 imiii 11 ...3
INJD1A mVM JHILLS
0
H
ft
H
s
8
0
0
107. 109 c 111 PREMOKT STREET
rHiciNiixni 1 Minx i ti u j-j 1 ai:oi iMrACTK Ai. j:xi'i;ki.
- nr-nprtb B-art--t tn ncrf rrt ion
- i'iJ tfiiritU-d The jlew at Ibwe
urtaaoailttar tht rdflr whlrh
iiuprvr' inrni in 1 mjTlrlW
fe ecablEd to largely Reduce the Rales for lhe Hulling & Cleaning of Paddy.
WSti 1W. 14M Alt Tt.l .- MlIlI'Ii I A II 111 1 ft a I IIAMISCO
t IT (U'.WIIi 1111. M I : IMIM II 911 I.I A,
Till, till UtHIM. H1 HI, !.!:
vat.
ft y
fw lib
m4 l.-
IH lnM-rUilil(l) l M-ftll.
Ill l.Mlirrl rr-ltn frnm mMhii Nmrll
fun rtiUiarl of io rtrmnnt tc
AMI Mli Iltt lieu-r I(ni- ti
Ivan
CONSIGNMENTS OF PADBY SOLICITED.
Grrl CBttmiMitn Mrrtluant anil Proprietor of thi
w'1 IKD1A KICK MILLS. San l ronrico. CL
iYew Cxoods h IjMv Arrivals
FROM S AN FRANCISCO,
ifEW YORK & ENGLAND,
Received by Castle &; Cooke
ALSO. TO ARRIVE BY VESSELS HUE TKON ABOVE PORTS, AND
To iii.Soj,i it iilWIT ISA TICS
GOODS
Suitable for Plantations,Country Stores
OrFAXIMKS. Hnlrn. lilM at .Sl.or.c-l Xuliro ami ih .Sati
Urlion lo I'tu-rlia-pr.. -Wtculioii is Called lo Our
Improved .Paa-is J?L O W
lnm rxta- IU.I MAUL l li.IJMK.I. iauT hTEKL. ad Uutanlnd
UxmLius; I'fc. Ik Ik. Hiilrl AW ulitr Biln ..(
Hmm-
I i" .".f U, , I ll..r..dsi1VSI v'olS"
qtn . i mwI raft- iMUbk kjri Aiiiili.i;.ii.llMtu
1 J I ii ill fc.fcn.il Mn. fB t,i k. -I FU; ll.di Roh , M,w l (kll.r-. 1 t.lih
IkMlJIMri. Un Lmhi 1x4 Unhp li4uRlii,Mru1-llK; riMriihjiiiiv alUlxrs
UWaUumviriMnMf Jluki.cf ml. Unl -tat.adjUndrt.'hrat rilUH
DISSTOVS CELXBRATKI1 SAWS AND TILES, ALL SIZESj
IT lulu i. Nri . .it.- Iliui,r.railitri. Kl.u.l.lr.BLm'L.lutlb.i
"-" - " ukUI.1. Mi S.i!.. UJ 1( c II w nTaliThi
.Latest Improvements in Slielf Hardware
l uw i,u lum ii.i.im . E,d t. brn.ii r.iou is oil.
STAPJLli: X3 JS.-2" GOODS
4 IMMi.Xw fchrnfair, lj t l.lm and M-rlrl IImbL
STAPLE GKOGEKlhS, Githlvn (JsiIp, Star A, Sujiorlinc Flour
tliliwtw latw Pi Kn!-re W t . iift-oia Liw IVrtUtid Keif IlTnnnc Cmntt.
For Kei-oscnc Oil We Offer THE FiiXACE, and Guarante
It cannot be beat for quality or price; also, THE
V ULCAIT, a good and above test:
WOODWARD & BROWN'S CELEBRATED PIANOS
Tbr CfcrawM (SoOd Piano: rw Hauii Orcan Cok Varlor Organs
BILrLiIMSHAM & Co.,
Have Received a Full line of ihe Favorite
Dillingham Breaking- Plows
FH FLOiVS.
4l Mrri9m
I
II I.I IM.IIAX
UP RICE PLOWS
3 Iv 13 Int-li.
n" tdl mA Inn Mt on murj !v a. l)n m.i UfkLlvi-' 11. lu WflliL'Q r
IKarkstatLe VTxfWL We an; Ascnu t... lii - AIjocJ mAoij. Ajipnmtl btjluii of
Csltintors, Horse Hoes, & Harrows,
Old Pattern Xolinc Flows.
Plantation Tools, all kinds ;
Diflcrcntial Pulley Blocks,
Bncke-c Mowers, Hydraulic Jacks,
Fodder Cutters, Garden & Canal Barrows,
IafaacRting Oils, Turpentine, Kerosene Oils
Will. Faict Od mid Tusubf. StuJcbate- W-umi, Ftre-rrroof Kiln nd Born,
Itr roaccoWs. Uocu. l .rsiili: (1004; Lnaps. (XudcUt-rs. Luteras ie, Jr.
KV 2fcr Krtt&i cSTfUcxt?- aniTUx. V aim I. Lk . cr.rjO. o. tn our Hue tsd n t Uinl lYim. -
imuaiiait Gazette.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARV 7 16&5
The Uit Slm FU pom tk Watkls-
Tbe BbiftuMcb commemorates the tcrricft
and tbe Tirtae s ut tbe commander of tbe rero-
latioo vfaich made tbia a aeparate conntrr, tod
tbe fint Treiident of theie United States was
completed external! recentlj.
Dnririr the Tears tbat elapsed from 1M2 nn
til 1S79 the unfinished shaft (which resembled
more the whitewashed chimney of a bnge fac-
terj) was thts nation s difraee. It was the
sorrow of Americans and the sneer of foreign
tUi tors. Fiaallj on Independence daj of tbe
centennial jearf Senator Sherman presented a
resolution d eel trior it to be tbe sense of Con-
cress ilut the monnmentshonld 1 completed.
Tbe resolution and the necesssrj- appropria
tion to legin the work anew was passed bj
both houses unanimously, and since then the
wort Las progressed ateauilr.
In 1676 the monument 'had reached the
heichtof 1S2 feet above tbe foundation, ami
aloat $260,000 had leen expended en its con
st met ion. Alt of tbe monej befere that date
bad leen obtained br the Tolontarj subscrip
tions ot the pnbhc, imt since that time Dearij
Si00,000 has been expended nnder appropria
tions of Coocress. The comer stcme which was
cnt from the same ledge of marble (near-Cock
ejrille, Md) from which the marble of the
abaft has been taken, was laid with craod cer
emonies Julj 1,181?, weighed little more
than twelve tons and wss laid at the northeast
corner of the foundation,
nrsrMpTioN OF woiilc.
Verj soon after the appropriation of 1 676 be
came available Col. (then Lieut. Col.) Thomas
Lincoln Caiejv corps of engineers, U. S. A.
js designated bjlVesident Grant, through
Secretarr of War McCrarj, as the engineer
o nicer to conduct ttie work, and capt. ueorge
W. Davis, II th U.S. infantry, was ordered
here from Texas, and placed on special dntj
as an acting engineer officer, as asiistsnl lor
lhe nrnnument construction.
The first oik dene was in 1677, when shafts
were sunk at different points aliout the nurno-
litb and lortngs made to find tbe character of
the strata llow the foundation. It had alreadj
lcn ascertained that tho original foundation
extended only five feel below the surrounding
earth's surface, white f on r teen feet reached
ove lo tie floor of the s1itt. The eimm.
linns showed that belnw the idd fuiiiHlation
was a scries of lajrers o( jrellow and blue cia
on a rock strata, sloping awaj to the original
led rf tbe adjoining Potomac, and that these
led of clar were ibicklv strewn with huge
boulders of the Ice-period. The clay taken
out was tested for compressibility, bnt tho ex
aminations and tests showed that to sustain
tbe huge structure of over 81,000 tons, the
loundation slioald rest upon the ld rock, still
fifteen feet lIow. These examinations and
the studies of the subject made by Captaiu
Davis continue) until 1 678, when finally the
plan ot
nULDINQ A r.W rot7.DATIO.N'
beneath the old one was decided upon, to
tbe astonishment of engineers all over the
civilized world. How such a thing could be
done was tbe wonder until Col. Casey and
Capt. Davis practically demenstrated it by
accomplishing the lact.
Tbe old foundation was so ridiculously ahal
low and narrow in base that tbe addition f the
weight necessary to carry out the design of
uetgiit would have sank the structure into the
ground, much like thrusting a cane into moist
earth, or, mote likelt, have toppled it over
toward the adjacent l olomac flats. A new
and wide foundation wan built under the old
one and resting on the bedrock Ieneath. The
magnitude of this before nuheard-of feat of
enginrrnn was so great that home ami for
eigniitjl engineers waited the work to see fur
themselves that it was actually luij done.
Tlte cvmpteled wink of the mbfuiiiidatioii is
one of the greatest fcals i.f engineering know n
in the woild. and Col. Cjer and Ctt. Davis
re entitled to official recognition for their work
witltout waiiutg for ihr kIou procesa f or my
proiiimtoii,
ilea nt inn-, while tho loutKlaitnti examina
tion had pn-grtinrJ, titrii Ii-d inrei lotind to
reach and examine the top width was left un
finished before Congrees took Action. Tho
three upper courses of stone, each one two
feet high, were found to be so damaged by the
action offroet, and perhaps lightning, tbat
mey were removed ietore the work on top was
resumed at the exact height of 150 feet.
September 11, 1676, an inspector of the pro
poei work and Mr. l II. McLaughlin repott
ed at the monument grounds, and were fol
lowed uext day by a small gang of carpenters,
ot which Mr. McLaughlin wa then the fore
man, who began the erection of the ncccstary
buildings. The first superintendent, who re
ported in the same month, was Mr. avarre,
a son of the famous old Indian fighter, in tbe
days of Mad Anthony Wayne's campaign in
the west and tbe war of 1612, and on his re
signation In 1670 Mr. McLaughlin was pro
moted from mastsr carpenter to succeed him.
THE rtnST NEW STOit LAM.
Aug. 7, Ib&O, the first stone above 150 fee t
from the foundation was laid, and to this dale
Mr. McLaughlin has superintended the whole
ot the work.
Saturday morning was as drear a dar as
could well be imagined, and many thought tbe
work of setting the capstone and aluminum
lip would be poetned on that account. The
rain that fell in sheeting torrents until long
tast nootidremhed the brave superintendent
and his men, bat the work of preparation
went, steadily on, and all was ready at tho
appointed hour. a
Soon after 1 p.m. Col. Casey arrived at the
mono men t grounds, and at once ascended to
tho top of the shaft, and was followed lalcri
by his invited guests. These comprised tbe
following named persons: Urig. Gen. William
McKee Dunn, U. S. A.; Hon. Horatio King
(ex. postmaster general,) Dr. J. M. Toner, and
Dr. Daniel U. Clarke, of the Monument so
ciety and of tho joint commiseicn of the mon
ument dedication: !ex-. Mayor Matthew G.
Emery, Mr. G. Kreebus, the draughtsman of
mo new poriion ot the monument; J. 11. but
ton and 0. M.Thomas, cleiks of Col. Casey's
office; John Croley, Col. Casy's messenger;
J. L. Smitbmeyer, Mr. Jlinckeldyn, of the
German legation; Gen. It ratio King, jr.,
of Governor Cleveland's staff, and repre
sentatives of the Associated Tress, the United
iress, and( tne local newspapers. Col,
Casey's official party comnrised besides him
self Capt. Davis, tbe assistant engineer io
charge, and Col. Bernard It- Green, bis as
sistant on the state, war, and navy building
ivuBi(ut;iioii.
When the guests arrived al
TUT 500-roOT LF.VXL,
where the pyramidal roof becins. the wind
was blowing from the southeast what seafar
ing men designate as " living gale," and but
few availed themselves of the opportunity of
Roiog juiuicr. ucn. uunn venture ouiside on
the platform on the east side below which the
netting is hung, and promptly lost his Derby
hat, which gyrated in various directions aa it
was drifted to leeward of the shaft or w as
canghtby tbe wind and finally settled rrace
folly in Babcock lake, when it was rescued by
a workman and awaited the general on his ar
rival below. When the hat left so also did
Gen. Dunn for tbe interior of the monument,
where he was soon bewigged with all the silk
handkerchiefs In the party, He says be intends
having tbe hat framed as a memento.
There were two means of going higher than
vuo icei auove me monument noor. une was
br spliced laddera extending almost rwrnendi.
cularly from the base of the pyramidal cap to
the platform at 313 feet, aitd thence by a shor
ter ladder la tho smaller platform from which
the cap aud apex was set, and another, by a
winding series of ladder leading up inside the
cone to me irap leu in me last course uelow
the capstone. Koone exceot the toamaliata
present dared tlte outer ladder, and most of
those availed themselves of additional security
by laving a strong noose about the waist ami
hauled by sturdy workmen above, so tbat if
lhe strong wind should blow them from the
ladder there would be no fall. The reporter
of Thk RKrrsLiCAX shinned up the ladder
i4juut "ci', uu uiuu i a an iiao it, ana
when all was over hesitated some time before
returning the came way.
Tromptly at 2 p. xa, the ceremony of
SETTiyO THE 7IMAUE
began. At this time the narrow nlatform was
occupied by Cul. Caaey, Capt. Davis, Col.
ureen, .Mr. .MCi.aogunn, uenms u Leary (the
master mason,) James liogan (master rigger,)
Edward Wayson (the elevator condoctor.l
Lewis O'Brien (tbe colored man who has pre-
parea hi me cement lor me cap,) and one other.
At tbe hour named Col. Casejr passed the word
below to the men at the hotitinr annaratuB.
and the stone was swunc into nlace. and after
an inose present on ine pi ill otto bad placed a
pofiion or toe cemeur, cot.vaaey giving the
last touch, it was slowly lowered into its rest
ing place, and the aluminium tip was placed
on the top. Before the apex was set various
coins, ranging from a 510 gold piece of Col.
Casey lo a nickel contributed by a newspaper
man, were placed in tbe cement on which the
metal rests. As the bright tip was secured
CoL Casey turned to the halliards that loosen
ed the American flag from the top of the scaf
folding, and at tbe same moment Col. Green
leaned over the frail ratling and waved his
hat to signal those below. The signal was
seen by the watching thousands, and even be
fore the beautiful fiaz of the countrr had fiun?
oul its folds, a puff of smoke from an inn
mroax in me wbite lot began Ibe congratula
tion that in a aeccAd mere was Toieed from
hundreds of steam whistles and thousands of
uxoats. The slender flagstaff that hoists its
truck fifteen feet abore tho tin of the scaffold
above the apex was too alight to bear the
train Saturday of tit garrison flag provided,
and it was flown instead from the northwest
corner joist. YeslcnUy Mr. McLaughlin hois
ted it to the truck, where it flattered bravely
all the bright summer-like day.
After all was over, and the guests gathered
at the elevator top below, Col. Casey, Cpt.
Davis, and Mr. McLaughlin were heartily con
vatulated, and after the elevator hd taken
below the last of the visitors, those engaged
on the wot k took part in a generous lunch
provided by Col. Casey.
As the guns and whistles announced the
completion of tbe outer work, an informal
meeting of tbe Monument society was held at
tbe elevator top, when Gen. Dunn offered the
following resolution, which was adopted:
VieWm, That we are thankful to hare tho
opporlnnity of this occasion, and at this eleva-
lion, to congratulate the American people on
the completion of tins enduring monument of
our nation's gratitndeto the father of his
country."
The terrible storm deterred more tlurn a few
hundred from l-eing prcsei.t at the monument,
bat had tbe djy been ss f-tir as yesterday or
the djy preceding the ceremony it is more than
probable that fully 10,000 would have been
tliere. The detail or policemen and tbe vigil
ant watchmen of the monument were kept
busy answering inquiries at tbe entrance ami
keeping back unauthorized applicants fur per
mission logo In the top, but despite their
vigilance one enterprising young American,
wlo gave his name as Henry Phillip, not only
took passage on the elevator, but went up tho
outer ladders and tn tbe uppermost platform
before he was headed and sent lelow.
When the elevator began its lang and datk
dracrnt with its first load of passengers after
lhe ceremonies were over aluut thirty jrcoplo
were on board, including Gen. Dunn and his
handkerchief-sw allied head, and just after
starting down Mr. Fred G. Calvert, in a good
baritone voice, struck up the "Star Spangled
Banner." Tho example was infectious, and
all joined until the shaft rung with the stirring
strains. Tbe effort was applauded by thewu
still above, which further inspired tho passen
gers to sing "America" and, at Gcu. Dunn's
suggestion, 'Old Hundred."
"Arrived at the bottom, tho visitors came
forth glad tint they were afcly back again to
the earth' surface, and glad that, after llico
many years, tbe greatest monument on caiih
is completed as to its external structure.
Yesterday the monument grounds wero
thronged all day, and it is estimated that fully
5,000 people were tliere.
The Treaty "War-
Tho battle of the Treaties has begun in
Congress, aud vested interests have opened
their heaviest batteries. Tho Hawaiian Trea
ty has been signed by tho Secretary of State
and awaits Congrcs ional action. The Spanish
West-Indian, Mexican and San Domingo Trca
ties stand in tho same position, and to add to
the consternation among those who control
profitable monopolies through the agency of
the Custom House, a treaty of commercial re
ciprocity has also been negotiated with Cana
da. This is the nukindest cut of all. Instead
of absorbing tho Dominion it threatens to
absorb the United States. Indeed there is
some dancer that San Domingo, tho "Colored
Republic, which occupies an elbow of the
little island, famous since Columbus ti i e, may
nace fires and compel it to "shut up shop,'
as it were.
All this would be ery absurd wcro it not
so intensely mischievous. The argument
sgaiost these treaties is that wo are giving the
other contracting parties lhe amount of the
uuy mat migm oe coiicticu upon their pro
duce entering into consumption in tliia 'ctiiiii-
try. This is not the case. These duties are
paid br tho home consumer and not lr tlm
loreign producer. We chejen the price of
prouuets in consumer, however, and nuke a
better market for tho producer, limn by enabl
ing him to purchase mure liberally fruit us,
Iftbe Hawaiian Treaty did not cheaimn su
gar here, it was because the siinnh wis not
-rxtcnsive with the demand but with free
sugar from Hawaii, Mexico, Cubi, Port" liico
ami Sjii Dmtiingn; the tonditious of supply
will tc chanced, and uniform iiricea nrcrail.
Thatjip inevitable: w hercforo opposition to lhe
HawflMti Treaty ah-ml 1 cease i hi tho ground
of high prke.
Wc nlncMc that the IV has wheeled into
line aud now vigorously attack 1 tec ip rooty. It
regards Iho Hawaiian Treaty as injuring this
country, iiid wants no kind of Beciprocfty
which does not give the United States exclu
siva command of tho foreign market, of courso
compelling the foreigner to pay whatever our
citixens may please to demand. Such a pica
for exclusive advantages on behalf of tho most
prosperous, tbo richest, tho most inventive,
and lrogreesive country in the world is sheer
nonsense. But it is tho kind of political
economy which is dished up to Californians
in their daily and weekly press. Xo wonder
meir views ot public policy aro perverted
No wonder trade is desert In us and coin-
elsewhere. Why is it in this home of liberty
that everything should bo frco except trade?
ino .iiTTiw ,llj"s that anything which p
motes international exchanges must be bei
ficial. The Hawaiian Treaty docs this and is
uiereiore eminently profitable to the people on
uii s voaai.
Want to Know, lYon Know
Washington, Dec I6th. In the executive
session of the Senate to-day, after the con.
firroation of Secretary McCulIoch, a resolution
was Introduced by members of tho Scnato
uomniitice on t-orcign llelalions, reciting m
its preamble tbat the Doniuican treaty had
been published in the New York llrnthl and
the Nicaraguan Ircaly in the Xew York
TribttM to-day, and a propositi ihat a
special committee tic raised lo investigate the
memous uy wmcii copies ot thesu treaties had
been secured by tbo press. A aiiinreation was
made that in as much as the Foreign Relations
Committee had treaties in f la custody, inves
tigation should bo undertaken by Ihat Com
mittee. To this tho mcmlrcrs of lhe' Commit
tee objected on Ibe ground that members of
LfOinniitlce would be thus called iiikjii to sit in
judgment upon each other, and suggested that
me aenate-Lommittce on rrivilegcs and Elec
tions be charged with tho duty. The mem
bers of the latter committee objected on ren-
eral principle, and called to tho attention of
the originators tho lact Ihat on a former occa
sion such an in ves titration had lcrti under.
taken, and had resulted only in bringing
ridicule and contempt upon the committee and
Senate- An assertion was made on tbo Demo
cratic side that siecial friends wero first sup
plied with copies of all treaties, and tho opin-
ivu was czprcsscu u) una senator mat mo
Administration was probably at fault in this
matter, lius gavo nso to a short and acrim
onious partisan debate. Several Senators
lamented the inability of the Scnato to enforce
its rule, in reply to which tho point was
made that tho rules had better be amended to
meet what seemed to boa popular want. Some
one suggested that tbe Xicaraguan Govern
ment or Xicaraguan Minister had given out
the Xicaraguan Treaty and tbe Senators
generally accepted this as the probability un
til it was remembered that the President's
message transmitted had been published
with this treaty, whereupon the new theory
was abandoned. A new amendment was next
offered. The text of the two treaties will bo
published in the vonymuon liecorxi to-morrow
morning. This being objected to, a motion
was made to lay the original resolution on tbe
table, and this was carried almost unanimoti-
Beet BoTLntlfr-
The QmMttiiHtl'r aays: We have taken
some trouble to endeavor to learn precisely
what tbe advantages are that the manufac
turers of beet sugar have over those who deal
with tbe sugar cane, which enables them so
completely to thrust their rivals out of the
market. Ilio per centago of sugar in beet-root
is but little more than one half of tho percent
age in sugar cane, bat it is probable that ow
ing to the nature of tbe material in which it is
enclosed it is more easily extracted, and that
there is more sugar left in the woody megass
aiicr crusmng me cane man in tha pulp of
beet. The best sugar manufacturers have the
assistance of the best chemists and of tho most
perfect machinery it is possible to obtain.
There is no doubt that their Drocea i much
more perfect than that by which it has hitherto
been possible to treat the cane. The cultiva
tion ol beet ii much less expensive than that
oi cane, ana aner me sugar lias been extracted
from the root, the residue is rateable as food
for stock, while tho cane meass is valutdu.
Tben in all the countries on tho Continent of
Europe there is a heavy excise duty on sugar,
and this duty is refunded on exportation, but
tho excise is not charged on the actual quan
tity of sugar made, but on the quantity ol ma
terial operated on which is calculated to vield
a certain quantity of sugar. These calcula
tions however, were made before the manu
facture of beet sugar had reached its present
perfection, and the governments have not
thought jt advisable to revise them. Conse
quently in France a manufacturer pays duty
on raw material calculated, according to the
official tables, to yield eighty tons of refined
sugar, but he actually makes ninety tons and
cm exporting the ten tons on which he has ac
tually paid no duty be receives back the full
amount of the duty on the quantity of refined
sugar. In Germany, in I6SI-2, (he manufac
turers produced over 100,000 tons of sugar
more than tbe quantity on which they had to
pay duty, and oo exporting this they would
receive back the duty which thev were aon-
rsd Io have paid but did not, and this would
the bounty. It is extremely hard to say
what this bounty actually amounts to no two
writers can arrive at the same conclusion. Of
coarse, if a French manufacturer exnorted
only the one ninth of Lis manufacture on which
be paid no duty, the bounty would be equal to
the excise duty, which is on refined sugar. 73f.
30c. per 100 kilograms, or about 129 per ton;
bnt as a matter of fact, he exports perhaps.
one half of his make, and the advantage which
he gets by a return of duty which he has not
paid on one ninth of It has to be sprerd over
the whulo lot. To show tbe difficulty of learn
ing accurately what this bounty amounts to
we will quote some authorities. Mr. Farrar
says: "Xo one knows w hat the amount ol any
foreign bourty i. Even where bounties are
admitted to exist, ihey differ, not only in each
different conntry, but m different seasons, times
and circumstances in tbe same country; on
different quantities of tbe raw material, and
almost, it may bo said, on every parcel of su-
The following table straws the different esti
mates made of the French bounties:
TVr Ion.
M IVbjtt Onrrtlcr rttlmstrd thrra it
v iMitrin s a I
11 Uxenne " 0
MJicomar " .?
MrWaJpole M 0 J
V Kopq.rt t
Lev xjrtoiierfUtxste) 4 2
M Lroa Mr faBHhrretlinatr).... - " 9
fimcfa oQclal utrnrnt 1
In Belgium they are estimated at from 7
Ss. Gd. to 3 per ton. In Germanj from 1
10i. to 1G. bd., and in Anstria from 10 to
1 10s.
Attacking Netkrivna System.
Slmmr Cclti Cipsar Moreno retnrned lu the
United Stale last May, after an alienee f
eight ars and is actively at work again in
tho effort to destroy the infamous "padrone
system." In IS73 be started the agitation
which resulted in tbe passage by Congre in
1671 of a law designed to uproot lhe system,
and ho prosecuted lhe ivtrvHi under it in
Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Xew
York. Xew Haven. Hartford. Boston and
through the West far ns San Francisco. So
long as ho remained in the country tho ' Mo
reno Law, as it was calico, wassocucciiveiy
enforced as lo virtually stop the evil. But
after his depart uro the system was revived.
oigtior .Moreno said lately lo a iriowwe re
porter: ''This padrone system is an outrage on
American civilization and on humanity. Chil
dren aro brought hero under the plea of teach
ing ihoiu mechanical trades, and adults of both
sexes aro induced to mortgage their little prop
erties, in farm or vineyard lands in Italy for
quadruple the amount of their passage money,
anil lo enter into contracts with the padroni lo
work for from one to six years under the prom
ise that, at tho end ot the contract and when
the money advanced has been repaid, Ihey will
lo given farms in various parts of tbo Uhitcd
States. Tho children and adults when once
here enter iolo a life of blsvery worso than
that of the southern negro before emancipation.
ihey aro compelled to do whatever their task
masters rcqniro of them; to play the harp.
violin or hand-organ, to beg, to pick rsgs or to
work on tho railroads, and the padroni collect
and keep tho money they earn, lodging thera
in miserable quarters, and furniahincr them
with poor food and cheap clothing, for alt of
winch they charge up against their victims
enormous prices. The head quarters, or rather
pens, of these slaves are in Mulberry el , from
the Five Points to Blcekcr st and In EIitab:tb,
Mott, Baxter and Crosby sis. Many of them
aro also lodged in miserable hovels in Brown's
Woods, Union Hill, X. J. near the reservoir.
"The padroni, if( unaided by others could
not carry on their infamous traffic so exten
sively. They aro aided by persons who, with
them, grow lazy and tat upon the blood and
sweat of the poor slaves. This traffic in hu.
man beings began in lb67, when Consul-Gen
eral Do Luca came to this country, and from
that time until very lately the Italian Consu
late Ins been Iho headquarters of tho padroni
aim incir accomplices.
"Soiiie'hing ought to bo done to sunnress
Ibis traffic and stamp out tins slavery. While
the MorciHi bill of 1671 wa pending I found n
good man in Mr. Blaine, who was then Speaker
and he gave mc important assistance. I am
almost alone in lighting this great evil now.'
The two Ilali.in padroni, Michacle and Giu
seppe Ma rone, cousins whoso liquor stnn's
are at Xo. G2 and Xo.GG Mulberry St., and who
wcro arrctdod on .Mondty on complaint of An
gth", Antonio and Pietrn Castetlano, and Yin.
cciizn INitosilo, chamnz them wllhlnrciu-r
the complainants t tho point of the dagger to
oi,;" aLhiiun inicniciua in ucuia willCll mey
did not owe wero arraigned al JeflVrnon Mar
ket Court ycitcrday. The complainants failed
1 1 appear in the morninir. but thev wcro traced
to tho Ita Ian Cousnlale and brought to court
in the afternoon, when they explained that tho
reason of their non-atlcndano in tho morning
was that tho defendants had threatened to kill
them if they went to court. Tho defendant's
were admitted to bait in $2,000 each to answer
at Special Session, and the comtdainants. hav
ing no homes, were committed to Iho Homo of
Detention to wait the trial. A. i . Tribune,
General Dcrlistmcnts.
G. BREWER & GO.
1 HAVE
JUST RECEIVED !
r.u Ajir.nit'A.N
Bark Ceylon
Tin: loi.i.invi.Mi
MERCHANDISE :
Whlcli wiU ba Sold at
LOW RATES !
" Electric Oil"
1305 1VATEU WHITE: 1'ATENT Xoztle CaBf.
URI), in 5 & 10 lb. PAILS
EXTRA PRIME
LARD OIL
X nAltlll.l.N AMI CASK
Tar and Pitch,
COAL
In Casks for Family Use.
m: o.MniAxn
I R.03NT SAFES
ASSOnTKII MIDI
CUMBERLAND COAL
CARD MATCHE8
Fairbanks Platform Scalos,
ASMIKTCD MIlIi
ASH OAKS, 16, 17, 18 it
Axe Handles,
Pick Handles,
Cotton Waste,
Salt, Plaster.
A Choice Selection of
CHAIRS 1
Barrel Shocks
EXCELSIOR,
JPhaston Carts
HANDY PHAETONS,
New Styles of Carriages,
ExpresM Wagoiw I
Ladles' Phaetons,
CIDER VINEGAR,
HAND CARTS,
EASTERN MADE OXCARTS
SUGAR BAGS,
33XJM
0. BREWER & COMPANY
FOR THE COMPLEXION I
THIS :r,KG.VT rRKPAItATIOX
1. lk MOST TEBFECT BEALTIFIER KXOWX.
II i. rre s.4 ntnalw. Urllktr.l la IUArpllc.II.
.d womirrl al la lu Erfrcu. wklle thecivt ktviI.t
hill t.drtcttlliaf. Prtml Vr
II. BOIVXAS. Clml.1,
HOLLISTER & Co.
.DDKDBjiioinuiaariiin skat-
L lj dan. at tA (Hiette OOr.
tntrol Drtrtisrmtiits.
"Pioneer" Line
JROM LIVERPOOL.
nitral !3!tttrtiscnunls.
Arrival of the Iron Ships
"Ophelia," "Bordeaux,'
and " Clan Grant."
Theo.H.Davies&Co
Have Rccdvcd by these Vessels
And other Late Arrivals,
the Following-:
An Asst. of Dry Goods
CONSISTING IS l'AUT OV
Horroek.a Lone ClolU nnJ otlwr brands of
.Whit. Cotton , Uobleacliixl Cottons,
Prints nctr stvlrs, fast mlura ;
Kleachnl auJ llmn dittoim, 8 to 10 nnatltr
I'mnm I .inen Dnllft. Wbite I.moil IUCK.
Crown Canvas lllk .t Chi French Meriuoa. all
Grades; Waterproof Tweedy Grey, Hlno and
Mixed Flannel
A LAUGH ASST. OF IlKKSS GOODS, SILKS,
Satin. NlL'-ttiblmiM, Velvet,
I'nion and Cotton LisUdos, Linen nrnl Cotton
linnukf relnefs, Into nml l-olorcu Mnris,
Uirinn Tti.1.F-i)iirl Mini UrAnPrft.
IjftJied UnJcrwuar, Linen and Cut tun Towel,
All qualities ana styles ; i ictom iiwn,
Whito MoletVtn, Check Molcftkin,
Trait. Tjim EdcrinmL ftml Insertions.
HtooU LUO yd. Spool Cotton, CoMcs 400 Jtl.
Wnool tJolton, 1 icning. luue I'cnuus,
Slow .oi to Netting, 'JO inch ;
Rubber Coats & Leggings
Bed Blankets,
All Sizes. WcieMs, Qualities nud Colors ;
Velvet fc Tapestry,
Rugs aud Mats,
A FEW OF TUB NEW STYLE
OlilNTilE RUGS
NAVY AM)
Merchant Canvas !
Filter Press Bags 22 x 36
We make tbis one of oar Specialties nud
bare n Toll block ot
Sugar, Rice & Coal Bags
Which vo are selling nt llottom Trie...
8 cfc SplyTwlne
ENGLISH, HAWAIIAN". AND
a, r nnd 7 ard;
FLOOR" OILCLOTHS
Ultra Hevry. Assorted M'idiUs;
Ladies' & Gent's Saddles
AND HADDLEUY,
A complete lino which o nrosvllini
Cbeapcr tliAn Kvcr.
Iron Bedsteads,
Galvanized Buckets,
TINNED IRON
Tea Kettles & Sauce Pans
Assorted Sizes do Fry 1'aus.
Butcher Knives, Knives & Forks,
Tin Plate, Sheet Lead,
Galvaniicd Water Pipe, to -2 in.
WHITE LEAD, various qualities;
BOILED OIL, TURPENTINE
CORRUGATED ROOFING,
m t Jiiac, fi, 7,8 find J fULenelbn; Gait,
Screws and Waslierss Ualr. Itidcinc,
Yellow Sheathing Metal, and Nails
Annealed Fence Wire, Fenco Staples,
Wiro riant Oaards and Arclies,
STEEL RAILS,
With Fish l'lales, Holts and Spiles,
Portland Comont,
Flro Clay, Firo Bricks,
Both Square and arch ;
Lump Rock Salt,
Fishery Salt.
English Bolting,
i io i. men status
AN ASSOltTJIENT OF
ENGLISH GROCERIES
fcUCIl as
Worcestershire Saooe, Fruits, JaiitH,Cream Tartar,
Hoda, pioes lto., Elo Ltc.
Iri7We bavo also ant reccived-na asst. ofv;
AMERICAN GOODS
Among them
Bleached & Brown Cottons
27 to 30 Inches vide ;
Fancy I'rinU, Kloo Pminis,
Cbildreus' lloott and iShoca. sIzpa nnd
Sljtes adapted to thii market.
A LAltGE FKESU ASSORTMENT OF
Shelf HARDWARE
CrocVerr and (iUssvarr. Ou., 1'icV., bhortlf.
Plantation and Mechanics' Tools
IiOBEY t CO S
Portatolo Eugliioe
4 11-1 sad II r.
ONE SPLENDID PIANO,
BY IlllINbMKAl) Jt tONS.
Toatod OlactUa.
Gorsai-e's Soap, two qualities, in buics of I'L Rirs
and GO liars:
Best Welsh Steam Coal
COKE, FLOOIIINO TILES,
mninii n
i'lVV II II v
Lit
it
PrtACTIOAI,
DRUGGISTS
No. I 13 451 15 FORT STREET
DIPOT FOR DOEUICKE J. bfUEE. KE's
nn
RICKSECKER'S
3F ERFTJlVrES
AND THE
COMMON SENSE
i
iYuriii Jlotllc.
BENSON, SMITH fc CO.
D rnccl.tr-
FOR SALE!
House and Lot
ON JUDIl bTREET. HOXOLVLC.
Rlsht frpIte Mr. IUrtvell M lt
. cTTin)Ma iiosoiBia. wt rood
tbd Uvrt .nd eunUili nui fr oac bone ill nir
rOMd. and 1A tell nt -malar.! f thM
roo. oi at
Iga " Mr. TfTTr'n tore. Siast.
FOR SALE.
Fowler's Patent Tramway,
U pond Kail,. II r.cjn.11,.
WithPatent Steel Sleepers
Oano GeLrm.
f Wl.I mI4 is ;lot a erailiimtai.
,a "C. BBEWEB CO.
THE .
DE. LIEBIG
Irlvnto Dtstonin'i
30 GtAUT 8TUIT. BXX FBAXCTJCO. CXU
f Cmdocted by QaaflM rtpHm aaj 8tugeu--
."H tTTTti OMeBt pctllto la th CbttM Stairs
at l Prtntf. (-hronh) tM IS Htudb htm.
VlfmaOia mrta, Bnlllar afiha tulaa-i.
M.f1wial trrmn tttm inlrTn fnp Itfn.
I from tst sr youth w Mm, or taj cassa t petya untr saj
I rrntelT cird
I suii-JLw94 aad Old men. an a an wb Bm
I ral kliraad nmrt . rrmnii rb old rneua i.m.l.
I atooce. II boptnloa coats ootftliif.andmartaTefatnra ToherrmaX
I Kham& WhralDOooTralrattntiBiirh4tr far tnwlmrat.
I Ibe OI4l lpllUt.bv vbom
111. ati pbrlctai Uiroujboat mF-
I tbentritrT,lEiKnf1f)ctlih.7rvqoraU7 rmxnmmJ difficult fa, to
Inn uimv, npruuiihur wnw nrrr a nan I wm
rlr li ted. To Conor! A ud Expertenee nuka Lto
Oanwitlch bitra tUUoi taotiw
I armw cndtrtaXm, DolcaiTd. lIlorwrU. Honri: VmAlrtt
lta.ic.lol p.MMtosernitti( sandajlOtaiaoairNi
rn e lilTUIIIUUull IvUIUIb! Sut 1UK mBu
OTfW w- mm-
DR. UEHC'S WDSOESnit CEKHAM KYlCCSATTl!!
i wo, ''' ! u ijiuiu, ww rawer iso j
I Kt m rxmr mnml Tfmfmrmt,wmi f IV Lmty Vmn'j I
5- to if ri tmntj .frntrrUM-m. Mt
rs"- mNntniRMMOimlk MMaUnM
LIKm DUmsANT. 3D Omti Ul T .Cil
CROSS CUT TOBACCO
Dukes & Son,
FOR PIPES AND CIGARETTES
BEST IN THE MARKET
HYMAN BROS.,
Sole Agents.
At the Old Stand. No. 8 Kaalxunianu Street,
TIN, COPPER & SHEET IRON WORKER
PLUMBING, in all its branches;
Artesian Well Pipe, all sizes:
STOVBS AND RANCtBS
1'acIoS.uu, Medallion, ltichnioml, TipTup, l'nlncc, Flon, May, Content, Ot.iud I'tic.
New ltUal, Oir, Derby. Wrvn,Iollr,iywylioeeM, 1uim?v.A: Army lUiif a M tyital barier.Itock,
Knrierior, Magnet, O-toeola, AlmetU bclime, Cliartr IVtk. N'iml.Ie, lnwood and Uiantlry Stoves,
(rulmnizeU Iron nnd Copper lMlcr for Itanccs, Granite Ima Ware, Ni.Lel I'Htrtl .tad llaln ;
Galvanized Iron Water Pipe, all sizes," and laid on at
Lowest Rates; Cast Iron and Lead SoilPipe,
House Furnishing Goods, all kinds;
KIlllllEU 110SE-AI.L MZKH ANll ('.HADES;
Lilt nnd Force rnniiw, (fatrm I'unitK. OalTanizvd Iron. Shfct Cor-Iier, UUt Load.
Iad I'ii, Tiu Tlate, Wattr Closets, Marble BLibs and ltovla, Enameled Wash Stands,
Chandeliers, Lamps, Lanterns
'I'MUSSUM J.l'HUSSKS! TuussnS !
HOLLISTER & CO.
ittiftiiHi'S PEfif iHiTEflY
Perfumery ! Perfumery !
Perfumery ! Perfumery !
HOLLISTER b CO.,
Have Just Received the I argest
LO'T OF PERFUMERY
EVEII IJil'OUTKU INTO THIS KIMIH0M, COJIl'lllSIMi
Over Fifty Different Odors of the Celebrated
Lundborg Manufacture.
Odor-Gases, Fancy Boxes, Bottles, &c.
Hollister & Co.,
Agents lor Hawaiian Tc 1 -n gri ortx
59 Nmianu St, and Cor. Fort and Merchant St.
ice:
A Large Invoice of the Celebrated
llil,t!JiOli Is:
Dlroot lyi'oxxx tlio Pactoi-y.
Wo llavo Especial FACILITIES for Adjusting TKUSSES.
Hollister & Co.,
Cor. Fort and Merchant Sts., & 59 Nuuanu St.

xml | txt