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The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, January 04, 1895, Image 11

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1895-01-04/ed-1/seq-11/

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PUBLIC PROTECTORS MELT,
-Dr. Russell Complains of Diseased
Heat in His District.
THE INSAXE Jl.SYI.U3I WINDMILL.
-Executive Officer Iteynold roints Out
the DerecU New Clilnene Doctor "In
Town A Small Carco of Medicine
- Ordered Probable Contest for a Ball.
The Board of Health held a reg
ular meeting yesterday afternoon
with President Smith in the chair.
Executive Officer Reynolds
handed in a report regarding the
windmill at the Insane Asylum.
It eeems that the mill has not
given satisfaction although it waB
approved and paid for. In Mr.
Reynold's opinion the pump is all
right but he is in doubt whether
the machine has motive power
enough to work it.
Mr. Reynolds was given power to
remedy the fault.
A letter from Superintendent
Meyers waB read regarding affairs
at the leper settlement. He stated
that satisfactory progress was being
made in the removal of the healthy
natives from Kalaupapa and did
not anticipate any trouble. The
people seemed disposed to accept
the offer of the Government and
retire in a peaceable manner.
A letter from Dr. Hyde was read.
It referred to the Y. M. C. A. hall
at the settlement. He is anxious
to have the building placed under
control of the American Board of
Missions, and has the consent of G.
N. Wilcox, who donated a sum of
money to its erection. The mem
bers of the Board of Health are
agreeable to the plan, and think
it would be a desirable arrange
ment. It seems that the building is now
controlled by a building committee,,
the members of which have not the
confidence of the natives. The
latter are anxious for the change
also.
Mr. Reynolds stated that a baker
at the settlement threatened to
ehut up shop unless the price of
wood was reduced. The man in
question opposes another in the
Eame line of business, and trie result
is tbat bread is sold at five cents a
loaf, instead of tenas formerly. If
he Ehould retire from business his
opponent in trade will immediately
raise Lib prioo. The matter was
referred to Mr. Meyers, and the
chances are that the lepers will re
ceive their daily bread at the pres
ent price.
Dr. Russell, of Waianae, com
plained of the poor quality of beef
furnished at the place mentioned.
According to hiB statement the
cattle are half-starved and most of
them are unhealthy. The secre
tary was instructed to inform him
that he had the power to condemn
any meat that was unfit for use.
The Eame doctor spoke of an ep
idemic of influenza that annually
visits Waianae and claimed that
vaccination was a sure preventive.
He askeS for enough virus to ope
rate on the-members of hiB district
as an experiment.
It was decided to allow Chun
Kam Chin a license to practice
medicine. He was recommended
by several prominent Chinese and
possesses a diploma which was
read off yesterday.
Dr. Goto wants more medicine
for his hospital. Two tons were
ordered; enough to last two
months at least.
Bids for supplies were opened
and were referred to Mr. Reynolds.
THEY NEED SOME MONEY.
Prospective Shortage in the Funds
of the 4 Hawaiian Board.
The Hawaiian Board haB five
missionaries at the Gilbert Islands
and two at the Marquesas. It costs
$1,700 a year to keep them. In a
letter which appears in The Friend
Treasurer Hall reports a prospect
ive need of $11,500 for 1895. The
letter says :
"The friends of this evangelical
work that is being carried on
among the various nationalities in
'these Islands have given liberally
in the past, and we have faith to
believe that their generosity will be
continued for the days to come.
"The case is urgent. Besides
that which we are doing for those of
the Polynesian and Latin races, we
are trying to evangelize about 40,
000 Asiatics. We have over thirty
teachers and .eyangelistB at work
among them including those at
work among the Portuguese there
are thirty-six in all with eix well
organized schools, sir. churches,
and nearly a score of preaching
stations. -"'' ' 9
"Our 'work among the Hawaiian's
iB very varied. We stand back of
Eome fifty ordained ministers,
about forty of whom are conduct
ing the work in fifty-four churches.
Most of these men ought to have
grants in aid for present emergen
cies, for their support is most mea
ger. Three of our four native
schools are without endowment.
The great work they are doing for
the education of Hawaiian charac
ter could hardly be continued with
out the support of this board.- For
the carrying on of all these
branches of the work we ask your
generous support."
NINE SUNDAY SCHOOLS.
Account of Christmas Gathering
at Waihee.
On Christmas Day over three
hundred Hawaiian s, from nine
Sunday schools in the districts of
Makawao and Wailuku, Maui,
gathered at the Waihee church on
the occasion of the annual Sunday
school exhibition, held In the holi
day season at 'different centers.
Each of the nine schools took part.
during a four hours' programme
with great credit to themselves and
their leaders and to the enjoyment
of the .congregation present.
Scriptural recitations, biblical"
catechising, and singing, made up
the contribution from each Sunday
school,; all -parts, particularly the
singing, deserving notice and re
flecting credit on both singers and
leaders.
Three judges--N. Kealoha, David
Kehaulilio, and D. Opunui
with the approval of the audience,
awarded the chief honors for the
beBt performances to the schoolB of
Wailuku, Makawao and Waihee.
The Wailuku school gave an ora
torio directed by Pastor Kapu who
had himself arranged .music and
composed words ori the theme of
Moses leading the people out
of captivity and into the
land of promise. The fcupericr
style of composition and rendering,
with the fine voices of this choir,
made a feature that would have
been an attraction at any concert.
Makawao school, led by Judge
Kalama, made an excellent record
for itself with good singing, as did
also Waihee, led by Robert Nawa
hina. The interesting feature of
the last school was the large num
ber of young people and children,
who took part with excellent effect.
The exercises throughout, of un
usual interest and excellence, were
marked by harmony and courtesy,
and there was an entire absence of
any political allusions in the sev
eral acceptable addresses that fol
lowed the exhibition.
A point of general comment was
the appearance of the church,
which, in preparation for this fes
tival and the New Year, the pastor
and members had with their own
hands scrubbed, painted and
whitewashed, inside and out. A
comfortable outdoor luau closed
the proceedings of a pleasant day.
NEW HOTEL STEWARD. .
Goodchild of the Steamer China
Coming to Honolulu.
On the return of the steamer
China Steward Goodchild of that,
steamer will assume the duties of
steward at the Hawaiian Hotel.
Mr. Goodchild will bring with him
two Japanese cooks direct from
Japan. The arrangements for Mr.
Goodchild to come to this country
were made by Col. Macfarlaqe
some months aco while in San
Francisco. During his absence
Mr. Chapman had been engaged to
fill the vacancy then existing. He
will retire on the arrival of Mr.
Goodchild. Col. Macfarlane has
only words of praise for Mr. Chap
man who is also very popular with
the guests.
His Third Respite.
United States District-Attorney
Knight received a dispatch from
Washington yesterday announcing
that President Cleveland had
granted another respite until Jan
uary 25, 1895, says the Examiner
of the 20th ultimo, to Mate St.
Clair, the mate of the Hesp'er, who
is now in the Santa Clara county
jail under sentence of1 death. St.
Clair was convicted ef murder on
the high Eeas and sentenced to be
hanged some months ago. This is
the third respite granted by the
President.
District-Attorney Knight made a
motion in Judge Morrow's court to
have St. Clair transferred from San
Jose to San Quentin. The court
granted the motion, stating that he
would leave the matter to the dis
cretion of Marshal Baldwin. The
latter said that he had decided to
leave St. Clair at San Jose, as he
saw no necessity for his removal to
San Quentin at present.
Mrs. Frances Edgerton, now in
Hilo, will arrive by the next Kinau.
During her stay Bhe will give one
or two "dramatic-recitale. -3- -'
WHO HHiffiWTHEIlTEB?
A Dramatic Editor Give His Views
Regarding It.
T. Levey Writes a Letter, but It 1
Not Printed "William Dailej's
SncCAM EitablUhed. -
Recently L. J. Levey sent a letter.
to the San Francisco Music and
Drama for publication. The editor
refused to print it, giving the fol
lowing reasons :
"L. J. Levey, who for several
years, was sole agent and manager
for the proprietors of the Royal
Hawaiian Theater during the late
monarchy, objects strenuously to
the announcement that the house
is at present under the manage
ment of W. R. Dailey, and sends a
letter to Music and Drama, in
which he claims that he is Btill in
charge of the only theater in Ho
nolulu, having been' its manager
since October 26, 1891. lie makes
some statements in the letter re
ferred to against Manager Dailey of
a purely personal nature, which it
would be manifestly unjust to. pub
lish, and also sends clippings from
two Hawaiian papers to strengthen
his statements and position. The
fact that Mr. Dailey played two ex
tended engagements in Honolulu,
evidently financially successful,
since his company was paid in full,
and presumably successful from an
artistic view, judging from the
great praise the performance re
ceived from the leading Hawaiian
papers, seems to be established.
The question as to who now con
trols the bookings of the theater is
a matter that any manager who
contemplates a visit to Hawaii
can easily ascertain. Mr. Levey
has played a number of first-class
attractions in the islands and has
been a prominent merchant and
citizen of Honolulu for years.
There is no reason why there
should be any controversy between
the parties mentioned, as they are
not likely to, want, the theater at
the eame time or to clash with each
other in engagements, as the firm
of Spreckels fc Co., who own the
property, will attend to that part of
the business."
LIST OF LETTERS
Remaining in the General Post Office
up to December 31, 1S94.
LADIES.
Andrews, Mrs S D
Brown, Mrs I At
Carson, Miss E
Cuiruis, Mrs J
Carpenter, Mrs H C
Deskeli, Miss M A
Humason, Miss E (2)
Ganet, Mrs J K
Laihrcp, Miss (3)
Miner, Miss M
Parker, Miss C
KJmbert, Miss,M
Taylor, Miss E
Vilson, Miss PBM
Wilson, Mrs J (2)
Vhitney, Miss A
Brown, Mrs C H
Cavilo', Miss M
Cottrell, Miss E
Drew, Mrs
Howard, Mrs G L
Green, Mrs J B
j
Magnnn, Miss M
Thompson, Mrs E
Von Berg, Mrs (2)
Wilkins. Miss A
Very, Mrs E
OEKTLEMEN.
Beckley, V A
Buth, J
Barber, B,
Brown ifc Co
Brown, J P
Brown, J G
Cunningham, J
Cross, C
Cooper, F
Cottrell, JDS
Divine. F
Drew, Li
De Ken, II1
Dickson, J
Forrester, T
Graham, J
Gray, It
Graenhaleh, W
Gilbert, W
Halen, Avon
Heinzmann (2)
Grace, H F
Johnson, C
Kilbe.E.
Knowles, H. C
Kimball, C
Love, Jas
Lewis, It P
Limo, E M
Myhre, C G
Miller, C
Monktown
Marmont, J R
Melelenes, U
McManimin, D
Koreni,E(2)
O'Connor, Jos
Pedersen, P (3)
Platter, L
Rich, J
Ramsey, G H
Summers, W
Stern, H
Smith, Y
Shaw, O J
Souks, T
Schrotke. H B
Scott, S X
Thompson, R J.
Thompson, E P
White, Capt F
Wilson, W H
Walker. T B
Whitney, B B
Wigfrins, A
Woodward, A
Bowles, G
Bolster, A D
Byrne, C
Brown, M
Brown; J
P Comb, G
Cooper, F H
Cannon, H
Cottrell, Hon Don
Davies, J
Durune, J
Delmar.E
Dunn, D R
Geron.JA
Gendinpt
H Gesse, W
Harnston,.G
House, D
Kennedy, G D
Koch, G
Kriesner
Luther, O H
Langly, A
Martin, D
Mushery, J
Martin, C S
Margale, A
Newby, L
Pool;C V
Peck.S
Robinson, T R
Shaw, O J
Smith, F C
Scott, M -Sandstrom,
A E
Stone, H
Spencer, J
S (3) Thurston. C
(3) Taylor, W
1 Wolters.HW '
Williams, M (2)
Williams, F B
Welsby, F
Wallen, A
BEGISTEBED.
1799 Geo E Combe
6023 Chas Hill
6813 Patterson
S891 Tr Edw Hinrichs
-Parties inquiring for letters, In the
above list will please ask for "Advertised
Letters." '
jos. m. oat;
t Pcstraaster-General.
General Post Office. Honolulu, Decem
ber 3i,i894.. ; ," - -i .-.-.
J --'
11
are fret rtwhjt oftw
tfeatrlrea Jfs "Stoat:
J. U nuet" fMfli
AkiiciriCiMM
r i
VJM
i i
energy, force, all go to trake the
perf ect man. If you are laclung
in any of these there 'is some
thing wrong, most likely a run
down condition of the system.
Perhaps a stubborn cough or
weak lungs. Perchance even
consumption or chronic bronchitis.
Arigier's
Petroleum
Emulsion
JO--"
is the Food -Medicine, success
fully combats disease, builds up
the constitution and supplies new
energy.
CO cts. and 81.00.
Our bock"Health"aod"Bamj-"sct free.
, . WTCIER CHEMICAL CO., Bosioa.
HOBRON DSU9-CO.i t
.V ; Agents,
J OOK OUT FOB
0K HOLIDAY GOODS!
Furniture Just Receive
A COMPLETE STOCK OF
BEDROOM SUITS
-A.X LOAV BRICKS;
Wicker Ware,
Rugs and Portiers of all size .
Shaving Stands,
Card Tattles,
A2?D ROCKERS
In Oak or Cherry,and other goods
too numerous to mention.
J. I I OPP & CO
74 King Street.
Give the Baby
I 5
A Perfect Nutriment
for growing children,
convalescents.
consumptives,
dyspeptics,
Rr.atbc Act, ai)(J
n .Viuto llluets crtl
ell Va:lts Di-qascs.
THE
Best Food
far h'and-fed Infants.
OVU COOK for trip 1-trfc--"'"i
-flOtJiets.-'rU'eC'arcni.i! Vtnl.
.j of tnCmtf'wi): 1- sr?
. i ui.y widresa, uroc rnistu
OCLlSER-GOOOALt CCU
BENSON, SMITH & CO.,
Sole .Aeents for- the Ha-waiian. Islands.-
FOR AND
FANTSHn, i NVALi D
iPlliiil
FHE MTJTXJL
LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW YORK
RICHARD AiiJjcC?7i2Z.Ev. - - - President.
Assets DecembeiMJlsti 1893 : $186707.680.1 i
o
A Good Record, the Best Guarantee for the Future;
FOR. PAP.T10CLAB5, APPLYTO .
,. ; a B. ROSE,
' -. -Qeiieral Agent foi- Kavraiiah ' JSlaiAi
&Y GOODS,
SUCK i
Priais, Qinghnmff, 0t ml TliriiltMM. ' 1
ia Um Utmt- -----
vuiwea aamaub ami KM
SATiMs, Yxirrrs ud
CEAP2. AC
TAILORS' GOODS, I.
Seme, Kmmih At, J,Ae.
Clothmf, Umltrwttr, 5)Mt,
Rasa acd Ctnak.
Kibboas.XneeB aad
Catlery, Pcfwy zmiMtfs, '
&-t &e-, A.
Ahtga -variety ef
Vienna &bA In (wudu
1FOK
AmnaaB asd Mi a.
aUlTwiM art 1S?Tm.
Itmerfmm Ctotfc.
Hoofiufi S.'ates,
3B.
Sheet ZIe. SluAt. TnJ
Plain G1t. liom Beat ami Bwt,
Steel Kaite, mi 38' C
" " "-"r rT'1niiiyhfu,
ft
Market Bafa4a.
DtotijawM awl CM. A.
-AUO
Golden Qt, Diamond, Sawii'g.
Sal m oh. Coned Beef. .
&c, e, ., A.
Tot sale ea the mmt lihttai um
and at leweat iiriees.
BY
H. HACKFELD t CO.
HEAR CUSTOM HOUSE. nOXOLCLU
Imported and Dealer In
Japanese Provisms,
ury uooos,
Aim every iajo: or
JAPANESE MASUFACTi'Jtl.
IcUnd otJet fl:hfntlj IStd U
able prices. In qaintltUs to inn.
p.o boxi:s. - . nm.TXL.
Golden
BAZAAR
Xmas! Xmas.lf Xmas !!!
Don't forget tlus is tka store for aQ
kinda or p reseats.
SEAIi, AliUGATOR asbCILF SBDL
PURSES and POCKET BOOKS.
IJiaries ,1890.
PKESEXTA.TJOX BOOKS ol aU d
ecriptions at Publishers prices.
IXL Pocket KniT
PEES & SON'S PAINTS AXD DRAW
ING MATERIALS.
Calendars and Booklets.
HAND SEWING MACHINES $3130
and $12Jj0t
DOMESTIC SETSG MACHINE.
TOYS AND GAMES
BASE BALL AND LAWN TEXXM-
FTNE SOCIETY PAPSTHEEES AND
STATIONEKY.
Hair Brn&he hjmI ObiImi.
VELOCIPEDES jot WAOOS.
GUITARS from U.W nr-
TMs store is asolataff a Cash
and prices are oasa.
W. F. REYNOLK,
Elects. f QBkix.
T TIIBANUAX,;
at the Waifcee Smw Cm
y. im fell (h mm,mtw
icr mm earr ytz
Hi.l Y i Mi
Jtr. . m.

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