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The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, November 16, 1917, Image 2

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1917-11-16/ed-1/seq-2/

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HAWAIIAN GAZETTT-
FRIDAY,
NOVEMBER 16. 1917. SEMIAVFT'CLY.
and
'V.
f
HUD'S SUB PH0ICTI00 15
Ti'JELilE PEUGEOT LESS SIIICE VI
Ccasuc'ptioa la United SUtcs lias bcrcascd Tea Pcrceot
In Balk Bat Fallen Off Per Capita cf Popa-
'vvi-V":- lation Seven Pounds .
4. i ju uniira ,ouim i toe worm 'e , tnree-iemn cents, pna in ivi xour anu
greatest consumer of sugar, despite the
. let that the per capita consumption
, has decreased about tan percent . the
result of th high prices. A eompiU
tion by the National City Bank of New
York show that the , consumption of
augar in tha tlnited States for the fecal
year 1917 waa but eighty-two poun1
fr capita against eighty-nine 'pounds
a 1014. (the year preceding the .war).
.The total quantity continued in 1917
. was, feowever, eight and one half bil
lion pounds, and we also exported One
and one-quarter bllion pounda, or twea-ty-tve
timea a much aa in. the year be
, fore the war. ( . .
'.. " The compilation ' ahpwe that ' the
world 'a augar prxluctioa ia now about
, ' twelve percent below that of the year
preceding the war. Beet augar ptpdue
tiou ia Europe has fallen forty-three
: percent, but eaae production ia the trop
ica haa increased about twenty-Are per
cent. The beet augar. of Europe, which
- waa ' eighteen and one-half billion
, tieand ia the augar year 191213, waa
but nineteen and one half billioa pounda
Jn 1910-17, and tha world cane produc
tion, which waa. a little more than
twenty billion pounda ia 1913-13, waa
. ever twenty-five billion pounda ia 1916
" 17 world production of cane and beet
augar' in 1913-14 waa forty-two billion
,'.' pound;, ia 1916-17, thirty -seven billion
. ; pounda. Beeta produced one-half of
- the world 'a lugar prior to the war, but
ia 1916-17 (applied only one-third of
the world total. . . -
Baptd ProducUoa Increase :
la the United Stat and (ite inland
':, possessions there haa been a rapid' ia-
rreaaa ia production, la every one of
'.' the augar areaa under the American
, flag Porto Pico, Hawaii, the Philip-
pines, and the cane and beet field of
. continental United State there ha
.' . been a marked increase, the aggregate
product of these areaa bavin? arrowu
from about four billion pounds in 1912
13 to practically fire billioa pound ia
191617. The share of our consumption
drawn from foreign coantriea has fallen
... front 'seventy five : percent ia - 1897
(twenty years ago), to forty-eight per
cent in-117. -
" Heaviest Consumer
Ia aouMinulioa af augar the .United
States stands at the head of the list'
of the world' countries, our total con
sumption being eight and one-half bil
lion pounda in the fiscal year 1917
! against approximately five billions in
; (iermany, five billions in the United
', Kingdom and 4o billiona in 'France,
'. the figure for the European countries
. being those for normal years. Our per
: capita concumption, however, is leu
; than that of certain other countries,
'Denmark's consumption being ninety
' three pounda per capita, England nine
, ty. United States eighty-two, Germany
seventy-five, Norway and Sweden sixty
, Netherlands sevsuty-tbre, Prance i or
. i ty, Bussia thirty, Spain fifteen : and
Italy ten. About twenty-five percent
of our consumption ia drawn from our
own fields, twenty-sevea percent from
our island and .' forty-eight ' jiereent
, from foreign countries, chiefly Cuba.
.The value of the sugar entering conti
nental United Btatea wait, in the fiscal
, 'year-It 14, $135,000,000 and ia 191T
348,000,000, the average import price
per pound (including that from the is
v lands), having been in 1914 two and
.. :' Caae-r- .
Cuba
' British India
(. Java';.'. i... ......
Hawaiian Islauds ,
Tort Kico , .
. I'hilippine Islands .
Inisiana
tHiuth America
Mexico, fend Central America , . . .
Formosa and Japan
Australasia , . . .
Africa . . ..''.....'
, Vest Indies (except Cuba aud Porto Bieo)
4 "Total cane
Beet. ...
'. Germany . . ,
1 'Austria-Hungary
' ltussia
Prance '
Vclglum
Motherlands ......................
. United States . A . , . . .'. ......... . . .
sit-tentbs eeats.
Brporu Ortw Bapldly : !
, Our exports of augar have growa
vvtj riifiij uuring ina war, naring
been, In 1914, fifty million' pounda, in
1913, 530' millions, and la 1917 1230
million pounds, the value of the. ex
port increasing from less 'than $2,
000.000 in 1914 to ever $77,000,000 in
1917. Of the )250 million pounds ex
ported in 1917, 430 millions went to
Prance, about 130 millions 'to Great
Britain, fifty' millions to' Italy, 230
million to aeutrat Europe and about
150 million pounds to South America,
The world s chief producers of cane
sugar are Cuba, India, Java, the Ha
waiian and Philippine Inlands, and
Porta Rico; and the chief producers of
beet sugar are Germany, Buaaia, Aus
tria Hungary, France and the United
States. Cuba,' from which we draw our
chief Imports, is now the world's larg
et producer, her crop, in the sugar
year 1918-17 having been 6,730,000,000
pounds, India S(882,000.000, Java 3,
575,000,00), Hawaii 1,288,000,000, and
Porto Bice 1,006,000,000 pounds, while
Germany 'a beet ' sugar proddction it
1913-14 (the latest peace year), was
6,09.1 000,000, Bussia 3,808,000,000, Aus
tria Hungary 3,774,000,000, France, 1,
749.OOO.0o0, the United States in 1916
17 1,646,000,000 pounda of beet sugar
and 613,000,000 poanda of cane.
' The world 'a sugar production, as far
aa ran be statistically stated ws,s ia
1870 6,000,000,000 pounds, ia 1880 7,
000,000,0(t0, in 18W) 13,000,000,000,' in
1900 20,000,000,000, in 1910 33,000,000,
000, in 1914 42,000,000,000 and in 1917
37,000,000,000 pounds, this falling off
in 1917 being due to a reduction- of
product in the beet fields of the Euro
pean countries at war. Our own con
sumption haa about kept 'pace; with thia
rapid growth in world production, since
we eonsomed in '1870 twenty-three per
cent of the world 'a output and in 1917
twenty -one percent of the world 'a to
tal. : ;
Sugar Production of World ,' '
The table which fellows show the
quantity of sugar' produced in ; the
principal sugar-producing eouatrias of
the world in each sagar year from 1912
13 to 1916-17. The period of the year
in which sugar ia produced, of Course,
varies greatly; in the United State
from September' to January; in the
West Indies, January to June; in the
Hawaiian and Philippine Islands from
November to July; la Java from Hay
to November, India from .December to
May; Auatraiasia from June to Novem
ber; Egypt from January to June; ia
the beet area of Europe from December
to June. The figure presented are in
most eases those of total production,
though in a few instances' it ia only
practicable to show the quantity ex
ported. The chief exporting Countries
are Cuba, Santo Domingo, Porto Bioo.
Hawaiian and. Philippine Islands aaa
Java. Bussia, Germany and Austria
Hungary export a portion of their eropa
of beet sugar to other European coun
tries; practically none of the beet su
gar crop of Europe (which is normally
about one-half of the world 'a sugar sup
ply), paases out of that continent. Brit'
ish India, the second largest producer
of cane sugar, consumes her entire
crop. ' .
Production In KUlloa Founds V .' ;
1912-13 1913 14 191413 1915-16 1M6-1T
5,441 6,820 5,806 6,738 6,720
5,134
3.013
1,214
728
504
583
1,747
040
42X
79.'
1.044
NEW.ELiiCi.aCAL
PLANT IS HOT :
COMPANY'S FIRST
:'.. 1- fit . ii m
Purchased By t tTui Agricultural
Marks mere as a &ni Not. Bo
ginning of Its Electrification;
- Probably First In Field
,i Ms ill Agrictiltoral (1ominy I con
tract for electrical equipment marks an
increase in its electrical plants and la
not the first mechiuery of this type
wht a it nas installed. In fact Maui
Agricultural Company was probably the
first plantation in the Islanija o par-
Relative to the new contract and the
electrification of the mill, J. P. Poster,
factory superintendent for the rem
pany writes:' " . ,;
First To Electrify
,'To the beet of my knowledge, this
company waa the first ia the Territory
to electrify its factory, the electrifica
tion having tahen place in 1912, and
antedated by several years that of any
other factory la Hawaii. It may be
well at this time to state that there is
not a mill ia Hawaii which is electri
fied, aa the term ia ' voderatood else-J
where than In Hawaii. Such electrifi
cation as exists is an electriflVatioa of
the factory auxiliaries only, and ia no
case is even that complete. Mill elec
trification, as it ' is installed in Cuba,
means electrically driven mills as well
a small auxiliaries, '
Installed In ltia
"As stated above, electrification of
the Maul Agricultural Company's fac
tory ia so far aa any factory in Hawaii
has been electrified up to this time,
was accomplished in 1912, following im
mediately upon the installation of a
1000 K. W. hydro electric, plant Which
was put into operation on December
13th, 1912. At the same time there
waa installed a 125 K. W. unit in the
fa-rtorv, followed by a 500 K. W. unit
in 1015, and a 300 K. W. unit in the
earlv part of this year, making a total
of 25 JL.W. installed in the factory,
and a grand total of 1925 K. W. on the
plantation.i
present Increase Large
"The 750 K. W. unit which haa just,
been pan-baaed will, it is true, be; inV
tailed in a central power statioa at
the factory, but it has ' no relation to
the electri jlcatioa ' of the mill accom
plished five year ago. The electrical
rapacity of the central power station
will be 1675 K. W. with the addition
of the new unit, and the building will
be designed for future increases for the
same purpose for which the present in
stallation is made, vir, the electrifica
tion of the irrigation pumps.' With the
arrival of the additional unit just pur
chased,, the grand ' total of electrical
power on the plantation will be 2673
kw. ;
4-
GPP 55 YEAR 13
-ABOUT COMPLETED
5,123
2,91
1,093
784
347
307
1,165
847
437
806
1,060
594.
697
5,513
2,919
1,292
486
1,882
320
589
780
1,174
690
6,900 5,883
2,686 3,575
1,187 1,288
963 ? 1,006
38 1
607
1,872
190
.977
661
1,216
853
744
276
1,434
. U2t
907
560
1,172
838
.20,794 22,107 23,047 23,896 25,028
6120
4,301
3,100
2,193
672
710
1,39S
Total beet
V. 20,082
Total world production, cane and
beef.. ............... 40,876
6,0!.'
3,774
3,898
1,74
506
513
M7
19,934
42,063 '
5,606
3,588
4.4H2
679
457
676
1,47.
18,538
41,585
117510,671
.J.747 I- 1,646
13,103-1247
37,656" 8774.
SCHOHELD BARRACKS.
. TO GET PURE WATER
A rhlorlao Uab 1 to-be Installed
ot Schofield' Barracks , ia ' eon sect ioa
with the water system ia order to pre
', vent the danger of future typhoid out
' breaks. - A large number of eases have
' bcea reported at the port sinre the first
of October, and .the cause i supposed
to ;?ie la tl water fornlnhed to the
l'ower post, 'a no eases developed io
fbe upper cantonment,
The plant will be a temporary one
stid will et about 63000. By it the
rliloriwe will be fed automatically into
the ! water ia the prprtion of' two
pouiula to a million galUin. Authority
to. erest'the plant tecrivei) from
Washington ystrday by . Usut.-Ou).
liu limoriO jlc.A.. rs'iinll, dartmeal
' qiiarterir
riuni - v
rtalled
r
A
)(fuiil)'t rUrln
44000 will be n
4 1 . I
irnri
HOD
CAPTAIN "HARRY"
CELEBfiATES BIRTHDAY
When Mark Twain traveled from
Baa'FraneUee to Honolulu aboard the
steamer Ajax in 1806,. the third officer
was Captain " Harry ' Webb, . who
rebWated yetrlny hi seventy -firtt
birthday at-Washington Place. ; ',
Captain Webb was bora Jo Bangor,
Maine, and went to sea as a iad. Hi
wanderings finally brought him to the
flolden (late and 4n San Francisco hJ
became an officer on the tan.er Idaho
Mhich was among the first of the big
liner to sail at Honolulu: . He next
rent a)oard the Ajax. He b-ft this
vessel to enter the service of Kameha
meha V. He ha been a f riant of long
standing of Colonel Iuukea aud ba
been, resident at both Wasliingtou
l'ljiee. Md Queen' Waikiki beach
Louis for manja, yeara. Hi wife wa.
with the Queen on Hunday morning
when she passed away.
Grinding for the year is about over.
The breaking of the drought on the
Big Island, - followed by. abundant1
rains, allowed the resumption of flunk
ing cane- to the mills of thoeo com
panies that had been delayed oa their
grind by the drought. . As a result they
have finished grinding or about finished
in practically all instance ' ;.
. Wore interest - perhaps etch
ed to the finishing of th., ,.' nd
than to aty other 'Hawaii,-'... 'an.
At the agency of the plantiii.i ) -r-i-r-day
it was said that grindii V ti
going on throughout the ivcik, vne
atarted iust aa soon as the fo.'i. t a
been full enough and it w' ttin-vcf
the grind was finished for tile t-.'r r
would be finished withia the inv.r
days. Letters expected Saturd A' l,Q.l 1
tell pf thia. J
On Maul there have been no big
rains but there is now sufficient vrkter
IrJ streams and flumea to cart for all
necessary irrigation ao the drought on
that Island may be aaid to be at aa
end.
SHIPPING QUESTION JS. . . j
BOTHERING PLANTATIONS
How the next' crop is to be moved
is the ehief source of anxiety to the
plantation agencies in Honolulu. With
grinding of this year 'a crop about over
and very little still remaining un
shipped, they are facing the problem
of 'next year with very little informa
tion at their disposal of what may . be
expected. . V '.' : .,
Beeent newspaper "reports oa ' the
mainland said that seven Alaaha packer
yeaeela were to be given . over to the
l-earrying of the 19)4 sugar crop from
uawau. xc uavejop that J1 of such
craft are sailing vessels, se it is said,
and that the shippers face long delays
in marketing In consequence. These
vessel are reported to be of about
3000 tons. With the Hatsoa linera off
and with the Americas Hawaiian
steamers off, these seven, sailing ves
sels would require considerable help to
move the 1918 erop even-though it will
ba materially smaller than this year's
crop.
But it ia said that the best informa
tion obtainable ia Honolulu: is to tha.
effect that there will be only four ftci)
yessela in Honolulu service.
' I'rom other source it is (earue that
there ia a promise of tome other steam
ship to help move he crop, but such
inforniHtiop is sot ijefiuite and it ' ia
largely because of the uncertainty that
the plantation agents are the more
aaxiou. .
. Tlj)r )iaalMen a big gain in the ton
rag of sugar beet in the United
States on the October estimate. It i
low believed that the tonnage will 1)
7.'I0,IHH) too. The December estimate
last year wn- 6,00,000. ton.' t'allforr
nia iHtimated her touuage laat pocetji
ber st 1,463,000 toon, but it will total
1,700,000 too.
'i Help D To I
'" -M il
I,,avc,Sc :A.fJ
Anguished' Mother
Mrt,.AIice D'odd,. Mother of First
American Boy To Fall With
Pcrshino'$ Army, Acts As Red
Btpotfcd American Woman
"Ood help me to be , brave," wtir
th.e sobblpg woci of Mr. Alice Podd,
mother of James Uresbam, the first
.)mericni bpj Jo sjied Jilj blood InJhc
Unrnif rerahint's troop, when told of
the death of her on,'! , " " ' ' ""
Tl. ...'.. ILi nW I. .1 !J KIH. ' Jt.'
logue that wa enacted when' a ic
imper n ufifolded tho ' sad tale' I
told, in the following clipping, dated
i ' Mr; Alice podd nd not been a'otf
ficd tiy tlie ifovcnirocot that her boi',
Jhrne1 Oirsdam, twenty-three, Wst'tlie
flrat to his blood fpr Aoicrka aa
a 1nm('r of Pcfs.hlng'l trooper. Hh I
wis' bemfirtg iivrr 'a iiil tul it her
Jlttle home, No. 007" liemch avenue,
,yoii,Vre the mother of James' 0r'
t.
ham, t ho bov 'who 'i fighting in
rraadefahe was halted. : ' '
VT,.indped," and the answer camp
promlly." ' ' ; " '
'VVclVX would Ji'k to have on of
bis photoarsph."
, "Whyt" .be .ake,i:r: v'. rti "!
! Tbe reporter told her h wanted it
fp pot la' the paper r ' "
.She talVed glibly' about' her aoVai
eh looked ihrough' pile of phot o-
'raphs aeekihg one of hi. He hid
olned Vbe army 'fonr years ago, "trhe
raid; 'Ha wag' under Mge, but she sign
ed (he papers for ,nim.' ' Tea, ah? ws
proud of him. of , course ' ., '
'"''And wouldn't -;vuny mother
Wouldn't vpii--be glad If "that toy.
rrre the'firat. thrf'Verv firL"to'1
his life for 'the ciiiae an'd his country f '
continued the' riewnpaper msh'.' . :. 1 '
"tes," she" ssiu. and looked up with
a bright eye and 6 smile.
And thenthe litfht died out of her
eye and the smile faded. o ' V'
wOreal Ood," she eried. "It'a not
my boy that's dead!" '.
There, were just two sentences tha
framed themselves .out ' of the babble
of her words that followed. One waa.
"Ood, help me to be brave, " and the
other. "Will . they bring his body
hornet" .-..''" 1 " ..
The Ust time Mrs. t)odd saw James
was three years ago.'., But he wrotf
every week' and oftener. In her hand
she Clutched a little silk handkerchief
embroidered in gay-colored . floes, a
souvenir of France, the last gift James
had sent before h went into the
trenches.
'Yiea,' he 'a hero, and for hie' sake
I ought ;t. le brave, . but I 'm hot a
hero,. I'm luat a no'.hor.",igLed the:
woman. I And'the .reporter' Wondered
which was the greater hero, James or
his mother.
r : : i' . " ' '. '. i 1 i
Mrs. Stokes TeJIs In .Report of
Christmas Contributions
." V ..'" ' .v ; ' . ' ' ' . ' :: ' " ':
A report of the' contributions, gift,
and expenditures for the Christmas box
for tha Bt. Louis bovs has been handed
iq by Mrs. J. V. O. Htokes. who had the
work ia charge. - The statement, which
was sent to Mrs. Henry M. Damon, fit
the Bed Cross Auxiliary, itemise re
ceipts of 1117-15, aad give aa account
o the expenditure of thia sum. -
A number of gifts were bought, some
of which were directed , to the boys
whose friends had " not remembered
them by sending gift far the box: The
boxes, of which there, wera, four and
a guitar rase, were taken to Ban Fran
cisco free of charge by (he.Matson
Company. The freight across the con
tinent for tha 1009 pounds aent was
638.53. .. .-. ...
Mrs. Stokes spent several' days of
strenuous effort in taking in the gift
for the bbxes, shopping-, for the ones to
be bought, and packing the huge ease
ready for their long shipment. There
were so few day in which to get in
the gifts' aud aend them away that Mr.
Btoke worked nearly twenty five hour
out of . twenty four during the days of
reparation; ' If It kJ not been .for
iss Berniee, Cook And all the other
kind . friends who. o willingly helped
by contributing money and gift nd
hours of work. Mra.v8tokos would not
have been able to get the box off in
time to guujden the -Cbrlstmss day of
those hosie-loving Island boy,' and she
say so while thanking them ia ber report-
' ' . ' ,'V-' ;
MANY ENLISTED f.i ,
AREJBTAINED
A "much larger group of enlisted mch
than eatne to the first social attended
tb second loclal of the women's soci
ety of Centra) Union Church last eve
ning. These socials are monthly affair
which will be continued during ': the
winter. ' - ' '
' The program, ' whkh occupied tl)6
fi rat part of the-evening included solo
by Mr. George Tackabur, accom
panied by Mine Alice Harrison, and
comic songs, by 0. L. Bergman, whoa
accompanist was Mia' ' Helen ;. Oraea
Cadaian. Mia Forterfleld, instructor
ia ex iireaion p Oabu College, - gave
several readings. .The mjn 's quartette
of the church sang "Over, There", anil
tU aofdier. guests added a vera! fea
ture which were enthusiastically ao
plauded. Kefreahmeiit were served in
the parish house after the program.
C-.rrrTr. If"
FLiih,ilEliL.,iLl
Pineapple Preserving Plant
Forced By Shortage of Labor
To Employ Women
A
"'Femal' labor at meoli warfe on a
rount of the rigrnc'ir of the war bt to
bo the "policy of the Hawaiian freamv
Ing Company,, one of the biggest pine
apple canning concerns In the Terri
toryand which employs a a rule 00
maa and 200. women at ita plant. : . :.
!!Thrf "dhift' trnd-- the Waiiibinent 'oV
the ' National fluar.J 'hfc depleted " the
male labor of the cannery and lb order
that thd 0Hratirni Of th'raanery be
not upendfld, 8nperiritndent ' X " I
Fraiwir ha decided to replace men. who
have' been working for him' and who
have been 'rallH to the.aorvice of their
tWiitry; wilfc'Women.,
PomforM Provided 5 '"'' vr!
III' coiiforhianc with this noliv overV
effort poHHihle h t'eeq msile fo 'secure
tha' roinfort of the woihoo who will
work in the cannery, and aim) of their
Children. ' " , : ; ' ;
tosi rouii a teen 'prepar'eir ' U
which the Women piny leave their cHjl
droit during the hour of Inbor,'. and j
there will in addition be a creche' rtro-
videl for, the very amal) children, i,
whirji they ma'y'trbmp and Jumble to
their hearts' content.' '-A' matron will
b in cliargfl of both the reat rgom and
the ctmhe. , . , ." ,.: ''
Women, Workeri'will be given fifteen
minute, rest between the jiour of ten
and ten thjrty o'clock' In the ntornintf
and .three, aud three thirty1 bVlock In,
the afternoon in which .to. attend to'thft
feerling pf their1 offspring, jnd no time
will be ( de4uctef y the management
for'thfr InterOiiagioo. .
SafiiUUoa a ractoy-'"-- , ' "' rw-
Banitjir condition 6 Ahe'. factqry
have been gone tiver and, made' aa con
venient and excluaive' a posaible And
everything has been and wiH be done
to make the women workers as comfort
able and well guarded aa possible.
Superintendent , Fraser -etated last
night that he. would be glad if the
women of the city who are interested
ia social welfare would visit the can
nery, -pei under what conditions the
women are working add make sugges
tion tending to betterment, if possible.
The Hawaiian , Preserving. Company
has been operating for ' the ' past five
years and during all this time has set
4 high .mark ae regards the surround
ings of Us help. "
' ''The courts have criticised the pine
apple canneries," said Superintendent
leaser, last night, "but I have been In
the canning business for the pant five
.years and I want to say that I have
never aeen anything la connection wttn
the conduct of local canneries which
was in any way 'detrimental to "the
labor employed whether It were men ori
roaipa. 1 reel, however, that where
women labor is concerned the surronnd-
ings should lie made as pleasant and
sate-guarded as possible and that is
why onr company is going the limit in'
arranging for the welfare of women
laborer, without vwhom we should be
hardly pressed to keep thing going.'.
T
RUSTEES EXONERATE
ROEHL AND HOSPlM
Say Charges Preferred By Mrs.
Moe Were Not rpwQ ,
The report of the committee appoint,
rd.by l'rasidcnt Oeorge W, Hmith with
th approval of the truatee, to inquire
Into the charges preferred against the
Queen's Hoapitsl and ' Superintendent,
Werner Vochl, by Mrs. William Moe,
w l)o prior to her discbarge, was head
nurse, has been completed, and it i the
expressed bolicf of the committee that
the evidence gathered in the Inveatiga
Hon which, haa been under Wy sine
July will, hardly auvtain the, chargr,
The report is jgned Ytf-Henry Home,
F. J. Uwrey, A. F. Judd and W. )I. Me
Inerny, life member of the board of.
truaieea',' .': '. '"..; ,,.,': '''
Following her discharge from the hos
pital, Mrs, Moo charged the institution
witfe furniahipg .supplies to the former
German gunboat ,Goier, abd dlcrimina
tiou gsiaat the' I'niled Hate frmy
uniform by Nuperinteudent Boeht. ' '
At regard the first charge, the com-,
rait tee' expressed '-'the opinio? tha( it
wa not auatained, for' it wa ' found
that any food that might bV ben
used for different purposes 'was not is
exrens of the reasonable requirements
of Mr. aad Mrs.' Boehl. The - charge
that the sailors of the Ueier had, been
supplied from the hospital stores was
considered entirely without foundation,
' As regards the charge of discrimina
tion against the uniform,' the commit
tee Is of the opinion that If any were
liown, If wsa by-'.Mrs. V Moe' own
friend.' "fbe frankly admits," iays
the report," that when' her - huabund
called upon her at the hospital be never
appeared in uniform." .' v . ,
. . ... .
Mrs;
Regrets Death
Of Liliodkalani
WP
Mr. Jack London ba not forgotten
the love of her husband for Hawaii
and Queen Llliupkalani, for Jack
often a visitor at Washlngto Flaee
and delighted in conversing wit Her
Majesty. A toon a the news of the
Queen' death reached Olea Ellen, Mr,
f.ondon nt th. following message, to
polouel Iai4ks: '
"i'lfsae accept and extend to Ha
waii aad the luwaiiun toy profound
tegiet and sympatby.'f
BllilllHlEIGIIt
.V'.; ''' '"''"' easManaaBaa - , y
Seven Ad-Steel Sailing Vessels
Enter . Matsort Service -Until
Needed for Alaska Pack . ,
Seven of the big "Alenka Faelera
have been turned over to fbe'MaUon
Navigation Company by the t'nltcd
State Shipping Board to take the place
Of . the Itctim; tarrief' MAtil, Mtoni
and 'wtlhelmina which have jbeen mln
niandcercd and Vhich '.tra expected to
an ifito Attnutia acrvice sooii. ace.,rl-
ing to word received by Matnori onq..'M
bow 'in the. city by ha vloat, niail. : v
, Theaji .veaaols ..'af 4fllL'' square ViggeTi
with 'an average, deadweight rapacity
of 3000 tons, 'Jhe ihipv which are all
htrrl and .which, in ,kl BicsourJ, will
revive Ithi daja before steam crowded
thf ; numerous sail from, the' It arbor,
yre: j ne cuar or t jnianrj. jeiar ni tag
land, Jtsr . of 'Buaaia. Star Italy.
Star, of Scotland, Star of Alka and
C4.."r r..t.A -i " 'rr, ' ,
'.Tbew biir snilinc' veipcli will be uae.t
to serve the .Islands 'pnder pfiafter to
the Matson cotnbsnv until anch time a
they are' Seeded to gq north,"'fpr thf
salmon, pack next year'. lender, winter
cqnciMfuqs, wpicn are more, pf less un
c.crtaia at. to tra.Jji. wind,,- the his
ah n il(l 1 be' able '. to', make ..the yoyage
oii o.aoout.iiipcn, oaya na return
is about twenty tliree diivs., ''.:
.. Tt lv thought here that these Boiling
vesacla i"3 be ; ))lb', for,' the 'wreeenf,
o.l,K '..l.J-k. '.A ' Jl Ml
V available, to en'rc.for the ,imncdiate
need prj'thfl JsUdd'e. By. tbt time
these snips, are' needed for the Alaska
pack,' It' is thought' the shipping board
Will hve th0 freight aha passenger sit
uation sn well in hind that's satisfac
tory arrangement can be made with lit
tle difficulty. , ,;
rrrrrmr. .
'i r- r j, -
HC::CLULU STCC:c EXCIUf.'3E
t
it i tri
ML PAY II m
K
ft i t' : v- -''fs- m '.: a i ' r ?
Wairuna Sailed From Bydney
and Never Heard Of
''' " ' naaaBMBaBBBBsai " - V ' ''' '
. When' the Ventura, arrived in San
Francisco oa her last voyage, e11 Cali
fornia Street waa set oa edge over the
report by ship's officers that insurance
on the .VTuion steamer Vairuna bow
several months overdue, 'will ' be paid
under the war risk ' clauae, according
to recent mail advice rem tha Coast.
Much wa the. decision of a board ia
New; Zealand which had spent .muck;
nme in- investigating tnui oaue.vo w-,'
' Another story was circulated to th
effect that the ' Union : freighter Maio
tuaga which left Sydney fpr Baa Fran
cisco last June,, had not been heard of.
She sailed seven weeks after the Wai
runa and neither one. haa "bee a sight
ed since departure from the Antipodes.
v : s -,; ' . . ' : ; ' ?.
WALKOUT
DEIAYS
LOGAN'S DEPARTURE
Deck and Engine Room Officers
: Demand More Pay .. t
'Just, about 'two. minute before the
transport Logan wa due to sail frdm
San Francisco,' the deck ahdengine
ropfn officers walked ashore and refuse;!
to sail, claiming they were not being
paid according to the schedule of the
Masters, Mate and Pilots' Association
recognlxed by private corporation v
, 'Woetber or not the. men were glvep
the schedule which they felt should pt
adopted, by the government could not
bo iperned here. However, the. Itgan
was delayed in San Francisco ' but , a
few hour, the' men returning to their
position ftcr conference with the
secretary of the.' association'.. . ,
: TROOPS BELIEVED..
v; .. ' ' , . '' i
The - troop of the , Jfith Infantry
whlclj have been on guard at ' Fear)
Harbor, Fort Armstrong, and the Ka:
boku wjrclesa atation ' have . bees .re
lieved UH(er order of Brigadier-Gfin-eral'
John P. WiaaeV by detachment
of the First Infantry. The change was
made Teter'day.,'.' , '. ";' ,;" '' ,:, '
Twq officers and sixty-live mea' are
sent to Fort Armstrong 'and the r
mainder of a company to the wireless
tatton. A daily guard of ix non
eommjssloned officer and sir private
are on duty at the pumping plant in
Moanalua and the water' tanks at Salt
Lake crater. Two eompkniea are cent
to Fear) Harbor for guard duty.
; 4 . t a. t i. v . , . i j
. UNLISTED SECURITIES
Honolula, Novutr W, I01T.
MEItC'AJtTII.W :
Alet. A Hiildwtu, l.til. ..
C. Wrewer Co.
y- ; 'kuoAB i - .'.
E'o-a rinntntloh CO.', v..
Ilalka Humr t. . ......
l Ar. Co.
iu.' .! n. ro: ,
n. Murni' o. ,
Ilonokaa Hnsar To. ....
tlfinmnii MufrHr 'o. .. ...
Ilittrhlmton .Snwr P. Co.
Kahnku 'Clsntatlon l'0 .
Krkaba Humr to. ......
1. ..I U .. . . 1
.MrlirjMl Hue. Co., Ltd. ..
Olsa Huir. Co., l.tJ. ....
Onomea Hn. Co
rasuhaii rtuaar I'tant. I'o,
rarloe Hoswr Mill .......
Hut I'lsDUtlnit Co .,
rfweir.ro Hiiih tJo.- i.
f'loueer kf Ml Co. a 4...i.
Paa rarlo MDllr i'o. ..
Watelua . A(rrb'Ultrai Ue.
W alluku Euk. t o. . .....
, nSCRtXANKQC ,':
Kndnn rxret. Va.. t.t . . .
im. iiwue ahwm, irrm ru
VJ Iiikiic Paid I n ......
lift
.114
IBTe
2
ail
1R4
an
'JO
to
U
m
Itnlku K Co I'M.
fHilks P.- f. ., Com
Haw. Cou. Hy. ......
Uaw. t'on. Kr. f H. ...
1 la wall t'on. Hr. Con,,,.
Hawaiian. Weenie Coy ...
Haw. !'liiei)ils Co. t ...
Iln. R. ft Mt I'o I.tit .
Honotnla ian Co.. Ltd. ,.
Hon, H. T. h. Co.
Inter-latnne U N. Co. ...
Mutual 'lelenbone t'o. ...
Kakw allwy 4, Umt Co.
i-apana Kiimier Co.
Helwsa-DinillnK. INI.
Ha ma 4MrY. f.h ...
Tsujouc UUt fiulilw C.
. ' ' . BOSl ' ' '
tlewchiWark t.- p. H
llainakiM dltj'li ('.. Oh..
Hawaii Cua. Kvv Srt..,-..
Hawaiian Ire. Co., 4a ....
Haw, Ter4t Bef. 11KXJ
llaw Ter. 1, Pntv. Ini'M.
Haw. Tar. Pnh, Imp. 40fe
(aerie inia iftim
Haw. Terr l VAfr ..i ...
iru ia cw.. Ltd,' ,..
Honolula Us -Co., Ltd M
naoai nr. Co.. . ....
Manoa tmt. Ilat. 6l,
McBryite fngnt Co., Aa
Mutual Tel. us . ......
Uahu R. L. Co.. B
Oahti gucnr Co.. IT,
IKWleemaOle at JOB at
matiiritrl
Ola a bui. Co.. Vfr .....
Kacinc unanw K. Co.. B
Psclfle Hasac MUI IV.
8aa Carlo Mill. Co.. .
a
20
1"'A
o
.2
inu
140
175
1!V
i:w
18M,
10
WW
mti
IOI
100
WW
n
SO
JT.1
oV
04
lOL'vd
10H4
10(1 fZ
100
104 I
i '!
11
DO
im i
loo
104 ' I
101
T3"'
. . i
IK
IV.-i "
40
a.
! H
03
a
"i" "i
'.'.'.'.I i'.V.l
' aawaao
40
18 1
.V.'.'. '56' V
l.-.tv.
t :-1
..I..
100
100
v ' BETWEEN BOARDS
' Olna, 00, .00;. Oshu, 40,' an.Sft "':
,'.. BOAK RALRH '-
HoUokaa. IS. 4.M: Kwa. 2L "O Vlf II 11
ft M. Co.. 5. IR I214. . . . f
ri v8UOAa QUOTATIONS
' , .y. '"A September rt. 01T.
snwlfals beet inn sdricesK ,
Parity- , ,
W Ceat. rfnr Hawaiian ancariO 0.110
..,. RLBOKB gi OTATlONS '
'.'.' '... ' ' KnrnnihM T lfttT. f
Rlnsnpor , ... i..v..,.. MOO
new xorx . v... WLoo
.. nTVTTIT! vrta . .
k'' .. : November 13, 10IT. 1 -
! Hawaiian Suicsr .. .:...........'.....' t .t
04iu . , 'jgt
Walalna .'..-..... -.aw
O. U. U Co. ..,,.,,KW
I NEW YORK STOCKS
XKW YOltK; Naveailier 0HBr Awi
la ted Prenal Kullowlne are the oiienini
and cliwlnx qiiounlonn ot ibovks lu ttiu '
V L. . I . . . - ...
Amriicao Musar Upt. . ....
Aiueiii'au Itt-'t
AMMf-lare4 till
Alaaka Hold .
AiuertraM LoronintlTe . ..,
Amertc-an Tot. ft TL
Ainerb'aa Hmelter . .......
AmericwB Ntrvl fdrjr. . ,.,
Anaconda I'opiwr
Atchtana Rallwa . .......
Ilalla. Lovotnutlv
Mb IH mora ft Ohio . .......
Ilcthlehn tel "tl" .
California IVtroleuiu ......
ijeotraf Leather-,
Ca nail Ian I'ailflc .
(vu. l jw
Cuto. Fuel ft icon .
Crw-tMe Plod .
Cuba nnr. Han . ........
Krt wimmim ,.
erl Ktnetrli- .........
!enersl Motors (ucw) . . ,,
liyat Northers) iifl.. r. . ,
inlernatloual Paper . .....
imiiMtrlal .eutu . ..v....
Hennecott Coicr .
t.ehiirh' VMvj ItnUroad . ..
New York 1 'entral .
I'eiuiMyivairt 1 ' , . ,
ltr Couw.lklatcd .. .
kcailln; nmiiuna .
HqpXblic Jnn couiuiigt .. .,
Houthurn -Paclnv ,
Ktnilebsker V ,
Teaaa int. .
l ulled uch Rublter . ...
t'aton l"cne .
t'ullad Ktulo Htect .......
t'tall ..........,.....,
Western Vukm ;
WeatluirLoaee . . . j. .
'..'-:, .!
70
SUV,
1U1
IWIVs
H
W4
Mi
01
m
:io!4
Kh
074
AH
Jl
7
10
Ml
:ia.
ixi
'
.s
. 7..
Kl
a
48 V,
107 V,
T1
OS
54
'(.
MUX.
M'l
77
, 1
W.iVi
il
:ti4
lit5
R'l
(Tk
2.".
100
a'i
31
U7',
47
XI U
07 Vi
Wl
ftl',
1.1.1
,i7
SAI FR4NCI5QO. QUOTATIONS
1 SAK PUANCIHCO, tNnwmlMr 1(W(Aho
etated Prawi) Kotlowlu are the oiieuluit
cIomIuk quotatUina of aiiasr and other
ato-ka-la the Kau Fraucbco market yes-
tM : -.. ;
' &TOOM ' ' ? .-
. : f t
..'..'.. ' i : 1
' "' '1' ' 1 1 I '11 i" j 1 1'1' n.'ia 1 I'M
. ." ''' . OIL ' '" .i ' ' . J(
lloa. Coq. (HI S. SO 4 00 S.IK)
" uiNi.sa ;'.''
w
bMi)
Knieelx 'per: . .... 1.00 . J.Ml 5.W
Miuaral Product '. , .07 i.OO' .00'
Mnuntatn Kiaa OA. ,M .07'
lontaua Hlanlvaio .. .40 .
Mader Mllu M M i .HO
. bai.kh . , , '".
Manara Mold, Woo, ate: 4110 XSr( IlltO,
.V.c'. Mintu BIiikIiu. mjO, Aoc. Muulalu
KIllK. ,IMI. lc: llnpiHqlu Oil, 40(1, U.lH;
Knuela Copper, 12, 5.SO, -.... .
Ilaw'n Com'l Hugai' . ...
Hawaiian Hiigar Co. ..
Honokaa Hucar . ......
Kutcliliiaoa' tiHKr Co. ,
Kllauea '.,...........
Oahu Bnxar Co. .......
Knrla L'ti , . . , . .. .
tniomea HiiKar Co. ,
(Ilaa uar Ca. . ......
Paauhau Siinar Co.. ,..,
Iloaoiulu Oil .........
HoooliUu a'laptaUon , ..
Oimo-Itit
4l'
1 "
X0
isaI
Clua-lua
'34
9
28
0V
1:::
61
.I8V1
t.....
AH
; tKl WWnd.
- 1U nqoota..,
NEW YORK. pUR.B STOCKS
Quotation, en the followtna New fork
enrb Htocka, vkreleHN to Th Adver-
tlaer kr Bloueuam ft Co., ami
MtK Ilsa!
Caledoula . .
Utuma Ciniper
tiarKraTfw .
Irolu UIonnoiu
Jerome-Verde , ..
Jlin liutter . ......
Harb..
Mother Iide . ...
Ky lleixiile
Iteftrue Kill . V.
Hes Con. ., .......
Hllver KiiiK Coin. ,
Tnnish Kxtenxlon
TiKilniune . , .,; .. ,
WMhert . .........
Itli hiiioiul Cniier
Knrs Lake ... . .
i Mliplnxuill
Wedne
.V,
.7.
.OS i
.XI
3.1H
,'
soo
1.IMH
i.-js
.0
.1J
4 71,
rA . . . 4 T
T.ia
Yater-
duy
l.:t7i4
'." .42
, .4.1
.7.1
.74
:H
, .10
.07
IMS)
I .Ml '
1.2.1 .
.12Vi
4.7.1
4 TVi .
4HU
It
It
1
f

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