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The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, March 05, 1918, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1918-03-05/ed-1/seq-1/

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LATEST CABLED SUGAR QUOTATIONS
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HONOLULU HAWAII TERRITORY, . TUES
MARCH 5
SEMI-WEEKLY.
WHOLE NUMBER 4718
1
r
:. ' wmi mi 1 1 IMIW t 1 1 I I ll l til ' I I 111! ! I
OPERATIONS GROW
luMORF.-SIfiNIFir.ANT
OE BIG OFFENSIVE
1
AotfvUieft Intthtlfy Generally
" vAlohg -Wettern Front and
America Sectors Won Than
Usually Buiy for Twenty-four
.HouriJ-;:;---, ' ; r
UNITED STATES LOSSES
WARE BECOMING HEAVIER
French Carry Out Successful Sur
; prise' Attack " While In Pales
tine- General Allenby Achieves
- s$tiil Further Successes
W ASHINGTON, March 5
,? (Associated Press)
Operations. all along the western
front ire; daily growing in extent
and in importance clearly indi
eating the approach of some great
offensive movements. Trench
raids jgrbw . larger daily and one
by. the French forces yesterday
closely approached a battle in its
magnitude.
The American front is no ex
i option to fhis rule of added act
. ivity and the official report from
the war "department last night
told yesterday, had been one of
unusual activity in the American
sectors. .NigM as well as day
was proceeding' and for twenty
lour, hours there had been little
or nd intermjssipn. . '
. . 'Pencra) Trshin esterday re
v Pprt)J ji W news' pf .pnt lieutenant
f'a and nhe jprjVatea.vvho had "been
Ttillcn-ctiwn'necptain,'qne
r ltenant efcl P1
iy wouqded and men slightly
wounded.vtne' -list .covering the
casualties suffered last Friday. .
It is learned the prisoners
claimed to have been taken by the
Germans in the Chemin des
Dames sector were probably
members of a patrol of thirteen
reported missing for no Ameri
can prisoners were taken in any
of the attempted German raids on
the American trenches.
MEN REWARDED
Premier Cletnenceau visited the
American troops and reviewed
the soldiers who on Friday re
pulsed the German attack.
The famous French statesman
met General Pershing and Amer
ican officers and privates distin
guishing themselves in the sharp
fighting northwest of- Toul were
given war crosses in the presence
of the premier.
Premier Cletnenceau expresses
himself as satisfied that the
Americans are able to hold their
own in the new trench warfare.
SURPRISE ATTACK
Successful carrying out of a
surprise attack by the French I
east of the Meuse was told in the '
official despatches of Paris last
night. This occurred at Calonne
and penetrated .the German
trenches to the fourth line. The
advance was along a front of 1200
meters and penetrated the enemy
line to ' a depth of 600 meters.
Boche prisoners to the number of
more than 150 were taken.
ALLENBY ADVANCES
General Allenby's report to
London said his forces had ad
vanced north of .Jerusalem along
a twelve-mile front to a maximum
depth of 3000 yards overcoming
a strong resistance. His army is
now astride the Jerusalem-Nabu-lus
road.
MANY GERMANS ARE TO
LEAVE THE PHILIPPINES
MANILA, Mareh 4 (Associated
Press) Many Gersssns who ksvs been
in the employ ot Americans sere and
who have bees discharged will be de
ported from the Philippines, Thar are
to be taken oat o the aeit transport.
Prbhibitionists
Hay Determine On
Disbanding Party
, CfHIOAOO, March 6 (Asso
dM4 . Press) Whether the Na-
Uonai Prohibition Fatty will
maintain its separate political en
tity .wider which it has t ought
tha Uqicr traffic for many years
r wlU merge with a proposed
niw party la the question which
la to be determined hero today at
taa eaatwnftlon of the Prohibition
iwtrty,.
zfaUtlon preraUed last
sight, fudging from tha expres-.
toa of delegates to tha Prohibi
tion ceamtlon that tha decision
wlU 1m to disband and to nniU la
tha nsw Nationalist Party which
will open Its conrentioo on Wed
nesday. The plans for the Nationalist
party ttiwo from the outset looked
for tha wpport of tha old Prohl
.tntian party. Tha now party
wold anlto with the Prohibition,
lata la securing he adoption of
tha natton-wlde prohibition eotv
atltatlOBal convention la tha
rloos . ttatos starting campaigns
for tha adoption at aa early data.
Many prohibitionists last night
ozproaaod tha belief their caaao
coald h farthered bettor by this
coarse.
STRONG
IRELESS
' vnw pitv
111 11L.1I lUIAIAUII!
t-
mw IS SEIZED
Apparatus Strong Enough To
..Communicate With Germany
' Found In Tower Office
OWNED BY FORMER
SAYVILLE MANAGER
Pfund Resisted Taking Over of
'.German Plants Months
Ago By United States
NEW YORK, March 5 (Associated
Press) -Strong indications of the ex
istence of a German source of informs
ties., right in the heart of the business
district were fouad in a raid which was
Sarrted to a successful conclusion here
yesterday. In an office high up in the
tower Of a Broadway skyscraper the
secret service men fonnd a wireless out
fit .which was strong enough to com
moaleate with Germany direct. At the
samt time they arrested Richard
Pfana.
'.Pfund was in possession of the office
and be claimed o be in the employ of
the navy. It was verified that he hss
been doing some work for the United
State navy but the arresting officers
and United States officials decline to
make any statement.
, Before. tha war Pfund was the man
ager of the Telefnnkan Company's
plants at Bayville and Tuckerton and
when the United States took over snd
closed those plants ha resisted the ac
tion strenuously.
'
ALLIES
WILL ASK JAPAN TO
PROTECT THEIR INTERESTS
IN SIBERIAN TERRITORIES
Ib
OLSHEVlST commander in chief of the armies who ordered
suspension of hostilities against German armies. He held
the low rank of ensign in the Russian navy and is usually called
Ensign Krylenko. He was transferred to the army and so far at
is known held no rank until the. revolution.
-
FEDERAL COURT IS
NOT FOR BRIBERS
Ninety-nine Indicted In Cinciib
V'atti Case Win NoLHav ?t ;!
WAfillrNdTbN. March aW(Ajeoela-
ied Press) Federal eoufts have no jur
isdiction over charges of bribery. The
punishment for the offense lies within
the province of state courts. This was
the burden of a decision handed down
by the United States Supreme Court
yesterday.
The decision rendered yesterday was
handed down in the "Cincinnati Elec
tion Fradds Case." Ninety-nine de
fendants were Indicted on bribery
charges and demurred to the complaint
claiming lack of jurisdiction in the
federal eourta. The appeal was carried
to the Hupreme Court and tinder the
opinion rendered yesterday the defend
ants will not have to stand trial.
-v,tyHy--'y. SK tj
r e V ' .-1 ' . '
S 4 .-u's '.',X'V "
X '' Vi'.W i Km
. .ll
To
GERMANY BOUND TO
HOLD
TO
BELGIUM
Would Only Discuss Giving Up
After Being Forcibly Evict
ed, Says Zeitung
AM8TEBDAM, March 5 ( Assoc iat
ed Press) "Decision as to when peacn
negotiatiou Shall begin rents more with
President Wilson of the United States
than with the Eutente Allies or any of
their leaders," is the expressed opin
ion of the Frankfurter Zeitung in coin
menting ou the recent speech of Bui
four the text of which has reached Ber
lin. The editorial regards the tone of
Balfour's speech aa moderate but It
says that Oermany will never consider
or discuss seriously the evacuatiou of
the territory it has acquired in Bel
gium or making any reparation to Bel
gium until she has been forcibly evict
ed from those lands.
WILL BE ROUNDED UP
WA&HWOTON, March 4 (Asso
elated Press) A round-UD hss been or
dered of all the alien enemy disturbers
in tbe raomo Norm west.
These persons are spreading the doc
trines of and encouraging sabotage and
anarchy. The department of labor is
in charge of tbe round-up and has or
dered that aliens preaching these sedi
tioua doctrines, whether members of
the I. W. W. or not, be confined for de
portation.
WOMEN WILL APPEAL
WAPHINOTON, March 5 (Associa
ted Press) In tbe local eourt of ap
peals yesterday the conviction of the
l women who picketed the White House
in the campaign for woman suffrage
was reversed.
In this rase the women went to jail
in most instances, in some they carried
on hunger strikes and they won an ap
peal which restored them to a jail from
tha cleaner quarters to which they had
been sent.
Slayer Alleges Ran She Shot Had
RirlnerJi Lffek Rv . Tallinn
lzzJj Dfamainrv Stories. ,
" ' ' ' S'Sjn y-y S., I
, VXtl AM A, "California, March 5 (As
soelated Press) la a court room that
waa crowded sad contained more than
a amattering of women there was
started yesterday a trial which prom
ises t& be the most sensational that has
ever beea held in Visalia. Mrs. Orlean
B. How was brought into eourt, the
preliminaries quickly ended and the
work Of selecting a jury given a good
start before adjournment was taken.
Mrs. Orlean B. Howe, thirty five
yeara --old, was arrested following
the shooting of Will H. Brooks, a Por
ter villa, California, orange grower, in
tha lobby of a Porterville hotel the af
ternooa Of November 19, 1917. She
was charged with murder. When ques
tioned immediately after the shooting
by the sheriff, into whose custody Mrs.
Howe gaVe herself, she is alleged to
have said; "He ruined my life."
Story of Shooting
Brooks was seated in the lobby of
the hotel talking with several friends
and acquaintances when shot. Three
bullets took effect one of them passing
through his heart. He fell forward
from the chair dead.
Tha State will seek to show that
Mrs. Howe left her apartments shortly
after aoon on that day and went to a
sporting goods store where she pur
chased a heavy caliber automatic re
volver Which she asked the clerk to
load for her. It is then contended that
she went to the hotel, entered the lobby
and Bred four shots at Brooks from a
distance of four feet.
Her Husband's Friend
After Mrs. Howe was put in jail she
made a detailed statement In which
she dated tbe inception of her alleged
trouble with Brooks aa eleven years
sgo. At that time, she said, Brooks
and her husband W. C. Howe, were in
timate friends. They had grown up
together. Shortly after hef marriage,
Mrs. HowO said she accepted a dinner
nvitatioa from Brooks. They went to
l well kaown Ban Francisco cafe. At
the close of tbe meal, she declared, he
insulted her. She refused his advances
and, she said, a few days later Brooks
went to her husband with the first of
a series: of stories which reflected on
her morality. These stories, she said,
were told by Brooks, not only in San
Frsnoiseo but in Los Angeles and other
parts of the State where she had ac
quaintances, with the result, accord
ing to the Story, that she was shunned
by former friends.
Heart Old Btortee
Mrs. Howe is the owner of an orange
grove near Porterville, to which .prop
erty she gave her attention during a
portion of the year. She went to Por
terville from her home in Oakland early
in October and shortly after her ar
rival, according to her story, she found
evidences that the malicious stories re
flecting on her character were still be
ing told. Her mind, she said, was a
blank from the time she bpught the
revolver in a Porterville store until she
came to herself after being lodged in
jail.
For some years Mrs. Howe was prom
inent socially, in Oakland. Her hus
band W. C. Howe, Is representative of
an Eastern manufacturing ooncern and
for some time prior to this tragedy had
been stationed in South America. At
tbe time of the shooting be
was making his home in Buenos
(Continued oa Fag S, Column S)
RECARDEOCAS
PEACE l'irW RUSSIA
5S
NEW YORK, March 8 (Associated
Press) While the German terms of
peace which have been accepted by
Russia have not been made public it
is evident that Oermany secured about
all that she asked which is practically
everything. In Berlin there is a great
rejoicing and the war pariy
mer opponents swinging back to it in
the hour of success.
See Master Stroke
Articles and editorial comment
the German press, eopies
Moscow for final ratification Ty the
All Russia congress which will be held
March 12.
Iu the advance of the Austrian forc
es in the east it waa reported that
more than 770 guns had been taken.
Mlttel-Europ Shadow
A train the Mittel Europa shadow
could be seen yesterday in the oocu
Aland Islands, between
was said
landing of
forces on the Finland mainland with
the avowed intention of bringing or
iler from chaos, in that country.
Finland appears on the tentative
of which ! 'P of Mittel-Europa which included
firmly than ever in the saddle aud pre I ration of the -Aland lalaada,
paring to ride the eountry under a Hweden and 1-inland which it
tight curb with a large number of for wore to be a base for the li
reached Amsterdam yesterday greeted
the advent of the Russian peace as a
"master stroke" on the part of tier
ma n v.
Cessation of hostilities was ordered
from i'etrograd yesterday by General
Krvluiikn commander-in-chief of the
Russian forces in despatches which he 1 language 1
fnwar.led to the field staff at Molii ' "y poken.
lev.
The Austrian advance through IMa
lia continued Mini apparently met with
no resistance.
Higning of supplementary treaties by
I,enine and Trotzky were reported to
Lon. Ion from Brest Litovsk. These re
ports said Lenine and TroUky, after
the signing of the treaty were pro
reeding to l'etrograd where the trea
ties would be submitted to the cabinet
of the commission for first ratifica
tion on Thursday and then taken to
also the strip oi nussia wnicn uermaoy
has exacted aa a part of tbe price of
peace.
The Aland Islands formerly Belonged
to Sweden and although ceded many I
years ago their population has always
remained preponderantly Swedish, that
eing the language general
The Islands were recently
ment has presented
to Germany against
orcupid by Sweden and it was report
I yesterday that the aweaiaa govern
a strong protest
their occupation.
Negotiations for do ace between Ku
mauia and the Central Powers which
were reported to have gone on the
rocks have been successfully resumed.
Official reports from Berlin last even
ing said Rumania had accepted the of
for of an armistice for the considera
tion of peace terms and to proeeed with
negotiations for a treaty.
NORM LOSSES FOR
WAR GROW HEAVIER
RAILROAD BILL IS
LONI)ON, March 5 (Associated
Press) Norway's heavy shipping loss
es during the war are told in a report
which reached here yesterday.
Since the beginning of the war the
known submarine and mine losses to
Norwegian shipping have been 7-S
hips and 900 camen. At the same
time the report hIiowb fifty three vessels
missing ami seven huudred men.
Norwav yesterday protested tin
seizure by irent Britain of the German
steamer j)usneldorf.
The British steamer Arriuo, -HCS
tons, wus lost while en route to tin'
I'nited States, having encountered -i
submarine.
.
PHILIPPINES HAS FUNDS
FOR BUYING OF VESSELS
MANILA, March 1 (Associated
Press) Governor Harrison today six"
ed the bills for the Philippine merchant
marine and an appropriation of li.oilll,
000 gold for the purchase of vessels.
. -
HITACHI MARU SUNK
TOKIO, March 4 (Special to Nijipu
jjjj) The German converted cruiser
Wolf captured and sunk the N. Y. K
liner Hitachi Mn ni in the Indian Ocean
Captain Tominaga remained with his
ship until the end going down with the
liner an hour after the ship was struck.
WASHINGTON, March 4 (Asso
ciated Press) The conferees of the
house and senate on the government
railroad bill today agreed that no al
lonance is to be made to the roads for
the improvements they carried out in
the few months preceding federal con
trol. This will reduee the eompensa
tions to the roads about $6,500,000 on
nually. Important points of the bill
are still in dispute, including the an
thority to fix rates and the period of
government control after the war.
"WOMAN SPY BILL" IS
PASSED BY LOWER HOUSE
United States Not Expected
Join But Will Not Op
pose This Plan
Situation Critical Along Rail
way and China Finds
Border Threatened
WASHINGTON, March 5 (Associated Press) More and
more it becomes apparent that Japan is to be called upon
to protect the interests of the Allies as well as her own interests
in Siberia and indications grow that Japan will speedily move along
lines that will be quite satisfactory to the Allies and to the United
States as well although there has been manifested in this country
some slight opposition to the landing of armed forces at Siberian
ports. It is also indicated that China may speedily be engaged in
important hostilities against the Bolsheviki.
UNITE IN REQUEST
British, French and Italian ambassadors to Tokio intend to1
jointly ask Japan to protect their interests in Siberia, the London
Daily Mail asserts. This article says the United States is not ex
pected to join in the request but that it is expected the United
States iyin offer no opposition to the plan outlined. Such request
is to tte'the reply of the Entente to the inquiry which a Reutert
despatehlfyesterday said was reported frotp reliable Japanese.,
source!, to have been made. Thia inquiry is said to have been v
rounding of the views of the Allies as to tneir view on me pro
posal that Japan, send an ejepedfripn into Siberia.; ,,The xlespatth
further, y 'thati no definite program has-been announced Jnt
that Japan has mide it,ctea to : jih Allie hat jf ,she enter -Siberia
if4riir b ithtviistertil temtodaWgjnv".' ?w;rr?
SLIGHT OPPOsmpM-:OFFEUtD n
thus far oracticallv the only oppositioriTucli hi eeTvo1ce(l
in this country to a Japanese. expedition into Siberia J" come :
from the Russian-American chamber of commerce Hit organization
of business men who are heavily interested in i Russian industries.
This body met in New York yesterday and passed a resolution
in which it said that an invasion of Eastern Russian territory
would be, in its opinion, harmful unless all of the Allies were
agreed and united in an expression which would clearly state the
purpose of invasion. t .
From Japanese sources it was learned that an important meet
ing called to consider the question of Japan entering upon a
Siberian campaign, was being held. . The meeting was attended
by the Emperor and members of the committee on army affairs.
CHINA'S BORDERS THREATENED $
Indications of early hostilities between China and the Bolsht
viki were found in a "Peking despatch received last night whict
s-aid the governor of Sinkiang in Western China had telegraphed to
1 Peking that the Russians were massing their forces along his
boundary. He asked that munitions be sent to him with all haste.
John F. Stevens, head ot the Unitea states rauroaa commis
sion to Russia, now in Yokohama indicates the damage done by
the Russians to the Trans-Siberian railway as serious and says
i here is doubt as to the ability of Ambassador Francis to make
his way through from Pologda to Vladivostok' and so out of the
country. A cable message received from Francis said he would
remain in Pologda for the present.
Departure from Petrograd of the British and French em
bassies and the Belgian, Serbian, Greek and Portuguese legations
was told in despatches from Petrograd to London. These des
patches said the Italian legation was detained but gave no ex
planation. , '
Qfficial advices received in Washington told ot preparations
being made in Siberia to block a possible invasion. These messages
said bridges were being blown up and costly work being destroyed
from Lake Baikal to the frontier of China and this is the damage
referred to by Commissioner Stevens in his despatch which ex
pressed fear of the inability of the United States ambassador to
make his way out. '
WASHINGTON, March 5 (Associa
trd Press) Women, citizens of hostile
lountritm who have not secured Amer
ii'an citizenship will be in the same
ioition aa are wen alien enemies when
tlie bill passed by the house yesterdnv
receives the sanction of the senate ami
Seromes a law.
"The Woman Spy Bill" authorize
the President to deal with such women
ii h if they were men.
GENERAL SMITH DEAD
HAN DIEGO, March 4 ( Associsled
1'ivss) Briy.-Uen. Jacob ("Roaring
Jake") Smith is dead here.
FIRE LOSS FOR YEA$
EXCEEDED ONLY ONCE
' TRENTON, New Jersey, March 5
(Associated Press) Fire losses for the
year 1917 were heavier than for any
year since 190. The losses were swol
len by several disastrous conflagrations
that have been attributed to the work
of pro-German conspirators. In the rec
ords that have been kept last year's
losses were exceeded only in 1901.
PNEUMONIC PLAGUE GETS
TO SHANTUNG PROVINCE
SHANGHAI, March 4 ( Associated
Press) News comes here that the epi
.lemic of pneumonic plairue has reached
Shantung province and that four deaths
have occurred at Tsinanfu.
American medical missionaries tire
making a brave fight aainst heavy
odds to check the spread of (lie (lis
esse.
PRINCE MIRK0 DIES
AMSTERDAM, March 4 (Assoc iat
ed Press) Prince Mirko, second son of
the exiled King Nicholas of Monte
negro, has died In Vienna of pneumo
urn. according to news received here.
GREAT ORDNANCE BASE
TO BE BUILT IN FRANCE
ssssaessB t
WASHINGTON March (Asso
ciated Press) Announcement was
made by the war department today of
plans for the building of a huge ord
nance base in France, eosting 35,000,
000. Thia will lnelude twenty store
houses, 100 shops and magaaioes and
machines, tools and equipments costing
5,000,000.
il n,
AIRCRAFT PROGRAM NEEDS
LARGER APPROPRIATION
WASHINGTON March 4 (Asso
ciated Press) The war department to
day asked congress for an additional
45,000,000 to the amount provided in
the first aircraft progress.
,
REVOLUTION SERIOUS
HANKOW, March 4 (Associated
Press) The situation la serious iu the
Ysngtse Valley, where the revolution
ists of southern China are very active.
They have wounded several passengers
on the Japanese steamer Tebuag. Na
gotiatora from Japan are going to the
scene and British guuboats have beea
called upon for protection.

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