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The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, May 03, 1918, Image 4

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1918-05-03/ed-1/seq-4/

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HAWAIIAN GAZETTE : FRIDAY, - MAY ; 3, 191ft SEMI-WEEKLY,
OTIHAWAIMN GAZETTE
RoDtiuttO. UAimo EDITOR
j BREVITIES
FRIDAY MORNING,
MAY 3, 1918. "
THE ADVERTISES SEMIWIEKLY
ThcJidcMay Have
Tufned.-;,- ; ,.;
EXULTANT Gefituny, sweeping down the con
quered Blopc&oi, Mount Kemmel, flusri4iWth
' the expectation of completing its victory of Ypres,
has been dashed back.Uggering before he blast
of fire frpwttht ttencbel of. th gallant poilus and
) the doughty Topies. While the blasphemies of
the Kaiser ttrcyct atmding.'vrftk his impioas
, thanks to the Aimightyjor the help He had given
German rti$ ttsaiTrs Were being slaughtered
by thousands and beaten along miles of battle
" front, st - . va; .
K'ine uniiMi nni never ucuci mii
' ' .;' ... L. .t i9in . iliiv ahmil.l arlrnnwlrrlfrej
defeat. The latest hattlc in Flanders demonstrates
' " . . i . . . . t A.
-this historic lactanew., jpor tne time DemB. at
v, least, th Flanders drive; has been checked, and
. . m i . . i n a.v a vn.wa nn iinnnav j 1 1 1 1
' yestenlay may marie ine turning oi me uuc.
Tommies and the gallant polltts are willing to fight
in unequal battle. , The' Germans are not. They
must have odds and ttvery prospect of victory-, and
' the machine guns and bayonets of the Allies are
;, cutting down those odds and disjelling that pros-
- ject
America the Symbol
WHAT does the term American signify?
,-,First of. all it embodies. . the hope-yes,
more than that ihe definite intention, for aVor.d
Deh.cracy.L In the wide free spaces of North
America men have become parifiedf of dfuss by
th Jun-drenched winds of Liberty." Granted this
is large statement, nevertheless it stlnda, Con
sider for moment that for sbmethingr better than
a century America has received and clarified the
dregs of Old World "civllization'V
This was ho light order, yet, ht chemintry,
a murky mess is rendered clear by orie drop of
the proper reagent, so has this human conglomera
tion thrown into the crucible of Liberty precipi
tated that golden button to which -mankind now
looks to redeem it from social turpitude. America
stands in the relation of big brother to the World
and the ultimate smashing blow (or ft world peace
is up to us. Freedom to think, and db has brought
us to this high estate and it is to preserve it for
all mankind that we have drawn the word. Each
of us individually, signifies America, hence each
one may see where lies the responsibility.
Here are two well authenticated Instances one
of them documentary which may crystalizc the
foreeointr and make it hit even a casual reader
PERSONALS
,'V'
1!
rWtnaiL.rlMrl n nenninir tin in France and sauare between the eyes. v
Flanders nd Gnnan;wounded are overflowing all ! First: Forty-eiRht years ago John Lothrop Mot
t.1 i..;-i. ..f n.itm.m .- ri;t world rpioices. lev. while American minister to. Great Britain,
Tpdayfor very Buu ho falls the cause of civil- wrote to Bismarck, who was his old college mate,
' - ' ' ' a t ,1 1 leal IaMap vaiAn1.
iaatioti progresses;-in every graycoat wounded or i. lnermiy ana avowi-uiy unUmvi .w...
killed the "hope Of humanity is brightened. To kill mending clemency for France. "Trie more moder
' Germans on the battlefield ' has become the high- ate the terms on the part of the conqueror at this
''; JViff tKi' rf aWinirtn of freedom and demo- sunreme moment," he wrote, "the greater would
ilntv' nt tfii.' rnarnmc
.v..'., . . , , : :j u ,H th
cracy, and when enough lluns have been sweju oe hic connucmc ," v,
from, the earth and' the"" Kaiser brought to the bar
" cf outraged Rustic, thfc sacrifices being made to-
day by the men barring 'the paths to Paris and
' the sea will be shown not to have been in vain.
A Satisfactory A nswer
IT IS an iinediiying thng to say the least, to
witness such an efforjt as . has been made to
secure draft immunity,for young Selwyn Robin
" i4n, son of Aubrey -Robinson, millionaire planter
and rancher of Kauai. ; It has been a sad example
:. '.-.to set befire'th other 'youths of Hawaii.
.Those competent to judge, after reviewing all
the evidence in the case,'have decided unanimous
ly that' this yburig mah"bught to bear as great a
part in the defense of America and of the world's
freedom s every other, physically fit, unencumber
ed America jouthv , Efforts to secure him free
dom from sthia x esposibiUty, are, certain to be fail-
, ures ivefythlng!eJcc.eBt, in earning for him and
for . thos assisting him v the scorn of his fellow
; Americans.
- The Robinson case had become more than the
. question .whether a certain youth' should or should
not be made to serve his country as a soldier, the
same, is every other young man. It "had become
1 a question of whether wealth and influence are to
- prevail in keeping anyone out ol thednKer that
tll others equally able to serve as soldiers are call
ex! upon to. face. It had become a question in Ha-
1 waii as to whether a family with wealth enough to
keepanisland tabu from outsiders is also wealth)'
, enough to draw sacred circle around its young
men and tabu the arm of the selective draft.
. This -morning' Captain Field answers, and his
answer is that there is no influence and no amount
of wealth sufficient to deter him and the officers
. of the draft in Hawaii from the performance of
' their full duty. And that answer is very satisfac
tory to every loyalist of this Territory. -
W.8.B. j
' Pan-Pacific Progress
A proposal to found' in Honolulu, in coopera
tion; with the Mid-Pacific Institute, a Pan
Pacific commercial college, appears to be taking
definite and practical form. If the ideas of those
' behindhand endorsing the plan can be brought to
fruition- it will be a notable contribution to the
cause of International friendship and the promo-
tion o. Jhat bef mutual Understanding between
the nations. facing onHhe Pacific that is the incen
; tive offso "much already under way in these Isl
ands. . Honolulu, at the Crossroads of the Pacific, is
. ' already an interracial experiment station for the
'. Pacific,, where many peoples mingle and where
. there 'is a noticeable absence of race prejudice.
Here auch a commefcjal college could carry into
a new'and broader field, what is being done at the
Mid-Pacific Institute and could supplement in the
' forward by
:' ther institution in the cial and religious fields.
' . The' mbve'nieht Is one that deserves considera
lion from a uumbef of standpoints, the least of
V: which is the banefit Honolulu would derive direct
" ly from the establishment of Such an institution.
AlilL w. S. S.
more secure the foundations for a durable peace,
and the more proud and fortunate the position and
character of United Germany". This letter was
dated from London. September 9, 1870.
Bismarck wrote on the margin of the letter:
"DAMN CONFIDENCE".
Here's the other instance. Bob Evans, standing
on the bridge of his flagship as Cevera's fleet was
being torn to pieces by American gunners, raised
his hand to silence the cheer ot victory whicn
burst from the throats of his meh and said :
"Don't 'cheer the poor devils are dying"!
Our own ' President has expressed in all his
statements this same sentiment. We all know
what the sentiments save the mark! of official
Germany have been in this war, just as they have
been in the past, the sentiments that issue from
a bullet head, narrow between the eyes, flat at the
back and bulging at the nape of the neck ; senti
ments worthy the gizzard of a vulture cock of helL
-D we wnt this bird to rule- ua? Do we want
to suffer him to exist at all ! Do we want him to
say of America as he said of France: "Damn con
fidence". To feel his foul talons in our vitals r
We do not I We're going to justify the confidence
righteous humanity reposes in us today by each
individually throwing his weight into the fight to
make confidence the watchword of the world, for
without it there can be no peace on earth.
w.as.
Must Be No Others
V7 HILE we are inclined, as a personal matter,
YV
to congratulate "Captain" Allen on his dis-
haree from custody, after his arrest on the charge
of murder, we cannot, at the same time, approve
of the demonstration made after his trial nor agree
hat anything but a very dangerous precedent has
been established.
It is unsafe for this community to permit itself
to be carried away on an emotional wave, whether
labelled Patriotism" or otherwise. It will be de
cidedly unsafe for anyone to emulate the action
of Allen under the impression that the outcome
niav be alone similar lines
At the same time, the attitude of the community
er it has been exemplified in the Allen case ought
to be a stern warning for those pro-Hun talkers
in our midst, a warning to them that they must
keep their mouths shut. This is no time for trai
tors to babble nor for enemies of the public good
to show their hand. The swift death that came
to Walker may not, and should not, overtake them
The law provides otherwise, but that law will now
move the swifter and strike the harder because of
the Aala Park tragedy
Loval citizens must respect the law and there
must be no advocacy of Judge Lynch, either by
one man with a gun or by a mob with a rope
Others must be made to respect the law by those
sworn to administer it. We believe they will here
after.
.,..".. . i ' v W. S.S.
Men of Class 1A in the Hawaiian draft will not
hae to wait long now before they knuw whether
r not the government desires their services imme
diately or later. The Advertiser is able to state
ihat the call for up to three thousand men will be
made officially within the next five or six days
and at least one regiment of draftees will be in
kliaki before the middle of the month. The Ad-
N times of war they ask us for the necessarv I vertiser aesires in auva.c i.. M,Kiu.u.aiC
1 rh Una nnon theT war-like Hun and deal I young men who will soon-be in the military ser-
M. Kawamoto ws f)nd tea ttollnr
and coU in tk poli,eoart-yeterriiiv
morning for S Violation ef the traffic
ordiaaara. -V V
riant hava ba praparad anil til
will aoon ba advertimtd for tho predion
ef a eomfort station at Aaln Vark wljirh
in to roit in tha neighborhood of o000.
Oflirora and "noldiera of thr army or
gam ait ion a tationd on Ob1u have
taken oat 0,000,000 wolrth tf war la
dornnrf. Nearly a million dollar n
nWribed teat Mk,
With tha rank of firnt lieutenant.
H-v. J. Knox Bodel, roetor of the KpiK
eopal Church at Hilo, harbean appoint
ed chaplain of tha Boeond Begiment,
Hawaiian National Guard.
Mr a. Richard rera "baa been namad
xerutrix of tho will of her late hna
band in probata proceedings held thla
week. Tha aetata haa a value of 400,-
1.000, 100,000 of which ia real property.
Magistrate Harry Irwin, who ha
been appointed ' deputy attorney rn
oral, will cdntinSia "to 'Conduct poller'
eourt until a successor is named. J.
B. Lishtfoot is beina mentioned a
one of thoaa who may receive the ap
polntment
M. F. rroaser, Allen Robinson and
Olaf Borenson, tho three volunteers
from Hawaii for field service for the
Rod Cross in Franco, have all arrived
in Washington, according to cable des-
patches received yesterday at Hawai
ian chapter headquarters.
Suit for 10,000- damages will be
brought against Edgar Henrique's, man
ager of the Peabody Katste lau U in
Bouth Kona; by Joseph raaknun, an
employe of tho South Knna Tolmri-o
Company, says the Poet Heral l of Hilo,
April 29, the action being base, I on a
claim of malicious arrest.
Andrew H. HamricV, meteorologist
and weather man for the Territory of
Hawaii will leave shortly to take up
similar duties in Wyoming, with head
quarters at Cheyenne. Sir. Hamrick
has been in Honolulu for three years
and has established several new fea
tures to improve tha local service.
Felix Turro, who was arrested last
week and charged with nonsupport.
was ordered by Judge Irwin yesterday
to pay his wife five dollars a week.
Tranquilino Baylor, a convicted Filipino
wife benter, was given a suspended sen
teruc of thirteen months in the police
court yesterday morning by Judge
Irwin. ,,
Road Hupervisor Cantin declares that
there are at least 2000 laborera out of
nork in Honolulu. There is practically
little or no road work, going on outside
of a few patching gangs that are mak
ng none but absolutely needed repairs
the roada. stevedore iuho are feel
ng the pinch of hard times owing to
lie shortage or shipping at this port.
CoL Howard Hathawar, collector of
nternal revenue, said esteniav that
the government ia disposed to denl leri
entiv with delinquents Who have failed
to file income tax returns providing
that they act at once and bring in re
turns. Those who do fail to come for
ward at this tirhe vita overdue- returns,
however, would feel .the 4M weight of
tha lawj he-added. : - .yirVi v.
ThrM XUftrn nt a'' VhrfniniAiM wo
man, who ia believed tJ be demented
nd who tied with the children from the
Palolo home last Tuesday, were brought
nto the juvenile court yesterday after
they had been rounded up by probation
officers and were ordered taken hack
to the home bv Judge William H. Heen
What will ba done with the woman baa
not yet been determined.
O. Flood, an American, internation
ally known as a shipping maguute, bo
lieves that Uncle Sum's "hands off'
policy in Russia is a winning one. He
is returning from Kussia to the United
Htates on the Tenyo Maru after spend
iuff several yearn m iSiberia. He has
closed up his shipping business in Rua
sin until the present eouditions becomo
more settled, he says.
Mr. P. N. Smith of Baa Francisco ia
registered at Halekolanl Hotel. Wavl-
kikl. ...,, s
Circuit Judge Burr, of Maul, la
spending a week's vacation In Honolulu-Mrs.
Annie Stanwood.of Brunswick,
Maine, is reeent arrival at Haleko
lanl Hotel
George jPN BussaU, manager of the
HW I row .Works,, setaraed to. his home
in Hilo yentorday i( ,.
' Gilbert Jj Waller wa a 'departing
(tassenger ia the Mauaat Kaa. yesterday
lor the Big Island.
IV. Q. B. Wood re'twraed from a
short visit to the t volcano yesterday
on the Manna Kea.
Land Commissioner Bertram Blven-
burffh waa a departing passenger on
the Tenyo afar yesterday.
Fond Administrator J. F. Child left
for Kawaihae, Hawaii, in the Mauna
Kea yesterday morning.
Hi H. 'Beaton, manager -of tha Union
Mill Co, Kooala, left for his home yes
terday, accompanied by Mrs. Benton.
R. Von Temnsky, a eattlemaa from
Inul, waa an arrival yesterday on the
Manna Kea from tha Valley Isle.
W. II. Hill, businessman of Hilo,
ho arrived yesterday on tha Mauna
Kea, is a guest at tba Young Hotel.
J Ames A. Kennedy, president of the
Inter-Island Hteamship Co, returned
from a business trip to Hilo yeatarday.
Wallace R. Farrfngton was among
passengers leaving for the Big Island
on tho Mauna Kea yestenlay morning.
A Lewis, manager of the Bank of
Hawaii, left on the Tenyo Mini yes
terday for a short bnainesa trip to tha
Coast.
I. T. Phillips, manager of the Hilo
ffico of tho Inter-Island Steamship
o., was an arrival on tho Manna Kea
esterday.
Archivarian Robert I.vdecker left
or Maui yestenlay where he will col
lect b number of ancient archives for
the territorial archive bureau.
John Stone, a member of the Star-
Bulletin reporterlal staff, Is said to
ave been selected by Governor-fc.lect
J. McCarthy as his private secretary.
Dr. IL S. Pearsa and family of Mont
Clair, N. J., have taken a bungalow at
Halekulani Hotel. Doctor rearse is
onnceted with the Equitable Life In
surance Co., of New York.
George B. Carter returned on the
Mauna. Kea yesterday from Hawaii
where he baa been perfecting plans for
the Territory-wide campaign for Red
Cross funds which will be started May
GEHIilG TO COAST
I
NOV H
' ! " X.
All Steamers Booked 'Full Many
Weeks Ahead School Teach
ers May Have Te Stay Home
ARD PROBLEM PACIFiaCOriMERClAL
UULLtMUJtUItU
Thoo desiring to go to tha mainland
within tha nax. two or- three months
are golifg la! flhd It ,"a rather difficult
problem, 'uhleM they Ati";'BRINGINQ TOGETHER 0?
raciory reasons lor meir wanting oj , 11)V " 0r T" IC IHCA
. men i imvw , i iwtn
Steps Are Being Taken To Estab
lish New Educational. Insti
. 'aution Alond 1Vo AlirUhi U
ThrjftyStamps
na .a a
; ,the fatal smash.
I' :.. ''And it is right. To win the fight we've got to
' have the dough, and those whq stay will have to
' pay (pr thos who have to go.
,,! "So buy THRIFT STAMPS and put the clamps
' upon the German horde. We'll surely win if you
kick in buy U you can afford.
iV."The boys, who fight have every right to look
. to US pay. They bear the brunt, so do your
stunt and Buy Thrift Stamps Today." -'L. C
Davis.
r .. i -: .U I
vice ut llieir COUUiry anu i)icjaiin; mkmik ivcs in
hflp smash the bloody tyrants of Berlin.
The advertising value of the Liberty Loan post
ers having passed, it is now requested that store
keepers and others take these from their windows
and replace them with the Red Cross posters,
whirli have been distributed. The idea now is to
concentrate on the Red Cross campaign, and it is
ietiested that this he done in advertising as in
verything else.
Mr. Hornibf, stage manager for the
Ooldin troupe, now appearing at the
Bijou, who is twenty six years of age,
haa been ordered to report to tne Jim
ihta consul at Kan Francisco, on arriva
there. He had a conference yesterday
with Captain Field, of the draft serv
ice, but being a tlrllieaer, ne was re
ferred to Consul E. L. & Gordon. An
other member of the troupe was fouud
physically unfit for army service.
May HI has been selected as Pledg
Day in. Hawaii by the War Savings
MtemD campaign. A house to house
canvass will be made to sell Thrift
and Wir Saviui: Htampti. A nieetin
of the general committee will be held
at half -past four o'clock Friday af
ternon when captains and teams for
the camps iirn will be selected. A gen
eral meeting of ail committees will be
held this ufternoou at the chamber of
commerce rooms to revitalize the cam
palgn.
An effort will be made by the dele
gates of the Honolulu Ad Club to linn
tha 1820 convention of the AsMociatoi
Ad Clubs of America to Honolulu. "On
to Hawaii in 1020" will be the tdogu
of the local admen. The delegates
from Honolulu will take along 3,001'
small bags of Kona coffee ami 3,000
small bags of BugHr which will be usm
as souvenirs nt tne pig convention
8a u FraiuUc.. . Another aouveuir wi
he in the form of ' ranted uhlnapt'le
to be put up in mull glass jars for this
occasion.
Secretary A. 1.. CaHtle of the llawai
tlan Chapter, American Bd Cross, had
received appointment as general field
director of the Hed Croes in the Ter
ritory of llawuii, and will be cousid
ered practically a member of the army
headquarters staff. Tha appointment
came from Washington yesterday
through department headquarters. Thin
order gives Mr. ( .stle. tha, ' satu of
an officer, and his pOJ wiA jhT) thf
full cooperation of aniiy . Mat aW'lilu
will place ut his disposal every faeili
ty to aid him in the conduct of his
duties. . -
Dr. N. S. Fairthweather, a kamaaina
dontist of Honolulu, was called to the
Colore this week and left for the main
land yesterday nnder orders. He is
now a member 'of the dental corps of
the Navy reserve. On Monday evening
he waa tho guest of the Dental Society
of Hawaii at a farewell dinner at the
Oahtt Country Club.
w. at. at.
LOCAL AGENCIES FOR . l
' RAILROADS CLOSED
get away, and nnleas ; thele, f efctisg
away is argent, for 'during the at
several weeks, tho bookings; for pas
sage to San Francisco have baaa-growing
so apidly that tba Honolulu ftgenta
of tha various steamship companies
have found it necessary, to have .their
patrons book away" ahead of time, of
ten a whole month ahead.
The lituatlon ia crowing acute ac
cording to tha agents, and it ia feared
that for at least two or three months
from now there will scarcely be any
accommodations on any of the vessels
leaving here for the States. The
cabins on even the Japanese veseela,
which were placed oa the Island rua
to relieve the congest ion of" passenger
traffic, are rilled up to late, in Joly.
The Matson vesaela leaving here within
the next two months have all accom
modations takes op with long lists of
travelers awaiting the first chanee or
getting away.
The school teachers, numbering about
two hundred, who usually leave the
Territory during the summer months,
may have to remain here for their
vacations. The shipping agenta aay
that their shipa are well filled until
August, and that there is no possibility
4
College'of HawaH, Mid-Pacifia In
stitute and J. B. Castle Estate
- Cocyerawjn jiiovtement
It ia announced that 'active steps are
to be taken to establish in Honolulu
a new educational institution to be
known .a tha en-PafiCemmerqinl.
College a project which haa been one
of the great alms of the Pan-Paeite
Union and the Mid Paelfle Institute.
As outlined at present it ia intended
that the College of Hawaii, the Mid
Pacine Institute and the J. B. Castle
estate are to cooperate . in founding
the new school, which is to have its
special departments for the technical
nd manual training of Hawaiians,
Filipinos, Koreans, Japanese, Chinese
and all the mingled races of the Pa
elfle. 1
Ia Business Vortex
It ia held that nowhere else in the
worltl save in Honolulu eould a Fan
Pacific Commercial College be establish
ed inthe actual business vortex of the
various races. It is pointed out that
of getting any nccommodatlons until I already in tne puDiie senoois oi no
tn,n ' nolulu race prejudice has been set asido
AU the Matson liners are filled up ai "'"' ln a Drorneriy coopera-
nnttl late In July, the Sachem, which
leaves at noon today for San Francisco,
not taking any passengers. The Ma
noa, which ia scheduled to sail next
Tuesday, has her cabiaa all filled with
a list awaiting her next trip. The Lur
line, which ia scheduled to leave oa
May 14, will take out about fifty ea
bin passengers, leaving a long waiting
list behind. The Shinyo Maru,, dne
from the Orient about May 17, will
probably not take out any passengers
from here, aa it is believed that she
in well filled up with people from the
Orient. The Ecuador, Colombia and
Venezuela of the Psoiflc Mail line,
nil have long waiting lists, as have the
Makura and Niagara, of the Canadian
Australasian line.
It is not certain that ships from the
Orient ean take away more than a
few at each call, and local agents say
that no assurances can be given as to
relief appearing in the near future.
SCHULTaSUCCiED
JBY VALTER R. COOMBS
Further Step Taken In American
izing of Hackfelds
AH IMPROVED QUININE
DOES NOT AFFECT THE HEAD
Because c4 Its toale aad laxative effect,
LAXATIVE BBOMO QVWINH will be touw'
better than ordinary Oulaiae. Does not cau
nervousness. Bar ringing la the head. R'
member, Jicra Is only one "Bromo Out .dne
The !!" ot K. V. C.ro-; U or. ef'
Owing to the fact that the govern
ment has taken over control of the rail
roads, contiietition for passenger busi
ness between the various lines has been
discouraged in all (tarts of the -United
States. As a result of this condition
the local oflice of the Santa Fe and tho
Southern Pacific ltailroad were closed
down here yesterday.
H- E. Vernon, who has been the local
representative of the Santa Fe Rail
road nns been appointed neati or inc
Kteamship department of Theo. II. Da-
vies ami Co.; taking over the position
that has been held bv Wentworth Bu-
hanan for a number of years. Mr. Bu
chanan has been given a position with
the collection department of Davios
Co.
L. K. Thompson, who has been in
'harge of the Southern Pacific oflice
here t for a nunilter of years, expects
shortly to enter a mercantile firm In
this citv.
W. B. .
PAMHENOKKH AKKIVKrt
II y str. Munna Kes. April AO:
From llttwnll Jninen A. Kennedy. P. T.
ritllliiiH, Mrs H. Er.lherg. J. B. V lontan-W-v.
(V A. Kraui. Mm. F. A. Bk'hards,
ttr. t it. Wood. Mr. (leors-e G retires,
Mm. A. I.. MH'alla, Mr and Mrs. W. 8.
Iluitoii. Maxtor It. Hnxtnn. K. uusniara,
K. YHtutt'ln. Mra. II Lewis. Muster Lowls,
Mts B. NobriKS. Ouvo. K. Hlrsmnto, K
HuMhliiiiitn Axainl. FukaKhl. Ah CSonir
Mr. and Mrs. ('. Nakauiotn, eitshlmura,
11 rw.i Ankl MtvRiiiittii okiinn. Yatnaila.
Mrs. M. Nlnehnka. Mra. A. Miguel. OeorRS
U. Csrler. K U. White. Mra. W. Thomp
son ami child. H. I. Crooka. A. A. Kosa,
.1. M. Young. Mr. and Mra. K. Lyman.
Mr anil Mra II. S Huliliard. Ut. W. H.
Hill. W. J. Veat. Mra. Morlatikl and two
children. Mra. It. Jamea. Mra. Nemolo,
Vfrd Kluifitfi Mra MiitHiiimira. lahlliara
Mra. llvBhl(ln I'. Muratuoto, Hoklrbl
Mulau. lleorice Moure. K. ruumoinlya. N.
(lulilma It. kuNiihiira. Oaawa. Kswsum
ra, Kitniio. Mr. and Mra. ('. Fnllniura and
three clillilren. K. t. Otiara. K. Nakaani
ma. Hirsts, K. Uuuilaakl, I'mrtca, Mean
la Ralil
From MuiilJatiiea F. Fen wick. H. O.
K. I.lndner, Frana IIiirenbrHtb, Yutakfl
'I'ltlll ir lie hi It. KihiiHhl. H. Ftillkawa
Oeorve (Hani. M. KuroHuml. H. KanaakL.
ArliniikHinl. II. Yiininiiifito. II. Kltnura. HI
ri7iia. Itoliert White. II. Cullluan, L
Ffllh.nl Imi. Uefira-e F. 1 jirMea. i. C
wllllHina. M Tiialilrn. K. Okaila. Mataul
lltimi R vim Teiniiakv. J tl Zabrlnkl.
Maater It. (Jli-ater. W J. Cooper. Louis
Kiililiiian. lul Soon. Frances l'slea, l'Uk
Ilnnli-I. Joae Ferrelra
FAKNKNOCKH IIKPAUTKD
lly air. Manna Ken for I.Hbaiua and llllo
Mut 1 -N. N . Smith, f. W Herrou. w. J
Cooper. F. I.. J ii men, (liHirKe K. Tuiiper
It. it. Hlu. I, Mr. and Mra. W. H. l.atlliliu
I. K. Himldliic. c F. Wrlaht. J. Kreaky
W. A. ('Minion. I'unl Kchuitdt. H. W. f'ralg
Mrs I. I.. Ilerlimer. MUa L. Iterrluaer
MIhk A III. In. Mra. .1. O. II. Cameron and
iifiini MNk Caiin-ron Muater amermi
Mlaa Cnuieron. Mlaa Mury Nnhuliia. Mra
X. Atkillea. Mlax K. Spurxttn. . II. Kouue
I. 1, Mleluielxoii. Kev H. L. Heaha. Mr
Silit-'iVrrK Malcolm Mih IiiIvto. Kev. Nelou
Uol.erl I In re. C. U. Al. Iter. Tae Kel Yiioh
11. F. Auderaon. S M Heawell. Ye l'lug
N. W. A Iti II . .1. IV Hllva. Naksta. Albert
(Intnl. II FiiJIkawa. Maxter Henry Yuuna
Mlaa N Wong. Mlaa Vount. H. voa Temp
m.i J. (1. al,i Inkle. Mra () M. Auderauu
I T Meliroeiler. II A. Mauu. (luahlkln. H
limn, tl Helinar. M. II. Crawford. J. F
Clill.l. W It. FnrrlnKtoii. Iter. .1. K. llodei.
u. W llulwr. (1 .1 Wuller. Mr. and Mra.
II. 11. II. -lit. 'ii Mra. ItcKita. Mlaa Hurvey.
Mr and Mra Caleb llurua. Muater Ilurna.
Mlaa Hurt lei. J. Hardy. W. I. Kourke.
John de Mello Jr. ll.-ortie J. Huaxell Y.
II Char. How Tin Woutc Mra. William
lie I.u Nui. Mlaa Kuuenla lahlbuahl, Fran
cla Lee.
Walter B. Coombs succeeds Herman
P. P. Hchultxe with H. Hackfeld 4
Company, Limited. Mr. Coombs re-1
signed his position with I.ewers A
Cooke several days ago aud yesterday
he was beside Mr. Mchultze at Hack
feld k Company, picking up the strings
preparatory to taking over the duties
of the latter.
Following the reorganization meeting
when the plans of the custodian of en
emy property were put into effect,
which was not attended by Mr. nchultxe
n spite of the fact that he was noti
lied both before and at the time of the
meeting, it was announced that the
services of Mr. KchulUe would be die
pensed with as soon as a satisfactory
successor eould be secured. The tender
of the positiou was made to Mr.
Coombs. Thus the name of another en
emy alien is stricken from the roster
of H. Hackfeld ft Compuny and sup
planted by that of an American.
Mr. Coombs Una long oen with l.ew
ers ft Cooke where he rose te the posi
tion of cashier. He is Iowan by birth
and is in his thirty eighth year.
r. a.' a.
tion of Pacifle races might be made to
radiate from a college Of the kind pro
posed to spread abroad the creed of
business understanding among all Pa
cific peoples.
It is intended that every commer
cial country in the Pacific ahall .send
its carefully selected business repre
sentative competent to fill a chair in
the college and lecture to the students
on the commerce of the representative 's
country.
From the fonr corners of the ocean
then would be, brought together young
business men of ' Pan-Pacific race.
Both boards of trustees of the Pan
Pacific Union, and the Mid Pacific In
stitute have nnanimously approved the
uniting of forces to establish the pro
posed college and the College of Ha
waii will cooperate. As the Mid Pacific
Institute owns ninety acres of land in
Man'oa Valley adjoining its great edu
rational boildlngs, and the College of
Hawaii has as much more, it is pro
posed here to set aside a site for the
new college.
Mullgsxdt Ia Oneet
Louis Christian Mnllgardt, the create,
or at the Ran Francisco Exposition of
the Court' 'of Ages and architect of the
commercial center to be. built here will
be a guest of honor-at the Pan-Pacifle
3uncaea tW9vt' O'ctecJt "tkmierVow
Lanlahee when, the proposed Pan
Pacific Conference which Hawaii has
lieen asked to call, and aomething
about the building of a Pan-Pacific
Commercial College on the grounds
either of the Mid Pacific Institute or
on thoee of the College of Hawaii will
be discussed.
. .The project of a Pan Pacific Com
mercial College has beeii discussed
quietly for some time, and recentlv the
boards of both the Pan-Pacific Union
and tha Mid Pacific Institute have ap
pointed committees to promote the mat
ter jointly'. '
w. a. .
LI
IEUTENAN
AVIATION INSTRUCTOR
GENERAL J. P. WISSER
IS BACK FROM T
Lieut. L. W. Wishard, aviation corps,
formerly of Kauai, ia now at Park
Field. Mulington, Tennessee, as an In
structor. His wife, who waa Miss Mary
Benton, of Kohala, has been with him1
at the different camps, and In a recent
letter to her mother expressed ner opin
ion about the fine appearance and
splendid behavior of the men of the
corps where she had been.
Lieutenant Wishard is a graduate of
Punahqu Academy, and Ann Arbor and
spent a year in the Harvard I .aw
Schools. When war has declared he
went to San Francisco from Boston to
volunteer ia a ground school for avi
ation service, at Berkeley. He took
his flying lessons in Han Diego. He
stood the highest in his class.
MEN TAKENIN DRrtFTNET
REGISTERED AND FREED
General J. P. Wiaser, dcartmeiit
commander, who reviewed the Maui
battalion of the National Guard at i'uu
nene last week, has returned . accom
panied by Lieut.-Col. C. G. Mettler,
orduauce corpa, and Lieut. K. 11. Wia--i'T,
aide, and reports that the organ i
jatlou is "just fair." This refers to
care of arms nnd equipment.
The Hilo guardsmen, as well as those
who assembled at Kealakekuu, made a
good impresniou upon the commander.
At Hilo the general and party were met.
by MaJ. George Desha anil Lieut. Colo
nel Don Bowman, who saw that the
oflicers were entertained, and motored
them up to see the volcano in actiou.
Professor Jaggar accompauied the gene
ral to the pit. On Maui the party was
entertained by Benntor Hurry Baldwin
and Harold Bice. The general looked
over some of the big stock ranches.
w. a. a.
HAWAIIAN COMMISSIONED
AS ARMY LIEUTENANT
Nearly all of the "slackers" whom
Capt. H. G. Field, selective draft of
ficer, placed in juil to await action on
their eases,' have been registered and
examined by the medical board and re
leased. They have been carefully
tabulated and added to the Cmas I lists,
and will be availuble for the draft call.
Captain Field decided that it was
beat to give all the men a chance to
Much speculation has arisen as to
the identity of Lieut. Walter Kamp,
Hnwailun, who .was recently commis
sioned a lieutenant at Camp Zachary
Taylor, Louisville, Kentucky. It was
only yesterday that juat who Lieu ten
ant Kamp is leaked out. Ho is no
other than Walter Kamaiopili, better
known here aa Peter Walter Kamaio
pili, son of Itev. and Mrs. Bamuel K.
Kamaiopili of tufa city. Young Ka
maiopili has been in the mainland for
some years but mainlaiulers gave up
trying to pronouueo "Kamaiopili" and
decided to call hn y"6 Hawaiian
"Kamp", and Kamp it has 1oen eveu
siure. Lieutenant Kamaiopili was a
noted football player !m jhia day at
Kami' humcliii Behoof 'm ' lAdl ns one
of the beat singers the Kulihi school
has turned out. h;' , , .
A GOOD ETJXE FOB THE HOME.
Muke it ii rule of your home to al
ways keep on hand a buttle of ('ham
t cilaiu'a Colic uu. Diurrho:a Kemedy
u aareguar.l uguiiist bowel com
serve in the army rather than iu jail. I
The nlun wus formulated bv Captain las
Field and Judge .1. J. Banks, assistant pluiuti'. It alwuya cures promptly ami
Unite I Htates district attorney. Thia j uo houaeltpM is safe without it. For
will bring an end to all draft proaecu sule by ail dealers. Benson, Hmith &
tiqus for the present. Co., Ltd., agents fur Hawaii. Advt.
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