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The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, June 11, 1918, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1918-06-11/ed-1/seq-1/

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JUL" 20
FOOD FORECAST FOR TODAY.'
All Meals Meatless and On Wheatles
' ' 'UL j N0'V HONOLULU. HAWAII TERRITORY, TUESDAY. JUNE 11, 1918. SEMI-WEEKLY. WHOLE NUMBER 4ttT
SMUmimOF hum ALREADY MARKS MAPJflFQ MA Iff
imimmSIVEM GERMAN DEFEAT
V -a
RecklslSacrM No
Benefits ToRupprecht But
Battle Rages On
,,.,.t.
EVERY FOOT THE FOE ADVANCES
ADDS TO HIS DISADVANTAGE
Allies Thoroughly : Prepared Welcome
Each Furious Onslaught As Chance
To Kill More
NEW YORK, June '1 (Associated Press) At the end of the!
first twenty-four hours of the bloodiest fighting of all the war!
the impression is gaining ground that the German offensive towards,
the Oise has already become a German defeat. Despite the em
ployment of great masses of troops, hurled into the battle vortex j
with the greatest recklessness by the Huns, the French last night
were fighting along practically the same line as at dawn. On the
wings the French defense had not budged. In the center it had bent
to only an insignificant degree, while all along the front the Ger
man dead were piled in heaps.
At no point has the French line been pierced and the deepest
German penetration has nowhere extended beyond the "covering
ground", the advanced positions between the frdnt trenches and the
real defenses prepared by the Allies. The German high command
has been unusually reckless of the
has been appalling.
FRENCH MOST CONFIDENT
Reports from the headquarters of the French army state that
every foot of German advance on this new battlefront between
Montdidier and Noyon only bring the Germans further into terri
tory prepared in the most thorough way for defense, ground with
which the Allies are thoroughly familiar and over which the Ger
man progress becomes momentarily more difficult.
The Allied staffs art fully prepared' to meet any ; German effort
: UNDIMINISHED VIOLENCE
The German offensive was maintained throughout Sunday night
and kept up all day in undiminished violence along the entire twenty
one miles, with particularly furious attacks launched against the
French left, south of Montdidier. These attacks were repeatedly
broken up on the. left, although the Germans, by pouring in masses
of reinforcements, succeeded in bending the French center back
through Ressons-sur-Matz to the outskirts of Marqueglise, making
a total advance in the center of two snd three-quarter miles.
The bitterest fighting came in the efforts of the Germans to
drive the French from their positions on the Oise south of Noyons,
the main object of Crown Prince Rupprecht being to extend the
German front south on the Oise to threaten the French salient to
the east, between the Oise and the Aisne. All the desperate attacks
of the Germans at this point failed.
INTO SLAUGHTER. HOUSE
The Germans are striking at those very places where the Allies
have been braced to receive the shock and the attackers now find
themselves being thrown into a slaughter house from whence most
of them will never live to make an exit.
The official reports from Paris state that the advance of the
Germans in the center has given them several small villages, in
eluding Mery, Celloy and St. Maure, which they occupied after
repeated assaults and after sacrificing great numbers of their men.
Every foot of advance has been at a terrific cost.
BATTLE LIKELY TO GO ON
Everywhere the French defence appears to be efficacious, with
extreme violence marking every German assault and forming the
dominant note of the battle. Desperate attacks with huge masses
of men seem likely to continue for some days, although the real line
of defense of the French has only receded at one point, that south
of Ressons-sur-Matz.
Keuier s correspondent at rrencn neauquarters says mat tne
huttle wa ra rrinrr last nitrVit in iitiHiminihl vwilenre the C.nniniu
. .i j -ic f i ,. ,v ,
having attacked with fury from early morning. 1 he reckless efforts
of tiie enemy were bringing them no commensurate gains.
BERLIN IS RETICENT .
On their right wine, below Noyons, the French yesterday took
more than five hundred prisoners,
. i f .
. v...V ..-.J.
Berlin, officially reporting on the fighting along this new front,
describes it as a French offensive, the wireless despatch sent out
saying: "The Germans are holding their line against newly brought
up French forces southwest of Noyons. The war office officially
states that eight thousand prisoners have been taken in this new
offensive".
FATAL ACCIDENTS
AT FLYING CAMPS
WASHINGTON, June 11 (Awtociat
fil Pre hh) Two fatal airplane acciiltMiU
in training taaiB were reported jester
cUv. At Arcadia. Florida, a machine
arrvinfr Lieu' Benjamin Haisland and
Cadet Caston, both of Penntylvania.
i rashed t,-i the ground. Jhe lieutenant
van killed and the cadof injured. Ah
inont a parallel aerident nappened af
Aberdeeo, Missiitaippi, Lieut. Clark
(imuo of Mihlao 1 1 ' i r LJ kill. id avd hi n
air companion, a ktudent, being injured.
lives of its men and the slaughter !
who agree in their reports that the
ii I
DANIELS TELLS TIMES
RAID IS A FAILURE
WASHINGTON, Juno 1 1 ( Ottiiiuh
.Secretary Daniels culiled yesterday to
the Loudon Tunc, stating thut the
German submarine raid off the Atlantic
coast had been unable to hamper the
inovemeut of American troops overseas
nor inteifere with the truffic alimj; t be
rt-yilar fa laneH.
. w. n. t.
AIK0KU MARU FLOATED
SAN FRANCISCO, June 10 uffl
ciali-The Aikoku faru. which mm
reported to have grounded upon a
d;in;ertine ledue hub Wep miftly i it
cd and brought to a Pacific port.
PORTION OF THE WESTERN FRONT Showing the sec-j
tor now being attacked in the latet German drive towards '
Paris. The shaded portion of this map Indicates the German'
gains up to yesterday hoon, since which time the line in the'
center has been pushed south of Rmioiii mr.Mitt. AUntr h;af
shaded strip has been some of
bloody war. with the Germans
J ing nothing whatever of value.
DUTIESOF LABOR
Must Be No Strike That Cannot
Be Justified To Men Who Are
Fighting In France
ST. PAUL, June 10 (Official)
Wonlx of ringing patriotinin marked
tlic ojifiiiriK aiiiireiw of President Bain
ui'l (ioiiiiitTii km the keynote of tho
n.iti,Li,Ul .mnrnntinn nf lha 4 .ki.i.i .... n '
Ki'iliTiition of Labor.
(lumpers presented to the eonven-
tin tll(. rePOrt ot lta executive coun-
I which said in part:
faJS "lE
mi mcy, justice, freedom ami absolute
'onii,ii-nc e between the government! of
mr wwiui niMi ueiwvmj lilt) ifuvuru-
the world and between
Hu nts and the people must triumph.
"Our workers are virtually a part
of our fighting foreea. There should
be no strike tlmt eannot be justified
to the men who are fighting in France.
Our whole nation a in this war as one
great people each individual imbued
with the highest ideals of justice Our
duty ia determined wheuovcr we are
doing our whole part."
(ioiiiperH told the delegates that the
American workingman will be satisfied
only with a peace through which Oer
liiun war machine shall be overthrown
and destroyed and said they must be
pn iiared to make great sacrifices and
to labor untiringly to the end that a
maximum of production be. maintained.
RAILROAD FARES GO
HIGHER ON MAINLAND
WASHINGTON. June 11 (Official)
- Higher railroad fares have gone in
ti effect on the mainland on all of
thi govornnxeut controlled railroads.
The two cents a mile basis ended at
midnight last night and the new
charge ot three cents n mile, with ad
ditional charge for Pullnmn car or
Miuilar car sorvico, went into effect.
iOtamltX . ..... , JmMm '' fV'
mnet o 522
y lSlm xf Hamper
GOMPERS POINTS TO
the bloodiest fighting of all the
suffering terrific louse and vain.
INTERVENTION N
SIBERIA IMPENDS
Diplomats Recommend To Home
Governments ThatJapanese
Should Take Action '
HARBIN, June 10 (Associated
Press) In the hope of receiving aid
from the .lapunese and Chinese and
perhaps from the Entente and from the
United Htates, Seminoff ia holding the
Holsheviki on. He is reported to have
driven back those of them who erossed
the Onon River although he is heavi
ly out numbered.
In spite nf the fact that Seminoff
is hourly expecting the arrival of as
distance from the Japanese first it is
officially denied that Japanese troops
are moving in his direction. It is ad
mitted, however, that definite' move
ments on the part of the Japanese
and Chinese to be followed by joint
operations, are imminent.
It is learned that the diplomatic
forces of the other nations at war with
the Central Powers have strongly rcc
ommended Japanese intervention and
have sent these recommendations to
their home governments. This reeom
mendation is said to include the Amer
iclius.
ENTER RUSSIA IS
ADVISED BY TAFT
WASHINGTON, June 1 1 (Associa
ted Press ) Speak ing in Newark, New
Jersoy, yesterday, Former President
Taft strongly advise I that the United
States should enter Kusia in order to
proueed against the enemv.
i
t lie i
a ad 1
I
"We must enter Russia.'' said
ex President, 'snd we must make
defend an Eastern front."
On the other band a large manufa
turer of engines who recently arrived
in Ban Francisco has advised that "we
must have pitience with the Russians
The Allies should gusrtatee the in'-p
rity of that unfortunate country."
AfjflTHFR G A I N
DRIVING HUNS
BACK A MILE
Clear Belleu Woods of Foemen,
Charging Over Dead Huns and
Capturing Two Trench Weap
ons In Their Advance
READY FOR ATTACK
ON AMIENS FRONT
Italian Headquarters Reports
Austrians About Ready For
Another Drive and Making
Many Local Attacks
PARIS, June 1 1 ( Associated Press)
American murines launched a new
attack upon the Prussian lines north
west of Chateau Thierry, on the Mama
front, yesterday, penetrating the ene
my's position along a six hundred yard
front to a depth of two thirds of
mile. The attack practically cloared
the Germans out of Helleu Wooda,
leaving them with only a foothold up
on the northern edge.
The Marines carried through theit
attack impetuously, the advance being
over the bodies of dend and wounded
Germans, whose losses were heavy.
Two minnewerfera were captured.
In the neighborhood of Bouresehes
the French and Americans continued
their attacks upon the German lines,
gaining front and adding to the mm
ber of their prisoners.
On Edt of Drtre
General Pershing, reporting on the
fighting on this sector on Sunday, says
that a heavy Germaa attack upoa the
Aaiaricaa liae was repulaed. the cue-
ItWy-fc jwuie fcaavjr. ; 'afc'T; ,
The Americans . holding . posltlops
south f Montdidier, oa.thtji edge bf
the present offensive of the' Hermans
in their new drive, were heavfly bom
barded on Sunday, the Americans south
east of Amiens being likewise attacked
by artillery. On both sectors the Sam
mies were ..prepared for an Infantry
attack to follow the shelling, but this
did not develop. ' '
British In Bruahes
There were German attacks upon
various British positions yesterday, one
of the heaviest being at Albert. All
wet;e thrown back. Last nigh't there
were only artillery duels to be re
ported by General Hal;.
Karly in the day the British launch
ed a local attack south of the Homme,
making sligh gains in the neighbor
hood of Beaucancourt. While the gain
in territory was small, the advance
enabled the British considerably to
improve their position at this point.
Opinions on the general situation
were made yesterday by Premier Cle
inenceau, who, referring to the light
ing south of Noyons, said: "It's been
a perfectly satisfactory day," and by
General Foch. The Entente command
er in chief, in a published article, says
that the Allies will assume the offen
ivo in good time and when they do
they will win.
Austrian Drive Soon
There has been a markjfed increase
in the activity of the Austrians along
the Italian front, with every indiea
tion that another great drive is to he
attempted there. Italian headquarters
reports that the railroads behind the
Austrian lines are being rushed to
their full capacity, day and night,
bringing forward troops and muni
tions. Yesterday's reports from this front
state that the artillery work is being
vastly increased and that the Austrians
have attempted a number of local sur
prise attacks, in none of which have
they been successful. The Italians arc
raiding generally.
Innreased activity along the Mace
ilo;iiaii front is also reported.
w. a. i. ...
PLANT IS COMPLETED
One of Four Great Establish
ments For the Government
WASHINGTON, June 10 (Ofti. ml
One of four great plants built tor
the government for the loadiug of pro
jectiles has been completed, it was an
nounced by Secretary Baker today. Mum
is the first of the four that were an
thori.ed and for which appropriation
was mude. Another will be completed
and in readiness for operations next
in out ti an. I tlie remaining two in Aeg
l''ich nf these plants will have -t
about $5,000,000 and thev cover fr.mi
.'000 to 5000 acres each. They w i!! h
a daily capacity for about ls.(,ru
shells.
Many private plants are alread" in
opemtion and in them H,r ir.
ployed many women.
I Coal Supply Is Cot
For Makers of
i
Passenger Autos
Will Be Reduced To One-fourth of
Last Year Cutting Supply of
Non-Essentials Is Stimulating
Nation's Demand
WASHINGTON, June 1 1 ( Associat
ed Press) ( urtailment in the use of
coal will result m a heavy curtailment
In the output of the automobile fac
tories thHt manufacture passenger au
tomobiles a ii ' I is likely to result in a
speedy cleaning out of new cars from
the market.
Announcement was made by Fuel Ad
ministrator Oiirfielt yesterday that be
ginning on August 1 the supply of coal
for the use of manufacturers of passen
ger automobiles is to be further cur
tailed and from thnt time forward un
til further nntnc will be limited to
twenty-five percent of their last year's
, consumption.
I The monthly report of the federal re
serve banking board tells of the effect
I that has followed the orders for the
curtailment of the production of non
essential goods. It is noted that this
curtailment has greatly stimulated the
demand for such goods, especially in the
ease of pianos, other musical instru
ments and talking machines. The incli
nation is to purchase the article before
the supply in the market shall be ex
hausted and the reduction in automo
bile output is expected to be followed
by a similar demsSid.
Business throughout the United
States is reported to be good with war
time orders tending to crowd oat those
for goods needed by the civilian popu
lation. w. i. a.
GET INTO WARFARE
Millions Available For Use Over
seas If Needed
HAfc FHANCISCO, iine 10 (Offl
eUUrigX raJae..f6:tlM Chlnena as
fighting men .and the report that mil
lions of them are available for the
use of the Allies overseas, were voiced
by C. O. Smith of Taintao, recently
arrived here from the Orient.
Chinese are available as fighters and
as workers in millions, he said, pro
viderf they shall be needed and trans
portation can be furnished to them.
He noted that 120,000 from Shan
tung had eagerly joined the Chinese
labor corps that ia now in France.
Hundreds were rejected because of
physical flefects but they were not
daunted or discouraged by refusals of
their services and nought repeatedly
to get into the corps or some line of
war service for the Allies.
' w.. a.
HOSPITALS BUSY
LONDON, June 11 (Associated
Press) t'nder Hocretary Mc.Pherson of
the wur office told the house of com
moils yesterday that the Germans had
sent air raiding parties to bomb the
British hospitals in France seven times
between May 15 and June 1, many of
the bombing squadrons being in large
force. These hospital bombers had in
flicted nine hundred and ninety one
casualties upon sick and wounded men,
hospital attendants and Red Cross niirs
es, the number of deaths resulting be
I ing three hundred and forty-eight.
w. m. a.
SEVENTY-FOUR NAMES
ON CASUALTY LIST
WASHINGTON, June 11 f Associat
ed Press) Yesterday 's raeualty list
announced bf the war department is:
Killed in action, thirteen; died of
wounds, five; killed in airplane itcci
dent, one; died of disease, one; died
from accident, one; total deaths from
nil causes, twenty one. There were
forty six severely wounded and seven
wounded to a degree not yet deter
mined. '
W. 1. 1.
SMALLPOX EPIDEMIC HITS
GREAT KRUPP WORKS HARD
Till-: HAOI'K, Netherlands, June 10
i Associated Press) A despatch from
a neutral correspondent based on ad
vies from (lermniiy. nnys that there
is an epidemic of black smallpox in
tin- Kiupp plant with four or live
death- daily. The epidemic i- attrib
uted to underfeeding and insanitury
coml i t ions.
w. a. a.
REDUCE COAL USE
niKMINGHAMfEnglund, Ma;
i. Associated Press) A national s
lor household coal to apply to the
'oonin was decided upon nt a i
cu b h're this week. A 'educ''oa
r" oal for household.: -s is mi
lat-'d ;.i order to avoid rj'. .0...11
1 1 c : Li industrial purpjtu-5
A homo office report shows
pni .1 i ll from mines in It'll 7
.Its l' 1 I'M .1', ,..1 1 - -
tons.
:tn -
hem e
hole
infer
"' the
up
tl b"
E
FLEET
IN FEW YEARS
Merchantmen Will Carry Stars
and Stripes Into Every Port
and Link America To Every
Land Predicts Hurley
LEAD OF BRITUN
WILL PASS AWAY j
Half a Million Tons a Month This
Year and More Than a Million
Tons a Month Next Year Is
Expected
SOUTH BEND, Indiana, June
11 (Associated Press) By
1920 t,hc United States will have
a merchant fleet totalling twenty-
five million tons, the largest fleet
under one flag ever in the history
of the world.
Ships flying the Stars and
Stripes along the trade routes by
that time will have cost a total
of five, billions of dollars. They
will ply through every ocean, link
ing up America with Central and
South America, with the Orient,
with Russia, with Australia and
with Europe. . f '
FIGURES BY HURLEY :
Sdch is the confident prediction
made heef last night' in ad? ;
dreaV3iJ Edward Nl- -Tittrleyy '
chairman "of - the shipping boar d, r
who stated that he expected the
shipping output of the American
yards this year to amount to more :
than three million tons, while the
yards next year will launch ships ,
of a total tonnage of thirteen and
a half million.
This latter figure is more than
Great Britain, heretofore the
greatest shipbuilding country of
the world has ever been able to
reach, in any five years, said Mr
Hurley.
Since the United States entered
the1 war, her merchant fleet has
been increased by four and a half
million tons. Before the end of
the year, American yards will be
adding to this to the extent, he
expects, of half a million tons ev
ery month.
- w. a. a. .
AVIATION CAMP IS
Only - Sixty Days Required To
Make Ready For Students
A WK8TEBN AVIATION CAMP,
.Tune 10 (OfHeial) Marking tha open
ing of thia new camp today the flrit
of many ntudenta in flying arrWed
thin morning. 1
Thia eamp eovera an area of 784
Keren and ita construction hai coat
1.1100,0, K). It ia remarkable for ita
rapid eoaitruction for it hat been com
pleted in aixty dayi after tha itart
was made.
There are now ready aeeommodationa
for 1500 aviators aud students. On
the premises there are fifty seven
buildings of various sir.es and types
and they are equipped with every mod
ern device that ia known to aviation.
W. a. a.
DIVER RAIDERS MAY
BE WITH THEIR CONVOY
NOKKOLK, Virginia, June 10 (As
Hneiated Press) Survivors of the finar
ilel Kio, American steamer torpedoed
seventy miles off the American eoast,
assert that they saw a "mother ahip"
nf HOOD tons in the vicinity of the
Hiilnuarine.
W. l. a.
WILL POOL RESOURCES
WASHINGTON , June 10 (Associa
ted Preta) Government official! of
AlUed dcpartir.cat are working 00 a
rlan to j,ool all resources 0 the Unit
e 1 States and tho Allies into oue rast
vomunie and wur machine. Theso
'Jann will ni,"n be presented to Presi
dent Wilson.
A
WORLD'S
RECORD
tjUICKLY COMPLETED
- A .1
! .
v t '. 3 ' .'
V, ':
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