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The Hawaiian gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, August 20, 1918, Image 2

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025121/1918-08-20/ed-1/seq-2/

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f -;- FRIDAY, ' AUGUST M' 1918. TUESDAY, AUGUST . 20, ' ,918. SEMI-WEEKLY.
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GOVERNMENT'S'
THREATENEQ;
Terauchi and His Cab-
Critical
TOKIO. August 18 (Special
to N'ippu Jiji) An urgent
imperial edict; Retting forth rega
Iatinn relatinrr to oimniilunrv
. .
purchase hy the government of
all available domestic ' rice 'sup
plies as well as for "importation
from Korea and China of foreign
flee tas yesterday" promulgated
by the frtiperor; Th goverruiietrt
recently made an appropriation
of 10,000.000 yen' for fhe ptirpW.
The utterances of the pTess are
rtx6t bitter in condemnation of
the present Cabinet;'- headed by
rremr Teraucht' Open 'denun
ciation .xl the government for
permitting the rice riot situation
throughout the empire to beeome
AO criiealjls fnade by the leading
'papers which at the same time
are- demanding the ' cabinet's
resigna'tiort.1:- V -f i
CALLED INCOMPETENT
"The responsibility for all these
disturbances Testa upon thi Tera-i
nchi-cibinet,-' said the press, "and
its failure in meetitig the situa-
It has ho " excuse to remain
s
tn
power. ' Jt roust resign,"
.
. txi.: fr '..Ut,.,;
ffon ' prcerly- show, that the Jf l ''",t,nf "V
V : , Deputy MaishaJ Vawter ia bm report,
ministry IS wholly incompetent l'vWhcn no liquor ean be had there p.
in 'Vianftllnii- t Via nut'in'm a ff 7 f ' notfareable decrease ia the numbef
. -...""' uuiiHiuiij i Tanana atnee .the. aloonr or,e closed; J nere i te' ease 11
f few Trlrtimi win. 5' rnni!r!.i I hare 'not seen a Dkrnin iindsr-fLaiiiV fair rait on Co)ocrn(
'rl fclnmn.. r,.6. wf. f.Uquor aine, th day. af Ooputy .KuekoJ
... ...w. rr...lovru,--ll,v, leard of no eomplainU from aaid there had been
nalist, IS -authority fo an, aytfga-f othera. , Every one is obeying the law, of the population
n . alreaay.ajrnven at a aeClBlOtl that
! tnrJsfgatiSn- of ht -eabinet-
J "
the only way open for himself,
?nd his official family - r"0 nd Alaska iaila wU go out of thfrf had been some easulties. ,
tu. a . , . " '. fbuaioeea." ' "What will be the rrputation of the.
toe general belief, however, IS j edodition peculiar to Alnaka nave press if thoy are forced to spread such
that the Terauchi nrmistry will m,B Nofvil most noticeke false reportaf" he asked. . Meerfield
. - !.' Ipriug the dark wiuter months said thut methods of the "enernl eom
remain in XJWer for Sometime. fa the northlaiid the salooos have been, mi.n.1 remin.lrrl him of suvint that
VJ" j ptaetirally ib only gathering plare "'under martial law eve.-v jackass can
CONSIDERS DOWNFALL
OFrARTNriTrPPTAtM
UI CABINET CERTAIN
r?' The 'Terauchi Ministry ft eondemil-
ed," said K. Kawamura, city, editor
. i. - w: t.-i j, . .
... ."iiu will, yesioraay in aiseuar,
eiuK iur ibic or ine Japanese govern-
xaeat. "The downfan of the cabinet
is inevitable and it is now bat a qaee-
tion f tine when Terauchi wil be eaat
down and out. ; ' ' '
"Premier Terauchi is unmistakably
one of the grfateU and ablest aUtaa
mon In Jaj.nu. Ife is a man of eqetgy
and reeonreei He lias many able lieo-
tenauts in hia nabinei,. aiich mea aa
Baron H. rioto, minister of forelua af-
'fct; y"0 mitet & to?i
merce. But since he ia a bureaucratic
statesman aad as hia cabinet has o
foundation in any of the political pax.
ns, uis success as tne aeaa C the na
tion's affair evnnot but be queation
ed. PITUATIQM PBOTJUAB
"It ia a peenl(ar thing o see a so
called ''uaeonstitutioaal eabihet, a cab
inet that has ne foundation in any
political party, a the present Tere,u.
ehi cabinet, rise to power In Nipppn.
"Teraucki's rise to power came aa a
climax of one of the most bitter poli
tical flghta In the modern history of
Japan. . When tha ! Okuma cabinet,
which was backed up by the Kenaeikai
tout opposed bitterly by tha rieiyukai,
the two largest '' political parties of
Nippon, resigned a fear ysras ago, and
when Couut Terauchi, who was at the
tkme Japan 'a governor general of
Korea, waa called upon by tha empsroi
to' form a new eabioat, the Belyukai
promptly went to tka aid of the count
and pledged its support to the new cab
inet in the Japanese diet
POUTIOAL MAJfETJVXB
"What the Beiyukai leaden med at
was the dowafall of the Qkuma cab
inet and the enseikai and they did
not rare mui'h who the successor would
)e.' It was merely a political plot that
.tleo) a temporary knot between the Bel
yukai and the Terauchi cabinet.
"Following formation of the cabinet,
.Terauchi ordered the dissolution of the
diet as the Kenseikai held a control
ling majority over the Heiyukai. When
ft new election waa held the latter, with
every possible assistance by the gov
ernment, won over Us opponents. The
Heiyukai, therefore,' possesses at the
present timf a controlling majority in
the diet.
' 1 ' ' WTTHOCT StTPFOETEBJS
"The fate Of the Terauchi cabinet
ia at the mercy of the Belyukai since
the cabinet baa- no backing in the diet
of any political' party except the major
ity party. Torniug the back of the itai
Vukal against Premier Terauchi meaas
ike downfall of the rablnet. As there
i euWeient reaaon td believe that the
tSeivakai ia not so friendly to the cab
inet as it baa been I am expecting the
HEW TORE, August l (Associated Pre) Troop have Won called out
to supprra te rioting in almost every important eity of Japan, it ia related
jwt ntivirfa 'w ibi
Associated , 1'rae
mat
atioa at Maibam han been affected byth spirit, of unrest a4 it in belie
lit possible hat the Empire ia nesting a social eriaia, , , -Ji r
Fretn art i ties' of Japar cam Tirta Mt 'disorder' and terrorism.
qui
NajMya, the great iinvwelain renter, a
in the rioting. At several places, including Kol, the -soldjer were compelled
to nm their bayoata ami even to fir on. tha snobs to cans them to scatter,
anil disperse. .''' ) 1 ,' (',: .
, In Tukle, houses and business place nave been rullaired'nif damaa-ed by
the' rioter kail Kanakas, tha great recreation raxert, wan damaged by the mob.
k" populate ia being
J ury aaif tii (falhariB(r ara prten ntronly aotl rapifalidtic fn their too. Tha
trnubl 14 evidently an expression f,
symptom, i . i . ..
. ' Tieatsi advice received ia London taiil: "The Japanese rice riots are
proving ta be tha worst outbreak againt sonstitutrd authority that .ha been
witnessed ia Japaa for many yeara. ' The" rioter r resorting to arts of ex
treme violence aneh ai the aae of dynamite an( tneentllariarn.
II
Uiil
JAILS OF ALASKA
Nearlj AH Sentences In Past
Twenty-Years - Due To Use of
Liquor Is Conclusion of Official '
FA IBBANK8, AU.Jca. . Augimt 1
Jaila, in A'AJa have ; been rapidly
eiaptied of priaonera alnae prohibition
went into effect on peeember .11, and,
according to C VV. Vawter, deputy
United Ktatet marihal at Tanana, ro
porting to hia chief, 1. T; Krwia, I'nit
ted Ktatea marsbal for the fourth divi
sion, with heAilquartera ia Fairbanks,
tka jaila 'will mob be available for
other naea thanie eonflnement of
lanbreakej-a. ,,
""inei I ntv'a been in Alaska, nearly
twenty year now, 1 believe that the
eaua of the fonApainnt of ninety nine
pereent of tne priaonera who have serv
ed at-ntenrea in air can be traced dl
of ajetm
ta, M illustrated by the- awal'
made recently ia ihe aaaiU'
' '' ' " . !
number,'
i district. . 4
""There haa. been nn 'drunkenneaa. in
lit appear. . l
emptied of , prisoners in the near fn-
t.edrjr taw." All
, the liquor that can possibly be cached
away will have been consumed very
-i,OT mua onnned toother in nettle
mepls that are flit off from the rest
of the wov!,l, and there has always
leen a h e n(.:.. e iu the I o.iu Of ve'
selstuiliii' t Ahini whirl .n -iven
T . . .. . . .
over l , re. l liquor itwi into
the terrltorv. i
- '
. IV: at.
PH IJADELPHIA HOMES
I IIIJ IIHI IIWIIIIUj
. .! .A) 1
4 H
'
City I Unable To Accommodate
.... . .
All Who Come To It
PHII.A'DkL'pHIA. Aiik-ust 1 (Asso
ciated Press) This city is crowded aa
never before. The influx of strangers
from, all parts of the United Ntafea to
toil in shipyards, munitions plants and"
'in other places where jioveruinent work
is beini( dose has greatly intensified
Ule housing problem.
Few nouses are available for renters.
A, "To Let" sign is scarcely ever
seen except In sections well removed
from the industrial plants.
Because of the high cost of building
materials relatively few boubes are
gong up, apart frpm those being con
structed by the government' for ship
yard operations until nfter the war.
Withal the problem of finding ae
eojomodajions for everyone is slowly
being solved, and after a time niajiy
families who have been furcd to share
homes with others probably will be able
to get plac.es. of their awn.
Rents, iq kefping with other things,'
.have taken an upward bound, sharply
in ip,e instances' Htepi have been
taka io prevent piofiteeripg but
there ha been no governiiieotal db-.
jwtion to advance where condition
warranted them.
Perkap no other city in the country
eaa claim so large a number at proper
ty owner as Philadelphia. Real estate
men figure that within the past year
more homes were purchased here than
in the three preceding years. ,
Where it was formerly possible to
clear a real estate transaction in
few weeks, it new requires as mny
moutlm. (rks tite and trust com
panr offices have been compelled to
work nights, as well as days, and eveq
thee they have been uuable to keep
abreast of their task,
Because of the keen dematd fqr
homes, real estate valuations kave in
creased many millions, and official fig
urea -which will be published later on
are expected to show a pheaomertal in
crease, ffrowth over those of 1 VI 7.
The abnormal luoulrv bv homeaeeker
Is attributed to the high wares patd
DRY LAW EMPTIES
3
BENE A
SQClAt CRISL
tecwived yesterday.
kivtil the nnvul
ved
At
mob of more than (10.000 nersmiH enroled
directed against all evidences of tux
JfN f ' fijh.jfw jty only a
15
n t
A eoldier for only a month, Chin
i;nnn cnoy, a Korean draftee, waa
found dead in hia bunk in the bnr
raeka of Company A, First Hawaiian
Infantry, ou Wednesday morniux just
after oveille. ;
Aa the aoldier waa around with mem
bera of hia company the uiht before
4. appeared to. be in the best, of
health, the finding of his dead body
the next morning gave rise to many
ru.Mora around the post. ' These were
quickly act at rest by tha surgeon who
pronounced tha man dead of heart
failure, which -a post mortem examin
ation eonilraied, .
Private. Chun Cbin Choy wan thirty
years of aire, a. native of Korea, and
the first of his race in the drafted
forces on Oohu to die in the military
aervice. iv
.ma. a.
PROTEST AF MUZZUNG
5 OF GERMAN NEWSPAPERS
NEW YORK, August 1. (Associated
Prte) The press in Qermany waa M.'
fOMd during a debate ia the Beiohxtaj
AHied air raida on German eitiea -e-
eordinir to German aewsbanera rae.eivad
' question waa ; the
on Mav is. ;
' of' thaCentra ri'rtar
no tjtnely warnins
ov the military au
taontiea.
Meerfield, Socialist, said
that although every child ia Cologne
knew that tweDdy Civ, peraon.ljad
been killed, the newspapers on that day
were forced to y "that unfortunately
rule.
i , : ,,t , .. , ; ,
E
MKS., A riyniiu, Aiyut 3 (AsstM'ia-
itT.okne
uiu,,,,! ,y lhe ('burch of Jesus Christ
of th.
Mesa.
l atter Day Slants (Mormon) for
Tho temple will serve a the
pure nt rliurch fyr the eutire souttbwest.
At presi-iit there are but six of these
greut ii'iuples in f iitcui o. Four are in
I' tali, nun hi Cunuila and oue in Ha
waii. Many Muriuon refugees from
ileiicii hue settleil in the valley of
Arixona.
, w' ' ' "
IS
, ltl LMis AIKKS, August ) (Asaoci
ated Pre,,) Thai Arjjyntiua although
nut in ihi. Mar is suiTering Its material
conseipiciii-es, in evidenced by the eon
stanfiy inrri-asing cost of liviug, sear
city nt uik, lowering of wages, devel
opment (,f "trusts," cornering of ar
ticles ut consumption, and extensive
private Hru!atiun in iublic necessities.
The government is being urged to adopt
emergen, v measures similar to those
'pursued ly other countries where the
war produced such condition. It has
FOUND DEAD If
SUFFERER
been suggested that special committees-LelfiesHy
be ;ii ut o.l bv the States to inter
vene, or that additional power be ex
tended to those brauehes of the public
dmiuiidiution, i)ch SI, the police, hy
giene, inin,r, which from the nature of
their t'liin tiuns are best equipped for
coping with the evil. , Comparison,
of (nice of various article of prime
necessity in force last year with those
ruling today indicate that many in
creases may not be attributed directly
to the vwir luit rather to artificial fact
ors engendered by speculation, price
juggling nnd cornering of supplies.
PILES CURED IN 6 TO 14 DAYS
PAZO OINTMENT ia guaranteed to
cure blind, bleeding, itching or pro
truding in 6 to" Jdio or
money refunded. Manufactured by
tlie' AklS Mt.mCiNKCO .Sl.ouis
U. i. a
fjrstLiicrtidsr":"
? Are Quoted Above ht
'NEW TOEK, Attfun IS (Offl
clal) Trading kaa recently boon
acttre in Liberty ta Bond of.
the fp-st ' lwue' and, or, Saturday'
thay r-vhe tka bkgkeat flgur at
tilch they liart bea 'ol4
their, (ssuance. OO.S passing par
by on 61 a, point, ;' y (
' Tbo. bond Of t issn 4 6
only non-taxable, but they are
; alao conyrtlbl Into r9ndi of tub-,
aeiinent fsauw aad Vi wertpel dor
liig whUh they poaaaci tall tet
ter ausllty wtli 4op November
.9' wWtk isy be'p to 'explain the
advance of thro and a half
-percent' govsrnment security
abore par. t Too price cortainly t
dedicate tho security felt bi gov
amnant Ueuee, ';, i.y.'iw 1. 1
!i v ti -! .' . t
Need of large Force Is Pointed
Out To Allies' Representa- '
i i. lives By Leader " '
W A RH I N Q Ti ) N , August 1!) (Asao
elated Prrsa-Al'rrent need of speedy
taeiVtance,' rendered nn a. large scale
by Jbe,. Allies is impressed upon th
Allies. If the anecesse, then far achlev
el by the Cstrhu r-lovnka are to be
followed'.; tip- and pressed. Oenernl
Die Wrhs, , commander of the Cxeeho..
Wovnk forefs has cnlled upon the rep
reren'ativen of the- Allies and urged
baste In the depatchin. of the Hibe
rian expedition., H sold the assistance
must com, on a large, scale and he
Advocated an advance upon Irkutsk
in Wr)er ,to aave WVstern (Siberia. ' '
Oflicisl despatches received from T
(io. said that. the Caec.ho-Blovak force
of the. Maritime provinces, left on An
gust 8. (or.Usrbia, and traveled over,
the tlilnee Kastera railway.
On, tkt Hssuri front where it Is esti
mated tne enemy has a trpgth of
lOllXXK), quiet was prevailing.
, "Th arr.ival of the advance forces of
the expedition of the Allies baa nerved
to greatly perturb: the Bolshevist and
their A'eHftyGerman allies and numer
oua desertions from their rank are re-POTted,-
-,.,.,'
,- ... '
Penetrate As Far As Havre and
; ' Also ?hower Bombs on Cat
ais and Dunkirk
,ir. . i i ii ," v"
PABIB, August 19 (Associated
Press) Oerman, air aquadrona bava
been very active in bombing town be
hind the front during the past two
day. Numerous raidf in, . yariou dir
ections are reported. . i
At Kouen mi were billed and five in
jured by the explosive which were
dropped: Tho GoOa flew, far b
Havre but there, they did no aeriooa
dataiog to Uvea, person or property.
Verdun ha been twice raided but
without material-damage resulting.
In the ojther direction Calais fad. Dun
kirk were raided, no great damage be
ing reported. '
Fonek is now the reading French Ae.
Downing Six enemy planes in a single
day he has record of seventy German
dsnes to hi credit.
w. a. a.
REALLY MAT!
I'ABIM, August 19 (Associated
Press) The note which Spain sent
to Genu n y deciariug that from this
time forti) bpain will compensate itself
for any marine looses occasioned by the
Teuton policy pf ruthb? jpulmsriniiy;
by taking over a tonnage of German
ilitrqed nhippiug equal t that destroy
ed, ia. to be., eqnsitlered an ultimatum.
Madrid ()epatcbe pf yesterday con
firmed the report of. the sending of the
note and snid it waa Intended to be a
final ultimatum on the shipping ques
tion. '''' '
WASHINGTON, August 19 (Asso
ciated Press) Five officer ami seven
members of the crew of the 8-hurz
which foundered after a collision with
auother American steamer of the coast
of Florida on June 81 kave been ape-
o6mmeniTed fOr' bravery
The Bchura wa formerly the Mer
man steamer Oeier aud waa interned
at Honolulu where it waa' taken over
by the ynited State when war was
dec'ared, repaired and put iuto eerv-
GOVERNMENT SECURES
IMINGSTOCK
f. Ji M - l(,
WASHINOTON. August JeJ (Ofti
iJ) Th railroad administration re
porta that it has received 10,694 eon I
ear from the ar builders aine Janu
Jh ffvn.tJua it. bo, re
ceived a total of 19liq freight cars.
During th- present year 4H,fl5H new
eara of all kind will b aecured,
SCURZ IS COMMENDED
AMERICA
DO WQT '-fi
( WA&HINQTONV A nguat . 1 (Associated fres) Act! vlty of the, Ameri
ea fopee in-three sector are "told In, the oflfclal daspft?h .J?f'r'd las
night from the ,'4mrrirn ronV f -''j v .', .- .V,,
- (. lhe Vesle.aoetor the?, flghtiug waa eoalned to an rtiUery gagemfnC
i'ronj )rrak bf idajr ntll,the'fall ,of 4rkaese, '(th4 Amerieaa-' artillery aeac
shells' far1 0 the north, over the Vesle Bivrri T,tbla abelUna tk German'
jtfpl.ied but that Frac.Americsn.'lit(eries througbout tke entire day averaged
two sneita tj xb on or tji enemy, i t'atrola whlck were at out on Saturday
night and penetrated p onsi.lerabl syay. to the norjl) of the river faileii to
And the Garnab Infantry, indicating ihajsi a j withdrawal, la the dirnrtlea of
tho Aiene ia ia progress. . ' . ,'V TT- v"1 V ' .
.".'"' .- r i 7 oaiw Icosa obockd' . "'-Vr.' -'- ,
In the ldrraine '.H-tpr the" American goiaet still more ground about
Frapellewhe. position whirl (hey took from th foe On Saturday, and main
tained their bold on the town1 in ipit of the fact that the.' eurtny .dropped
twnnty-flve kuqdred shell upon ; it On raid which th Boche' attempted
-as repulsed by( rifle Are from automobile. . , . ' , .. 'it'
t i-Jn the, Wevre aeetor' the American were ia aom lively patrol engage
ments. ...f,;.. . ':., V P." V'
Other despatches said that th American anti-craft' go a 3 rite off two
Grrman bombing plane.
' PSHSKXVO
General'' Pershing a eoipmfniqu, eonlirmed the' new f attempted enemy
raid pn American bonpltalsitowning of enemy machine anif the taking of Prt
i'H. , ' ""':-' ' ' ' -','t
Ia the Ve sector he report that th enemy position er being shelled
da pud night with tha enemy .replying
WASHTNGTON, August ,1 (OflleiaOr-Danger of privation has now
pasait i the cheering' naounremeut whirk has 'been male by Herbert C
tlopyer, I'nlteil fUate food administrator-in public statemeat ia Lon
.don, according to presa despatches received here. Ia thbi. atnnt he is .
; Rioted a having said i "The danger of privation kaa now" e passed,
'I am atisflel with the result of the 'conference' of the food con
trolera of the eo belligerent held here, during the paat three areeka. ' A.
progmm has been agreed upon as to, the, different con) modi tie required
- not only to maintain the health hut also tbe comfort, of th armies and
the ei (liana as well. :: V '' ; ''. ''. ' '- 'U'?: ;V' ;
"Tho people of North America will be abUvtblt year to shoulder th
movement of the great built of food andj aupplica U th European , AJltef
anu ii win luereiure u wwuk is cnruui mi fisi jengin, 0 tne voyage
to bring the suppH to tboee European AlKes, effecting a considerable
saving of -tonnage.. ., , . .- j ...$ a. fi- ; ...
"Arrangement hv been made by the, four food cntroller for the
creation of food, eoupeil which will be maintained in contlnuou aesaiou
in lndon, . , ; n W . ..' " a-V--
. "There will be universal war bread but it will, bit of better quality
than that pf last yeaa. . This wilt be for all tbos nation that ar fighting
Germany and thi bread wilt practically be obtainable f without. rationing.
There will be ample auppti of fats knd meat if nr pop.alatiOus wil( 1
- etooomicol and will avoid- wasta. W shall alsol be iblet Jtuild jip stoeks
'.' of cereal against the next, harvest in case it shhnld pro,v to be less
- bountiful than will tiie present barrMt.''. Vi.'.; 5.;v,. ,vy?-.r. . ft,,.
w ' -. W4 a .
Iflf'fllTlfl I 9YOCL' ATA ..!
mw"iuv ;.iuitv,ti iu
f " j f ' ' . '
urawn rrom
I ri Ji M tl ft
Most All Yocatjo:ns
. .,a,
Reoort of Collections
ongW
Where the Burden Rest, and,
VAkar. It . I rait U I tcKtlwl
Whtre It Is Felt Most Lrghtly
In Its Many Applicatio'hs ' 1 -
WAKHINGTON, August ' i-(Aso-ciated
Preas)-rOi the tHSfiOOflfH) per
sonal income tax collected for the fiscal
year 1911, investor and speculators in
all fields shouldered jast on-hird ot
the burden, labor .086 percent of it, and
the remainder earn ?rom th multitud
inous ranks of those whose incomes
were classed as derived from "busi
ness" and "services".
IO mb raced within the latter classes
is every calling from that of banker
tn the farmer with a scant aire, end,
in the profession, from the practitioner
of international law to the modest
chiropodist.
Ninety percent of the total tax wa
derived from those fulsome income of
more than f 26,000, and l.M pereent
from those of the $5000 class and less,
although the latter contributed more
than third of the total 437,000 re
turns. Tim - highest average rat of
tax actually paid upon net iueome sb
jeit to tax wa 12.9 pereent, whieh fell
upon the highest income class of 5,
000,000 and over. Only ten individual,
however, bore the burden of that rate.
They contributed $13,000,000 to the
totoi tax. The eve-ruga rate of tax
paid declined through the income
r lasses to a minimum of ,29 percent
for the t.'IOOO and 401K , elaaa.
Although income. of $100,000 and
mor constituted only 1.5 percent of the
total number of returns, they paid near
ly three-fourth of the total tax. '
"Property" income from atock,
bonds, rents, royalties and all money
working sources constituting nearly
one half of the net total of aix billion
dollars 'reported, even In the face of
the exemption of si) dividends, amount
ing to exactly a third of the. total net
income returued, bore nearly it pro
portionate one haMf of the ' total tax
because of the mueh higher proportion
of "property" income in the returns
of the higher income, classes, paying th
heavier - rate of tax. "laoomas from
" business " and "service" footed the
remainder of the tax bill.
Matrimony rroA table .
' As an evidence of the inducements
to thrift in matrimony, the return of
mnrried men, Making due deduction for
.joint returns of buba)4 A wi, inJ
diuutcd tl c'.r wealth at more than five
times that of ingl, ne as showa by
their returns, the former bearing a cor
responding burden ot the tax except
for exemption iu the $3000 ad $4i00
cu amounting to about t) percent of
their toal income reported.
Although for the country at large,
the return of siugl men were doubl
thus of,, single women,, find a)i . New
Kiigluiid status were a conspicuous ex
ception to the Tule. The total Income
reported by single mm in that wetjeq
goal
CONTTKMI '
only Intermittently,
.Wt'H; .barly JI5. pereent th ttal
of ,ngl women, bearing teatt
Itaorry .eitDkrav'tho.-srlor lndpl,-
. anf rnjn4T eapamty i
thN
England women or a reluctance to ahar
District of Columbia iatf Uawkif were f
,la eonapiettoua lit that reeoect show I
img siwwv ei(uir. revurus ior smgi men
k a striking eccentricity In the report
w uws-w t1 tv Vined and un-
kH labor !, ftf 'twenty two i-
comes abvvn tk ASOeWW marit, .five of
them being above 100,000. Two hun
dred knd eighty labor return were
above lluTWO, : '
.: Four aotnjnereial traveler showed in
come o,yer flQo.OOO,, id two
salpoakeepera, pn . prof eaalonal sports
nta,. eifhtfeea htel proprietor' ad
twenty two. innurnne' agents, ' Actors,
Binder anj musicians to the number
of WIS showed a total iiu'ooie of $11.-
.128,000 a net average of over $12,
000. and a possibility to stimulate the
Other npfiQQ not, waking returns. Five
ot the inoom were,,ov,er $160,900,
Is the aas.of, authors, editors ani re
porter, there were sixteen incomes' of
better than $100,000, and two above
$5,00,000. Twelve ministers of the gos
pel, showed Uvcomea of more than uv,
w,o. , ;,. ;. ,"' ....
. Tbe legal profession earned the great
est ,tOt.l incomes among profession,
althugh the average income . among
engineer waa hifdier.
Of the 23.000 nir' rutuierj iu the
country In 101C, ono in every ten made
returns, paying a total of twelve per
cent the tax l of the'merehaats, one
in ten made returns, paying twelve lire
tooth percent of the taxi of e.owiUrjs
sioq broker ,io alt fields, one iu fi -.
paying eiuhi percent; real estate boU
era. y, In.fo-.ping 0.g3 peraent;
lawyer, and Juiige. on. jo flv ... paying
x5 percent! mi owner and opera-
x5 perAenti nil owner and opera.
tr, W,' PV'Pg 4 pewent.
Que tarter ia about every four hun
dred mad returns, paying an aggre
gat of, one percent. of th tax, one
teacher in. every two. hundred, one
clergyman in about every aeveuty five.
Maw York Leads. ,
Tkttyreerslates reporting the great
est tbtal "jUwiV". Vr. the order
of . their Utur,' New .York. Pennsyl
vania and Illiaois., Nw York, with
nearly two billion, reported almost a
third of. the total retufas. This, how
vr, I not an a ceo rate indieatioa of
tha .aeUjal, wealth of a att, for per
son flls-Mturas wherever they resifV
rejiardlea of where tbeis investments
or properties sr. It ia a fairly no.
curate ' indleatiqn, however, of where
that muck iooome i ipent.
The net perapfal incomd reported in
1919 totaled t&,3QU)Q0Q, an increase
ef $3,40000,000 osvet or about
40 percent. --
Corporat return for 1916 showed
a total net ineoine of $rt,700,ooo,000,
an tnereaie-'of more thao three billion
over 1913 and flv billion over 1914,
mnr thaq 100 phreeot: Of the
341100' eorporatioa reporting, 40 per
cent (howed Bb net earning, which,
however, trfl a,'w prce'ptag than
U predU)g year. . j -.
.Of Mia $)7;'aO,OO0 corporal tax
oollecied. 17.fji perceo of it was drawn
from .publie-, utiiHci 1). pereeat froiri
Jroi m4 tte pj'oduciloui and. 9 per
cent from oilvraf operation. The
remainder ram, lamely from miaecila
neoii oianufactnriog iniustrie, bank,
ing and insufaqc eompaaiea, aod Pier
ohandliing companies . ,
Heavy Shell'Fire Com
els Bocl.cs f o Fall
Sdck Security From
Shells
i jrV ASIllNGTON, Aitgijst 19
VV -r(Associated Press)
Gradually j;he famous (.ys salient
td hV' West rAmentieres' ia
yieliing . ifrtdef 'the) ' Mfength of
continued liritish pressure. Gen
eral Haig'a forces are compelling
the foe to seek ground further to
the eastward and in the 'general
direction ' of Arrtientieres where
theyt nay be secure irOm tha big
gun shells which for weeks past
have been crossing this entire
salient raising havoc among its
boche' defenders and rendering
insecure' the Teuton line. " Fur
ther1 ground in 1 this salient was
Evacuated by the enemy yester
day the withdrawal made in good
order.'1.
Between Vieuxbcrquin and
Baileuil, to the east of Ilaze
brouck the British advanced to a
depth .varying from 1000 to 2000
yards alongt four mile frbnt
wbiLV at Merville,' further south
west four hundred prisoners were
taken and hositidns eained and
fheld.
' Doth to the north and the
soUth of the Somme the Franco
British troops are giving the Ger
mans no rest while' along the
V'esle the Americans and French
are harrassing the foe. In Lor
raine the American forces are
making local raids and harrassing
the enemy with a heavy artillery
fire. ' i-;t-
GAINS FOLLOWED UP
At the' joining or hinge of the
enemy's Aisne and Somme lines
(jturttlr
important gains were
madfe by the French yesterday
following up their victory of Sat
urday at Autreches, ten miles
northwest of Soissons where (hey
carried the entire' plateau, gain
ing the high land between Au
treches and the Aisne and gain
ing positions which dominate the
region to the northward, still fur
ther menacing the 'enemy hold in
that terrain, in the direction of
,tbe Oise.
ENVELOPING ROYE
Continuing ' the circling movement
about Itoye, the Hritisb drew nearer
to the Chonlnes Kove rood between
Chilly and Kransart to tne north of
the boleugured town thus jeopardiiting
it from the northward wh;le to the
south there were henvy artillery en
gagement in progress throughout the
Further roulli, in the direction of
Noyop, there was spjrifid artillery
flghtiii),' betwcii t'ainysiirii'.ntx anil
Beuvrigny, between Novnn mid I ax.fiu
ny fnm whence the French continue
i to advance.
I In the fighting to the south of the
. Aucre, advances were scored by the
I Krench forces which took 100 prisoner.
, (jenerni March, United States chief
lof stuff, iu summing up the results yes-
" -
d 0nHiv(, th. Allies ha ve s"
i
'nt 1'icar
surceeded in regaining aptiroximatelv one-third of
the territory which the Germans took
iri their March and April drive together
with 40,000 prisonera and hwve suc
ceeded in killing and wounding im
mense numbers of the Germans and in
taking mueh ordasnre which is regard
ed as a hghly important port of th
victory at this time
Pre despatches tell of the confer
ring upon General Ilnig of the Var
Cross by Premier Clemenceau upon rec
ommendation of General Focb in recocr-
Lqitfon of the splendid service he baa
rendered to the Allied cause.
...-
MACHINE GUM OUTPUT .
'' 1 " REACHES QUANTITY
M !', t; ' ,ii , c I ,
WASHINGTON, August 19 (Asso
eirted rreis) Vorn ripid progress in
the Mliv -f ordnnnce for the Amer
lean fX "diliornry force is beini;
shown. Kepcrts W vt v'esterd'ay said
that there hnve b.n-i 10H,8U.-I machine
i gun turocd gut nm a. rented by the
"overninent. Of these :W,2W were
Brownings.
FARMERS AW SUFFERERS
DUBir, August 1H (Assoeiuted
Press) With the Kiim Feiners rnidiug
the farmers and taking their shotguns
and th police in return seizing gun to
prevent them' from falling into the
hand of the binn Koinors, the farmers
au.d themselves at a loss to protect their
rpp. ,jfP'H .dastr.uetioii by bir'ta and
gam. At Kuuiscorthy it was decided
to make an apeal to the government
la reference to th mutter.
end will eome pefore long.'; j. to men fngaged ia government work.
:r ,.,., ....) -.. , ... . .: :..: -.y ' (- ( V' '1 '
V.K-'
.'.(ie'"M...i:. . (..)'
71

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