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The Helena independent. (Helena, Mont.) 1875-1943, January 03, 1889, Image 1

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025308/1889-01-03/ed-1/seq-1/

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Don'tIss a Fortune.
Youmay if you do not^read the Want Columns^to-day.
\JN313H
'juavaananand hhhj
Don'rOweaDollar.
MOBTAJTA
HASCASH IN THE TREASURY
(AMD18
EntirelyOut of Debt.
VOL.30--NO. 26
HELENA,MONTANA TERRITORY, THURSDAY MORNING, JANUARY 3, 1889.
FIVECENTS
MASSENABULLARD,
Attorneyand Counselor nt Lrw,
HftLINA, ^^ MONTANA.
WU1pr*rt1c* In all r^arU of record la the Tar^rtiory. offlc*in Oold hi ck
NOLAN^ BEANr^Law Office^Gold Block
HKI.KNA.
MT
R.G.DAVIES,
ATTOHNEY-AT-LAW.
ROOM1. AHIIBY BLOCK, ^ I1BLMNA, M.T.
DR.M. ROOUIAI.
PhysicianSurgeon,Atooucher. Oculist
AndAurist-
Memtwrof Hu Kraoeisco Medical Society, %l*^Navada State MatltcaJ Sock*y.
Office-Pare Den'^ mc sfc.re. corner above at alb^and Broadway. Entrance on Broadway aad ^'ack-^e.-i. Helena, Montana. I uuulUUou In German^^ and Ban Hah.
Eye,Ear, Nose and Throat.
DR.M. G. PARSONS,
Ktfteeo^eara' ex|*ert^nce aa
m OCULIST AND AURIST
Performaall nt*ratl^ ne and trente all dleeaaet^of the Kye, Bar, W and Throat. Correct* er^rors of v'alon and adj^iete glasses
^ffle li*5 nod 107 Grand Bl., and 104 and M^Brecken'ldtre M
J.H. FRENCH,^Veterinary Surgeon
orrit'B-Joa. O'NeUi a elahla, corner wM-^nnrtPrif ^ ^tT^^Um
M0NTF0RDSBACON, M D^Physician, Surgeon, and Oculist.
HELENA.M. T,
specialattention jfven to the Bye, Bar *
luM,
-iiassortment of artlflrlal eye*.
W.LONG,
VBTlIlilM ABs* MUttOBOH.
'*v^ k Brack A rtaner'a Htablee, Lower Main
Hire** Telepboae No \W
frenchlessons
,PROF. A. DAUSE,
I
Lateof Webeter lahendty, Pa Room -i Gold^Block.
\A. M. SANDS,
TYPE- WRITING
amd-^Amanuensis Work.
Officewith Pnuleen A McConnell.
H.BAUER,
ANNER^ DRESSER,
08Lawrence Street. Helena, M. T.^^ clean.a. ^. a'oomiau..
SEN^ M'CONNELL,
Mtt$n(tftrtctff to Aiihitfturai Work
Planeand epertflcadon* drawn. Work enper^rteed
OPFICK- Wilson Block. Hel^s^. Montana
G.W. MERRILL,
BoleAgent for the
CarbolicSmoke Ball and Debel-^lator,
willgaaran'een Mire cure for rstarrh, Mt^ mi,^br^ ncbltls, hey (ever, crone, cold In the head^cured In ftfU'en mimes Free n*#te t:i\.Ti at uur^office, room Isi, over Pa* nurse drug etore, foot^of Br ad* ay. Helen*, Montana Aa- nt* we'led^In every t hy In territory Mi rerun* *i^r !*lr | head^^ache. VrU-e of hmoke Hall $i Price of l^**b^ ll^at r $1 ennt to any part ot the territory. bend^fonr cent* tor p^^tage.
JOHNA. SCHNEIDER.
FRESCOPAINTER,
Mo.:is Houlh Davie Street.
PO H v ^^^. Hel*na, M. T
Publicbuilding*, rhuefcne. and dweLitj g h'tweea^decorated In the iat^t ^t\l*
WI'lfunibh d^licne. Decorated Hon. w. A^Clarke *nd M J. Telbot'e reeldencee, Butte,
hcratchwork and Knil^oeaed Ornamentation,^patented, a ape, laity
THE
ABORNLOTTERY!
Successof tbe Scheme Assured
IMPORTANTNOTICE:^How to Make Remittances:
e*aitby Postal Note, Express,^Money Order, New York or^Chicago Exchange or^Draft.
PBKB OF TICKET*!^^Ingle WholeTlrkcCe $5 00
(LI B KATKSt
Book..!',^ hole Tlrketa* 10 OO
^oh ol IO Whole I If hele40 00
Bookol -2t^ \\ hole Tl^ krteI OO 00
FirthTlcktle, I i earh.
Ai ereon can order a* m^ny kiftm tp kbt8^aa thev mar deel^e, all or iutikkst museum^Addreea all lettert and remtttmcee to
''HEMONTANA IN\ K- 1 M K T 0MPa^4Y,^Helena, Montana
BrVANDOF
Hamsd Breakfast Bacon
CL'RBDAM)
Smokedin Montana
BTTill
luMlWPMIIM IB PROVISION rii.
Packeri.t nrere aad Snokera ^f
Qhoice, M'd'y Cu-ed Meats
\+WU:t^VtTig*ratoi- Bull'Unc.
-eMllllMorphine HeMi CarM fa ^
ThePlymouth
CLOTHINGH^otT
ISOKKKKIM*
Bargainsin Fine Suits,
OVERCOATS,
GENTSFURNISHING GOODS, ETC.
Calland See us Before Purchasing Elsewhere.
LEVY^ ELIA8.
B.U ASHBY.
O,A. BKOADWATKb
S.C. Ashby^Co.
HELENAAND GREAT FALLS.
-- - aya ^ *
SWEET'SPATENT
Common Sense^ ^Arctic^ and ^Manitoba.
BOBSLEDS.
^11!
Mitchell Farm and Spring Wagons,
FineCarriages, Buggies, Phaetons,
Buckboards,Road.Carts, Etc., Etc
HARNESS,BARB WIRE,
VICTORFEED MILL.
WALLTENTS, WAGON COVERS, ETC^FURST So BRADLEY
HARROWS,HOOSIER DRILLS,
DEDERICKHAY PRESSES
JJailhi: Ties, .Etc.. Etc
T.C. POWER ^ CO.,
JOllBRKS AM) DBALBBH IN
MININGMACHINERY!
AND
AgriculturalImplements
JuHtreceived, a large Block of
ZBe~ment ^d Son's
Celebrated M Maine ^ and 41 Brown
BOBSLEDS.
Deere^ Co. Sulky, Gang and Walking Plows.
SCHUTTLERAND RUSHFORD
TUBULAR AXLE AND STEEL SKEIN WAGONS.
FINEHAND-MADE^Oarriage and H^a v ITeam Harness.
OurHtock of flue Curria^H and Huggim in tbe larfrent and mont comj lete ever^^homi in llMeua.
Afull line of Mine and Mill supplies embracing Blake 8team Punj|^e, Revere^Huhher Co. Mechanieal rqoiU, Codjdioii Seuae Whim, etc., etc.
Heudfor Circular** and Price Liat. 8teaml^f^at Block, corner of Main otreet^aud Helena aveuue.
F.S. LANG ^ CO.
(INCORPORATED.) WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
Ranges,Stoves, Crockery,
GLASSWAREAND HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS.
Granite Iron, Copper and Tinware.
MarbledGlassware,Bohemian Vases,
FalnuttenGlassware,Mush and Milk Sets,
JapaneseChina,China Dinner Sets.
OPAQUECHINA, DECORATED AND PLAIN.
HavilancfsChina, Decorated and Plain
Cupsand Saucers, Salad Sets,
IOBCHI- AM SETS, WI^E SETTS, ROOHBSr^R LAMPS.
Aurora^ Quadruple Plated Silverware,
THE BEST IN THE WORLD.
ATTENTIONLADIES!
Haveyou ween the Finest Line of
Evening^ Party Slippers
laUndnwd Kid, Beaded, ever thowD in tbe Weet. If yon would like^to we them call on ,
F.E. GAGE ^ CO., No. 25 Upper Main St
HADMANY CALLERS.
TheWhite House Rtcptidn on Tues^^day the Most Brilliant President^Cleveland Has Yet Had.
THE LADIES' DRESSES.
Descriptionsof the E'egant Costumes^Worn by Mrs. Cleveland and^Other Ladies - Washington^Official Life Represented.
WASHOUT!*, JlD.I ..- White
House^t Idoui, if ever, presented a luure^brilliant pperlarle than yesterday, on tbe^oocast'tD of the president's New Year re^^ception. Vi 111 pains had beeu taken^with the decoration*, and the beautiful^^uiteof parlors where the reception was^bfld never appeared to better adVAUtave.^There wan a profusion of Howem and^plant* distributed with charminK elferto,^the cbolcetit plants beniK placed lu the^lilue parlor, where the receiving party^stood. Uut the most elatM^rate 11 ^ral deco^rations were In the Kast room, where the^vmltom spt'tit a few minub-s In mk^Is1^convemation after they had paid their re^^spects. The mantles were hanked with^Mow* ri and a festoon of gra^Hes ami terns^was Huppeiided from the chandeliers. Tall^aalasf wen aiaatal in the windows sml^^tnefffi snd tropical plants of all kind*^lined the corridor running throuuh the cen-^ter of the houMe. Ti e large divan in MM^M#1 room was oruanieiilt-d witti a beauti^^ful vast containing palms of ilitfereut huea.^Tart ot the tower Buot waa illuminated t^y^gas, but the Kuulight was given lull play in^the east tootu. Th^- weather was blight^and sunshiny, aud. lu fact, everything was^moot auspicious The reception iH-^an at^11 u'clocl;. at which time the nceiving par^ty descended the stairs and took their places^in the lilue Parlor. Aa they Appeared^in siuht the Marine band Htarted ^lUii Ut^the chief,^and continued playksi it un^til the party had taken their positions. A^passage was made for theru through the^STOW*! that had already gathered in the^house. They canu' in the follow bsf| order:^( ^^ioiiel Wilson and Lieutenat Duvall, ot^the army; the president ai.d Miss Ha)ard.^.Secretary Kayard and Mrs. Clevelard; tftao-^retary Kairchild and Mrs. Whitney; Nec-^retarv Kudirott and Mrs. Ksirchihl; Mete^tary Whitney and Mrs. Dickinson, and^Secretary \ Mas and Postmaster General^Dickinson. They took their places with^the president and Mrs. Cleveland holm^the line, then Miss Itayard, Mrs. Ksirchihl.^Mrs. Whitney and Mrs. Dickinson in the^order iisrued. QffOVBfjd hehind them arete^a nuuiber of guests, including Mrs. Kol^soru, Mrs. Chief Justice Kuller, Mrs.^Sneaker Carlisle, Miss Florence Jiayard,^Miss Vilas. Miss Whitney, Mrs. Lhux-M,^Hon. HuK-h McCulloeh and wife, Mrs.^Hearst and C. P. liricUenrnlg*'.
Thepresident wore ablaok Prince Alhert^suit, with black tie. Mrs. Cleveland wore^a beautiful robe of pale pink faille, made^with round {fain. The corsage was^roundid at the u^p and had short siaevafl^t he tiont ot the skirt was draped in a^silver eiiiltroidrn-d net that had a fringe ut^bugh-s at the fi*it. On either side were^plain panels ot suit Kr^ rich gray silk, em^hroidered In a pattern ot roKrbudsIn silver.^The hack of Mie panels w as edged with^heavy Russian fur thateCHBiaaeawed at Mi^waist line and continued around the pink^trsin. The hack of the dress was prim ess^atiaype, with ^U.k f*^lua on tue waist.^fastene^l w ith pearl emhroidery. The Iront^of tlie jacket was shaped rounded and fell^over a full vest or pink silk draped^Wllh while net. The sleeves were of pink,^with short puffs edged on the arm with^pearl hands. The hody was edged with^heavy lur. Micw-re two diamond aeek^laces and a diamond star in her hair,which^wssdreased in loop* on top of her head.^Her gloves Were of a s^ ft pe.irl color.
MhlsItayard, who stood next, wore a^short dress ot h!ue hrm ade with palntetl^hod), back and front, upon whii-h wire^laid folds of gau/. '. Sprays of white lilac^adorned the hod) am! n kirtle of gan/.e was^draped about the upper part of the skirt.^The sleeves were rut to the eloow and her^hair wasdrrsMed hiuh with a blue feath'-r
Mrs.Kairehild wore a trained dress of^plain colored silk, the body cut low and lb*^train was of silk. The front was draped^with frills of lace aud the petticoat of dull^white satin. Across the front of the low^body was tied a tichu of lace, knotted at
OneSide
Mrs.Whitney wore a superb gown of^white hrocade, maOc with high bodice aud^en train. Down the Iront Of the body and^skirt were folds of yellow satin and gold^embroidery. The high collar was fastened^with a th re stone diamond pin. she wore^a great diamond star In the gold einhr-iider)^of her U'dire. On her shoulder was a^large ruhy set with diamonds.
Mrs.Dickinson's dress was a pale green^silk, embroidered in silver, with a train of^the same material. The front was draped^intuilHand also the low body. She wore^a black riidsm about her throat.
Thereception proper began with the pre^^sentation of Mi^ members of the diplomatic^corps, sll Id court dress. The most sinking^coHtunu s were thoae worn by the repre^^sentatives of China. Kussia. France ar d^Core a. Hadje llassien Khoulf Khan, the^new Persian minister, attracted Mir sjejal^attention. He is the first representative of^that country accredited to the t'nlted^States. Tie column was huaded by Count^Kavla, the Italian minister. Mr. Preston,^the Ha)lian minister, who is dean of the^^era*, was prevented freei taking hla ac-
cusUunedplace at the head of the line by-^reason of pressing business which r* njured^his presence in New York. Secretary^llayard presented the diplomats to the^President and Mrs Cleveland, and then^departed to his residence to preside^at a breakfast given In their hoaor^He left th* White House lu company with^bts daughters. Col. Wilson and Lieut^Duval then took their placet near th^^president and Mrs. Cleveland and Intro^duced all who followed. The Justice-^,r^tbe supreme court, headed by Chief .fustic**^Kuller, caiue first, and were followed In^rapid succession by the judges of the court^of claims, and the Judiciary of the district^of Columbia. Nearly all the judges were^In attendance, the principal absentee bung^Justice Matthews, who is still confined to^his residence by ill health. The irftl feat^ureof the reception, the army and navy,^was probably the moat interesting of^all. Tne army officers were^first priwnted. T he patent sffli'tioo^In the family of Major General Schofield,^commanding the army, prevented hi* j r-s^ence. and the line was hearted bv Brigadier^General Wanner flttJf d^ auu brigadier^(General lient, chief of ordinance, the sen^^ior ranking officer in the city. Nearly all^the oftVera stationed In this vicinity were^present, and of course sll In full uniform.^The column of naval oflh-era was hearted^by Admiral Porter and Hear Admiral .lou-^ett Hear Admlrsl L;l and Command-^Mi Walker, M Card, Melville and Colonel^McCawley occupied places near the head^of the line.
'Ihe senators and representatives were^assigned a place ahead of the army and^navy, but were nearly all late and took^places wherever most convenient They^were less in number thsn usual. The con^gresslonsl delegation was followed cloaety^by the commissioners of the District of^Columbis. the officers of the Smithsonlsu^Institute and of the executive departments^Among these walked Assistant S cretarh ^^'I hompson and Ma)nsrd, fieri Stevenson,^fren. Knott, Assistant Secretary Hues^and Soiintor Oeneral Jenks. Librarian -p-d^ord and Commissioners Cuoley, llragg and^^ii.'tr ^ i ^ t the inter-state commerce
comndsslon.The rlos** of the ^ fticlal^Ilnea was composed of veterans of the war^of 1H44, the S A. K and members of the^o.dest Inhabitants assoc iation. So far the^reception had is-eupb d over an hour aad a^half, and the president and Mra. Cleveland^bad kt pt up a constant hand shaking. The^reception waa. however, just about half^over, as at 12:30 o'rjork the outer doors^were thrown open aud the general public^admitted. The first conws of tfate vast^crowd bad taken theplav*esat the outer^ga'es before 10 o'clock. The attendance^was larger than on any similar occasion^during the present administration.
SENATEAND HOUSE.
Th*Tariff and lha Hlvar and Harbor Bin th*^Principal Points of Olacuatlon.
Washington,Jan. 2.^When the senate^met to-day these waa more than a quorum^pn sent. Amoug the petitions aud memorials^presented and referred was oue by Kd^munds from a brain h of the Woman's Re^^lief hoard of Salt Lake City, reuioustrat-^ing againat any action of congress looking^to the admission of (Ttah as a state. Kd^munds said he was happy to think there^waa not much danger of any such action at^this session, liy Hoar, to prohibit disfrau-^ctusemcut on account of sex. lly Slier^man, from the Host on hoard of trade, for^the suspension of the purchase of silver^bullion and the coinage of silver dollars.^I he senate then resumed consideration of^the tar it! bill.
Allison,going back to paragraph H4. as^to chains, moved to amend It hy reducing^the rate on chains less than three eighths^of one Inch in diameter from :t to L'cents^per pound. He stated that this was the^rate under the existing law. The amend^n.' nt was agreed to without division. Che^bill was then taken up at the point at^which It had been left when last before the^senate, schedule I, cotu n manufacturer,^the question being on the amendment of-^fereO by Vest to reduce the duty on cotton^thread, yarn, warps, etc., valued^at not excei dlilg L'.*^ Cents per pound,^tr^ in 10 cents pel pound to 7t^ per cent^advatorem. Vest confessed his objection^to a high protective tariff was the en ruious^price which the people of the west, the real^prtaiucers, had lo pay under It in order to^Increase the profits of the New Kngland^manufacturers. Stewart said he fouud the^tariff question so intimately connected^with the question of money, that he was^unable to separate the two. lie thereo|m^n^proceeded Ut read a speeeh on the subject^of silver coinage. At the close of Mew^art's up- cch Jones, of Arkau*as, read from^i he test i moii) id a cot ion manufacturer
itigia, Mr Win. II. Young, showing
(hathis n.ills had been earning average^dividends of 17 pi r cent since 1H70; that (he^Unit whs of no advantage U^ him, and it^he were to make the same class of coarse^cotton giaalH that are sold In Kngland he^could sell hem in Kngland and makegtxKl^prcit on them. Aldnch suggested that the^ranentt why the southern cotton mills paid^^nnb large dividends was that some of^them di.i not pay MN than two-^thirds of the wages to similar operatives^in New Kngland. Jones slated in reply^that the ISjnunMNI] showed the southern^operatives were content with their wages,^ami did not go on strikes, while strikes^srefnenaaaMa in New Kngland. Aldnch^said he did uot know of any cotton mill^strikes in Kliode Island In five years, and^that there had bam vet] lew strikes then'^In a generation. The debate was then con-^tluu d at some length regarding various^seciioiisof tbe country, being participated^in by Saulsbury, Morrill, Teller, Vest,^Vance, Coke, Allison, Hoar and Chandler.^Finally the bill was laid aside without ac^^tion on the pending amendment.
Thepresldiug officer laid before the^senate a message from the pr sldent In^regard t ^ correspondence on the subject of^the treaty with China that was pending^last September. The reading of themes^sage was Interrupted by Sherman, who^snntKested 'l 'M' r*'f*'rred U^ an executive^meeting. I'h m ling oili'-er lngalls said it^had been sent to the senate In legislative^session and that It would be laid on the^talc tor farther examination. Tbe senate^then adjourned.
Themessage mentioned above contained^nothing new except the translation of a^cipher message, dated Sept. 21, saying that^Chtne would not consent to ratify the^treat) unless further tune was given for^discussion id the proposition to lessen the^term ot restilt tiou.
.^iUK llOl'HB.
trotmore tuan seventy-five members^were iu attendance this morning. After^n ad lug the Journal the speaker proceeded^to call the committees tor reports, hut none^were submitted. A bill was passed grant^^ing an annual leave of absence of thirty^days to employee of the bureau of en^^graving aud printing, in place of fifteen^days. Iu consideration of the morning^hour Matson, of Indiana, called up the bill^prohibiting any agent irom recovering a^fee for seeming a MMteej on account of an^increase from the nenjalni originally^granted, or tor securing a special act ol con^^gress iu antnn where a peusiou might he
obtainedunder the general pernio lis laws.
P lers, of Kansas, offered an amend^merit afoi uling the applicant for a pension^may contract with any persou In the state^in which tbe applicant lives, to pay not ex-^enniitnn *3 for services rendered, should^the increase be uM.iwi d. The amendment^was adopted ami the bin passed. Springer,^of Illinois, Introduced a joint n solution^for the admission of An/, naand Idaho.^Referred. Mi)ers, of Texas, reported the^fortifications appropriation bill. The house^Mien went into committee of the whole on^the river ami hariHir appropriation bill.
Sowdeii,of Penris) Ivatti*,me4c an attack^upon the bill as being entravagaut aud^wasteful, and directed his criticism espe^clally against the appropriations for lin-^prov raanti |e Texas. Cram and Stewart,^of Texas, defended the committee report^anataVnorthed the national Importance of^tin* piopom d improveuient In Texas, ('rain^moved t.. increase the appropriation for^Arkansas Pass from y^5.0Uu to #1.^^7 tssi^Sowdeii objected and alter some debate the^amendment was rejected. Craln made^various endeavors to increase the appropri^^ations for Arkansas Pass, Sahiue I'assaud^fjaiveeton hariHir, nut waa in every case^roted down. Finally the committoe rose^and the house adjourned.
NationalCapital CuUinK^.
Waiiim.ion, Jan 2 ^The following^memorial was presenhd lu the senate to^^day by I^olph. and went to the cornmltUte
of.cottee ^The National Hoard of
Tradehereby resjH'ctfully memorializes^your honorable Itodh-s to continue Ut make^from time hi time ample appropriations for^Judlci-ms improvements of the principal^rivers, harbors and water wa)s, and espe^^cially to see that the important works of^improvement already begun may not so^stopped tor want id the necessary funds^for their continuance and completion,^thereby Incurring waste, damage and Ulti^^mate incressed coat of work and unneces^^sary delay In making such improvements^available. The National Hoard of Trade^hereby respectfully memorialises your hon^^orable bodies to provide immwU itely such^delenses as will la* necessai) in the event^of war to thoroughly protect our sea, gulf^aud lakecoa^t* and harbor*.
Inthe house Morrow pi* sented petitions^front the chamber of commerce, sau I ran^ctsoo, asking that the aenate tariff hill be^modulid to sfTird protection to the Cali-^fi.rnia beet sugsr.wiue and fruit Industries;^also regard in it A uieriean interest iu Samoa.
springer,of Illiuola, Introduced In the^house a joint resolution proposing a con^atitutional amendment relative to the elec^^tion of president and vice president slid^representatives In congress. It extends^the presidential term to six }f*rs, atd^rnakeg the preaident Ineligible for re^^election. It abolishes electoral Colleges^and provides for a direct vote by the peo^^ple.
Thebill Introduced to-day by Represen^^tative Springer provides an enabling act^for the admission of Ariz ma and Idaho aa^as states. The people of the two territories^are author.zed to hold e bet ions on Tues^day after the first Monday iu November^IHhH, tor the . ^ ^ :. of delegates to a roll^atitutional convention to meet the first^Wedm-adry lu January, lMtfj. The const!^tutions fraim d at those conventions are to^be voted Upon by the people of the two one^posed states on Tueadav after the first Mou-^day of November, law, aud if a majority^should be fouud In favor ot their ratlttca^Hon, authority is given e.chterrit ry to^form a state government which, however,^ohall r-main lu abe^ance until the re^^spective sta'e com tilutious shall be ap^proved by congress
Awarrunt for the pardon of llenjamln^Hopkins, cashier o' the late Fidelity hank^of Cincinnati, was mailed the warden of^the Ohio pmiteutlary at Columbus this^afternoon. Accompanying It waa an order^for Hopkins' iiuBiedtate release.
Colorado'sOutput.^Dknvkh. Jan. 1 ^The estimated output^of Colorado gold and silver mines for IHatt^was Ittt.Mi.M*. of which tS 106.119 is lo^gold. ^17.u2fi,Ai^ In silver, $^,776,562 in lead^and i 1U.M7 In oopper.
HILL'SSENTIMENTS.
NewYork $ Governor Calls the At-^tention of the Country to^the Last Election.
hiNTS FOR CONGRESS.
The pr. -deotiai Tenure to Be In^^creased to Six Years, With But^One Term - Ex-Preaidentt to^Be Life Senators.
Ai.ban v, N. V., Jan. 2 ^The state sen^^ate yesterday was organized by the election^of J. Sloat Kassett, secretary of the repub^^lican national committee, Ut the presidency^pro tern. Fremont Cole was elected speak^^er of the assembly. The inauguration of^(iov. Hill was conducted with much cir^cumstance and display. While reading his^annual measage the governor created L .me^sensation when he employed theae words:^The uecesslty of some change In uur elec^^tion laws, whereby the recurring corrup^^tion, which has become im'idcut to our^elections may be prevented Is lin^perative. It Is believed the last^pn Mdentinl election waa the most corrupt^ot any in the history of the t nited Male*,^so tar as the direct use ol money is con^^cerned in influencing electors, and putdic^sentiment la naturally awakened to ihe^desirability of some relief. The peculiar^causes which induced this immense corrup^lion are apparent. Anxiety to aubserve^selfish and private advantage rather than^the general inteiest ot the public naturally^to a campaign being conducted upon
led
businessprinciples, whereby it Is asserted^electors were bought and Kold like goods^aud chattels in opt u market. It is claimed^that at leant $ 100,000 were expended in the^tweiii) fourth and sixtieth congressional^districts lu this state In efforts made there^to elect congressmen and U^ secure the^electors believed to be favorable to the MaV^icy of fostering private Interests. So sue^cessful have (M en the recent efforts ai nn^raiding the ballot, that good dtlsettl are^led to doiibt whether the tree scnltineuts ot^the people may not continue to la* nullified^by corruption whenever it appears the m^terests of the people contlict w hit those in^terested monopolies, who, profligate of^their money, are intent upon resisting all^interference with their selfish deiuatids.^(Iov. Hill recommends that by joint resolu^^tion the legislature urge congress to adopt^institutional amendments regarding the^presidential term,and a provision for ex pre^sideuts. tiov. Ilih's recommendations are:^First, that the term of office of preaideui^and vice president be six yearn; second,^that the president shall he ineligible for re^^election: third, that the presldeut shall im^^mediately, upon tbe t * pi rat ion of hln term,^become a member of the Cuited States sen^^ate fur life, and receive an appropriate^salary. This amendment shall appl^ to all^living ex presidents.
W0LC0TTWINS.
Rapubllcanaof Colorado Namo tha Man Who^Will nuccaad eanator Bowan
Dknveh,Col., Jan. 2.^ The seventh gen^^eral assembly of the stale ef Colorado con^vened at noon to day. Hon. H. H. Kddy^was chosen npeaker of the house, and M^H. Carp* titer president pro tern of tin- sesj^ate. iMdh houses then adjourned uuui to^morrow. The republican members held a^senatorial caucus benight to decide wuo^would be the next United state* i smntof^from Colorado lo succeed .^eiialor Tom^liowen.
Thecaucus adjourned at |Ja\ The first^ballot reaulUd as follows: I, W. Wolodt,^45; Thos. M. liowen, 15; 11. A. W. Tabor, 1.^1 he legislature will meet In joint session^lo formally choose the senator on the 15th^inst. Tin- nomination of VYoh-oit is con^nhlered a grent triumph for the )oung N^publicans of the state, an he is but 4o fntsffl^of Kg^. He wan lought hitt*Tly by a com^blnation composed of ex-Senator Tats^r,^ex-ttov. Kvaus, Senator liowen, Congress-^uian Symes, Dr. Moore ami .lodge Klbert.^In the tight, however, Mr Vfolen t hul the^fnemlstnp of Senator Henry M. Teller.
Lanni.no,Mich., Jan. 2. The legislature^nf 18KV convened tonlay. At a lepuldicau^caucus lo night James McMlllau, ol [^^^^troit, wan nominated by acclamation to^succeed Senator Calmer.
AroiNiA, Me., Jan. 2.^The Joint re^pub I lean eaueue to night reuoiuinautl Hon.^VV. 1*. Krye for senabir by acclamation.
MandaraonAll Right.^Lincoln, Neb., Jan. 2. A letter has^been s. ni to Senator Manderson, signed hy^103 of the republican members of the Neb^raska legislature, saying Ills entirely un^necessary for htm U^ come to Nebraska lo^look alter his fences, that fie will he the^unanimous choice of the repunilcau party^and would be elected by an overwhelming^majority.
Marla'iBwlndlas.
SanKmantihco, Jan. 2.^From suit^brought here It appears that Charles K^Merle, president of the California Hone^Meal Fcrtlli/T company, and hn-al agent^for Fairbanki A Co , of Chicago, who tils-^appeared last week, Uw\ caused an over-^Issue of 250 shares of the fertilizer com^^pany's stork. Frederick Silliuari, Jr .holds^ceiiiticates for a hundred and ten shaie^ iaj^this over Issue for which he claims to have^advanced 92 SOU to Merle. Stllruan has^brought suit to recover his money from the^company. The remainder ot the over^lsnue is not aceouuied for, hut fifty nharen^are baJd by President Welch, of the Amen^can Sugar Refinery. The Mrentofl of ttie^lioiie Meal company held a meeting and^according to the books it appears their ha
bllttiesWere but $1,400. A committee of
three,was app dnted to Investigate the^affairs of the company and to rcpori as^^^. ,-i as ptissible. One of the officers of the^company gave It as his opinion that Merle^had committed suicide br avoid arrest.
ThaBaal Flahariss
Wasiiinotun,Jan. 2 Senator Hoar to^^day introduced a resolution, which was^ailopted. asking the prudent to transmit^to cougreaa any correspondence hail with^Ureal Britain concerning the seal fisheries^near Itehrlng Straits, especially as to the^seizure of any vessel of the I 'uiu-d States^or other country, and what regulations^governing the fisheries had been adopted^by thin government. There have been^arid are stilt widespread complaints of un^just discrimination made against American^veasela, that while they are not permuted^to take aeals nut at sea, which Is pertectly^proper and right, no Interference in made^with the operation of vesaels of other^countries particularly those of Great^Itrltalu,and he wantedbi know why.
FatalQuarrsl About a Farm.
NkwOhmcann, Jan. 2. ^A special to^the Picayune from Alrerdeeu, Miss., says^This evening, near Fentress, Frank and^James Coleman quarreled with Charles^and William belay, about the possession^of a farm, and the quarrel ended In a bat^^tle between the parties with double bar^^reled shotguns. In which Frank Coleman^and Charles Delay were instantly killed.^After the guns were emptied the survivors^engaged each other In a hand-to-hand con-^Un In which James Coleman waa wound^^ed In the head and William Delay badly^wounded In the thigh. Two slaters of the^Delays, who had appeared ou the scene^during the melee, were alao wounded.
MoMam'tChancaa Go d
Ciikaoo, Jan. X.^Colonel Kroadwater,^of Montana. Is in the city. He has received^word from Senaurr Mitchell, of Oregon,^tliat Montana and the other territories ex^^cept ( tab and New Mex'co will likely be^admitted this session.
COLOREDCATHOLICS.
aConvention Oaing Hold at Washington Car-^dlnal Qlbbont' *ovic^ to tha Dslegalca.
Wasuinoton, Jan, 2 ^The national^e invention of Colored Catholics, composed^of delegates from nearly all the colored^Catholic churches and societies throughout^the country, began lis sessions yesterday^In St. Augustine's Colored Catholic church^In this city. Kvery seat In the church was^occupied, when, at 10:30 o'clock, Father^Talton, of Quincy, Hi., the only colored^Catholic priest at present In the United^States, began the celebration of solemn^high masa. Immediately In front of and^beneath the pulpit sat his eminence, Car^^dinal ttibbons, wno delivered the sermon.^He was clad iu the scarlet robe of bis^office. At the conclusion of his sermon^theCardiual welcomed the delegates. ^This^gather!ng,^said he, ^will mark an era in the^history of the colored people at the I'm ted^States, for never before had the colored^Catholics of the country met In conven^^tion. Be trusted thai the dclilteratlooe of^the convention would be marked hy mod^^eration and discretion. The actions or the^convention would he wau-hed by the coun^^try, not with the kindly eyes ot friendship,^but with the sharp ones of criticism, lie^suggested that the convention discuss the^education of children. A religious educa^^tion wan necessary to the life of tic repuh^lie.^ Temporary organization was effected^by choosing Win. U Smith preaident.
Atto-day's session Daniel II. Kudd, of^Ohio, was elected president, and Lincoln^Valla, Missouri, and I Htlllerd, of Miurie-^aota. vice presidents. A resoluflou of^greeting ami asking the Holy Father's^blessing was ordered sent to the poper.
EMANCIPATIONCELEBRATION.
Fraadmenat Phlladalphia Llsian to Frad Doug^^lass on tha Naada of tha Raca
l*ti11.aikitiiia, Jan. 2.-The celebra^tUui of the first quartet of a century of^emancipation from slavery began here this^afternoon. Many of thoae present were of^the freed race, ami they listened intently.^Uev. H. F. Lee, ex-president of the Wither-^force university, and now edlbir of the^Christian Recorder, and Kev. Dr. U, J.^Al.en, secretary of the Freedinan's board^of the I'rcsbyterlau assembly, spoke at^length. Hon. Fred Douglass objected to^calling the southern question a negro prob^bin, because it whs untrue, misleading,^and had a tendency lo obstruct the path of^duty and truth. I he question was not of^tee negro, bul the nation. Whether the^American people tn the light of the mne-^tbenth century have virtueenough In them^toadjust the action of the nation lo the^fundamental principles nf the declaration^of Independence and the constitution of the^United states. Douglass said slavery^still exists in the south. A negro lalHirer^works ou a plantation for month and^Is paid In orders on stores kept In almost^every Instancy by the man the negro worgs^for and the prices el'arged are double what^they should tie. The laborer scarcely svet^sees dollars of real money. What the^south wanted aud must have was to he^made to understand that there was a fmwer^La Use country to make all sections of It^comply wilh the demands of tbe const I tu^Hon of the I mi. d S ates.
CAVENERS THREAT.
ThaOompromlso Batwasn tha aurlln(ton and^tha Englnaara Not Yal Agraad Upon.
Ciikaoo, Jan. 2.^ Chairman A. II. Cave^^rn r, of the general grievance couiuittb ei f^the llrotherhmaj of Knglneers, says fhe^brotherhood was never more earnest in Its^support of the fturliiigton s'rlkers. Still^the fact Is recognised that they have got^the worst of If, and are willing to settle the^matter It the company will only make tea^aonaoneeaestona, if this in not done,
serioustronbte will follow and the strike^he extended to roads which have black^lilted Un- Hurliiigton stnki rs.
TheDaily News, in an interview with^Cavancr, says: In case the ISnrlUaffton^com pa y refuses their overtures for a set^Heine nt, the brotherhood will make an^extremely radical move. He admits
thatthe antaferenee nf engineers' from
allthe western roads last week was^commit ring thin matter. Cavaner sa)s^they have consulted flit* best legal talent
inthentry. Tnti is understood to be
Col,Robert (I. Ingemolt It is believed^this foreshadows a sirike on all western^and southwestern roads which connect^with ami feed the li'jrluigtou, If all the^present negotiations tall.
Ifwas understood ihe conference he^Iwi imi the engineers' committee and ofTlcials^of the Iturllngton road would he resumed^to day, but on account ol pressure of buil
nessupon the railroad ufflcnra, incidental to^the opening of a new year, it was eoetnonnd^till to-morrow. No blot could he obtained^from t lie i ailroad people as to whether they^had decided U) r^ i ct or accept the ttfonnet Q^compromise. Chairman *'sveiier. of the^engineers' commMh e, seemed ansMent,^notw ihstsiidirig his sggresslve attitude,^that the whole metier would be settled^amicably.
Ci.kvki.amp, Jan. 2^Chief KnglroMT^Arthur, when shown the dispatches from^Chicago rnnortti g me status of llurllngton^all iirs, saui he had no direct advices from^the conference eommlttne, and would not^express an opinion. He waa, however, of^opinion that Chairman Cavener had not^made the radical statements' attributed to^him regarding the possible tying up of the^Hurliiigton'* eooneetloni and feeders lu^the event of failure to reach a settlement.
SmarlcanilnOangar.
NkwVniiK, Jan. li. A ^|^eclal to the^Mail and Kintnej from I'ort au Prince,^dated Den moer htj saya: ^Articles In the^Haytiau newspapers coutaln furious^threats against Thompson, minister of the^Lulled States to Haytl. Many Americans^h**. e been arrested, both men and women.^The American consulate Is filled with refu^gnes. Ilippoiytes army Is marching on^this city (Vort au-Prlnce). I Interviewed^LaatunM to-day. He said he would fhow^no clemency to foreigners who tnt^ n.-r-^with llaytian p^dltlcs. Legitime stat*d to^me he wou'd shoot one hundred If neces^^sary. The excitement here Is Intense, and^the Americans at Port au Prince, are In^great d inger
inn gard to the published reports of 111^feeling against Americans tn Haytl, Minis^^ter Preston states the reports are uufound^ed. He says, however, it is not ^errain the^little republic will pay the $200,000 claim^of the rutted States for damages; that^there may tie a counter claim put tn.
HonoringQladttons
Nai'I.ks,Jan 2 A reception was given^to tiladatune at the municipal palace to^^day. All the members of the cour ell were^present to greet the great Kngllsh states^mih, who upon his arrival at the palace^was received with military honors. The^syndic, on tadialf of the city, welcomed^Gladstone and thanked htm for his past^services to Italy, and especially to Naples.^Uladabdie, who was deeply moved, made a^brief response.
TbeReforms publlshe^ au Interview^with Gladstone, In which he repudiates the^Idea that Ireland under home rule would^i^- come a papal InRtruiiicut. In support of^his belief (iladsbuie instanced the fact that^the Irish nad chosen Protestants as their^political leaders, beginning with Parti- II.^In regard to the Papal question, his views^had not changed. He considered the pos^^session of temporal power hy the Pope as^Incompatible with the unity and liberty of^Italy.
KiirainMaana Sualnaaa
Ciikaoo, Jan. i^Parson Davles, who^returued to this city to-day, said: ^I left^Mitchell and Kllralu lu St. Louis. Next^week I shall go with them to Buffalo.^Troy, Albany and other eastern towns. So^far we have made good money, and I ain^g'ad of tt. There Is no truth In the rumor^that Ktlraln woul tight Jackson, for 1 saw^him late Monday night and he told me that^if Sullivan did not come up to the mark^with in in he would ugbt Jackaon, to show^be meant business.
AIRBRAKES BLAMED.
DisastrousWreck of Freight Trains^On the Montana Union and Mon^^tana Central Railways.
NO PERSON INJURED.
IcyRails in Silver Bow Canyon Make^It Impossible to Control a Train^^Passenger Travel Greatly De^^layed^At the Smelter.
Butts,Jan. 2.^[Special to tbe Inde-^prndent.] ^ the unfortunate Montana^Union road had a serious accident near^Williams' wood camp, between 7 and 8^o'clock this morning, when twu trains^were telescoped, demolishing two locomo^^tives and destroying fourteen freight care.^No on** was Injured. Accordiug to a state^^ment of au engineer, the accident was due^to ihe defectiveness of the air hrakee. Ko-^gtneer Shutter was running a north bound^traiu of twenty six Moutaua Central cars,^loaded with curd wood. When In Silver^llow canyon, about fourteen miles from^lu re, the train ran aud slipped along the^Icy rails with great rapidity, so that tt be^^came unmanageable. The engineer ap^^plied the air brakes, which would not^cbi ck tbe t rain before It arrived at the^switch at Williams' station. Engineer^Miutter realized the situation aud jumped^otf, aa did the hrakeman aud conductor;^also the engtueer and men ou the opposite^train. Just as the Hutte bound engine^was switching off the north bound^train ran into and telescoped both^traius, piling the cars on top of each other^In a prnajtseuous manner. One of the^engines demolished belongs to the Union^Paclttc. Mu|^erliiteiideui Dickinson left for^the. scene soon alter on a wrecking train.^The blockade greatly impeded trains from^moving In all directions, and traffic, partic^^ularly fur passenger*, has been wretched^all day. The wreck was cleared about six^o'clock benight. Tat passeugers on tbe^morning Helena express arrived at about^11 o'clock to-night in the caboose. Nof^^wlthatanding this disaster, trains for Ana^^conda are being rapidly moved. A train^containing thirl} live cars of ore was re-^reived si the Mueller at about half past^twelve o'clock to-ulgbt. Work has been^resumed In the upper works smelter.
HllllnctNotaa.
BllUnejSV Jan a.^[Special to the hide^pcndodt. | Monday night tbe Webb^(tuarda, Moutaua inllltia, gave their first^annual ball, at which were present a num^^ber unequalled by any previous entertain^^ment ot its kind in Killings and comprised^of many of the prominent citizens of tbe^place. The hall w as elegantly decorated^with flags and hunting, and general good^humor prevailed, winch enhanced the en^^joy ment ot all. Dancing was kept up UU^an early hour, and all departed expressing^themselves as having enjoyed a most p.eae-^ant evening.
Anovel sight whs presenbd when the^weat hound passei ger pulh-d in this morn^^ing, by twen.y live of the young men of^the town, armed w ith cow hella and jing-^lers, w ho conveyed to their new home In a^cutter, a newly wedded pair who stepped^otf the train, thu^ expressing their cordial^welcome to one ot their number, who has^entered upon a lile ol wt-ddid bliss.
Theeclipse of the sun was total here,^l Mist i valloiis were taken by several peo^^pie, which will be forwarded to the proper^authorities^
Qr*atPajaj Nawa
tiKKATKai.lh. I)e\ 2 ^ (Special to the^Independent ] The l^oard of trade this^evening re elected 1 K t'olliiis president,^('has. Wegner was elected vice preatdeut^aud Judge Mace secretary. Steps were^taken to promote an annual fair and race^meeting in Cascade county ami lo stock the^upper Missouri with fish.
Thehouse which was in course of com^^pletion as a residence for Hon. T. K Col^^lins took tire early yesterday ton noon, and^was burned to the ground. The losa was^nearly covered hy insurant's. The origin^ol tin fire is unknown. The house would^have been au ornament to tin* town, and^the fire li consequently regarded as a pub^^lic loss.
TELEGRAPHICBREVITIES.
TheMissouri legislature met yesterday.
Thecommittee In charge of the Gen. U.^S. ^ rrant monument project here has closed^the competition of artists for designs for a^memorial ol the dead soldier.
AllSt LNls flouring nulls except one^rload down yesterday, under an agreement^entered Into by llo- Millers' association at^the late convention at Milwaukee.
SentinelWilkes, a hay stallion six years^old, baa been sold by W. II. Crawford to^W. C France, the owner of K^*d Wilkes,^tor *^_.^^.He Is bjT George Wilkes, dam^by Sentinel.
TheLoudon Chronicle's Vienna corres-^spond'Utsays the Hungarian maize ring^s\ ndtcate has collapsed, having but 3,000,.^000 florins. Maize may be bought tor half^what the syndicate paid.
Johnllenniker lleaton, M P., will visit^tbe United States early this year lie ex^^pects to appear before cougreaa In advocacy^of ocean penny postage. He has figures to^show how It Is pertectl^ feasible.
Theputdic accounts of the Dominion for^Ho* fiscal year IHh7 h ^how the gross debt^Increased during (be year from i. 1*^7 rtjn^to S2H4 BIS H41. There was increase in the^coat of nearly every branch of th^ public^service.
Allthe dies, numbering between HOD and^WOO, uaed during the year 1HHH iu the United^states mint, at Ptuladelph a, have been de^^stroy ed, under the direction n* Superin^^tendent Kox, In the presence of the chief^coiner and assay er.
lioulangerheld a reception last evening^which was very largely atteuded. In re^^ply to an addreas from the patriotic League^lioulanger expr- aaed confidence that Paris^would select him to the chamber of depu^^ties, special detectives wab'hed the houa^^ami MiS notes of those who viaited tha^general.
Blownto Piacat.^N'oHHisTowN, Pa., Jan. A horrible^accident occurred veiteruay two miles from^Sonneytown, this county. Two young^men named Krb and Shoecker, employed^at Miller's dynamite factory, were at work^tn Swamp Creek, near tbe factory, mixing^the ingredients of dynamite. It la supposed^tu mixing the atuif the proper proportions^were not placed therein, and as a result an^explosion ensued. The man were blown^to pieces and fragments of their lie- h scat^^tered ^ r a a i area. None of tbe fac^^tory building* were Injured, though fhe^shock was felt in houses two miles from^the scene._^
Cauaadby Ovaratudv.
Ci.KVELAMti,O , Jan. a^Miss Mary B.^Sherman, of Wakeman, O , a member of^tbe freshman class at Oberlin college, shot^and killed herself at her boarding place^this afternoon. Overstudy Ls assigned aa^the cause.

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