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The evening telegraph. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, September 03, 1866, FIFTH EDITION, Image 2

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THE DAILY EVENING TKLKGRAPII. PHILADELPHIA, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 18G0.
THE NEW YOKK PRESS.
EDITORIAL Of INIONS OF THE LEADING
JCUBKALB 'UPON CURRENT TOPICS.
COMPILED XV KI T DAT FOR EVfKISO TKLKGRAFH,
Doing Dougla.
From the Tribune.
The 1'teKidcnt complains that the Frecduicn's
Bureau costs too much money, while we are of
pinion that its absence would cost us a great
deil more. Those who do not tbink that tho
President himself Is too expensive an article
will find no objection, of course, to the extrava
gant escort which the President takes with him
on hit political funeral tour to the tomb of
Douglas. The procession, exclusive of a great
many supernumertirle' who are paid by the
job, to about us follows:
First. The President of the United States,
whouc salary is $25,000 a year, and over $2000
per month, alter all expenses are paid by special
appropriation ot Congress.
Second. General Grant, Admiral Farrasut,
and General Kawiins, who are paid for rations,
horses, servants, etc. etc., in addition to a
plump body ol sulary, all of which they deserve
nobly. '
Third. Secretary Seward and Secretary Welles,
who receive join, ly about $10,000 a year, alter
other expenses are careiully provided for.
Fourth. General G. A. Custer, Admiral Rd
foro, General McCullum. and a half dozen
brevet briaadters and colonels, all drawina pay
from the Government and touring srratis. Their
items lor servant.-?, horses, rations, etc. etc.,
stretch out like the tails of a Bashaw.
Fitih. Generals I'uDerton and dioedmfin, com
peuhattd rojally for their jaunting crusado
apuiuht the Freeilmon's Bureau, imd now enter
tained at tho same lwe to look on while Con
gress is abused.
Sixth. Senator Patterson. General Rousseau,
Marshal Coooiui.', Mr. Dooliule, Surgeon-General
Barnes (it is impossible to travel without a
surgeon, tnouph the exchequer must bleed for
it), and a large number of inconspicuous gentle
men, including Major Seward, Mr. Spoll'ord,
and gentlemen who tind their wry on the train,
and are "tho truests ot the nation" by virtue of
an expensive hatred of "radicals."
We hav3 thus condensed the Presidential
muster, which is lonprer or shorter, according to
different stages of the journey Douglas-ward,
and we have, no doubt, omitted the names of
a number of fiiBt-cla9 expensive guests, whose
hotel bills are a proverb lor height, depth, anil
buadtb. Saythitt the President's tour, beloro
it is over, will cost the nation a hundred thou
sand more, and it becomes an interesting query
who Is to pay lor it? If the President, as we
have heard it rumored, lias an idea of returniuff
to Washington by way of the South, we will
only have to double the bill. It is too much to
be expected that gentlemen who denounce Con
gress will do it at their own expense. We make
only a rough guess ot what the travelling libel
on the representatives of the people U likely to
cost a nation ot taxpayers, how much the Pre
sent's disjointed declamation and the Secre
tary's tedious jibes will afflict us per word or
yard, and what the hotel bills of all these extra
paid conservative gentlemen, who grumble
about the Freedmen's Bureau, will come to at a
given rate. Whatever the amount may be, this
poor, abused Congress ot our? must loot the bill
ronguanlmously.
Ore at National Importance of the Presi
dential Tour Its Kxtcuhloii South
warda. From the Herald.
However modest may have been the views
- I n 1 T I . 1. i . 1 . . . . lt
oi i resiueni' tionuHuii uciuj c octung uui uu iub
pious pilgrimage to Chicago, he must have
realized ere this, as the people at large have
realized, the ereat significance, in a political,
or, rather, national point of view, of the enthu
siasm which has atteuded every mile of his
progress. Nothing like it could have been
anticipated. All the party prejudices which
have been so recklessly cultivated and en
couraged for the last eighteen months seem to
have melted away before the warmth and
geniality and good-natured common sense of
the man, as the fronts of an autumn night melt
under the influence of a warm sun. Every
day of his journey rectilies the evil wrought Dy
weeks ol the lute radical Congress. As he
intimates in one of his speeches, it seems to be
his mission to bring balm from Gilead and
pour it with all its healing influences on the
fclill open wounds of toe country. He well ful
fils the mission ot peace on which he has
started; and it may, without any ii reverence,
be said of him that he goes about doing good.
' It would be a pity it the influence which he
exercises in such a maenetic maDner over the
people among whom he passes should be con
fined to the towns and cities lying between
Washington and Chicago. We bhould wish to
see the same iuliueiice exercised in a still wider
circle. The Slates of the Northwest, up to th
head of navigation of the Mississippi, wouli ba
equally bene o led and delurbtcd by a visit trom
Piesident Johnson; and the States of the South
west, from Missouri to Louisiana, would hail
his presence as a harbinger of peace and good
will. And why should these communities not
be gratified In this munDer? Why should they
not have an opportunity of evidencing their ad
miration ot tho mat and their love tor the great
principle of which he is the impersonation
the complete restoration of the Union, and the
renewal of brotherlv love among tbe citizens of
all its sectioi.s ? We earnestly appeal to Mr.
Johnson and atk him, fT the sake of the coun
try at lare, not to weary iu the great and good
work which be has undertaken, aud which is
already producine such happy results. Let
him accept invitations to traverse the States
ot the Northwest, up to St. Paul, and to
descend, the great river made free bv two of
the distinguished met who are his feilow-pil-.
grims Grant and Farragut. The people of
that reglou want to ee their benefactors, and
no such opportunity may ever again present
'itself. Let the paity visit St. Lous, Louisville,
iempniB, vicKsounr, iiw-uuii, lamvucc, u
New Orleans, not foreettlng to call at Island
, No. 10 and Port Hudson, and the other points
along that histeno river where the two great
' commanders ot the army and of the navy won
such honor. Coming northward, they would
have a gran 3 triumphal procession throuch the
States which, once hostile, are now peaceful,
loyal, and true to the Onion. Visiting Savan
nah, Augusta, Columbia, Caarteston, and Wil
mington, their last stopping-place on their way
to the capital would be Richmond. In this
Southern part of the tour the President would
hA nble to undo much of the evil which the
present radical Consress has done, and to wipe
nut the feellnKS of estrangement and bitterness
to which it has given birth. We put it most
A.msuiiv in Mr. Johnson not to forecro this
grand opportunity, but to avail himself of it
In the interests of the nation: and we run no
risk in prediotluer that, when he gets back to
Wawhinaron. he will have given the death
blow w the radicalism which has proved bo
disastrous to the reunion and prosperity of the
Th National I'nlon Policy anil the
Policy of C'ougreMK.
From the Timet.
The National Union policy has the merit of
covering completely the object It is designed to
accomplish. The end to be attained being the
restoration of the Union according to the Con
stltution, the plan which is calculated to ac
complish that result with the least possible
delay is, on its face, the most desirable. And
in this regard the policy agreed upon at Phila-
delnhla is Blmole. logical, and effective. It
raises no knotty problem, requires no subtle
UrguittCUl, Rum wjotuw uj ivvm iv iuvviiv kjvu
trovprsy. Accepting the purpose of th e war a
declaied during its progress by Corgrcss and
the Executive, it recognizes the existence of tho
Stales with all tbe rights guaranteed to them
by the Constitution, and propose to consum
mate t!je act of restoration by admitting them
to Consress without other conditions than those
euacted by existing lnws. Thus nothing is
assumed which Coupre8 has not already con
ceded; nothmsr is proposed which the Constitu
tion aud tbe law as It stands does not sanction :
no new Issue Is presented; no action la required
rave that which Comrress may at once perform
without departure lrom its established routine.
On the other hand, the policy of Cougreg has
neither consistency nor effectiveness to recom
mend it. It talis short of tbe standard which
tho (oncressional leaders have themselves
erected. It virtually aamits the ripht of the
South to be represented, yet proposes conditions
to which the majority of the Southern States
will not submit. It dees not meet the demands
ot the radical faith, while it calls for more than
the Constitutional Uuionists arc prepared to
grant. The latter contend for the right to Im
mediate reprcientation, while the radicals
preach the doctrine of State destruction with
out Bctiuir upon It, and clamor for negro
suffrage without venturing to male It a fea
ture of their platform. The policy of Con
gress, therefore, doc s not heartily please any
body. The more bitter the opposition to tbe
President, the more vehement are the objec
tions to the plan with which Congress is iden
tified. Mr. Sumner has not concealed his dis
gust; Mi. Thadiieus Stevens cannot advocate it
without seli-stultincal ion: Mr. Wendell Phillips
berates it as a delusion, and us promoters as
hjpocritcs; Mr. Uemtt Smith maintains that
"Congress is a coward," "lacks faith in
righteousness," and has "embarrassed and de
moralized" the Republican party by a plan
which substantially acknowledges the principles
contended lor bv the President. Indeed, mut
terings are heard which portend a storm among
the champions of Congress upon this subject.
They rind themselves in a fi-rht without heart to
go throuph it on the present conditions. They
insist tbat the plan shall bo rendered more
radical that is to say, more certain to mortify
aud otlcnd the South and more widely at vari
ance with the views of the National Unionists.
We have, theu, to look at n certain fact as
well as not remote probabilities. The fact
already fixed is, tbat the Constitutional Amend
ment which tho Southern States are asked to
ratify as a condition precedent of ri admission,
will not be ratified. The South will not pur
chase a constitutional right, to the recognition
of which the Federal Government is pledged,
by accepting the terms proposed. Hence tbe
Concessional plan of leeonstiuetiot, asopposed
to the constitutional plan oi restoration, is even
now a failure. It will not eth-ct the restoration
of the Union. It will not extricate the country
from its perilous position. It will do nothing
towards producing bartuouy or perfect ine peace.
What theu? Will tbe radicals etlect the dis
ruption for which the Rebels struggled in vain ?
Will the South continue lor an indefinite period
out of the Union ? Will the radicals abandon
their amendment, and admit the South without
special coimitions? Or will ihey oboy outside
agitators, and substitute lor the amendment
now repudiated by the Sou'h another plan, more
extreme in its nature, more unjust, and more
hateiul to tho Southern people?
The last of these coutinuencies we consider
the most probable. The radical policy as now
proclaimed exhibits inditlcreuce to tbe' require
ments and lest rain Is ot the Constitution, and an
arrosant intnU'rauce which opposition serves
but to intensify. Besides, ulterior purposes
have been avowed which it is impossible to
misunderstand. General Butlor is uot alone in
the work ot threatening. Others as well as he
have apprised the South of the horrors which
are in store tor it if it shall dare to exercise its
constitutional right, nnd repudiate the present
plan. The Chicar.o Tribune has declared that if
ibis plain tail, Congress will be at liberty to
overthrow existing State oreanizations, treat
the South as conquered territory, and begin de
novo the business of reconstruction according
to the most radical ideas. Governor Brownlow
gives vent to yet more ruffianly violence. He
predicis that the army of invasion which the
oiscreet Butler expccts'io command will exter
minate the feouthenj population, raze houses
and lences to the ground, and "make the entire
Southern Confederacy as God found the earth
when He commenced the work of creation,
'without form and void."' Then the lands
r.re to be resurveyed, sold to pay expeuses, and
Fettled only by adherents of the radical doc
trine! Of course, these are the ravings of
madmen or the suggestions of knaves. They
are not likely to commend themselves to the
minds of any considerable body of the people
in tne JSorth, or to be submitted to unresist
ingly by the people of (he South. But tnough
unworthy of notice from a practical point of
view, they ought not to be passed unheeded.
For they undoubtedly reflect the desires and
hi pes ol those for whom Brownlow and Biuler
speak, and they point unmistakably to a re
newal ot civil war, If the radicals are otherwise
unable to give effect to their policy.
Tl ee considerations will not be lost sight of
by the constituencies whose judgment upon the
ereat issue will soon b pronounced. There are
thousands to whom a common sense estimate of
the situation will be conclusive, altogether aside
from those vno approve ot tbe National Union
plan as a question of principle. It may suit
knaves and windbags to threaten confiscation
anu wholesale hanging, but the great majority
ot tuc people will rate them at their proper
value, and will prefer practical measures for
restoring peace and Union. Mr. Stoddart, the
writer ot a letter, is not atone among6t Kepuoii
cans in his conception of the weakness and
failure of Congress. Individuals of this class
may not approve ot the President's course in
every particular, but they see in bis policy a
consistency and feasibility ot which they dis
cover ro trace in tne proceedings ot radical
legislators.
On these grounds the movement for the im
mediate admission ot the South to Consress will
acquire strength, wherever the question shall
be intelligently discussed. booner or later, tne
Southern States ruuHt be readmitted, and there
is no wisdom in delaying: that which is inevi
table. If they would accept the proposed amend
ment, well then acquiescence would silence
complaint from other quarters. But since they
will not ratify tbe ameudment, the wisest course
will be to aiiow u to urop, to insist no turt tier
upon conditions, and to admit their loyal repre
sentatives vwmout waste or time, rue union
has nothing to fear trom the presence of the
South in the Capitol. Tbe only danger Is In Its
nrolonsred exclusion, with all the chances ot
mischief which may meanwhile arise. ,
Henry AVard Beeeher nnd the Cleveland
Convent lou.
From the World.
The interesting corresondeuce between a
committee appointed to Invite Rev. Henry
Ward Beeeher to offleiata as the chaplain of tbe
great Soldiers' and Sailors' Convention, and that
gentleman, challenges universal attention. Mr.
Beeeher does better than accept the invitation ;
he uses the occasion to make the clearest, the
most condensed, powerful, and couvlnclntr ar
gument in support of the objects lor which the
Convention has been called, taat nas yet ap
peared. Had Mr. Beeeher consented to go to
Cleveland as chaplain, he would have lndornea
the policy of the President only by the just
weight of his character and his eminent stand
ing in the Republican party. A solemn prayer
to Almighty Ood would be an unfit vehicle for
a political argument; and an argument or such
lorce aud cogencv as Mr. Beeeher haB written,
is altogether belter for the cause than would
have been his consent to conduct a devotional
exercise lor which any other clergyman of fer
vent piety is just as competent. i
Considered simply as an intellectual produc
tion, this luminous letter is superior to anything
ot Mr. Bcecher's whiuh we recollect to have
.seen or have listened to. Ha has doubtless done
tin tics winch would be' deemed more brilliant;
lor among the talon's with which nature bits
prodigally endowed him, he has an active funcy
and ureut lorce ot caustic humor; but these
taking faculties hsve been restrain") in this
letter, and made to give way to a chastened
wisdom and earnest sobriety of thought. It
contains not a word which cau wound the sensi
bilities of soy political partisan; it is an
appeal' aodrossed to the moral nature,
tho sound judgment, the patriotic Instinct
of the American ' people, the masterly con
ciseness of its diction, tbe calmness and elova
tton ol Its tones, the breadth of its social philo
sophy, Us statesmanlike forecast and saear.ity,
lte grave eloquence, fit it, beyond anything that
has yet been written on the politics of this con
juncture, to produce conviction on candid minds.
Such an argument would have great value com
ing trom anybody; but from Mr. Beeeher it is
inestimable, because his eminent position com
mands for everything he may say on topics so
interesting the attention of the whole country,
and especially the respectful attention oi the
Republican pirty.
It is the too common practice of heated poli
ticians to ebuse men who differ from them, and
to act as If impugning their motives was a suffi
cient reply to their arguments. The impossi
bility of resorting to such weapons aeainrt Mr.
Beeeher Is auoth'T reason why this statement
of his views will be more effective for good
than if It bad proceeded from any other man
lu the United States. Mr. Beeeher doubtless
has his laults; but detraction itself would never
think of sajing that timeserving Is one of
tbem. There is perhaps no man in the coun
try whose moral intrepidity is less open to
question. A bold independence of spirit was
born In him; it come? of the Bencher blood.
Nibody will think of aspersing him as
crlnping to the President for office; his great
talents have made him as independent by posi
tion as he is by nature. Nor will anybody
accuse him of wanting humanity for the freed
men. of linking disloyally to the Government,
ot pro-Rebel sympathies during the war, or of
the compromisiE'j; tameness ot character which
would surrender a principle for the sake ot
peace. He, therefore, if anybody, should be
listened to with candor. And we cannot hesi
late to think that every Republican who reads
Mr. Bcecher's letter with candor, will acknow
ledge the soundness of his views and. the force
of his reasoning.
Many of Mr, Beccher's statements, have all
the ctlccta of argument; as, for example, when
he says: "Our theory of government has no
place lor a State except in the Union." And
again: "Our Government, wisely adaoted to
its own proper functions, Is utterly devoid of
those habits and unequipped with those instru
ments which tit a centralized Government to
exercise authority in remote States over local
allniis. Every attempt to perform such duties
has resulted iu mistakes which have excited
the nation." And this admirable passage: "To
keep half a score ot States under ' Federal
authority, but without national ties and re
sponsibilities; to oblige the central authority
to govern halt' the territory of the Union by
Federal civil officers aud by the army, is not
only a policy uncongenial to our ideas aud
principles, but pre-eminently dangerous to the
spuit ot the Government. However humane
tne end? eouiiht and the motives, it is, in tact.
a course of instruction preparing our Govern-
Bient to be de-pot ic, aud familiarizing our
Ecople to a str' tcb of authority which can never
e other than daiiirerous to liberty."
We have taken these passages almost at ran-
do in: there is hardly a line in the letter which 1
is not equal.y luminous and persuasive. We
call particular nttentlou lo the victorious but
somewhat trenchant logic with which he ex
plodes the argument founded on the daneers ol
admitting the Southern members into Couuress.
It is too loug lor insertion here, and as it could
not be expressed in fewer words than Mr.
Beeeher has used, wo should only impair iis
force by any attempt at aoridgincnt. Mr.
Beechcr's honest scorn of the puuillan'mrty
which tears that the weakened South, with its
few representatives, will get the upper hand
in our politics, is so well supported
by solid and masculine reasoning, that
he compels the reader's concurrence in
bis conclusion, that if the North, with its
mk'hty preponderance, is so demoralized by the
war and so besotted by grovelling interests as to
allow this- to rake place, the South is the nobler
and manlier section, and deserves to rule, on
the principle that the too!s belong to him that
can Landle thfin. "In such a case," he says,
"the South will not only control the Govern
ment, but it ought to do it !'' The soldiers and
sailois, who are the manliest nnd most self
reliant part ol our population, will lull. v sympa
thize w ith the inanlinrss ot this declaration. If
the South, lew as it is in numbers and weak as
it is In resources, bus such superior visor of
cbaiacti r as to surmount its disadvantages and
bestride the country like a Colossus,
"And wo puttv men
Walk about under its huge leps
To tind ourselves dishonorable graves,"
then it is time we had a master to sovern us.
Shame on such abdication of manhood ! and
thanks to Mr. Beeeher for his scornful and
trenchant exposure of it !
Tbe part of the letter In which Mr. Beeeher
discusses the prospects of the freedmen is per
haps the best thiug in it. His views are so im
bued with a courageous social philosophy; they
evince so much enlightened reflection on the
nature of civilization and the laws of progress;
they are so tempered by a wise humanity, that
they do equal credit to his understanding and
his moral nature. Tbe keenness and impe
tuosity of Mr. Beechcr's earlier years have
ripened into a full maturity of sober streneth
which makes his productions as wise as they
were always eloquent ana effective.
Great thanks ae due to the committee for
giving Mr. Beeeher the opportunity tor this
seasrnable expression of his well-weitrhed
views, which, bear the marks nf having Oeea
tormea witn great caie and deliberation.
LEGAL NOTICES.
TN THE ORPHANS' COURT FOR THE CITY
X AM COUNTY OF PHILADELPHIA. ,
laiate oi KeT DAM Hi HaEKljjAN, deceased.
Tbe Audi'or appointed by the Court to audit, settle.
ana aajusiiue account oi MitMAti, i uj.tr.Ar., ao
snlnlMrator d. b n. ot Estate of liev. DANIEL
hilEK DAN, deceased, and to report distribution
ot the baiauce in tbe hands ot tbe accountant, will meet
tbe parties Interested tor the purposes of bis appoint
ment, on MONDAY. Kntembtr 10. 1IW6. at S o'clock
P. M., at Boom K. 1, 9' ET11 EK1LL HOUSE, in the
cltv ol Philadelphia
8 24 imwSt CP. CLARKE, Auditor.
T7XFCUTOR'8
NOTICE. PERSONS IS-
Jli dubtfd to the Estate of the late CHARLES S.
WATM, will please make payment tv and those
having claims uaa'nst the estate will present tnetn to
ed w. u. Wayne.
Acting Executor,
8 lU6w No. 1113 MOUNT VEUNON ttireet.
SHIRTS, FURNISHING GOODS, &t
J W. SCOTT & CO,
SHIRT MANUFACTURERS,
AMD DEALS BS III
MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS,
No. 814 CHESNUT Street,
FOUR DO0R8 BILOW THE "COSTINENTAL,
821 $ip l'H IL ADELPJBTA.
PATENT SHOULDER-SEAM
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AND CENTLEMEN'S FUKMSHING STORE.
PERFECT FITTING 8H1BTS AND DRAWERS
made lrom measurement at very short notloe.
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WINCHESTER & CO.,
8 24,5 No. 708 CHESNUT Street
342
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FINANCIAL.
JAY GOOKE;&;00.,
'' I ;
Ho. 114 South 'THIRD 8treefc,
BANKERS
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KRPPr rEN STEAM ENGINE AND
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fHaU'KAl AM I'HlOKETlvJAk EKUIN ECUS,
MAtHIM.'l , BUlLMt-MAKEKS. ISLACKhMI 1 ll.i,
and t OUM)Elb, Iiuvuik tor many yeura beoa In suo
cvHHtal oprmtion, and been exclusively enxaged In
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JOHN P. LEVY.
8 21$ BEACH and PALMEH btree!s.
J. VADCHAK HEBBICK,
WILLIAM B. KEBBrOK
JOHN B. COPE.
s
OTJTIIWARK t'OUJSDKY, FIFTH
AND
WASHlWiyi) Streets,
Philadelphia.
HEKKlCK. 6 SUNS.
ENOISKtKH AND A1ACH1SI8T8.
manufacture Hiyh and Low Prttasure bteum Engines for
Lund, l iver and Marine t-ervice ,
Doners, Uasotneters, Tanks. Iron Boats, etc
Caitiipgs oi all kinds, el. her iron or biass.
Iron Fraue Hoots lor Gas Worka. Workshops, and
Kailroad Stations eto.
hetorts and uas Machinery, ot tbe latest and most im
proved coDstiuetlon.
Every description ot Plantation Machinery and 8ngar,
Paw. and Jrit Mills. Vacuum Pans. Open !teain Trains,
ueiettttorm fixers, romping engines eio.
hole Agents lor X. BUIeux's Patent Sagar Boiling
At Darotus. Nesniytb's Patent 8team Hammer, and .s
pinwall A Woolsey 'a Patent Ceatriiugal sugar .Draining
Machine. 6 30
"D
J
RIDE8BUBO MACHINE WOEKS.
OEKICE,
No. 65 N FKONT STREET,
PflLLAPELFHIA-
Vfe are prepared to till order to any extent for our
well-known
MACHlfi EBY FOR COTTON AND WOOLLEN Mil L8,
liH'iucnug an recent improvements in earning, spinning,
an'J weaving.
We In . ite the attention ot manatactnrers to our ex ten
give ork.
1 1 AtFRED JEN KB & 80S.
"W
'AR DEPARTMENT, SURGEON-GENE-
JtAli t) Vt t ICE,
Washington. V. c.. Anirust ID. moo
An Army Medical Board, to consist or Brevet
Colonel J. ii. Brown. BurireoB. V. S. A . President;
Hi em Lieutenant-Colonel 11 U. Wirtz, Bureeon. U.
8. A. : Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel Anthonv Heer.
e-orireon, u. . A.i ana lirovot Major warren Web
ster, Assistant Surgeon, U. H. A., Eeoorder, will
meet in new I oi k city on tne ztitn of ctep emoer,
next, lor the examination ot candidates lor adm e
sion Into tu9 Medical Staff of tne United States
Atmv.
Applicants most De over zi rear ot aire, ana
nhvaioallv sound.
Applications tor an invitation to appear bolore
the Board should be addressed to the Murtreon
Ueneral, United State Army, and must state the
lull name, residence, and date and p aoe oi birth ot
the candidate, leetimoniull at to chaiaoter and
qualifications must be lurnlshed. It tbe applioani
bas been in tbe medical t-ernoe oi tbe Army ounnir
tbe war, tho fact should be stated, together with hi
former rank, and time and place ot aervioe, add tes
timonials lrom the omoers with whom ha baa served
Imnlil also be forwarded.
ho allowance is made for the expense ol persons
undergoing tne examination- g it is an lnampensa
his i rrniimite to aDtiointmnst.
i here are at present sixvr vaoanom in iub neaioai
Staff, lorty-eix ot whioa are original, being created
bv tne Act oi congress aooruveu ouij to, 1000
8 11 mw29t Burgeon-General, U b. A,
ROBERT SHOEMAKER & CO
WHOLESALE DRUCCISTS,
MANUFACTURERS,
IMPORTERS,
AND DEALERS IN
Paints, Vanishes, and Oils,
No. 201 NORTH FOURTn STREET,
1J3 3B) COBNEB OF EAOli. I
SUMMER RESORTS.
J3' I N Oil A M JIO USE,
EteveaUh and navrkct Street, Phllsula.
' Tbli now and elegant boose la now open tor tbe recep
tion of guests, wttb all the appointments ot a first clasa
notel
CURLIS DAVIS,
1 1 m PROPRIETOR.
CONGRESS HALL.
CAPE ISLAND, N. J.
Onnd aftor Aupoat 2T, the raft will he reduoed
to $3 per day.
Dotal romains open u: til OCTOBER 1.
iU21J
J. 1 OAKE.
COLUMBIA HOUSE,
CArE ISLAND, N. J.,
Will Remain Open This
Later than Usual.
Season
Persons visiting ns (ate In August or carlr In Sep
tember will find it a vorr pleasant portion of tbe
sea shore season, and have the beue&t of a ccrtatntr
In securing ocean-front rooms.
GEORGE J.
BOLTON,
Ptdprlotor.
818 3w
gURF HOUSE,
ATLANTIC CITY.
CHOICE BOOHS can now be had at this favorite
Rous?.
W. T. CALEB.
OPEN UNTIL OCTOBER 1.
l8U
MERCHANTS' HOTEL,
CAPE ISLAND, N. J.
This Hotel being entiielv refitted and refurnished in
the best manner, 13 NOW OPEN FOB THE RECEP
TION OF GUESTS.
The bouse Is located near tbe ocean, and every atten
tion v. Ill le given to merit tbe patronage of the puollc.
McNUTT & MASON,
6 22 tt PBOPKI ETOR8.
ITOIR- CAPE MAY.
Commencing TUESDAY, August 28, 196S. Trains will
leave Pier tarty) Market street, fhliauetpbia, as
lollowM- .
V JC, Di. aue at i ape imauu i ir n,
He turning will lesve lape Island-.
H A. M .. due in Philadelphia at 11 .17.
Ticket Onici s, at t'err.t loot oi Maraet street, and No
B)h( ho.nnt street, t ontlnenial Hotel.
Venous purchasing tickets of the Agent, at Mo 828
Clieeuut sheet, can by leaving orders, have their bag
oiitie called for and checked at their residences by
Oraiiam's llagcaxe JtxDtess.
28 J VAN Ki-NSHELAER. Superintendent.
GOVERNMENT SALES.
E
XTENSIVE AUCTION SALE
ov
GOVEfiNMEAT lOBACCO.
SEVKltAi, JJ.UADKED UOliSHEADS
o
FINE VIRGINIA LEAF.
IBHASURY DEPAHTMhNT, CUSTOM HOXJfV, I
JUchmoind, Va., Aucu.t 5, 186S. I
In ccnipl ance with instructions lrom U A. Kis-
lcy, Eq., bupei viMnir bucc al Agent, there will he
sold, to tbe liiptiest bidder, at public auction, at 11
o'c ook in the forenoon of W EDnE.SUAY., the &tu
day ol Bentcmbcr next, at WIASIOIS'S 13 U ILL.
lliG, corner of FOURTEENTH ana CAItY Streets,
in the oity of K1C11MOM), Virginia, tho fo lowing
described
CAPiUEED AND ABANDONED PROPERTY,
viz :
TWO HUNDRED (OR more) HOGSHEADS
LEAF TOBACCO.
FIVE nUNDBuD BOXES MANUFACTURED
TOBACCO.
Tbe Leaf Tobacco bas been eatbrod from the
counties oi Bed lord, Roanoke. Franklin, Campbell.
lleurv. t'atuck. ttaliinr. frinoe uawara, rutsviva-
ma, Mecklenburg and Charlotte, comprising all the
jrooft tobacco lands in tbe Stale. Much of it is ot
1 be finest quality, suitable lor ''wrappers," and bas
Deen wen curea ana preservea. inis eaie presents
opportunities to the manulactnror and dealer rarely
ottered, bbouid tbe demand warrant, some three or
lour hundred hopshca.is more may be added to tbe
sale, which will couip e'e tbe disposition ot Virginia
lobaceo lor Government aooount.
t-aniDles of each hogalieaa will bo ready for inapeo-
tion at the salesroom ion d ays preceding tne day of
J.
Terms Cosh. In Government funds.
JOHN b. LOOMIS,
8 Ww Assistant Special Agent.
OTEIGLEDER. TROUT. VOIGT A CO..
IO beg most respectmll to call the-attontlon ot tbe
publio at 1 arize to their newty-inventea ratent,
THK UMVKK8AL AIABMIHT.
which, by discharging a percusHiun ca. made expressly
lor uie purpose, ivui prove very eueoiuai m we preven
tion oi uurxianes. eiu.
The ioliowinir are some of Its treat advantages:
1st. Mmpliciiy ol construotlou. cheapness and ease In
application, so tnai a kervant or ennu mij set it.
2d. Freedom lrom danger to oenxins or nroDertv.
HA. Universality oi auiHca:ion toanv i art of a Poor,
Window. Grating, Shutter, Oate, Garden, Preserve,
r i.ti l enu eto.
4th. It gives a check to barglais by alarnilns the In
mates, neighbors and uollce.
Kth 1 he mind Is islieved from much painful anxiety
In female loneilnes or eld age especially when aiticle
OI rieai value are seoi in uia nouse.
6th. It Is a universal proUsctlou to travellers to fasten
on cnamLer doors.
7th Its oonstructlon li simple and not llabls to get out
IMKECTIONa FOB USE ACCOMPANY EVEBT IN-
8TRIIMENT.
Wa ham nut nnr article at the low Dries of ONE
POLL A K. Inclusive or 25 caps, and It cannot be got
chtaper either Horn us or nrotn our agents, Forlurtuer
particulars inquire ot oraddrtss.
BXtlGLEDKB. 'I KOUT, VOIQT CO.,
...,- . a. i. Itr A l . TT 1
Room No IS.
We will send the ALARMIST to aay part ol the
country on receipt oi ptlca, and 'ii vents extra tor
miatauA.
Country Agent wanted.
629 Su
TVTONTJMENTS, TOMBS,
GRAVF-STONES, Etc.
Just completed, a beautiful variety ot
ITALIAN MARBLE MONUMENTS,
TOUBB AND OBAVE-8TONES,
Will be sold cbea for cash.
Work sent to any part ol the United Btate.
HENRY 8. T A lift.
If ABB LB WORKS,
wtm 8 Wo. 710 GREEN Btreet. Philadelphia.
TjtTTIAT IS THE BEST CURE FOR
CORNS, BUNIONS ETC.?
THEOBALD'S BOOTS. (
No. T03 CALLOWIIIXIj STREET,
Be makes the La-ts to suit the Feet, and Boot Fboe.
tc. eto. to Ut tbe leet THY Ulkt. 18 16 lin
KIVY WELLS OWNERS Or? PROPEUTY
'1 be only plao to get Privy Welt cleaned and 4
n footed at very low price. !
A. PET80N
Marufacturei of I'oudratie, '
8 10 J OOLDBaXTUK' UALU, UUHAKY Street
LUMBER.
1866
FliOORIMUl PLOURIHG11
, TOORl.Ot ri.O W1rtO(t
5-4 ( A KOI A riu(IKIMl.
4-4 CAKOI.IKA FlAuKINO.
MVIkUIKIt ri.O'!MNII
4.4TIB01NI Hooking
MUKUWAfiKfLooiiivo.
4.4IM.WAKF rL()HIM
AFH ANlV WALNOT r..O'HINO.
AMU A.ND WALNUT FlX0UliiO
HTKP BOABI, I
I KAIL PLAfcK.
18G6.
-PLASTERING
PLASTERINU LATHS,
AT 11K.I)1).;H PKlCfA.
AT KKDUCED PKlfK.S
LATIW 1 1
1866
DTSMAU AND PINK HinNCI.CH
). CEDAK AND PINK 6H1NOI.E8.
M). 1 LUMI t'H)ARHIMII,(JI. .
kb- I HHOKT t'KOAH HHiNOLKg. .. .
WHITK PINK MlINOl.tH.
CTt HKN MUNULfS.
FINE AftHORTHKNT FOR HAL4C LOW
QCl( LUMBER FOR UNDERTAKERS! I
lOUU. LUMI1HB FO rNDF.RTSKF-R.iU
Itr l K't DAK. WALNUT, ANl PINE,
HFI tF.DAH WALNUT, AND PINK.
1 ftfiri ALBANY LUMHKROFALLKINOS.
J.OUU. ALHANT LUUKFK OF AfjTfriOll
MJIHIM.U WALNUT. ,
HKAHONHI M ALNUT.
DRT POI'LAB CUF.KHY, NT ABB.
OAK I'LK. AMD BUS. .
MAHOGANY.
KOBEWOOn AND W ALN UT TF.KEFJtB. .
1866
-1CHJAR-BOX 'HANUKACTURKBH.
nuuH.imr MtkiiriomDvui
bPAMHH CKl'AB BOX M)A1U.
AT REIUCKI PK1CE.S.
i Qaa SPRUCE JOIHTI SPRUOW JOISTlt
XODO. NPKUIE JOIHTI RPHUCR JOIST I
FHOM 14 TO .Tl FRET LONG..
f-PHUCE 8ILLH.
flFMLOtK PLANK AND JOIST.
OAK P1LLR.
11AULK BKOTHFB A CO.,
6 2? 6mrp
& ... j . .j . . ' u n v. v- ,
ho. VM) SOL Til toTlEKT.
JJ N I T E D STATES
BUILDER'S MILL.,
Nos, 24, 26, and 23 S. FIFTEENTH St.,
rntLA.DBt.rniA.
ESLER & BROTHER,
WOOD MOULDINGS, BRACKETS, BTaIB BkJMtU
TEBB, NEWEL POSTS, GEJSERAL TWUM'l
bCUOLL WORK, ETO.
SHELVING PLANED TO ORDER.
1 he I argrat assortment ot Wofd Mouldinua fa hii Ml
Constantly on aand. tiDlia
fa O. PERKINS,
LUMBER MERCHANTS
Successor to K. Clark, Jr.,
No. 324 CUR1STULN STREET.
Constantly on band a lame and iarled ajtsortmea
of Build to c Lumber. CMS
COAL.
QNE TRIAL
SECURES TOUR CUSTOM.
WHITNEY & lIAUILTOal,
LEHIGH.
SCHUYLKILL,
AND BITUMINOUS
COAL,
Ko. 835 North MM II Street,
. Above Poplar, Km Sldo. (SB
A M E S
O ' B It I E N
DEALER IU
i
LEHIGH AND SCHUYLKILL COAL.
BY TBE CAHQO OR BIKOLE TON.
Yard, Broad Street, below Titzwater.
Bas constantly ou band a competent supply of the
alove superior Coal, suitable lor fanu.v use, to
which ho calls the attention of his friends and the
imbiio generally.
Orders ieit at No. 205 South Fifth street, No. 33
South Seventeenth btreot, or through Doepatoh r
Post Ofijce, promptly attended to.
A SUF&KIOB UUAl.lTr OF BLACKSMIfHS
COAL. Y6
JJAZLETOK LEHIGH COAL
A SPECIALTY.
11. W. PATIiICK & CO.,
No. 301 NORTH 3H0AD STREET.
Would solicit oruers for the above Coal, which tuer
have always on band, together with their celebrate
BE-BK0KEN SCHUYLKILL COAL.
8 23 smw6mj
o
O A L
GOAL!
COAL!
The best LEHIGH and rt)HlfTI.Ii.II. L OOAL, pra-
pared cxpros.ly lor lumilv use cous antly on hand in
mvlara o. 1517 CALLOWHILL Mroet under oorer.
dellverea on snort notice, well pionea aua rrea oi uimm,
at the lowest t:au prioe. A tnai will seoora root
UStOUU JUI1N A 'll,3'L
Successor t W. L. FOULE.
PrtiLATELPntA. August 27. lM 8 SM t
TRUSSES, SUPPORTERS, ETC
PHILADELPHIA 8UBEQNft
BAMiAQfc INS 1 1TTJTE. No. 14 N.
tlMIl street, above Market B. O.
I i. atTT, atte. thirty yeurs' practloai experience.
suarauteo tbe skiliul adjustment ot bl rreulum
I au nt Oraduatinr 1 rcui 1 russnnd a vanntv
ethers Bui'portets, Flajtie blockings, Mi.u'afer Ucao
Crutches, Pnsiensorie, etc. Ladles' apartoianta CO
ducted by a Ladr.
Q-HEAT SAVING OF TIME,
LABOR, AND MONEY.
FLANDERS' PATENT
POKTABLE CYLIN DER BORING MACHINE
Marine and Stationary Engine. Blast Cylinder,
Pump andt'orllo Valve bored out without removing
them trom their piese.it position.
Engines boreu or verv size and build, el'ber when
ve.iKai. horizontal or inclined, irom 10 to 300 horse-
?ower, by reaiovln onlr one or both beads and piston,
bis la the onl true way to bore a cylinder a no part
oi tbe machiuery Is moved from its present p ace, ex
cept vhai i mentioned above A great amount oi time
It saved, as the work la completed ui leu thaaou loarih
the tlnt othetwise required.
AU ordet. prompt., atteuded to. C(
Do. 1825 PoPLAB Mtreet. hllsdelphla.
No. UNortb W'lLU.iM Htreet.Naw York.
W refer to : 1 P. a orrls.Towne A t'o t at. W Ua'd
Win Co.i S Rowland A lo. WUIlain li. Tiomii
A Co 1 J B. Kroner di Hons; A Jeiik A Hons,
of hlladelphlaj Lelnah Ztuo W orks, llotliltheui.
t-eonsv vanlaj Truoiou Iron to. Trent. n, N J li-er-le.t
McVsuiis A t o . Readlni, fm ; Moi'ormlck k Co .
Harrisbur Pa I Howes 4 I'lill lm, Newark. N J ; aud
the Corilt Engine Co., Providence, li I. Blllui
jJL. PARASOLS AT $1-2S, $1-50, fl-76, AND
T"a. BUk Ban Utubrellas, 1 40.I1W, l 10.
i II. DIXOW
Htrwrni ll 0. Eiuu ia auroet.

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