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The evening telegraph. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, September 04, 1866, FIFTH EDITION, Image 3

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THE DAILY EVENING ' TELEGRATH. PHILADELPHIA, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4" 18CG.
CITY INTELLIGENCE.
I Tor AMUional Local Items tee Fifth Tage.
The Union state Central Committee.
This important committee had a large ntlii(t
yesterday afternoon, at their room. No. 1105 Ohes-
ut street. Keports from the different connties
were received, and all were of the most gratifying
character.
The following address was ordered to be pub
lished :
Oommittm Rooms, No. 1105 Chesnnt street,
Pbiladblpria, September 3, 1H06.
Fellow Oltizrns The superficial observer might
suppose, after the fearfnl straggles, sacrifices and
sufferings of the last five years, that we could
safely relax onr efforts and watchfulness, and, re
turning to onr individual affairs, permit the ma
chinery of government to ron Itself. An intelli
gent and patriotic survey of the situation, how
ever, will not warrant any snch conclusion, but
will impress ns more than ever with the truth and
wisdom of the adage, "Eternal vigilance is the
price of liberty." Six years ago the people law
fully elected Abraham Lincoln President of the
United States. The minority, enemies of our gov
ernment and country, refused to submit to
their defeat at the polls, and, for the first time in
oar history, appealed from the ballot-box to the
sword. Tbey detiantly threw off all the obliga
tions of constitutions and laws, rushed madly
into civil war, and fought with malignity and
desperation for four long bloody years In the
wicked attempt to overthrow and utterly de
stroy the government handed down by our fa
thers. This they did under the pretext that a State
hnd a constitutional right to secede from the
Union. The same thing had been attempted by
South Carolina in 1KT3; but, under the vigorous
administration of President Jackson, the effort
signally failed, and the doctrine on which it was
based was repudiated. Hat in 1850, when the De
mocratic party of Cincinnati nominated James
Bnchanan for President, they revived the old State
rights dogma of secession, by readoptlng the Vir
ginia and Kentucky resolutions of 17!H and 17H,
as a part of their plnltorm. And at the Charles
ton Convention, in 1H(U, although the party there
split into two parts, the one nominating Douglas
and the other Breckinridge for President, both
factions readopted these same resolutions. These
resolutions do not hold the relations of the States
to the United States as constituting a government
in the ordinary and proper sense of the term,
but declared to be merely a compact, and that
"as in all other cases of compact among parties
having no common judge, each party has an equal
right to judge for itself, as well of infractions as
of the mode and measure of redress."
Under this free Democratic charter for rebellion,
the election of Abraham Lincoln was claimed by
the rebel States as an "infraction" of the "com
pact," and they chose secession and civil war as
the mode," and the destruction of the Union and
of the government as "the measure of redress."
Hence, when the war broke upon ns in all its
fury, we found the Democratic party paralyzed.
It was suddenly brought face to face with the
practical application of its own political creed, by
Its own political friends. Hence, too, the sad de
moralization and want of loyalty and patriotism
shown by that party during the whole war. Those
of them who preferred their country to their party
and platform abandoned both platform and party,
and under the flag of their country manfully ral
lied to put down the rebellion, while the leaders
and the mass of the party aid otherwise.
They had so repeatedly proclaimed the right of
secession they believed it, and were everywhere
found justifying or excusing the rebellion, de
nouncing every means used to suppress it; pre
dicting the war a failure, and endeavoring to
make good their predictions, and boldly denying
there was any power in the government to "coerce
a State." The Democratic party thus acquired a
reputation for connivance at treason and diBloy
altv to the country which justly consigned it to
continuous and overwhelming defeats, until at
the close ot the war it bad not a Governor or a
Legislature in a single, loyal State, except little
Delaware and the legislature of Kentucky. And
since the Philadelphia Convention It seems to
have fallen upon the expedient of otder noted
criminals, and resolved to sally forth nnder a new
Tiftmn.
Not until April, 1PG5, were the rebels finally
overcome, and then only by the power of our ar
mies, which they could no longer withstand.
There was no voluntary surrender, but their arms
were stricken from their bloody hands. The great
conspiracy against freedom had failed, and the
armies and people of eleven revolted States were
at the mercvofthe conquerors, professing a wil
lingneBS to accept any terms the victors might im
pose. Congress naa men recenuy aojouruea, uuu,
under the law, would not assemDie until me ioi
lowing December, unless con veied by the Presi
dent in extra session. The occasion seemed to be
one of sufficient novelty and importance to require
a meeting of Congress, but the President judged
dltterently. He proclaimed that these States had
been deprived of "all civil government," and the
Supreme Court of the United States declared the
iDhnia nnmilHtinn thereof to he "alien enemies."
The President proceeded, by proclamations, by
appointment of provisional governors and other
means, to create governments for these rebellious
States, and npon the annual meeting of Congress
made renort of what had been done, and recom-
mTTHari the admission of Reoresentatlves. Con
gress claimed to have jurisdiction over the whole
subject, and proceeded to inquire whether or not
governments had been established, and whether,
under all the circumstances, it would be proper to
restore those rebellious people and States to their
former relations and rights in the Union, without
llrst imposing some terms upon them as security
fr ttiA tntnre 1
The great question is not wnether the States
themselves shall be restored, but whether they
shall have representation in Congress with or
withnnt terms. Our political adversaries Demo
crats, rebels and their sympathizers, north and
nnth-T without terms and conditions, and
tnrtnvith Congress, by the almost unanimous
vote of all the members who sustained the war,
hiu nrnnnsed sundrv amendments to the Constitu.
tlon of the United States, to be submitted to the
State Legislatures for ratification; and it will be
the Legislature we are about to elect
to approve or disapprove these fundamental
changes in the national Constitution. These
amendments are the terms fixed by Congress on
which the States lately in reoeuion ana tneir peo
niA nn resume their practical relations to the na
tional Union. These terras may be briefly stated
as follows: t .........
1. That all persons born or naturalized In the
United States shall be citizens thereof; and that all
citizens shall have equal protection iu me eujuy
man of life, lihertv and property.
o Turn, representation shall be apportioned
among the States according to numbers, but that
classes disfranchised without cause shall not be
counted in fixing the basis of Federal representa-
Inn
3. That all who are guilty of treason and perjury
shall be ineligible to olllce, unless the disability be
hu a. two. thirds vote of Congress.
4. That the validity of the national obligations
inenrred in the war shall not be questioned, and
all rebel debts and claims for slaves shall be void.
Tha KtjtteH nf Tennessee. Connecticut and New
Hampshire, by the action of their several legisla.
to-. hva Rireniiv ratified these amendments by
very large majorities. Our friends in Congress and
out of Congress are united in the conviction that
these terms are pre-emiueuuy uinguaiuuiuuB, i
and iuet; that they are the legitimate fruits of the i
war, and essentiul to our peace and security for the
future. By the storms of civil war some of the
landmarks made by our fathers were taken away,
and some of the ancient foundations laid by them
were moved. Let us wisely readjust them, so that
our temple of liberty may stand upon the broader
and firmer foundation ot universal liberty and im
partial justice. . , . .
In March, lt-66, the Union party assembled in
convention to nominate a candidate for Oovernor.
It reaffirmed its patriotic principles as proclaimed
and fought lor during the war, and declared it to
be the right and duty of Congress to prescribe the
terms ot reconstruction. Oa this platform Major
General John W. Geary was nominated for Oo
vernor by a unanimous vole, and subsequently his
nomination was enthusiastically indorsed by a
large and intelligent Convention of the Soldiers
and Sailors of the State. He is no obscure person,
age, but one of the representative men of these
eventful times. Asa civilian he has tilled with
ability and distinction many important public po
sitions, requiring intelligence, discretion and the
highest order of integrity and administrative
ability. He has been a farmer, a teacher, a civil
' engineer, a lawyer and a manufacturer. He has
served the people as postmaster and mayor of a
' citv, as judge of a court, and as Oovernor of a
territory. As a volunteer soldier he is the pride
and an honor to his state.
He went out from home to the Mexican war as a
1 captain, and came back with honors as the colonel
of his regiment. He entered the service In the late
-IJt M nnlonel. and fought it all the wav
through, having been promoted to the exalted rank
inrouKu.uB K, command and
promptness-o Execute." This valiant and faithful
' ?ol erwa. present at and participated in sixty
fnnr times wounded Inaction,
but ne ver once defeated. He made the entire circuit
BUl"iJi., .M..f. and fought Its authors
2nd 'drfendTr. from ev.r'y State that acknowledged
a ...h.,rii. lie has given to his
cruU,r7h JflrsCSoru. on. killed in battle; he ha.
pe?Uled ku Ule and shed bis blood for the nag and
cans of onr country, and he bears apon his person
the honorable scars from manv a well-fouk'ht
field. Such is the candidate presented for the
so ff rages of the loval and patriotic voters of Penn-
sylvanla.
as a competitor the Democratic party has pre
sented the Hon. Hlester Clymer. He, too. Is a re
presentative man; but it Is of his party, rather
than of his country. His platform and his cam
paign thus far may be summarily comprehended
in the phrase, "Up with tne rebel, and down with
the negro." He is a lawyer by profession, and it
Is believed be never held any office except that of
State Senator. His public record, therefore, Is a
short one, and consists entirely ot his votes and
speeches during his senatorial career. But that
term covers tne entire perioa wnen tne country
was torn by a distracting and bloody civil war,
and when the State was lavishly contributing her
blood and treasure for ner own aeience ana lor
that ot the national government. In this tremen
dous struggle where did Hlester Cly.ner standi
And what did he dot He has made his record,
and let It answer.
In 1801 he voted against the bill for the arming
of the State, and after the news of the attack on
Fort Sumter had fired the hearts or oar people.
and thousands were rallying to the defence of our
insulted llag, mr, Clymer caused to be entered
upon the journals of the Senate his solemn pro
test against the bill for arming the State.
In ISOii, when reverses had overtaken our armies
and our credit was strained to the utmost to keep
men in the neld, jyir. uiymer voted against the
joint resolution providing for the collection of the
taxes levied by me unitea states.
in 1H3 Mr. uiymer voted against the bill to en
able our soldiers and sailors to vote when absent
In the service.
In ibi'A he dodged the vote on the proposed con
stitutional amendment allowing soldiers In the
field the right to vote, and afier said amendment
bnd passed he voted against the bill to carry it into
effect.
He voted against the hill to define and punish
offences of a treasonable character, and against the
bill to legalize the payment of bounties to volun
teers. In February, H-04, In a speech in the Senate, re
ferring to the recent defeat of Vallandigham In
Ohio, and of Woodward In Pennsylvania, Mr
Clymer said: "I say now and believe that it was
the greatest calamity that has yet befallen this
country that those two men were not elected."
such is an outline 01 me inglorious record oi
Iliester Clymer, and by It, as he declared on a re
cent occasion, he is determined to stand. His
whole public career and all his official acts and
public declarations of opinion have been uni
formly consistent. His record may be searched in
vain for a vote or sentiment evincing true loyalty
to the flag or cause of the country, or which was
not at the time In harmony with the prevailing
political sentiment at Richmond and Charleston.
Upon these records and candidates we most con
fidently appeal to tne patriotic voters of tne Key
stone State for a most emphatic verdict in lavor of
the right.
Sundry dispatches captured from tne enemy dis
close his mode of organization and plan of cam
paign, rne cnairman oi tneir state central com
mittee, as a sort of head centre, appoints a reliable
subordinate in every election district in the State,
and these, from the debris of the late "Knights of
the uolden circle," and such other materials as
can be had, are required to organize "mystic cir
cles," or Democratic clubs, which are to register
the voters, collect money for the party, distribute
documents, and do various other things to Insure the
full party vote. These are semi-military secret or
ganizations, and the members are admitted by ini
tiation, at which the candidate "places bis rtgbt
hand on his lelt breast," and enters into most solemn
vows to "vote against all men who are willing to
give the negro either political or social equality in
this state, or in any other Mate, District or Terri
tory of this country." Their watchwords are
"Silence," "Obedience," "Vigilance." It is a
pity the great light of these magnanimous patriots
should be longer concealed under a bushel, and
that they can find nothing more important to do in
tbis great crisis of our country's fate. But fore
warned should be forearmed. Guard well against
these insidious appeals to the prejudices of our
people, and attempts to mislead them by such
means. Be not deceived by the stale clamor about
negro equality add negro suffrage. These favorite
bobbies were supposed to have been ridden to
death at our last election, when, as now, they were
declared by these same men to be the great lssuee
of the contest. They are now raised up and brought
upon the track again, mounted by the same riders,
and destined to the same ignoble end. The consti
tution ot Pennsylvania permits only white men to
vote, tiy its terms it can be amended only once in
every five years, and having been amended in 18(11,
allowing the soldiers tie right to vote, it cannot,
in conformity with Its own provisions, be amended
again vntil lbtiO. It Is hoped, therefore, our Demo
cratic friends will restrain themselves, and not
press negro snnrage upon us before authorized by
the constitution oi me state.
Complete your township and county organ iza.
tlons without delay: revive at once every where
the Leagues and Associations which pro ved of such
vast service during tne war: iet every mena ieei
that he has something to do in the good work, and
proceed forthwith to do it with all nls might,
Exclude side issues and suppress all local quarrels
and personal aspirations, and labor only for the
public gooa. see to it mat an neeaiut assessments
are made In due time. Be not discouraged by the
boasting and clamor of our adversaries ; they have
been ingioriousiy aeieatea in every contest lor
years, and cannot prevail against us. Nothing but
our base betrayal by the President and the hope of
oftice could have galvanized them into sufficient
vitality to make another right against tne vic
torious hosts of freedom. The physical conflict,
for the time at least, Is ended, but the moral con
flict between loyalty and disloyalty continues, and
the grave question is, whether the one or the other
shall rule the State and the nation. We urge har
mony, energy, systematic, associated and indivi
dual labor, ana a renewal oi men res oi patriotism.
The loyal and patriotlo people of the State have
noDiy sustainea us ana me cause oi tne country,
under the heavy pressure and discouragements of
drafts, bereavements, taxation and carnage, and
when nothing but an abiding faun in the justice
of God could enable us to see the end. Surely
there can be no faltering now, when the goal Is
almost reached, and when one more united rally
for our principles and our flag will enable us to
secure the ripe fruits of the late dreatful conflict,
and to garner them safely for ourselves and our
children.
We stand over the ruins ol a gigantic rebellion,
the most formidable enemy republican Institutions
ever encountered. We stand by the graves of three
hundred thousand of our noblest men, who count
ed their lives well spent when offered freely for
liberty and Union. In the presence of thelrspeech
less but eloquent dust; In the presence of the doubt
ing and sneering enemies of free government at
heme and abroad; In the presence of the oppressed
millions, who, from beneath crushing despotisms,
watched our flag with tears, hopes and uriveis;
before the rapidly-coming millions of the future;
before a God of justice, and in the name of all
that makes faithfulness to Him and honor among
men, we stand pledged to secure and maintain for
ever the principles tor which our brothers died.
By order of the Committee.
F. Jordan, Chairman.
Meeting in Fkont of tiie Union
Leauue Sl'EECH ok Mr. Maynard, of Ten
nesshe. A larpe meeting was held last even ins
I. v
under the auspices oi the union League.
Horace Maynard, of Tennessee, was introduced
to Hie n:eetiug by Mr. Frank V11. H said
that the welfare ot the nation is ia imminent
peril, and the coming elections will settle tb.e
policy 01 tne nauou uotoniy lur me present, out
lor lontf years lo come. Tup life ot tbe nation
has been decreed by more than tivo hundred
battle-tields. and the question whether our tins;
is to wave tnumDhantlv has been oettletl. The
question to be settled now is.Whois to adminis
ter the anairs oi tne nation r wueiuur mo men
who have saved the nation or its enemies.
Shall, he asked, the lioys n lime carry our
flag, or those in aery, who attempted to trail it
in the dust?
Men foreetthe 300.0(10 crraves or our slain, and
the hundred clorloua battle-fields of the war;
they l'orpet the orphans and widows scattered
througnout tne iana; tney lorgei tne auoujiua
ble prison houses ot treason, Auderonville,
Libbv PriBCn. etc.! they lorcretthe mighty struir
ele that we have passed through, and the people
of the South would have us toreet that tuey
were the sruilty authors ot all their sorrows.
Thev forget it, but we do not. (Cheers.) There
nre, some mini's mm it is a siu to iorcei. uan
we target the gioes, sarcasm, . and sneers cast
j,mhlv niifl vpRr hv vpar Ho-nirmt. nur val
iant defenders In their effort to overthrow the
cohort of treasonr JNever. never. (Applause.)
Let us teach the young as they grow up, what
a wicked thing it is tor a man to be a traitor to
his country, and the odium which should rest
upon tbe man that deserted his flag in the hour
of his country't peril. (Applause.) Let it be
known that treason against 26,000.000 of sove
reigns is more terrible than treason against one
sovereign. . .
A hiL'h ilitrnitarv ol the country littered a
solemn truth when be said "that treasou must
be made odious;" and although bonie of us may
have been disappointed that this sentiment has
not been carried out, it is with jou, gentlemen,
to make it good. (Applause.) lie said Jeffer
son Davis was a traitor, and ooerved the doom
of a traitor. (Cheerr.) But JeOerson Davis
unaided would bave been contemptible; but
'thope that made htm powerful are not nil in
the Isouth. and It was the duty of those present
to bunt out there at the North who aided the
Rebcll'on. He said that he had been asked
since his arrWal in thiB city, "What can the men
ol the North do for you of the South?" and his
reply was, "( arry the tail elections, and send
lo Contrress Union men who will stand firm to
the Interest of Union people in all sections ol
ire country."
The pneaker then referred to the Union men
of the South, and said that the people of the
North could easily talk ot conciliating the
Iiebels and afford to be mognunimous, and to
meet them in wigwams and march Massachu
setts and South Carolina side by side; the
leopard anil the lamb King fide by dde, the
lamb tnpidc the leopard; but for the people ol
the South, who have had sterner expetience in
his rccard, thev hoped to lie secured from a
repetition ot what they had already suffered so
much from.
Colonel Stokes, of Tennessee, was next intro
duced. He referred to the present condition of
the South, and said that the condition of the
Union men wan worse now than during the war.
In Tennessee, at that time, the Boys in Blue
protected the citizen', but t-lnce they have re
turned to their homes nearly all protection has
ceased.
A Meeting of the National Union
Executive Committee. Pursuant to the ca I
ibKtied Irom YVafchiniiton, the National Union
Committee met at Continental Hotel in this city
jesterday. The following gentlemen were
present: covctnor Marcus Li. Ward, New Jer
fey; 8. A. Purviance, Pennsylvania; N. B
tniithers. Delaware; II. W. Hoti'man, Maryland
O. bowler. Tennessee: John V. Delrees. In
dimin; H. C Cooke, Illinois; Marsh Gtllinsrs
Muhigun: S. Judd, Wisconsin; u. B. fetubb
Iowa; Thomas Simpson. Minnesota: A. W
Campbell, West Virginia; Governor Edmonds,
Dakotah; William Starkweather, Connecticut;
General B. It. Cowen. Ohio; A. B. Gardiner,
Vermont; and W. J. Cowline, Virginia.
The Conimlitee effected a temporary orcarl-
zation by fulling Senator Fowler, of Tennesye,
to the cumr. and appointing w. J. Cowine
Secretary, alter which the following preamble
ana resolution were unanimously a'lopte'i:
ri herea. The places ot Ilenrv .1. Kavniond. of
icw xork, M. i). bperrv, ot Connecticut, ani
Georce B. Scnter. of Ohio, in the Nationn!
Lnion Committee, are vaeant bv renson of their
aoannorment or tne pnncipies or the National
Union party and allilintion with its enemies;
therefore
besotted. That upon proper recommendations
said vacancies be tilled by appointment by this
Lomnmiee.
In puisuance ol the foregoing resolution,
Governor M. L. Ward of New Jersey was unani
mously elected Chairman, and John D. Delrees,
oi Indiana, secretary.
Alter the tratisartioii of other business of
ni.nor importance, the Committee adjourned to
meet io-iiioitow morning at o'ciock.
It is expected that an address to the country
will be issued belore the final adjournment ol
the Coninutteej
Meeting of Gvakdians of the Poor.
A stated meeting was held yesterday, President
Erety in the chair.
The Out door Agent reported havine received
$347 lor support cases. The steward reported
houe receipt? at $l(i.
The House Aeent reported the census of the
House as follows: Number in the House on
Saturday, September 1, at 12 M.,2826; same time
last j car, ztu; increase, 2U. Total, women,
1008; men, 1218 Admitted within tbe last two
weeks, 227; births, 11; deaths, t8; discharged,
1J0; eloped, 89; indentured, 1. Number ot per
sons Kr-mted longings withia the lasttwo weeks,
C: met1 Is. 92.
The wnoie number of persons receiving out
door relict was 1378, of whom 2'J'i were .Ameri
cans, 84 loreigners, and (Jt5 children.
A communicationj embodying the report lrom
the Board of fiealth, iu relation to the sanitary
condition of the house, and especially the In
sane Department, was presented anu read.
Presideui Erety said that much of tbe state
ment of the Board of Health, in reference to the
insane department, in reference to cholera, is
not true.
He thought an appropriation of lrom $75,000
to $80,000 should be made to build a new insane
hohpital, or to enlarge tne present one.
He referred to the cleanliness and eood con
dition of the insane department of the Alms
house. The report ot tne uoara or Health was referred
to the committee tin insane uepartment.
Alter the erHOimg ot the usual reciu siiions
the meeting ao.ionrnen.
Fai.se Pretenses. At the Central
Station yesterday a partial hearing was hnd in
a case in wnicn josepu vv niie, jatnes caum, and
others w ere charged with aiding a youus man
named Mooney in obtaining possession of a
trunk from an agent of one of the express com
panies. The trunk, wnicn contained sjsaoo u
cash, was to be delivered to a man named
Palmer, at a house in Poplar street, above Tenth.
and the agent stopped at a tavern thereabouts
und inquired for the place to w hich he had been
directed. One of the persons in the bar-room,
said to be named Mooney. represented himseli
to be the owner ol the trunk, ana told the aeent
to leave it there. When asked for the check
Moonev said he had lost it, and at the instance
ol the express agent a receipt was given for the
truDk, the name oi Palmer being sinned to it.
W hile the agent was inside tiie puouc house a
vnllse. which lie was to aenver ut NO. 1413 On
tario street, was stolen. Mooney, the alleged
principal, was not arrested, ana White auo
Cahill were arrested as accessories, because
thev were present. The ca?e was continued
until this aiternoon at 2 o'clock.
Aggravated Assault and Battery.
James Wetniore had a hearing on the charge ot
being concerned in an assault nnd battery on
K. A. bvans. or .ew iorK, ana cmraeon tnts,
U. S. A. Mr. Evaus identified defendant as one
of two men concerned in the assault, which was
commuted early on Wednesday mornine last, in
one of the Filth and bixth street cars, at Sixth
s'reet and Columbia avenue. The passengers
were from New lotfc, and were on their way to
Washington, ana some oi tuem oeiuc: cruwdeJ
no on tne dhck piauorm, a cry was raised to
look out tor pickpockets, and upon this the
a.-sault was committed. Sureeou Otis was beaten
until he was msensitiie, una iir. Evans wiu-
much cut and bruised ahoiit the face. The coti-
ductor ol the car had no doubt ot the idetitits
of the prisoner, and a policeman was t-auallv
sure of the m;-.n, thouch et!-iorc denied that
be was on tbe car. He was held in .2o00 to
answer at the present term of the Court.
THE AMERICAN BUREAU OF MINES
No. 64 BROADWAY.
alines, Mineral Lands and Ores examined and reporter
upon, coinpoitnttnginoers luiniBuea to Mining i:om
Danlca.
Consultations afforded on all Mining, Metallurgtca
and Chemical Questions, at the office of the Bureau,
C.KO. D. 11. GILLJOSPPE, President.
f)R A K.F. T)B KAY. Hecjeitary. lututln f
rUPB MAY IUlLT?iiAD COMPANY.-
V ' Notice Is hereby triven. that the nresent arrange
ment oi the 'i rains to ami lrom i aue May will be
CO.nT.NI'KD. vlzt-eavo Hhl adelu hla ail V. il.
ml Chub la and atB A. M .dally.
j. a i K.rsr.nLii.AK. Nunerinieuuvu .
Eep'embera. I Hot). tf
D0B SALE-STATE AND COUNTY EIGHTS
I' ot L'auewell A Co. a Patent Wind Guard aud
Beater for Coal Oil Lamps It ore.anta tho Cliimneya
irom nreaaiag this we wm warrant Also save n-
llilrd the oil Can and pee, tlum they cost but len osms.
Mo. SflSKAC" Ktieet. Philadelphia. Sample sent to ana
part oi me l nreq sitatep, on reoelpt ol tl cents i"
342
HO TIT H RTRRFT. M. TVANCOXA
nava the blithest nrlca tor Ladies , 'ana
'tents' cast off CI o thins. t-o. Mi hOWTU bireat oelow
dents' c
Fourth.
Kourtn. i onm
K1NKELIN CAN BE CONSULTED
confidentially on all recent, local, chronic, and
constitutional d'seas-a at bis old establishment norut-
et corner oi l hlil and lnion it reel a. ioi
WATCHES, JEWELRY ETC
FLE GOLD WATCHES.
to sojourners in our uuy.
We call special attention of tbe sojourners in our cltr
toUe
FINE WATCH AND MLVERWARG
ESTABLISHMENT OF
W. W. CASS1DY,
No. 14 South SECOND Street,
Who tiaaon band one of the flneat aaaorimenu ol Jew
t iy, etc. of any In the city. A splendid assortment ol
BILTEF WARE ALWAYS ON II AND. Remember
W. W. CASSIDY,
8 165 No. 12 South SECOND Street.
pCJ. RUSSELL & CO.,
,Nci HQ MOrth SIXTH St.,
' A 'Jf,'
HavlBS,Vvcneu facilities fer
7 v j -' ..4
FIN3 WATCH HKl AIHINU,
Invite the attention of the public.
All woik w arrantert for one year.
520
AXOXD DEALER & JEWELER
WATCHES, JEWELKY it S!I.Vl:i: WtllP,
. WATCH E3 and JEW1LP.T IMPAIRED.
Owing to tbe decline ot Gold, baa made (rent rc
1 uc tlon In price of his large and well anorted stock o
Uiainonds,
Jewelry,
Silverwwrr, 15to
The public are respectfully Invited to call and ex am In
our Mock before purchasing eiHcwnere. 2 IS
SILVER AND PLATED GOODS
OP THE
Most Superior Workmanship,
AT THE
N K W S T O 11 E
704 ARCH STREET.
No
Tbe underxluned flat8 t the famous R oners H oi
V
ManulacturliiK Coiudhiij) renect ally announce Uia
lucy rare outre a a new ana ncautuui store tor tne nait-
ot BlLVrK and 1'LATKI) WAKE, at Ho 704 AUC'U
Mreet. our lone experience as manufacturers wil
enable us to keen not nine but flrst-claj'n Goods and
tho-e w bo may patronize our a. ore will find our pUtei)
soouh lai eupeimr to any ever imported, anu our cus
tomeri n ay rely on the goods being precisely what the?
are represemea 10 oe.
D lb, BlMYAlAIt LH.UUAIS1J,
WATCHES, JEWELEY, &c.
MUSICAL BOXES.
A lull assortment ot above Roods constantly on
band at model ate prices the Musical Boxes nlayins
irom z to iu Dcautiini Airs.
FARE & BROTHER, Importers.
No. 824 CHESNUT STREET,
llllsmtbrp Below Fourth.
HENRY IIARPEll,
No. 520 ARCH ' STREET
Manufactu and Dealer in
Watcliew
P'ine Jewelry,
HllvT-I'l:itea Ware,
811
Solid Silver-Ware.
RICH JEWELRY
JOHN BRENNAN,
DEALER Dt
DIAMONDS, FINE WATCHES, JEWELRY
EK. IC. UtC.
20 Ho. 18 S. EIGHTH BXKJUET, I'Wlada.
THE EYE AND EAR.
JJEAFNESS, BLINDNESS,
THROAT, LUNG, AND CHEST DISEASES
CATARRH AND ASTHMA,
disordered Functions ol
THE DICrESTIVE ORGANS-
MORBID AFFECT10N8 Of TIIE LIVER,
WEAKNESS OF NERVES, AND GENERAL
DKBILITY OF THE WHOLE SYSTEM,
Treated with unprecedented auccess br
DR. YON MOSCUZISKER,
No. 1031 WALNUT Street.
The following OEKTLKXIEX. who have lately been
cured under the treatment of Dr. VON MO.It'HZliS-
KLK. nave Klnuii petmutea nun to reier to inem, ana
they would g.adiy bear testimony to tbe amount oi
bLKLI'li derived Irom his THKATMKN 1 :
n i UntiiL1 . UV l w VT Hkta Walnut mtwaat
tHOKMAKI.lt, hau.., No. Mb Walnut atieet.
ALAN WOOD, Jr., Ksq , No. 51!) Arch street
C. b. CliU .V I so.. No. 2i North r-eventh street.
C. J. IiOLI.OWAV, Kail. No 5M Market atn-et.
J . COOI'MI. Ksq , No 4 North Front street,
tor. DAVIDSON. N. VT. coiner of Nluth audChesnut
streets .
lienerai mi.iilk. . u. a., wirani bitcbi.
'1. W. kWEKNI.Y. Esq., U. S. Assessor ol the Second
.'"liAttY, Esq., Fiesldcnt ot tbe Nineteenth Ward
Public Schools. , ,
Kev. 8. U. HAKK. rut.aaeipnia i.outerence.
iiiimlreds of other names, ail persons who would be
carelull' conscientious to whom thev would permit the
Inii'irM fuent ol their names. n De exauuueu at uia
OFFICII, No. 1031 WALNcT Street.
THE ATOMIZER.
Dr. VON MOHCRZISKER asserts with the utmost
coniidcuue tnat his ays em ot treating LI NO,
IIUiOAT, CHfclST Diseases. CA1AKU11, AM111MA.
aud all mulaoies of the digestive oruaus, by the use ol
the A'lOJkil.lK, is the ouly reliable one. Htnoe the
Introduction ot this system cases have been brouvbt
lo bis oil.,. No lull WALNUT Street in which
every other possible means have been truitiessly em
p oyeu, put reuill'v jieiueu w uisuenuuoui
'Ihe A'lUallZEli isan All AKA1U8 constructed on
clout iilc principles, which, by a mechanical arranife
ment, either by atmospheric pressure or steam, con
verts any tnfdlcne Into a flno bPKAY. and reariliy
cunvevs It Into ihe BHONCH1.VL HJllKSor LU.nOS,
with the KE.-PIKA'IOHY i I'KHKNT. The medlclues
submitted to the action of thiB APPARATUS loss
aoibing ot their t HE H AL VALLK. at in otner
preparations, but are irecclved into the KhnnnA
TtRY ORGAN 8 In their full MEDICINAL
urrlf I. VfVI U
" J . . . - . . . Mn..n.n.ryx. a Au fT" III. V V
ALL HLKC-UAL OfEKATIONS on the Eyes, aucb as
CaUtract, Artificial Pupil, Cross Eyes, ens., ski iu Hy
peiiormed. ? rP .
u
NADULTEKATKD LIQUORS ONLY
KICHAKU rwi" s
Ko.TirrnESSUr HTEEkT.
Families iippllet a-'i era.lioui tbe Country prommij
notd to. "
AMUSEMENTS.
QKAND NATIONAL CONCERT
FOR T11E BESKFTT Or TBI
SOLDIERS' AND BAILORS'
NATIONAL ORPHANS' HOME FUND,
rKDER AUBFICIB Or TBS
SOLDIERS' AND SAILORS' UNION,
WASHINGTON, I). C
AT GROVER'S THEATRE,
On Thursday Evening, August 2, 1863,
POSTPONED UNTIL
THURSDAY EVENING. 0CT0BKR 11.
300.000 Tickets will be sold at $! each
75,000 rreaent8 Awarded, valued at $250,1)00
$23,000 of the Profits to be given to the Sol
diers' and bailors' National Orphans' Home
Fund, $2500 to the Washington Mah and
Female Orphan Asylvm. The balance, after
deducting expenses, to be paid to the Trea
surer of the Soldiers' and Sailonf Union,
Washington, D. C.
Out Present to KvcryFour Tickets.
TIC KETS CAS BE OBTAISED FROM
OWKNS & CO.,
Military ami Naval Law Oillce,
No ill CHESMJr Street, Oppoaitethe State House,
Philadelphia. Fa.
AIfo sent to any part oi the country promptly by mail
LIST OF ritPSENTS TO BE AWARDED.
Three-story Brick residence, 1 1 street be
tween hlxtli and Seventh 518,(K)U
1 Tbiec siorj Brick resldeucc, .ccoeU stroet,
near r. 10,WK
1 1 hree story brick residence, Tentn street,
between M and N 8 OKI
1 Two story Iiiick residence, Tenth street,
between M and N , 5 nufl
1 Two stoiv l.rlck residence, Tenia street,
between M and A ." 0 0
2 Fine City L ts, on Seventh street, north.. 4 i0
1 Mplcnalu Carriage, lloises, and Harness
couinlo'e 4,000
1 Pplcnold Diamond Kinx
1 feet diamonds complete (Pin, EarUliiKS,
and Kinits 1,W0
1 Grand Piano (rttelnway) 1 WKt
1 Ki lid Sliver Tea Met l.wo
It) Grand Pianos. SG00 each 6 ( uu
10 Grand Pianos MI0 each ft'Uu
II 0 Gents' Gold Watches, S200 each 20 000
60 Ladles' Gold Watcnes M'25 each H i1)
A Grand Melodeons, It '2 to each !,'
CO American-case hllver Watches. 75each.. 6.000
15 HuntinK do do 40 each.. 3.U00
Ml Diamond Pings, 6100 to 2(10 each l.!M
2S Mumond Plus. IWI cm: a 2..000
40 Sewing Machines, altln each 4 0 n
20 do 7S each 1 SOU
20 silver-plated Tea Sets .5 each 1 5mi
M) Si ver castors, 826 each 1,200
S.ttu I locks. Albums, Jeweuy, Ac, ti to al
each 27,000
10 0(0 Tea and Table Spoons. &c. 2 to 5 each. . 25.000
10.010 (.old Pens, Meeve Buttons, Ac, 1 to ti
each 14 000
49,453 Books, cutlery. Engravings, Ac., 1 to 10
each 50.000
Total 2.j00l
The awards will be made alter th i im mi thu
stngo oi the theatre, where three thousand permits csn
iiness ii. a cuinnutice win ue appointed by the audi
ence to superintend the sumo,
primed lists of awards will be published and sunnl'od
to Antnts and Ticket-holders, t'ar les liuvlni: tickets
will retain them until aiter the awaids are inude, and If
tueir uumuers appear in tne list, tuev will forward tneir
tickeiajmmcdiaieiy, witu iuii uirectlons as to the slilo
ping oi ttoods or needs tor the property, tickets lor
sale at all the nrincipal Hoteis. Book, and Music stores
in the city and at the Headquarters, In the Atumtuoih
Fair Buildinu lor the benefit ol the soldiers' ami Sulinrs'
National Oiphans' Home Fund, corner ot Seveiitb street
anu rennsyivama avenue, wasliluuton J) ( .
'I be Directors appeal to tbe liberality of the people to
give this enterprise their klnu support, and thereby
assist in re.ieviuK iu wants oi me orpuaua oi our taueu
comrades.
CARD. A large number of tickets remaining unsold.
It wlll be necessary to postpone the drawing until
THURSDAY, the 11th of October, 1866, at which time it
will positively occur.
The many swindling schemes that have been pre
sented to the public during the past lew months, some'
wbatdtluyed our sales, until we were able to satis ly
ihe peop.e throughout the country tuat this enterpilse
was iienulne. and solely lor charltah e purposes, ihe
Directors are confident of the sale of every ticket, and
have allotted suttlcient time to guarantee the saies
without any further postponement
Maj H A. HALL. Pres. Soldiers' snd Sailors' Union.
Col CHAS. E CAPEHABT. 1
MaiM.H ALBURV.hR, Managing Directors.
WILLIAM MORSE.
TRRASCBT DKPAETMENT.
OPPICC Of iNTkBNAI, HKVKNUE
Washin .Ton. JunstiK I him
Whereas II. A. Ball and others, as "Manairing Direc
tors" oi the "Grand National Co:ioert," to beheld in
Washington. D. C, on the 2d of Auust next bave maae
due application to 1.. ciepban. Collector of Internal
Revenue lor the Collection District of the District ot
Columbia, tor permission to bo d a lottery, rattle, or
9 lit euterorise, and presented to blm satisfactory evi
ence that the pioceeds of said lottery, rattle, or (rift
enterprise "111 be devoted to charitable uses, permission
Is hereby granted to sueb "Managing Directors" to bold
such lottery, rattle, or gilt enterprise iree frotna'.cb.rge,
whether from tax or llccne, In respect to such lottery,
Commissioner.
We refer, br permission, to
Major-General Winfleld S. Hancock, V. 8. A.
General Robert C Mchenck, M. C, Ohio.
General Holbert E. Paine, M O, Wis.
General John 11. Ketcliam M. C, N. T
General James G Blunt, Kansas.
GeneralJ. N. Bcndrick, Iowa.
General D. C. Mct'allam, D. C.
General O V Dayton, N. Y.
Hon. Thomas W. Ferry, M. C, Mich.
Hon. George Lawrence. M. C, Fenna.
D. O. Forney, Esq.. D. C,
Major J. E. Dougnty, N. T.
Hon. Richard Waliach, Mayor or Washington, D. C.
Hon. Ueuty Vtl son. U. b S
Bon William D Kelley. 11. C, Penna
Hon. Keillan V. Whaley.M. C. West Va.
Hon. Eheu C. Inuerso 1, M. C, 111.
Hon. Henry C Demimr, M. O , conn.
Hon A. U. I.atllu, M. C, N.Y.
lion. Leonard Myers. M. C , Penna.
Hon. William A. Newell. M. C. N.J.
Hon Geonre W.Jnllan M.C.lnd
Hon. Stephen F. Wilson, M C. Penna.
Hon. J. B. Gilune'l, M C Iowa.
Hon. B F. ada, U. S. Senator Ohio
Hon G. H.Latham M C, W. Va.
(Ion. Hen. E. Wilson. M. C, Ohio.
Gen. Hoys M. Olilo.
William E- Owens, Esq , Philadelphia.
8 16 to6
VALER'S (LATE MILLER'S) WINTER
GAHDEN-Nos T20-720 V1N K. Stieot.
GRAND INSTRUMENTAL CONCERT8
NIGHTLY.
P.y two larr-e and efficient Orchestras.
' TONIGHT,
And FVERY NIGHT. In connexion with our
EXC1.LSIOR STRING BAND,
a Brass Band, composing the best Artists In tne city
will per.orm. gEASOS.
Our spacious suuimer Garden, artbitlcally laid oat
wltn '"esaLOOV,
Esneclall v set apart tor F . TLIES. the best of Creams
and oilier ltelreshments wi l be serven. eitj
Gc Y 31 I ' -A- w 1 u l
FOR LADIFS C.FNTLEMEN AND CH1LDKE1T,
K K Oliu OF NViTU AhO AKCU DlKBtlH.
!,' lnstltuta wblca analn has been greatly Improved
lo?!he cmnlng lesson, 1 Tnow open lor subscription all
da andeveulnii 1A,h mnA .,.., .nit i.
hedily xercie - -.:---
bliihiT recommenaeu iu mm ...
r. y1- InritrUCllOU o luuunio.
$H -00
TUIB IUI 1 " " " ... u I.
i, . i ..n niHciiLB a ii iuii 1 1 1 -
H-eO
I er ins ir ; . ,.rnilH. n- iv . r.il:
Lvnim frofessors HlLLe.BBASo LEWIS
THE PIANOS WHICH WE MANU-
l2 u i fsetare Tecuuwienu uiemsoiyes. wiuiuuw
..uniu mor Ivesutliul tunes, aleuant workmau
.I'.in durability, and reasonable prices, combined wuh
Si'l uaiaota. For sole only at No 1017 WALNU1'
8 wi UNION PIANO MSCFACT""SG CO,
AMUSEMENTS.
N
EW CHESNUT STREET THEATRE.
CHKSN t'T Street, above T.vslfln.
WM. E. hinn A o Lessees.
Doors open at 1 1n Curium rises at ft.
TtF.f DAY EVKM u Septnmher 4,
GRAND OPENINO fit- THK
FFOCTLA R FALL AMI WI ttR SEASON.
Tbe Management are "ratified to be able to announce
that they bare secured tbe services of the diet ngulBbed
ivric tragedienne,
VESTVALI,
VrTVLI,
VESI VALI,
. , VESIVALI,
wbo will commence a
FAKr WELL F.WOOFMF.ST,
appearing In her great ImnTonatlon of
KOMI O.
In Hh.kespf are s Tranedy. In five acts entitled
ROMK) AMI JT LIKT.
ItOMF.O AND Jt'L'ET.
KOMKO AMI JVL1EI'.
ROMEO AND JULIET.
Borneo VESTVALI
Supported by the
SIKKNG'I II OF THPi NF.W COVPAVT.
SA I UP, D A Y AFTERS JON. eptenibei 8,
OKND FAMILY AlAllNEli.
In active pienaratlon.
BtL DEMONIO.
TVfKS. .1DI1N DREW'S NEW ARCH STREET
A.Y1. '1 HE ATItE Begins at quarter to 8 o'clock.
FIRST WFhK OF li. SEAaON.
MltS. .IOHS DREW
MRS. J OAS DRCW
In a new Flay
MONDAY AND F.VKRY SIGHT,
J. Wcst'ann larston's reat Piny of
THE KAVOUITK OF FORTUNE.
Ucstet Lnnlnytnn .Mrs. ,1iIV DSEW
SlU hlEl BY THK FULL COMPANY.
T'me 1 he present. Scene I he Is e ol Wight.
FhlDAY-Renetlt Of Mia. .lOIIN OKKW.
OMiAY-Jlr. and Jirs. W .1. FLORK. CE.
Prices as una Seaia secured six da s In advance.
WALNUT ATM K K 1 T HEAT kZ
N. E. corner of NINTI1 and WALNUT Streets.
REIOV OF M RRIMFNT.
Til. 8 t'luesilay) fA rSiX., "eDtcmber 4,
SECONO APl'ERAS" E OF
.MR J. S. CI AKKE.
wbo is eiit-sced for lx nlulits onlv. and will appear ai
r ARMEH ASHFlt1 LI),
(first time for tivo j cars). In Morton's celebrated
Coined) ol
SPEED THE PLOITGTI.
Also, as
NEWMAN NOOO,
In the braitlllul Urania, lrom the works of C'hurleS
Dickens, cntl led
NICHOLAS NICK LE 8 Y.
"VTEW AMERICAN THEATRE WALNUT
XN Strt et, above Eiirbth.
11 A. r.A ItrscBA w wo e lessee ana .vanairer.
BRILLIANT sUi CESS OF TIIE CHARMlNtl
WUHHKM. SlSt KK..
SOPHIE IEE.SK. ANI JrNSIE.
wbo. dirltiK tbe past week, have been received at every
uertonuanco wttu tne greatest applause ana tieiictit
tiy iinmense audiences.
second week oi tne popular comedian,
MR. T. L. DONM'LLY.
I ON D A V ANDTUrsDAY EVENINGS,
SeDtemoer 3 and 4
will be presented mo miry extravaganza, by J. R,
lunche. Esq. entitled
THE INVISIBLE PRINCE;
OR, THK INLAND OF TK.VNU.U1L DELIOHTH.
'lo coneitnlc with ihe Great Locui I rama, entitled
H1K FIKMnKN OF PHILADELPHIA!
OR, Tllfc. BK')a1) STREET HKIREsS.
n n a in
D
VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTAL CONCERT
AND
SUMMER NIGHT TESTIVAL.
UNDER DIRECTION F
Mil. CARL GARTNER,
OX WEIJMiSU.VY, SEPTEMBER 5, I8U0
. DAY AND EVENING,
AT ESUEI, &. WOLF'S FARM.
Ticket 50 Cents.
Tickets to be had at C. Trumolcr's and T, 'Vlcvcr'
Biu-ie s'orce ; also at tl 0 Continental and lilrardlioie s;
ntsebaef crA Koradl s booksiore corner Fourth and
Wood streets; Mr. Walker, Fourth and i hesnut. Josenh
Steppacher, opposite the Stale House, and dir. Greinei)
cuiowuiti anu crown streets.
Ihe fourth and Eighth streetcars will pass osssen
wets over tbe Girard avenue toad hhont extra cha'ge,
snd in conjunction with the Girard avenue joad. run
cars until I o'clock, mlilnlub'. It
"VTEW ELEVENTH STREET OPERA HOUSE,
JJN ELEVENTH Street, above HK8NUT.
'Til Hi FAJHUL. KEsilKT"
OPIiM FOR i'HH KlOSOV.
CsR( ltl)s t OIXIOv'S II.S1'IIRI,S.
the Great Star Troupe ot the World, in their GRAND
ETHIOPIAN SOIREES, KoNGt, DaNCES, NEW
BUULESyUES. and PLANTATION sCKNo.
lioors open at 7 o'clock. Commencing at 8 o'clock.
8 30 3tn J. L. CAKNtliOSi, Manager.
S S E M U L Y BIT I LD I N f,
LARGE HALL. TENTH antf CHESNUT Streets.
MR. ROUERI' Hi-i.LEU'i
SALLE DIABOLIQUE.
FULL HOUSES NIUH1LY.
OPEN EVERY EVENING.
NEW PROGS AMMF-M AGIO, MWO. and 1UN.
V A TIN r. K EV KB Y SATURDAY.
Ewenlns D rs open at 1 Commence at 8.
Admii-slon 60 cents; secured soalsJ4 cents. 9 3 61
JE N N E R C H O R 6R OllESTR A.
'Ihe active members are hirebv notltlod that the
recu or weeklv meetings tor practice will be resumed on
'1HI KM- EVENING, scHtembert 1S6, at8 o'c.ock,
at the Mannerclmr Hal. No. S4ti DILI WYN Street.
Pnnetuai attendanoe Is requesu d Amateurs desiring
to join are cordial, y Invited to attend, or call upon the
undersigned.
WILLIAM WOL8IF.FFFR, Conductor,
821 24 2S 81s4 6 6t.i No. 217 VINE) Street.
PERSONAL.
VTEW BOUNTY
BILL ALL SOLDIERS
X who eulls ted for three years.
since April 18 186I,
and served their full term ol service, or were discharged
before said term of service on acoount of wounds, and
received one hundred dollars bounty and no more, are
entitled to receive an additional one hundred dollars.
Widows, minor children, or parents of deceased soldiers
wbo enlisted tort hra yeaisand died in the service, or
from diseases or woufls contracted In the service and
line of duty, are entitieto receive an additional one
hundred dollsrs. Call or ..ldress
GEOKGE W. FORD.
No. 241 DOCK Street.
8171in One door below Third,
who has all the necessary forms to collect these claims.
DYEING, SCOURING, ETC.
PEKCII STEAM SCOURING
ESTABLISHMENT,
No. 510 RACE Streets 5?
We beg leave to draw your particular; ttation to our
new French steam Scouring Estabiisha eut the first and
only one ot Us kind In this city. Wedowrtfif but by
a clitmical lroccs res ore Ladles', Uentloinen's, awl
Cklioren's Garments to their original siatecwUnoo
injurinn tbem in the least, while giaat experience and
the best n'aehluery lrom Franca suable us to warrant
per ect satisiactiun to ail wbo maj- tavor us with their
listrcasiio. LADIES' DRESSED, of ever descuptlon,
wither without Irimmlngs, are cleaned and nnlshea
without being taken apAt. whether the color is genuine
or not
Opera Cloaks and Mantillas Curtains. Table Covers,
Carpels. Velvet Klbbons, Kid Gloves , ete.T cleaned aad
rem Hied u ths best manner. Gentlemen's Summer
SDd Winter Clothing cleaned to perteetn n without In
jury to the stun Also Flags sad Hanneis All kinds of
stains r n.oved without c tailing the whole All order
aro executed eniler our Inmediate suuervlsion, and
natlMiictiou gunranteed in every Instance. A call and
examination of our process is repectiully solicited
ALBEDYLL & MAIiX,
12rntii No 610 RACE Btieet
TTlr NEW YORK DYEING ANI) PRINTING
.ESTABLIbbMFNT.
STATES ISLAND,
No 40 North EIGUIH street (West side),
AIho known as the
8TATEN I "LA ND DYEING ESTABLISHMENT,
ltemg the I ARG1.8T In the UNITED STATUS and
Ilillt'lY YEARS OLDuR than any other on S I'ATKN
ILAND, is prepared, with the most Improved and
extensive Machinery (to which they are making oou
btant additions) to
DYE. CLEANtVASD FINI1H
evrv variety or GOODS AD GAR.MLNT8, (n a man
ner UNEQUALLED in this couuiry . ,
No. 4(1 North EI Hill Street Philadelphia.
No. flHDl'NF. Stret, New Yora.
yo.Vi UPOADWAY New York
No. 136 PIEhRtPONT Street, Brooklyn.
SAMUEL MARbll, President.
J. T. Yot'SG. Secretary. 8'Imwrtm
DENTISTRY.
swm THE GOVERNMENT HAVING
CftYrrs granted spS letters-patent tor say mode of
administering Nhruua Oxide Gaa. by wnUh 1 bave ;
rxtraoted manv thousands of Teeth without pain. 1 am I
JustlM. d in aasertliia that It Is bOibTsaler and saperlsr U
sny other now in DR. O. L. MUNNS
21 Cm Ko. Til SPRUCE Street.

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