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The evening telegraph. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, September 04, 1866, FIFTH EDITION, Image 6

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THE DAILY EVENING TELKGUriL rillLADELPHIA, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 1866.
TIIK SITUATION IN EUROPE.
BowiJa'J of the Napoleonic Kale and the Eecn
rtrcction of Earope The Treaty of Fonia'.ne
blean and the Two Treaties of Paris The Con
gress and tho Treaty of Vienna. ,
The latest intelligence which reaches u from
thr theatre oi war In Austria and Italy, leaver
tittle doubt itn to the ultimate rcsnlt of a contliet
which not only involves the vital interests of
three monarchies, but hIro exercises the tears,
. and demands the solicitude, of all the power of
' nropes One (act, however, must impress itself
nson every reflectlnij mind. Whatever may bp
the sequel of the piisfinR struggle, parlor and
rloset politicians, If not the crowned heads
themselves of the Old World, will have to alter
the combinations of blue, jtreen, red, and
yellow-hearted pins which, ior the last fifty
years, they have, been shifting Irom this to that
point In wild atteurt-' to trace out the possible
vicissitudes of the map of Europe.
Change Impending Over Kurope.
t Since the ratification of the solemn ct-nipacts
wn 'ch settled the prscrt limits of its various
1orin u'on, the innolent uprisings of some peo
ple he re anl lhcre, may have, however vainly,
attemptt t0 P,uefc- dw tbo milestones of arbi
trary ink' ant' eonntrwctH new ireoeraphy lor
themselves. Indeed, some of the crowned head
"f Europe ti t'Pft8Sinff Iba bot'nds intended to
rj event. v h,clP of -i ''(.utpuree of the
)lmu
calling
Saye Jjt 'Utieu, niLuii n ii'w years, m
Empire," . ' tho
hew down wit. n A,
monir themselves for the
they had tigreed an.
tueiity. Fw, our iinroe-
jurisdiction of then -as,
eliate tlavs, however, w.
it reHerved to witness
oritrinal mechanist
,i,rrell)utr ove,- an in-
the fpectacleot two ot tin
oi enoines oi despotlMD. nu
ifirt, durk. torbid-
lnwfnl nrev. As between Ai
'y; ploom.y viomes
ti seat of sci-
ding, and stationary as one of i
. i. nn,l li4(iuifi u tTnn veil.
1,1)111' ten-
til tgl Ml, IVUU " ..,, ..4 nr.
.nppT litters, and arta. and a centre V, H.ot jr o
merit ar.d industry, our sympathies
astiay. The main question, however, is u
li ii nni nl anility. We
V',ouf f
viht
urn- wished, therefore, in this lnoiiieutoiis q .
tion, to find Prussia mailed in a more equitain
right than that which fene nas reierrea 10 iu
arbitrament of her seeminely resistless arms.
Tfe are free, therefore, in this inquiry, to protest
that, so far as our views extend and the truth is
roncerned, we have no particular leaning to
this or that prevailing cause. Hence, in no
churlish Rnirit, we claim the privilege oi that
impartiality which once rultd the tight between
bull and bear. With other views, and tho more
lairly, indeed, to judge ol the merits ol tins
eiuarrel, it Is thought proper to look back sonic
liny years for the rights of the parties m imme
diate conflict. In contemplation of the radical
changes impend! ne over Kurope, the mind
naturally turns back to the more im
portant stipulations which her masters
devised to safeguard their possessions and
maintain the equilibrium ot their power. To
ussuoic theperlormance of such a task wi'hin
the compass of the. e columns, requires, as any
ene familiar with the numerous treaties of the
Aav will admit., much of the condensation, and
to that much without one sacrifice ot historical
troth, or one 8UDDresion ot material iact, we
Tesort to the Droecution of our object. The
treatv ot ToDlitz. of the 3d of October, 1813,
runnintr into a variety ot minor considerations,
may be said to have consummated the great
ullianee asamst France, and tiuallv resulted in
thp treaties of 1814. extended and ratilied bv the
acts of the Congress of Vienna of the (tn of
June, 1816.
The Defeat of Napoleon.
A Deriod ot six months had scarcely elapsed
after the ratification ot this treaty, when the
territory of France was tapped at all points by
the combined forces ot tue test ot Kurope.
With inadequate means and varying success.
the great Captain of the aire, contend ins foot by
foot, met the assailauts until his wa-tted forces
were driven under the walls of Pans, where, on
the 30th of March, 1814, a battle of unsurpassed
bloodiness closed with the surrender of the
capital.
The Treaty of Foutalncblenu
Betrayed by some of the puppets that he had
set up in royal state, abandoned by the very
men on whose adulations he had placed so blind
a reliance in the great eclipse ot his fortunes,
and after the conservative benate had decreed
the lapse of his authority, and the legislative
body sanctioned the decree he determined at
last to seek peace through a renunciation, for
himself and his heirs, ot the thrones ot f ranee
and Italy. This prouer brought about tne
treaty of Fontainebleau, of tho 11th ot April,
1813, concluded by Metternich, Nesselrode, and
llardenbcrg in the names ol Austria, liu9.sia,
and Prussia, and by Key, McDonald, and Cau
laincourt in Napoleon's behalf.
This State paper involved a decree of forfeiture
rather than a convention of peace. The propo
sition on which it was based had come forward
from the Great Defeated himself, and, consider
ing all the circumstances, the stipulations were
not illiberal in their kind. True, that by tbe
first article iino ilia lacfiryma of the nephew,
the fanatical worshipper ot his memory Napo
leon renounced for himself, his successors and
descendants, as well as for each and every
member of "his dynasty," every right of sov
ereignty and dominion, whether over the French
empire, the kingdom of Italy, or auy territory
whatsoever.
This convention, aud this alone, brought
about by the decree of both Senate and Legisla
tive body, and the consent and applications of
the Emperor, constitutes the particular treaty
ior which the Louis Napoleon can a fiord to ex
press a detestation which finds but a frail sup
port in the authority of facts. The foster-child of
the beneficence of Louis XVI we are writing
not as republicans opposed to Kaiser or King,
bat as summoners ot past events from whos
bounty he derived the means of developing and
arming his immense genius, a favorite son of
the republic, such as it was, to which, not out
of fidelity or love, but out of a far-reaching
ambition, he sacrificed tbe debt of gratitude
stored tip against him in tho registers of the
old monarchy an absolute Dielater under tba
mask of a popular Consul, which he wore just
long enough to achieve his ultimate designs
Napoleon, by a succession of acts which severed
him from the cause in defense of which he had
started in lite, had reached, '.through the mackery
I an ex vost facto nonular annroval. the posi
tion oi a self-constituted and belt-seeking arbiter
f th destinies of the whole world, with.ut
conscience and without restraint. He had
played for universal empire, and he lost the
game. When the hour of settlement cama, in
ftignine away nis lease oi power he merely re-
signed rights and Possessions which bad
been usurped, and which tho legislative bodies
iiecreea to oe torieitea ana to nave lapsed
We question, however, whether conditions
less stringent couia nave peon imposed on oua
who had but little claim in the forbearance of
' the victors. The second article of the treaty
secured to the hmperor and the Empress the
cnioyment ot their title during lite. Tbe mother.
the brothers, sisters, nephews, and nieces were
uiit'frip(l to retain, wherever thpv mlnhi vo
the title of princes of his family. The land of
Elba, erected into a distinct principality, was
allotted to him for life, in full ownership and
sovereignty. On the books ot the Treasury of
France his name wns credited for an aunual
revenue of $2 000,000 francs. The contracting
parties bound themselves to enforce re9nect for
thelafl and territory of his island home. Oui of
tne possessions wmcn dh surrenaerea mere were
reserves oi lanus ana domains, yielding a net
annual revenue of two other millions, assigned
to the princes and princesses of his family.
These were secured in all the property, real and
personal, which they held at the time of for
feiture. The payment of the debts of his
household was provided for by moneys from
the public chest. A large allowance of funds
was even made for distribution among those of
his former retainers whom he might recom
mend for reward. Lastly, and among points of
Jesa importance, we find tbe assignment of a
- sloop-of-war to take him to his last dominion,
with its appropriation to his use, control, and
ownership.
The Treaty of Pari of 1814.
Two months alter came the treaty ot Paris of
the SIKh of JUuy, mi, between Loaut XVI 11 and
his allies.' Peace was doc'laied among the con--trading
powers. France was hemmed within
the limits which she had held on the 1st ot
January, 1702. Her boundaries were rectified,
with the concession, however, of cprtain dis
tricts, so nicely adjnstd that it pnlarced hor
dominions to the extent of some 170,000 square
varus, and her population to the amount of
4.10,000 Inhabitants! The pen which drafted
tbe treaty blotted out the monarchies that, in
less than len years, had grown np under the:
creative handi of the Conqueror, and docked otf
15,3(10,000 souls from the jurisdiction of France
another not untruittnl source of detestation
and tenr-.l In the cqucl of stipulations, Hol
land, with some increase of territory, was
committed to the sovereignty of tho House of
Oianpe. Thix grant was accompanied by a
condition that neither the title nor the sove
reignty should In any ca?e Bttach to any prince
wearing, or call"d to wear, a foreign crown.
By a provision, in which neither Louis XVIII
nor France could now have any jcry material
interest, it was stipulated in vaglie and unde
fined lantrnage that the States of Germany "are
independent and un.ted by a Federal bond."
The independence of Switzerland was pro
claimed, with the understanding that she.
thould continue to manage her concerns undor
her own peculiar system of government. Italy,
outside of the limits of territories claimed by
Austria, and reverting to her authority, was
composed of sovereign States.
Restitution A General Amnesty.
The jiround being thus iorelaid tor a more ex
tended and explicit compnet, the contracting
parties proceeded to stipulate lor a scries o
restitutions, Irom one strnng-banded pillager to
another, the like ot which had not been wit
nessed since tho treaty ot ItyswicK. France,
titigiann, dwruen, Norway, and rortngal Uis
corged what thev had absorbed. This compact,
the arch on which all other conventions subse
quently rested, embodies a clause for which
honor is due to lhc memory of Lord Cathcart.
who, we believe, proposed it to hi colleagues,
or, at least, urged its acceptance. In order to
allay all heart-burnings, and bury in oblivion
the cruel dimensions which had rent asunder
the political society in Kurope, it provided and
promised that n? one, of what class or con
dition soever, shield ever be molested or
Willed in question io.r public acts, individual
Wtfions, or active participation during the
Pulsions of the time. i7'osir.g with this nm-
con . thp rmrties uliirti tmd . atelv beeucncaced
nest y, r (,Erce(i 0 n(.crptit plenipotentiaries
n the W. , jcnorni ot viuiino for necessiirv
in ConglCS. . .ni,,.. Ptarv nirnniwvrieitS.
ana i ' J
' of VUiiim-A lt.illlailt
TllC tOllglCH" 'Soul.
111,1 1 ii iu In En"'!"-'
The coalition had thus achieved its immediate
lUCUVf... ,vrW n itlinfl trv Vn ri.,i
ntiirpt. WblCn Ws K......vv. j,iu.r,
. j . . i .,o ct pnnnrnitnir mat neiiee u-prp
?nVm ec Ptotb "Congreaa of Vienna. At no
CommUtca to the f fci in px
period des W ph. Qi (tl,toenien intrusted
hibit ruch a gathering , . conbjder
with moie solemn duties, whether confer
the millions ot human beincs concerned.
vastness of interests at stake, or the greatness
of the coiifcequencwB involved. In weight of
matter and variety of questions, it was doing
injustice to tbe sessions ot Vienna to compare
them with the deliberations ot Otrccht, or even
with those of Westphalia. Its discussions could
not be contined to the meie mode of checking
any luure, disturbing action ot some single
power, which ambition might tempt to misuse
its preponderance at a neighbor's ex
pense 'aud to his neighbor's detriment.
The convulsions of battle had shaken
Europe to its foundation-seats. Old monarchies
had been sponged out and new ones, with
strange mleis, erected in their steady The Ger
manic constitution, the growth of Dioooy cen
turies and the master-work of European poli
tics, had been 9wcpt away in the war-torrent
that gushed out of the French Revolution. It
was necessary, therelore, to reinstate upon new
grounds the basis on which the equilibrium of
Europe had rested from the days when the first
check was given to the overgrown power of
Charles the Filth, and the tirst wedge driven
into the system ot teudalism, which ultimately
rumbled under the pervading influences of that
revolution. Next in order came the recon
struction of the Prussian monarchy, which had
been dismembered in tbe shock of buttle
between the troops of the fourth coalition and
the lorces of Napoleon's armies. In this ques
tion were interwoven tho destinies of Poland
and of the kincdon of Saxony. The Nether
lands, Switzerland, Bavaria, Italy, and Oeuoa
demanded the nicest deliberations of the Con
gress. A number of topics of secondary import
ance came Betere tne uiemoiaoie Assemoiy, to
which the victims of a quarter ot a century ot
relentless wars came for redress of their wrongs.
The conference ot the plenipotentiaries resulted
in a series of side treaties and specific conven
tions. Of those marked by a general interest,
the essential clauses were alterwards grouped
within the compass of a siuele act and plat ed
under the perpetual perpetual! guarantee of
the whole ot r urope.
Prime
and Statesmen Present.
On the 1st of October. 1814, two months later
than the period assigned by the tieaty of Paris
of tbe 30th ot May ot that year, the Congress
was inaugurated bv the presence ol the Empe
rors ot Russia and Austria; of the Kings of Prus
sia, of Denmark, of Bavaria, and of Wurteui-
berg: of the Elector of Hesse aud ot the Grand
Dukes of Baden and Saxe-Weimar. To its de
liberations Europe had sent many of her states
men ot nicnest tame ana suDtiesr minas. it
may be n-jt uninteresting, iu this sketch, to
recall Borne ot tne great names wmcn, wun tne
exception ot Prince Talleyrand, were attached
to a document which time lias proved to have
been, in the main, a record of diplomatic Jug
glery and hollow engagements. France, as
deeply interested as any of the other parries.
bad seiectea latiej rand Talleyrand, tunnen ei
omen, a name dating back 400 years in tne
annals of alliucut mind, andjin omen of battling
subtlety and snake-like lubricity in the twists
ano turns oi aipiomacy. ine Duke oi waioerg, a
nephew of the prudent Dalberg, who, faithful
to Napoleon, had to the last presided in wisdom
over the Confederacy of the Rhine. Latour du
Pin, an astute diplomat who left France in
disgust in the dark days of '93, to mourn the
butchery of his Catholic soverelen, and nurse
his taith in legitimacy in the neigbborhood of
the republican and Puritan town of Boston.
count, ana suDsequentiy liuke, de Noaul?s,
Marshal de Money's elder son, whose brother
holds a place in our history for services under
ashington in our Revolutionary war. With a
voice whi(h, as powerful as that of Pitt, for
years kept Europe under the iutluence of alter
nate aouots ana lears, Austria spoke through
Prince Metternich with the appendaee of Baron
Wessenberg "a bouncing cracker to a comet's
tail." Russia asserted her claims throuch
Counts Raesuniotickl, Stackclberg. and Nessel
rode. England was impersonated by Lord
Castlereaeh, the Duke of Wellington,
Lords Cathcart. tlancarty, and Stewart.
Prussia committed her damaged interests to
the shrewdness of Prince von Hardenberg and
the statecraft otj Karl Wilholui Humboldt, who
would bave held a higher place on tbe roles oi
distinction but for the inconvenience of an over
shadowing brother culled Alexander von Hum'
boldt. In the person ot Cardinal Gonsalvi, an
eminent prelate, Pope Pius the VI Ith came im,
with a sad catalogue oi grievances, numinattons,
and insults, amounting to martyrdom, to ule
his abated schedule ot rights to tha puny estates
from which strong handed robbers have been
pertinaciously and sutcessiuiiy clipping tor the
three last three-quarters of a century. Bavaria,
which, frem the be einning of the ninth century.
has plaved no mean, however secondary a part
in the vicissitudes of European politic?, dele
gated the Prince ot Wrede and Count Rechberg
names that are symbols of craft and wisdom com
bined. Hanover poor Hanover of 1806 which
claims and has the claim allowed, to "a local
habitation in Europe, so tar back as the con
ouering dav of the original Kaiser, half a cen
tury before the Christian era. Hanover, that now,
like "Antonio" bv "Shvlock." "stands in tne dan
ger" of Prushin. was content to intrust her con
cerns to the ripe experience of tbe Count of
Jluuster. fnain appointed tiomoz iaorador.
who, considering the slighter interests of his
constituents, realized, as a hard worker, the
meaning of bis name, aud broueht to his work
an amouiit of vigilance und utility which might
have been not nnfruitfully devoted to a more
important cause. Portugal, the "neither llesb.
fish, nor red herring" power of Kurope, which,
in niereantile supremacies, world-wide discove
ries, and colonial conquests, had onco looked
down tn contempt even on Envland's eflorta of
imitation, if not of rivalry, stppped Into the
Courress, in the persons ot'Palmella, Saldanha,
and Lobo, huddling under the skirts of Wel
lington's military frock. Sweden, through
Chailes XIV. ex-Sergeant Beruadotte, Fent
Count Lowenhiclm. no inferior specimen of an
able and accomplished court parasite. The five
great powers constituted themselves Into a Di
rectory Committee, with Prince de Metternick
as its chairman.
Pi nulla n, Polish, and Saxou ilueatlona.
The first discussions turned on the Prussian,
Polish, and Saxon questions. In the kingdom
of Snxon.y. Prussia found the only possessions
which, rounding off her territories, could secure
to her the source of power that her position
entitled her to wield. She was, however, com
pelled to yield in this leonine distribution of
spoils, and, after much negotiation, signed
the treaty of May 18, 1815, by which she re
tained Cpper and Lower Lusatia, the risht
bank of the Elbe, and some districts in the
Norih. The remnants of Saiony, Dresden, and
liCipsic were alloted to Frederick Augustus,
her King, who, tn consideration of thec grants
to Prussia, escaped the penalty of his attach
ment to Napoleon, and faved his crown. The
destinies of Poland, a much shorter work, were
settled simultaneously with those of Saxony.
The Infamies consummated in 179C, in spite of
Kosciusko's heroic clforts, were reascrtcd by
tbe Congress. The Grand Duchy of Wamaw
was reunited to tbe Russian empire. A portion
of the country, with a population of some
!K!0,i)00 couls, was dismembered and tacked to
Prussia. A portion of Eastern Galllcia, w hich
had been ceded to Russia, was, together with
the territory of Wlellczka, restored to Austria;
while, in the indulgence of a grim joke, the
Congress declared the city of Cracow to boa
lree, neutral, and independent republic.
Sardinia.
A secret article in the Treaty of Paris of May,
1814, had annexed thp territory of Genoa to the
Mates of Sardinia. This question commended
itself to the attention of the Congress In the
opening of us ses-ions: but it was not resolved
until the conclusion of the side treaty of tbe 20th
May, lblii, between the rulers of Sardinia,
France, Austria, England, Prussia, and Russia,
as contracting parties. With this addition, the
boundaiies of fhc kingdom were settled, and
nearly within the limits which it occupied before
the 1st of January, 17S2, and before the trtuEoh
of the republican armiet. under Bonaparte. The
States which had thoretofore constituted the Re
public of Genoa, including tbe island of Capraia,
were merged in the possessions of Sardinia,
(-omening upon its king tne title of Duke ot
(K"noa. llie countries which had formerly
beei.' designated as Imperial fiefs, united with
the Li'ri'm Republic, were also attached to the
States of Sardinia.
Austria mul Italy.
Prefermittin7 tue stipulations touching Swit
zerland and tho.8C relative to the Old United
Provinces, with wicn closely connected
the destinies of Belgi um, which, in the event of
a ceneral conflict, is .marked out as a future
battle-field for France, UjjS review brings us to
the definition and settlement of the concerns ot
Italy by the Congies!. It haa passed on the
rights of Poland and of Saxony. The recon
struction of Prussia, involving epilations f
territory, had been dtrvced wlt,h a touc,ninK
unanimity of consent. The TEdbc-n
Hanover, Sardinia, and Ketherla?" Jf-K??
rn. . c-.i ? u .u. admitted
the principle that the three brauches of the ,
ot Austria snotiia oe reinstated in tne Italian
possessions, through earlier treaties at the be- I
finning of tbe revolutionary stiuggle in France. I
iere, in connection with the Austro-Italian
phase ot the present war, it may be well to take
a backward step. At a late banqueting, with
the object, perhaps, of warding eff some possi
ble imputation agan st tils administration, lor
failing to foresee what it might have done, Lord
itussell expressed the opinion mat it is out
natural that Austria should resort to arms,
haviup, by a very equivocal treaty in the year
1798, obtained the government of Venetia."'
From the times of Cardinal Wolsey down to
those ot Lord John Russell, so tortuous and
uniair have been the negotiations of England
that, even in our davs, British statesmen can
find traces of their own unfairness and ambigui
ties in the plaiuest records of diplomacy. We
are not aware of the existence of any treaty of
17PH, equivocal or otherwise, that Aastria can
claim as a sanction for her authority over Vene
tia. With a very lair compend, however, of
the collection ot the treaties ot Europe before
us, we find that in consequence ot a succession
ot victories, which carried Bonaparte within a
hundred miles of Vienna, in the night of the
lxth of October, 1797, at the village of Campo-
Foimio, Austria, treating for peace and for her
hereditary possessions, ceded to France Bel
gium, Mentz, and Philipsburg.together with the
Cisalpii.e Republic and Austrian Lombardy.
The agreement divided the States of Venice,
Corfou", Cephulonia. Hagia-Marra, Cherigo,
and the depending islands, together with
Albania, were ceded to France. Istria and Dal
matria, the Adriatic Islands, the city ot Venice,
and the States of the mainland up to the Adige,
the Farraro, and the Po, were allotted to Austria,
so as to settle her dominion from the Gulf of the
Adriatic to the banks of the Po. Than this,
nothiug can be more plain or unequivocal. Tbe
Congress, theielore, actinsr upon the protocol,
assigned to me eiaest orancn oi tne riousc ot
Austria tbe ancient State of Venice, which, in
exchange lor the Netherlands, had been ceded
to her by the treaty of Campo-Formlo.
The Return of Kapoleon front EUba.
As to tbe rest of Italy proper, tbe pretensions
ot Spain to the Duchy of Parma aud those of
Murat, rigorously sustained by Austria in claim
ing his kingdom of Naples the price of his
treachery greatly disturbed the conferences ot
the Congress which had them in hand, when
the intelligence of Napoleon's escape and of his
landing at tne guii oi man on tbe hrtot March,
lsl5, swallowed up every minor interest in the
means of averting the battle-storm howling
about their half completed fabric of arrange
ments. The claims of bpain and Naples wre
unceremoniously thrust aside to make way for
their lamous declaration of the powers of the
13th of March, 1815, which, proclaiming Napo
leon an invettrat disturber of the peacp of
nations, and a civil and social outlaw, held to
public retribution, pledged the contracting
parties to the maintainance of the treatv of
Paris of 1814, and the appliance of every e'tfort
in. nwumu n Efipur. ilia ii.aMiillt. U n...na
A third Ruiirpp. t hp hittrrCBt nnrhnrvo M' tli Ha.
. . . i j 1 1. . i . J .
lesiauou ruukuug iu me uepnew's neart, was
The German iictlou.
In the meantime, formal conferences on the
great question of the German Confederacy,
opened between the Plenipotentiaries of Austria,
Prussia, Bavaria, isaxony, Hanover, and the
other parties in interest, were closed on th 8th
ot June, ten days before Waterloo, bv the siz-
T"l 1 1 , 1 1 1' i"l ftf h. I.'.l 1 t' 11 1 i Villi -in ... . . . 1 . : . 1. .. 1 .-. A ir
1 ui v mo & vuiAt.i wuiiiaiiv, VYUIUU. UUCauT
.....1 1 .. .1 1 . ' ... ....
uiuuidiKU iu iuc juvuiuuuuury eoutlicts Ot 1MB,
is now given in tatters to the winds, before the
rush of the late Prussian victories. To return,
however, to the point from whiou we diverged,
Napoleon was again in the field, und thp immi
nence of peril had swayed tho Congress iuto
what we would call hasty resolutions, in spite
of their thirteen informal and iucni.Hiiaivp con-
ferences. Irom the 14th of October tn tho Kit h ot
jNovemDer, ii4. cnougn mat. on the day men
tioned, the rights and obligations of Germany,
uo a luiura tua lasting wonieaeracy, were sol
emnly defined.
me duties pound tnemseives to defend the
wnoie oi uemiany, a? weti as every individual
Confederate Statu, from any and every attack.
They bound themselves to a reciprocal guaran
tee ot all tneir possessions, which the Union
embraced. Upon a declaration of war nv the
Confederation, no member thereof could broach
inuiviauai negotiations wun the puphiv. con
clude an armistice, or agree for peace, without
me sxpresseu uuutteui oi me omer Confederates.
The members ot the Confederation, iinpp.ineiiliv
reserving to themselves the right ot forming
aiimiiucB, uuuuu luouiieivei, uy an obligation,
not to take anv engagement wlnpli mioi, mnrt
ngnjuri t,u nj-vj vi vuc vvincucrttiiou, Or mat
;i,. .n.f.i... .iia ..... . . i
of the individual States of hich it is composed.
In the closing act, the 'Confederate
States solemnly bound themselves under
no pretext to wage war against' any
of the member; not to refer their dif
ferences to the adjudication of arms, buf to sub
mit them to the deliberations and decisions of
the Diet created September, 1815, which, laving
down tbe organic law of the Confederation,
established the rules which were to control
their interior, military, and exterior relations
and concerns. The special duty was aliened
to the Diet to apply every mediation, or, failing
these, to solve the matters by a final judement.
The cas of Austria conies strictly under the
provisions of the act of Confederation, and no
one will attempt to deny that her action for
weal or woe to herself, for the destines ot Ger
many, for tae quit of Europe, and tor the re
sponsibilities of Prussia was grounded upon
what should have been a suggestion, at least, if
not a judgment of the Diet.
The Merman Confederation.
It is scarcely necessary more pointedly to
refer to the force and the tendencies oi a
compact with which everv in'ellieent reader Is
conversant. To any one of them familiar with
the duplicities which, at the time, characterized
either the relations of States or the relations
of individuals, it Is needless to say that no more
pertect treatise of hypocrisies, falsehoods, and
lies could be written than that condensed from
the compacts and treaties concluded on the Otii
of June. 1815. Intended, so far as the "Em
pire" of Germany is concerned, to be "a per
petual Confederation of all her States," and
framed ns a bulwark aeainst domestic feuds
and foreign encroachments, they contained
elements of dissolution, not foreseen,
perhaps by some of the fraroers, which
the ambition ot any cne of the more power
ful parties might work up into uticr ruin of
every euarantee. They committed the error,
perhups an intentloned error in th previsions
of some shrewder diplomat, of bringing here
the secondary Stutes, and there the still weaker
ones, within contact of naturally repugnant in
terests. Hence there has not been one of tbe
last fifty j ears in which tiie strong-handed have
not been peculiarly intrigninsr and watehing,
not how to hold on to their Punic faith and
maintain the hybrid compacts; but how, on the
contrary, to throw dust In the ejes of the
world and pervert its stipulations and guaran
tees to tbe detriment and ruin of their unfortu
nately impotent and imbecile associates. If a
plot against the liberties of nationalities and
populations which, in the scrutinies of God,
are bound, sooner or later, to be free,
it was au ingenious device of uncontrolled
despots, exulting in the idea that they had
overthrown the most formidable, because tho
most intelligent, the most heroic, and the most
generous despot of them all. It an error, it
was a most stupidly fiuitlul error, working to
the hopes and ends of despotism, in reducintr,
to tbe authority of two overshadowing sove
reignties, the puny and fragmentary resistance
of twenty petty principalities and dukedoms.
It was an illustiation, so for as the superior
powers were concerned, of the thrifty wisdom
that would put the kite to watch the dove-cote
and the wolf the sheep-fold. Of the value of
such a promise neither Austria nor Prussia
could be unaware.
The Career of Prussia.
Of the two, however, Prussia must have been,
as she really was, the move ardent in the career
of encroachment, She was fully conscious of
the inroads which the popular mind, in the
revolution of 1848, had made into the heart of
her power. The Diet, on which she could
heretofore rely, though crippled by the grasp of
her power, was still a thorn in her side, and an
obstacle in her way. For the last eighteen years
she bad been sedulously working to bring her
people lo the v holesome restraints of that des
potic Dowcr Her own iniquities, wonderfully
helped b7 lne equa".Y grasping ambition ot
' ' 44 II nin.n niAniJanl'iilln . L. 1
Austria, ana s.'1 wvv- nvuncuuiij suuMu-vru
by the mad experiments of a successful polittcal
mountebank, seem, bj the triumph of her aims,
to have put her in a fair" way of regaining the
elements of absolute power which, shred by
shied, were fast passing away irom ner;
aud, under tbe pressure ot victorious
armies, which, eveu at the risk of
bankruptcy she keeps in the field, to give her
the promise of riveting back upon the people
or Germany tue yoice wnicn Austria uau laieiy
kept rather loosely fastened on their necks.
The French, who will. Irom every indication,
have a word to say in this matter and that, it
may be in the principle of the fellow-feeling
which begets kindness, have a very pregnant
adage in point otes-loi de la, que je my mette
pet out of the way and let me come in, the
vigorous Anglo-Saxon rendering of this piece
of popular wisdom. Prussia, no doubt, after
filty years of trials and expectations, thinks
that Austria should "get out of the way"
that she has been long enough sucking the
substance of the people- of Germany and she
has therefore reached the conclusion that it is
her turn to "come in" and indulge in that par
ticularly pleasant process of suction which
feeds fat Kaisars and Kings and aristocrats at
the expense of the very life-blood of the people.
ho shall be the victorious sucker a short time
will reveal.
DANCING ACADEMIES.
DL. CARPENTER & SON'S DANCING
, ACADEMY.
HO. Via AULU H1KT.M.
T). L. Carnntir. the well-known and exDertanced
Master of Dancing and CalistUcnlca, esnectmlly In
forms Parents and Young Ladles and Geatlumen that
bis Academy tor Private Tuition Kill reopen lor tne
reception oi ornoiars un
A I U RDAY 8EPTE1IBEB 1, 1806,
for tbe Fail. Winter, and Kpiln.
Kvery attention, as ueretoiore, win oe paid to advance
his tcliolars In everv particular, and he can b aeea
punctually at bis rooms, lio. tZ6 aKCU Street, dally
ana nignuy.
DAT9 OlVrnTION FOB T.II1FS.
MONDAY, WEDNESDAY. AMD 1B1DAY AFTER-
NOONS.
FOR YOTJNO MIBES AND MAfiTKRS.
TUESDAY, 1 1ll K8DA Y. A,D SATURDAY AFTEE-
EVEMNOS FOB UF.KTLEMEN.
TVESDAY, THCBSDAY. AKD BAiUBDAY EVEN
INOS. PRIVATE EVESING8 FOR LADIES AND GEN
TLEMEN. MONDAY, WEDNESDAY. AND FRIDAY EVEN
1NUS.
DIBECT PRIVATE TUITION
given In clansen or single lessons every morning.
Terms, etc . made known at D. L. Carocmer & Bon's
Acadeniv.
u. l. carpenter s, Hon win give tneir attention to an
the latent fashionable daaces ol tbe season.
All Galops. W a lues, hops, etc., and tbe many differ
ent figures ot tbe
GERMAN COTILLION
together, be will teab as usual al round dances and
OaaOrilles. and, in tact, any daace thac mar be ra
ti nettled Scholars can commence at any time uunng
tbe tall and winter seasons.
l-KlVATfc COJILLIO.N SUIKKI.!!
will be Riven to scholars and iriends at his Rooms tbla
Season, aa well as a courne of Evening Subscription
Holrees at tbe Musical H and Hall, ana a gratia jun.sa.ne
Subscrlulou Kali In February also, hte T enty-second
Annual Floral Hall will be given at tbe Academy oi
MuhIo this season Information will be glran on appli
cation to I. h. Carpenter
Ticket are reaoy at bis rooms tor bis Opening Holree.
CONtJTANTINK LK ON IDA 8 CailPETEK.
D. L. CAlH'EkTIB,
A 27 3m No. 625 ARCH Street.
EXCURSIONS.
iprfh DELIGHTFUL EXCURSIONS
ON TIIE SCHUYLKILL.
Tbe bcaitiful Intle iteameti
SILVER WAYJS AND
SILVER STAR,
Now running from Falrmount to Falls of Schuylkill,
will leave Falrmount a follows, viz. I At 1 20. 8-0). 8 50,
9 S4, 1010, 11-05, 11-60 A. M. And at 12 35. 1 20, 2 05 , 2 50
1 35, -2n, R'. & M, and 6 35 P. M. t
Beturnlur leave the Falls at 7-20. 8 0. 8-50, 9 35, 10-20
11-05. 11 50 A M. t and 13-36, 120, 2-05, J 60, 3'35, 4 20, 5 06
5-50, and 6-85 T.M. -1
FARE. To Laurel mil and the Falls, 15 cents: Colum
bia Bridge or Washington Retreat, 10 cents. ExcutjIoC
Tickets to Falls or Laurel 11111, 2&o. Picnles sad Sundaj
Schools taken at a liberal reduotlon. 5 9i O ws
LANDSCAPE DRAWING CARDS, A BEAU
tiful aeileaot views, fifteen tn number, dealgiied
ior tho luatructlon of Juvenile artists, yhot, I5ceuis a
aarkaite ..Hh the EVENING TELEGRAPH. NEW
YORK CLIPPER etO-tWillbOioundonitaJeattbe
H. W. corner SEVESTJ1 na CHEflN UT BtroeU.
INSURANCE COMPANIES1
XKLAWAREMUTOALSAFETT INSUKANCB
I j ( 'O tM I A WS Y
fNCORrORATEIl BY iHK LffimLATURE OF
PEN. SYLVAN! A, 1H.
OFFICE, . Z. (CRNsR 1111 HI) .,nt WALSCT
dlREKTs, Pl(IT.AUs.LPHlA
MARINE INRURANUE
ON VFHHEL3,)
hJO. TO all parts of e or) a.
FREIGHT. )
INLAND INSURANCES
On Goods by River. lanai.Lake and I d Carrlaae to
all parts of tlin I'nlon
FIltB INSURANCES
On Merrbandme penernlly.
On Btoree, Dwelling Houses, era
ASSET OF THE COMPANY
November 1, IHM.
100,ncn United .States 6 per cent oan 7f...!S 000 Ofl
l'jo.otin e " 'si ...i28io-M
200 (100 " 7 J 10 per cent loan
Treasury Notes M,37Voo
10O,C0Q State ol Pennsylvania Five Per Cent
Loan M.56V00
64,000 State ol Pennsylvania, Six Per Cent.
Loan 83,200-00
26,00 l lty ol Philadelphia Six Per Cent.
Loan 112,812 50
20.000 Pemmy vama Rallrond Drat Mort-
' n. . Slx Per Pent. Honils 20,000-00
26,000 Pennsvlvanla K I road Mccond ilort-
.... asaeHix Percent. lionds 23,750 00
25,000 Western Pennsylvania Railroad Mort-
i.v. R,K M Percent. Hnil 23,750 00
15.000 Sim fthnrea Stork Oennsntown Gus
Company, principal aid Interest
guaranteed by the City of 1'hliadel-
7,150 U HhareW WoekPonrisyiviiila 'Rail- 3'W 50
. ,ro1 Company 8,560-00
5,000 100 Shares fctook Norm Pennsylvania
. Railroad Company 8,250 00
40,000 Di posit with United States Govern
in 0n",.,' yect to ten days' call 40,000-00
30,008 Stale oj Tennessee Five 1 cr Cent.
i-nT,n.Io"n A 18,000 00
1 iOJOO Loans on Bonos and Mortgage ttrst
liens on City Property 10.000 00
1,038,80 Par. Market value. ...n,.Vi(i-oo
Keal Estate Jiimiii'!
UI la receivable for Insurances made.. 21 01 3 37
llalaneea due at Agencies: Premiums '
on Marine ro'loles, Accrued Inte
rest and otber debt a one the Coin-
naay 40,511 44
Scrip and Stock of sundry Insurunco
and other ompanles, $1133. Esti
mated valne 2,910 00
Caah In Ranks 55 M6 89
Cash in Drawer 678 4S
66,8-15 37
1.253 630-18
DIRECTORS.
Samuel E. Stokes.
.1 F. Penlstan,
Thomas f. HaMd,
John C. Davta.
Edmund A. hornier,
Theopbjius Paulding,
John K Penrose,
James Traqtialr,
lienry C. Daliett, Jr.,
James C. Hand.
William C Ludwlg,
Joseph II. Seal,
Georae C. Lelper,
Hugb Crorjt,
Robeit burton.
jieijry nioan,
W II lam G. Botilion,
Edward larlinitoa,i
11 Jones Brooks,
dward Lafourcade,
Jacob P. Jones,
James B. McFailand,
Jonbua P. F.vre.
Soeucer Mctlvaln,
J. H. Semple, Pittsburg,
A. B Berger. Plttsburx,
Ik. T. AliifLmn Plltuhlirtr
John D. Taylor,
THOMAS C. PAMI l'lPRl-teilt
JOHN C, DAVIS, Vice-President.
Hf.nbt Ltldcbm, Secretary. 1 1k
S011TII AMERICAN TRANSIT
INSURANCE COMPANY,
No. 133 South FOURTH Street
PHILADELPHIA.
Annual Policies issued aeainst General Accidents
all description at exceedingly low rates.
Insurance eflected tor ono year, in any anm from $10
to lti.tNjO, at a premium of only one-hail per cent
hecuring tbe lull amount Insured In case ot death, and
vuiuupnwuoD eacn week equal to tho whole pre
ml am paid
Short time Tickets for 1, 2,1,5,7, or 10 days, or I, 3, ot
6 months, at 10 cents a dav, Insuriiiff in tbe sum or3ii00,
or giving 16 per week It disabled, to be had at tiie
General Otiioe, No. 183 S. FOURTH Street, i hlladel
phla. or at the various Railroad 'ticket oinces. Be guru
to purchase the tickets of tho North American Transit
Insurance Company.
For circulars and further Information apply at the
General Otlice, or ol any oi the autruuiaad Agents of Uia
rkimpany.
LEWIS L. HOCPT. President.
JAMKH M. CONRAD, Treasurer
HENRY C. BROWN, Secretary.
JOHN C. BULLITT, Solicitor.
llRbC'10R.S.
L. L. Houpt, late of Peunaylvanla Railroad Com Dan v
M. Baird. of W. Ha.dwln A Co.'s.
Cnmuel C. Palmer, Cashier ot Commercial Bank
Blchard Wcod,o, 300 Market stieet
.luti es M. Conrad, No. 623 Slaiket street
J. E. Klngslev, Continental Hotel.
H. G. Leiaenring, Nos. 237 and 239 Dock street.
Enoch Eewis, late Gen. hup t Penna K. R.
G. C. Francis, us Gen. A gent Penna. K. R. Co.
George Martin, No. 322 Chesnut street 1 3 10m
QIRARD FIRE AND MARINE
INSURANCE COMPANY.
OFFICE, No. 416 WALNUT STREET, PHILADELPHIA
CAPITAL PAID IN, IX CASH, 8200,000.
T his com par y continues to write on Fire Ritkt cnli
Its capital, with good surplu . Is sa.ely Invested.
TOl "
Lotses by Are nave bee n promptly paid, and more than
50O,OOO
Disbursed on this account within tbe past few years.
For the present the oftce of this company will
remain at
No. 415 WALNUT STREET,
But within a few months will remove to its OWN
BUILDING
it. E. CORNER BEVENTH AND CHESNCT STREETS.
Then as now, we shall be happy to Insure oar patrons a
such rates as are consistent with saicty.
PIHECTOK8
THOMAB CRAVEN.
ALFRED S. GILT.KTT
FURMAN BUEPPARD,
TkOS. MAC RELLAU,
JOHN KUPPLtK.
JOHN W. CLAGHORJT,
Hll.AS TEKKEtl. Jn..
P. lyAn KHl'G,
CHARLES .". DUPOST
HKNRYF. KENNEY.
JOSEPH KXAPF.M.D,
THOMAS CRAVEN. President.
A LFRED 8. GILLE1 T. V. President and Treasurer.
JAMES B. ALVORD, Secretary. ll$
1829CnAIlTEI1 PERPETUAL
FRANKLIN
FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY
v
P1JILADELP1IIA.
Assets on January 1, 1806,
Ssa.GOQ.bsrotj.
Capital 400.(r00 0
Acciueu Surplus W4 543 la
Premium l,li,308 81
UNSETTLED CLAIMS, INCOME FOR 186
U.407 53. ruoooo.
LOSSES PAID SINCE 11 OVER
85,000,000.
Perpetual and Temporary Policies on Liberal Terms,
DIRECTORS.
Charles H Bancker,
l.dweid C. Dale.
George Kales,
Allred Filler,
Erancls W. Lewla, M. 7.
Peinr Mef'alL
i oiiiaa apner,
Samuel Grant,
George W. Richards,
Isaac la,
CHARLEB N. BANCKEK, President
EDWARD C DALE, Vice-President.
J AS. W. MCALLISTER. Secretary protein. 3 til
-rrIRE INSURANCE EXCLUSIVELY. THE
Jj PENNSYLVANIA FIRE INSURANCE COM
PANY Incorporated 1825 charter Perpetual No. 51
WaLNUI Street, opposite Independence Square.
'ibis Compauv, favorably known to the community
for over torty yeare, continue to insure against leas or
damage by tire on Public or Private Buildings, elthe.
permanently or lor a limited time. AIho on Furniture,
Stocks oi Goods, and Alercbandue generally, on liberal
'"l'i'eir Capital, together with a large Surplus Fund, Is
Invested In (he moat careiul manner, which enables
them to ofler to the insured an undoubted security In tbo
caae Ot loss.
DIBECTORS.
Daniel Smith, Jr.. John Devereuz,
Alexander Benson, I Thomas Smith,
laaao Hazlehursi, I Henry Lewis,
Ikouia Bobbins, I J. Ollllaghain Fell,
Daniel Haddock Jr.
DAN ILL SMITH, Ja., President.
WU.LIAH G.Cbowbll, Secretary. 30J
TDHffiNIX INSURANCE COMPANY OP PHI
IT LADELPHlA.
INCOlilOH'lED 1804 CHARTER PERPETDAL,
Mo. 224 WALNUT Street, opposite the Exchange.
In addition to MARINE aud INLAND INSURANCE
tMs Comaany insures rioio loss or damage by KIKE, on
liberal t erius on buildings, nieicbandise, tarulture, ete.,
lor limited periods, and permanently ou buildings, by
deposit ot premium.
The Company I.as been In active operation for mora
than SIXTY YEA US, during which ail losses have toe)
pioinpUy adjusted and paid.
Jol'O L. Hodge,
Lawrenco Lewis, Jr,
Al. 11. Malioney,
Jobn T. Lewis,
William 8. Grant.
Hubert W. Leauung,
D. Clark Wbartou,
xaviu ijewis,
Benjamin Etttng,
Tbomat H. Powers,
A. R. AlcUenrr
Kdmoud t a.llllon,
l.llllltt 41 ltlj,vrl.
Same JWllcox,
I
on-n R.
WTt'HJSllEK, presKW".
Bah t Wilcox, Stcjetarr.
11
INSURANCE COMPANIES.
LIVER rOOL AND LONDON
"AUD
GLOBE INSURANCE COMPANY.
Capital and Assets, $16,000,000.
Invested in United States, $l,50Qr,OOO
Tola! I'reiniums Ileceivd. "by the
Compawy in 18(J5, 54,947,175.
Total Losses Paid in 1865, $4,018,250.
Ail Losses promptly adjusted without reietence to
Enaland.
ATWOOD SMITH.
General Agent lor Pennsylvania.
Ol-KICK,
No. (i Merchants' ExcViaTio:,
PBlLADELruiA 18116m
U0VI1ENT LIFK AND TRUST COMPANY
OF I'MIT.AIlVi Pull
No. Ill South Eol'RTH Street
INCORPOK A I IJQ I MU.N'I H. Wd.. IReA.
t AI
IPITAL, Wl.tOWM, PAID IN.
Insurance on Lives, by V earlv Premiums I Of by , 10.
or J) vear Premiums. Non-lorieiture.
1 ndowmeniM, payab e at a utitre age, or ti prior
???f.'!A':y 1;rfm""n. or 10 year Prcniiunis
botli c arses Non-torleiture.
Annuities gianteil on favorable terms.
Term Po h les Chit 'ren's Kndowmenta
This Company, while giving the Insured the aeouritv
of a Bald up Ca, Ital, will dlviue the entire proflta of tho
Lite liusincxs among Its Poller holders.
Mone.t a received at Intercut, an I paid on demand
Authorized hy charter to execute i rusts, and to act a
Fxcruioror Anmlnlstrator. Assignee or Guardian, and
In oilier fiduciary capacities unuer appointment o anv
Court of this Commonwealth or of any person or Dor
sous, or bodies politic or corporate.
PIKECTOKS
PAWCEL n.'PHIPLFY, Kit HARD cadbuby.
.11 RHI1.M1 Hai K f R , 'HEMIV HAINEH,
JtiSIIL A H. MORRIS, T WISTARBXOWN.
Bit HARD Vt OOI), WM. C. LONGSTBETH,
(HARLEB F COFFIN. "J1"-'!'n
SAMUEL R SHIPLEY. ROWLAND PARRY.
Prekldent. Actuary.
THOMAS WlSTAR.il. I., J. 11. TO WN8KM.
7 27$ Ale (ilea Eiamlner. Legal Adriser.
MISCELLANEOUS.
JplTLKK, WEAVER & CO.,
J1ANUFACTTJ1ER9 OF
Manilla and Tarred Cordage, Cords ;
Twines, Etc.,
No. 23 North WATER Street and
2io. ii N orth DELAWARE Avenue,
I'UILAIlKLrillA.
EDWIH II. FtTLKR, MlCTTAEr-WgAVRIt.
C'OJiBAD F Cloiiueb. 1 14
QiO ARCH STREET. -OA? FIXTURES
J1Z CHANDELIERS, BRONZE STATCARY. Etc
-VANKllifc & CO. wouiorespectiully direct Uie itten"
Hon ef then-iriends, and the pubUc general'y, to their
large and elegsnt assortment ot G vm FIXTTJRls
yAVlt"8' '.n.d. GllN Ail EN 1A L B RON Z E
, Vs- -5ose i wishing hambioine and thoroughly
made Goods, at very reasonable prices, will and It to
U'er advantage to lve us a coil boiore purchasing elso-
N. B. Soiled or tarnished flxtuieg rennlshed with
special care aud at reasonable prlcea.
VAXKIRK A CO
G-EOUGE TLOWMAN,
CARPENTER AND BUILDER,
No. 232 CARTER Street
And No. 141 DOCK Street.
Machine Woik and Allllwrlghtlng promptly attend
0. SH J
CO Ii N E X C II A
BAG 11 AN UF ACTOR Y.
N O E
JOHN T. B A I L U X A O
REUOVBD TO
N. E. corner of SIAKEET and WATER Streets
Pui.adalphla,
DEALERS IN BAUfe AND BAGGING
, oi every ueaciiptlon, lor
Gtain, Flour, Halt, Mipet P hosphate oi Lime. Bono
liuat, Kto.
large and small O UN NY BAGS canstantly on hand.
Also, WOOL SACKS. '
John T. Bailet. James Cascades.
ALEXANDER G. C ATT ELL & CO.
PRODUCE COAIJIISSION 1IERCHANT8.
Ho. 26 NORTH WHARVES,
AND
NO. NORTH W ATER STREET,
PHILADELPHIA. II
ALEXAfcDKB O. CATTEL1,. ILIJAV O. CATTBLt
COTTON AND FLAX
SAIL FCCK AND CAN TAB,
ot ail numbers and brands.
Tent. Awning, Trunk, and VV agon-Cover buck. Alsc
Paper Uanniacturora' Drier Felts, Irom one to Ntat
, feet wide; Paultmt, Belting, Bail Twine, etc
JU11N YY. EVERM4N A Co.,
it) Mo luSSONES' Alley.
WILLIAM 8. GRANT,
COMMISSION MERCHANT.
No. 83 8. DELAWARE Avtnue, Philadelphia,
AOEur roa
Dnpcnt's Gunpowder, lteilned Nitre, Charcoal, Ete.
W. Baker 4 Co 'a Chocolate. Cocoa, and Broma.
Crocker Bros. & Co. 'a Tellow Alctal Sheathing, Bolts,
and Nails I 'At
SHIPPING.
je'PF-K STEAM TO LIVERPOOL-CALLING
-ii't Vii VuecnstowTJ Tho Inman Line, sailing
MlLVweekiy, earrvlng the United stataa mali.
"tllY OF NEW YOKE." Saturday, heptomber H
"C1TY'F LlMERll K" Wednesday, Sepiember li
"CITY OF BOSTON" Saturday, Septtmaer 15
't 1TY OF MAN CHESi Eli". Wednesday, September Hi
ETNA" Saturday, Seoteinear ti
and each succeeding hatuiday and Wednesday, at
noon, rrom Pkr No. 4ti North nvor.
raies of passage
By the mall steamer Bailing every Saturday.
First Cabin, Gold !Hi Btetrago, t nrrency M
To London 95 i To London 4c
To Paris lOoi lo Paris i.
Passage by tbe WedncedHy steamers: First cabin,
100; steerage, 36. Pavablo In United Slates cur
rency. Passengers also forwarded to Havre, Hamburg, Bre
men, eto , at motlerato rales.
Steerage passage lrxui Liverpool or Queenstown, 4
cuirency. 'l kketa cnu be bougnt here by persons send
inc for their friends.
For further luloimatlon apply at the Companv'4
ortlc'.a. JObN G DALE Aeent.
8 7 No. Ill WALNUT Street, Plulada.
FOR NEW YORK PiIILADFL
del nha Steam Prooeller C'omsanv I.
tiwiiii bwiusure Lines, via Deluware and Rarltan Canal,
leaving dary at 12 ii. and 6 p. Al., connecting with all
Buniu ru anu r attern noes.
For freight, which win be taken upon accommodating
terms, apply to WILLIAM M. BAIRD u CO.,
I IB No. L)2S. DELAWARE Tenue
a'O SHIP CAPTAINS AVD OWNERS. TH1
unueritlgned baring leased the KENSIHG'lOM
feC RE W DOCK.uegn 10 In oral his friends and the patrons
ol tbe Dock that be 1 prepared with increaseo fauiiltie
to accommodate those having rrsse s to be raised or
repaired, aud being a pracilcal ship-carpenter and
caulker, wl I give personal attention to tbe vessels a
trusted to blm ior repairs.
Cat tMpa or Agents, ship Carpenters, and Machinist)
bavlnfV'essels to repair, are solicited to cull.
Having tbe agency for tbe aaie of "VVetieniedt's
Patent Metallic Composition" lor Copper Paint for tbe
pieservation of vessels' bottoms, for tbls city, 1 tin pre
.paied to lunikh tbesamo on tavorsb!e termt.
JOHN H. HAMM1TT.
. . Kensington sciew Dock,
1 Is DELAWARE Avenue, above PA OREL Street
STOVES, RANGES, ETC.
QU LY E R'S NEW T A T E N T
DEEP SAND-JOIST f '
II 0 T - A I E F U 11 N A O E.
KANOE8 OF ALL fcli'.KS.
ALSO, PHIEG-AH'S EW LOW'PBESSTJEE
STIjAil JIEATINli AI'PAKATTJS.
yOB SALB UT
6 10 '
CHARLES WILLIAM,
No. 1182 MaKKEJ STlU.tX.
THOMPSON'S LONDON KITCHENER,
OR EUROPEAN RANGK. tor families, hotols
or public lustituiious. Iu TWENTY DIFKKKhNT
KlztH Alno l'hl adeluhla Kuiurn. Hoi-Air k ur-
Baces, lonal'le Heaters, lowuowo oratos nreuoara
Stoves, Rati Holler. Biewhoie Plates, ltrollem. Cook
ing Stovea etc., wuolesa e ana r-tail. by tim inanuiai.
tuiera kUARPE THOMSON,
I isstnthein Nu. m N. bk.0OAD Street

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