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The evening telegraph. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, February 08, 1867, FOURTH EDITION, Image 2

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THE DAILY EVENING' TELEGRAPH. PHILADELPHIA, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1867.
tration neoretly hailed with Joy by every
blurk m(n In tlie l111.
Tbov nleo watched with ercr gaze the Brm
atnnd taken by the Republicans of tno North.
All they feared was compromise. Tbey wished
for a collision betecn ihe North anil South,
for they thought they saw in It freedom for the
8' When President L'ncoln called for the first
75 000 men, alter the attack upon Sumter,
colored men were among the foremost to come
forward and otler tneir services to aHlHt In
rutting down tb. Rebellion. You alt know tho
result. Not only wag their offer roiectod, : but
they were lnsuluuely told that It was a white
man's war. Colored men held meetmsrs in alt
tho free States, to sympathize with and aid the
ceneral Government. In Massachusetts a bat
talion was raised, but our good Governor had
bo power to accept i'. , , ,
The Copperhead press exhausted Its resources
to prove that the Macks would not fight, even
if an opportunity were given them. Refused
admission into the army, no allowed to raise a
band in behalf of the Union, many of these
brave and enthusiastic men joined the recl
mcnts ns servants to the ofheers, so determined
were they to go to war. The Administration
without a policy, the army and navy half filled
with Rebels and Rebel sympathizers, nothing
hut disaster could lollow any attempt to put
down the revolt. Every fight, was but a defeat
for the Federal lorccs.
- The enemy's triumphs ct Bull Run, Tensacola,
Belmont, Big Bethel, and Ball's Blutf, gave Max
bold trout and iimde him feel bis power. The
-vi9knn ot the Union torces lay in the fact
that they were fighting' without a principle
and without a policy. The President called tor
more troops, and the railroads and steamboats
wore crowded men responding to the call, and
yet we met with uo succo&g.
The Confederacy was now a power, both at
Bouiennd abroad. Thousands of brave men had
died lighting for the Union. Mlewortb. had
fallen at Alexandria, Lyon at Wilson's creek,
and the noole Baker at Ball's Blntf. Slavery,
the cause of the Rebellion, was yet untouched,
and our army was daily returning the fleeing
bondman to his Rebel master. No general was
permitted to strike a blow at slavery. For
attempting this, Fremont was removed at the
West and Hunter was admonished at the South.
The conflict had now lasted a year and a half;
Rebel privateers swarmed npon the ocean, the
Capital was besieged, McClellan was stuck in
the mud, John Morgau wai invading Ohio, and
General Early was riding up and down the
Shenandoah Valley. During all these scenes
the black man was bidicg his time, laying low
and keeping dark, yet in many Isolated cases his
berotm had attracted honorable attention.
. At the battle of Bull Run, when the Captain
of one of the Rhode Island batteries had been
killed, James Reeder, a colored man, sprang to
the gun, and worked it successfully to the close
of the fight. We watch with Interest the dar
ing adventures of Potomac Jim, as Gene
ral Sickles unbuckles bis revolvers, hands them
to the bondsman, and sivs. "Jim, I want you to
go to the enemy's camp, view his fortifications,
see how he is situated, and return before day
light." Jim goes upon his errand, be penetrates
the, Rebel lines, reaches the earthworks: he
gets' the required information, he starts back.
As he passes the Rebel lines he is pursued,
overtaken, and rights for life and liberty,
return to the Union cauip, and is publicly
thanked by the General for his bravery and his
loyalty. A few weeks later, and we see the
same contraband mounted on horseback, and
riding by the side of General Hooker.
Another bondman gains for himself fame
almost equal to Potomac Jim. He came into
the Union lines on the banks of the Mississippi
Tiver, and they called him "Black Tom." He
follows the army in the long march, a soldier
dies by the roadside, Tom picks up the musket,
and in the next battle does good service for the
Federal cause. The black man begs to be
' allowed to go for his wife end children, pcrmis
eion is cranted. he passes the Rebel lines, res
cues the loved ones, returns with them, rejoins
the army, fights for the Stars and Stripes, and
elves his Hie to the Union cause. An officer
la the same brigade says of this heroic man:
"One day Tom was marching with us
Through a forest ns our guide,
When a uall from traitor rifle
Broke his arm and pierced his side.
. "On a litter white men bore him,
Through the forest drear and damp,
Laid him, dying, where our banners,
Brightly fluttered o'er our camp.
"Pointing to bis wife and children,
While he suffered racking pain,
. , Said he to our soldiers round him,
'Don't let dem be staves again.'
' "No! by Heaven! outspoke a soldier
- ; And mat oatu was not proiane
'Our brigade will still protect them
They shall ne'er be slaves again.' "
' We turn from the land to the sea; our com
merce is fast vanishing from the ocean, Rebel
privateers are triumphant everywhere. British
machinery and Rebel audacity gives the vantage
ground to the foe. The heart of the nation
aches for some achievement, some victory, some
defeat to the enemy. A vessel with the Ameri
' can flag flying, Bails from New York, bound for
South America. She is captured by a Rebel
privateer, the Yankees put in irons, and a prize
crew put in charge, and the captured brig sets
sail for a Southern port. There is one, however,
ot the Union men not contiued: it is the steward,
lie is a blactc man, and is needed to cook for
, nd watt upon the Rebel crew.
The vessel glides along swiftly. As she ap
proaches her place of destination the steward is
told that he Is henceforth to be a slave, and tnat
He is the property of the Confederate Govern
ment. Nlelii come on; darkness covers the
eea; the Rebels, rue after another, retire to their
; berths; the hour of midnight approaches; all
Js silent in the cabin; the Captain is asleep; the
' Jfate takes his brandy and reclines upon the
, quarter-deck. The black man thinks ol home
and all its endearments; he sees in the dim
iuture nothing but chains and slavery; he re
' solves to be free. Armed with a weapon, he
' ffoes to the Captain's room, and strikes the fatal
blow; he feels the pulse.and all is still. He goes
to the next room, another blow is struck, and
lie is master of the cabin:
The colored man now cautiously ascends to
the deck and strikes the mate. The officer la
net killed, he Is only wounded; he draws his
,' revolver; the black man seizes it; the mate
calls for assistance; the crew is aroused; they
are hastening to the aid of their companion,
-when thej revolver is discharged, the officer
. tails dead, and the colored man, with pistol In
J and, drives the crew below deck, releases the
Yankee boys, and proclaims himself master
Of the ship. Five days later, and the recap.
' tured vessel enters the port of New York,
- under tho command of William Tillman, the
negro patriot. The news ot the capture and
' recapture of the S. J. Waring sent a thrill of
Ioy through the entire length, and breadth ot
he land.
The uatlon scarcely recovers from its exulta
tion ere another black man vindicates the nra-
, very, humanity, and loyalty of his race, it is
early dawn, the city of Charleston has -not
awakened from its repose; it feels secure,
, although the Union squadron lies outside tho
bur, for nothing can pass those 200-pounders
mounted at Fort Sumter. They bid defiance
to the combined powers of the army and navy.
Wooden walls and iron-clads have tried them
and failed. Yankee invention andl ingenuity
can do nothing. Sumter laughs at them all.
It is early dawn. ' A steamer is seen leaving her
dock; she turns her head to the sea; shetrium-
. phaully passes the American Gibrolter. Once
. , out of reach of the fort, the Rebel rag comes
down, and nn eoes the Stars and Stripes.
- Our navy Is all In commotiou; the cry is
lieard, "There's a blockade-runner 1" The guns
c ure manned, port-holes opened, when the
steamer Is seen heading towards the fleet. A
, lew moments more, and thd steamer Planter is
' surrendered to our squadron by Robert Small,
',' Its neero commander. Applause follow ap-
nlause from Maine to Minnesota, and from the
fct. Lawrence to the Gulf. The schooner Ed
cbautresa was soon after captured by a Rebel
i privateer, a prize crew put In charge, and the
' , vessel started for Charleston. They, too, had
V tetaiued tho colored steward, intending to muse
iblm a slave, r , . j
. when off Cape Ilatteras the schooner was over
' lken by the United blates gunboat Albatross,
Capt Prentice. They had tied the steward in the
cabin, attor being hailed by the gunboat, and
showing the Stars and Stripes, iund representing
that it was a Union vessel, would have escaped,
but the colored man cut hlmelt loose, jumped
overboard, and cried out, "She's a privateer."
The man was taken on board the guuboat, the
vensel captured, and the Rebels put In Irons.
The nation onco more rejoiced, black stock
began to go up, wool began to rise. Tho Federal
M-my whs still lighting the Rebids with kid
gloves: their hands were tied. Millions of dol
lars hud been spent, and the bones of thousands
of the sons of the North were whitening In the
sands ot the South.
The nation had become satisfied that the
negro could fight, and wanted bis aid in putting
down the Rebellion. True, it had been forced
to It, which somewhat reminds us of the young
man at the West, who came running in from
the woods, fell upon his knees, and began pray
ing. The mother, a good Methodist, hastily
inquired what was the matter; the man replied,
"A rattlesnake has bitten me." Whereupon the
mother fell upon her knees, and said, "O Lord,
I thank Thee tor sending a snake to bite Jim;
please, now, send one to bite John, and one to !
bite Pete, aud another to bite the old man, for
nothing but snake bites will ever bring them to
repentance." i
The nation had been bitten by the rattlesnake
of the South, and hence they were ready for the
help of colored men.
The Emancipation Proclamation gave new
life and vigor to our men on the battle-field ;
the bondmen everywhere cauzbt uo the magic
word, went with it from farm to farm, and from
town to town. Black men flocked to recruiting
stations and offered themselves for the war.
Kvervbodv saw licrht in the distnnce. The
clorlous 64th Massachusetts Regiment sprang
into being as if by enchantment. But could
colored men be massed together like the whites?
vouia tney stand ere when tacing ttie enemy r
The Copperheads said 'No!" However, this
question was settled. The 54th Massachusetts
Regiment is on James Island: the 10th Conner
ticiit, a regiment of whites, is also there; the
wnues win not recognize tne DiasKs; indeed,
they hate them, and are not backward In show
ing It. The whites are put on picket duty a
mile off, they are attacked by the Rebels, they
are surrounded, they light bravely, but are
outnumbered; they are about to surrender, when
the 54th rush in, rescue the Yankees, and put
the Rebels to flicht. White soldiers shake han Is
with and embrace the blacks, and they become
inena6 ever aiier.
Next comes the storming of Wagner. It is
nightfall, and there stands the 64th Massachu
setts. They bar been out in a pelting storm
for fifty hours, their garments are still wet;
they have bad no refreshments for ten hours.
and they are told that it Is too late to have any,
for they are to lead in the assault. The fort is
six hundred yards off, and is filled with Rebels
armed to the teeth, and ready for the light. Our
men are drawn up in line, ana tne gauani anaw
cheers them up. The time draws near; the
word Is given, "March !" every man is in his
pi ace: no Btrapeting, Dut an move iorwara in
blsh glee. There Is a ditch between them and
the fort; as they near it. u shell from the
enemy's guns falls and bursts among them, but
on they go.
The Rebels open a cteauiy nre on mem: me
first battalion hesitates for a moment, but only
lor a moment; the eallant Shaw springing to the
front, and waving his sword, shouts, "Forward,
my brave boy.," and with another cheer and a
snout tney rusn inrouen me uucu, gam me
p arapet trtne ion amia asnower oi buui bhu
shell which sweeps themtdown; Sergeant Doug
lass shouts, "Come, dojs, come, lei s ngiu ior
God and Governor Andrew." The color-ser
geant Is wounded; befalls, but rises again and
flings the old flag to the breeze. Our brave
men rally around it. A moment more, aud the
heroic Shaw is pierced by a dozen balls. The
order for retreat is given, and the gallant Fifty
fourth retraces its steps. The brave color-sergeant,
with three wounds in his body, follows
his regiment, and, as he crawls Into camp, ex
claims, "I am wounded, boys, but the dear old
flae never touched the ground."
Ttie next moraine the Rebels found the body
of Colonel Shaw, with three of his black soldiers
lying on it, and twenty-live near it, aud tbey
buried them all In one grave, and boasted that
they "buried hlra with his niggers," yes, he
was
"Burled with a baud of brothers
Who fur blm would fain huve died:
Hurled with the gallant fellows
Who fell fighting by his side:
Buried with the men God gave hint.
Those whom he was Nent to save;
Buried with the martyrs, heroes.
lie litis found an honored grave,
Burled where his dust bo preclout
Makes the soil a hallowed spot;
Burled where, by Christian patriot,
He shall never be forgot."
But the brave Shaw and his companions are
not dead. They live in the affections of the
race they were trying to redeem lroin the curse
ot slavery. They live In the hearts of all true
friends ol the Union. They live in the history
oi our common country, and as the Republic
grows older, their deeds will grow brighter and
brighter. But the Copperheads said, "These
were free blacks who fought at the storming of
Fort Wagner. Will the slave iu the lar South
meet bis roaster on the battle-field, and stand
Are?" However, this was toon settled.
The speaker then described the encounter at
Milliken's Bend, after which he continued as
follows:
But this fight was only a prelude to a more
desperate engagement which was soon to take
place a little further down the river; a battle
that has since Decome Historic; a Dauieio wnicn
the colored American In future ages shall point
with pride and enthusiasm, and which no
amount of negro hate shall ever be able to
ell ace from the hlBtory of the great Rebellion.
The nation's enemy is Intrenched in one of
his strongest holds: he has the broad river
before him lined with his gunboats, carrying
cannon of the largest calibre. Behind him lies
the thick, dark swamp, with a deep ditch half
filled with muddy water. Trees are felled still
further back to make approach more difficult;
the Rebel flag flies defiantly over the heads of
the Insolent foe that occupies the fort. The
Federal forces, bearing the Stars and Stripes,
wec gathered from every Northern State, and
representing every phase of society. The
colored men were there too, with arms in their
hands and the love of liberty in their hearts.
It was night the lovely . Southern night
with its silveTyJmoonshlne, and tho gleamiug
waters of the Mississippi; the glistening stars
appeared suspended in the upper air as elobes
of liquid ngttt, wnn us iresn, son Dreezo
beariner such sweet scents from tho odoriferous
trees and plants, that a poet might have fancied
ancelie spirits were abroad, making the atmo
sphere luminous with their pure presence, and
every breeze fraarant with their luscious breath.
8uchwa8 the beauty of the night preceding
the battle of Port Hudson.
Tho Wn thA sun that rose on the next morn
ing Indicated that the day would be warm, and
as the day aavanceu me ueuv mxauic iuhujc.
The earth had been lor day3 parched, and tho
hitherto green verdure had pegun 10 turn
yellow. Clouds of dust followed every move
ment ot the troops, ana tne very Hiiuuspuere
seemed as if it was from an overneaiea lurnace.
The colored troops consisted of the IstReglmeut
ot Louisiana volunteers, miner uioumunuv
Colonel Bassett, and the 3d Louisiana, under
uoionei Nelson; but it was tne iv
tnai attracted the most attention, n uu iuc ex
ception of the Colonel, the officers of this regi
ment were all colored, and it haa me reuuuuiuu
of being the best ained of any on the field. A
large number of the soldiers were freemen,
many of whose backs still bore tho inariss oi uie
lasn, and whose brave, stout hearts oeat, ma
at the thoughts that the hour bad come when
they were to meet their proud and unfeeling
oppressors and vindir-nta thnir manhood. One
of the most popular of the black officers, Cap
tain Andre Cullioux, had olten diued with Gene
ral Butler, when that hero commanded at New
Orleans. The layinu atdde of all accoutrements,
and other preparations, show that the conflict
in iil'ki at nana.
The blacks are to lead In the attack, and are
already In the front, the welcome order is given,
and our men start. The enomw nnen Are with
canister, crane, and shell, tiiermnka rn thinned,
they close up, three masked batteries are opened
uiion Our troops: frtill thev fru.ar,t. Churire !
Charge i Charge t The gtouud la covered witU
the dead and wounded, but on they go. Many
ol the officers have fallen, the tirave Callloux's
ricbt arm Is torn off by a shell, be takes the
sword in his left hand; and leads his men.
"Advance the colors to the front," cries the
General. Aiiselmo, tho brave color-bearer,
springs to the front; he is shot, he falls, he hugs
the flas to his bosom. Two corporals struggle
with each other for the colors, oue is killed by
a shell, the other takes the flag aud bears it
triumphantly to the front. -
"Forward! and with one pulae sublime,
; And ringing trend of ancient rhyme, 1
Tliey sweep; nnd onward as they sweep,
... The thunders of the cannon lap ;
Upon them, and their bleeding host
- M llliin the bitltle-cloud Is loHi.
Flash sword mid bayouct, shot and shell
Fly scream lug in tbnt mist of hell;
But onward, onward, undismayed '
They hold their way, the Black Brigade;
And ou and on and on they trend,
And nil the field Is heaped with dead,
And slippery grows tho ground with gore,
But ou ward, onward, yet one more;
In vain! in vain! the moated wall
Mocks lliem, but valiantly they fall.
Anselmo dies, but to his breast
The Hag he bore in llfo is pressed."
' "Those rifle pits must be taken," shouted tho
General. Five hundred men rush forward.
They are lost to view in tho dense smoke. The
roar of artillery, the rattle or musketry, the
groans of the dying aud the wounded till the
air. The smoke clears away they have taken
the pits! they have tuken the pits! Cheer after
cheer eoes up from ttie whole line of the
national troops; the whites take it up, and the
wuuuo m me msiauce reverocraie wnn mo
cheers, like rolling thunder, and it echoes
along ihe banks of the river, the fleet take it
up, and cheer after cheer rises lrom the gun
boats. Our men hold the works for three
hours, amid a storm of shot, shell, and mus
ketry. All the guns of tho Rebel fort turn
against them, but they do not falter. The
order for retreat is given, and our brave
boys return. Great was the slaughter, and
humanity can scarcely forgive General Banks
tor the sacriBcc. But did these valiant men die
lor naughty
The speaker then passed to the fields
of Olustee, Florida, and Honey Hill, South
Carolina, the achievements of the colored
troops in these sanguinary conflicts being
vlvialy portrayed. He then continued as fol
lows: But it was not merely on the battle-field that
the blacks showed distinguished gallantry.
There Is a heroism still more sublime than that
which makes man meet his tellow-man in deadly
combat. It is that calm, deliberate bravery
which, in the absence of the clash ot arms,
causes one to forget hlmxclf for the good of
others, or to give his lite for the benefit ot his
country. For an illustration of this, let us go
back to that fearful tragedy at Ball's Bluff.
When our army was ordered to that point, a
slave came to the commanding general and said,
''Massa.dcjwoods ober de;ribber is lull of seccsh;
ef you send so lew men dey'U kill em all."
The black man was told to "get out of the
way;'' atd when it was found that ho was a
slave, be was promptly sent back over tho
lines. The Union troops cross the river. True,
the woods are filled with Rebel soldieis. They
attack our men; ihcy are ten to our one. The
battle rages for an hour and a halt'. Ihe
Union men, outnumbered and overpowered, ate
cut to pieces. The brave Baiter, while cheering
up his Spartan band, is shot, and falls. All
hope is lost; the men throw down their arras,
the Rtbels cry, "No quarter !" Night comes
on, that dreadful stormy night. The rain falls
in torrents, the river is turbulent, the current
is strorg. Union men leap iDto the river; they
are fired upon until the water is dyed with
their blood. Our soldiers seek shelter along
the banks of the river, under cover of the dark
ness. They are hunted out and killed.
A little luither down the rivera row-boat,with
muffied oars, is tilled with Umou soldiers. I
crosses and recrosses the river. The owner ot
tho boat charges nothing he only begs you to
keep still. The Union men call him the ''Good
Samaritan." He is black, as he Is the same man
who, the day before, was sent back over tho
Union lines. In the. humanity of his soul he
has lorgotten the wrong, and now risks his own
lite to save the helpless white men. He ferries
over the river one hundred and twenty soldiers.
The next morning be is captured by the Rebels,
and hung in the woods.
The kindness of the blacks of the South to all
whites who needed their assistance was pro
verbial during the Rebellion. Junius Henri
Brown, in his ''Four lcarsiu Secci-sia," writing
of the escape of htmselt' and friends, says: "Tho
negro who guided us to the railroad told us of
another of his race to whom we could apply
for shelter and food at the end of our next
journey. We could not find him till nearly
dawn, and when we did, he directed us to a
barn filled with corn husks. Into that we crept
with our dripping garments, and lay there for
filteen hours, until we could again venture
forth. Floundering about in the husks we lost
our haversack, pipe, and a hat. About nine
o'clock we procured a hearty supper from the
generous negro, who even gave me his hat.
"The black man did picket duty while we ate
our meal and stood by his blazing tire. The
old African and bis wife gave us 'God bless
you, massa!' with trembliug voice-and moist
ened eyes, as we parted with themwith grateful
hearts. God b less the negroes 1 say I, with
earnest lips. During our entire captivity, and
after our escape, they were our firm, brave, un
flinching friends. We never made an appeal to
them they did not answer. They never hesi
tated to do us a service, at the risk even of
life; and under the most trying circumstances
revealed a devotion and a spirit of self-sacrifice
that were heroic. The magic word
'Yankee' opened all their hearts, and elicited
the loftiest virtues. They never abaudoned or
turned aside from a man who sought food or
shelter on his way to freedom."
This writer fairly represents the feelings of
all classes ot whites who needed the aid of the
blacks of the South during the trying scenes of
the Rebellion. Thev cave food to starving
Union men, they sheltered prisoners in their
escape, and when the proclamation of Emanci
pation went forth they took up arms and gave
their lives for the salvation of the Union. When
the Federal Government called to its assistance
the colored population of the South, it pledged
to them liberty and protection. By accepting
the invitation to fight for the Union cause, tbey
aroused all the ill ieelingof their old masters,
which is now showing itself In the unprovoked
murders committed upon the treedmen. In
flamed by loss of property In slaves and their
deleats on the battle-fields, and armed with ex
clusive political privileges, the tyrants of the
South are more oppressive to-day than ever
belore; and the negro, even If technically free,
is still a slave while destitute ot civil and
political richts.
The only thing to save the black man In the
South is the ballot. Liberty without equality
is no boon. Talk not of civil without political
emancipation. If a man has no vote for the
men and the measures which tax himself, his
lamily, his property, and all that determines his
reputation, that man is still a slave. Give the
freedmen the ballot, and they will protect them
selves. Give them the ballot, and the trlcnds of
impartial liberty iu Europe will applaud you.
Give them the ballot, and wave a race from all
tho Inhumanity that the spirit of slavery aud
wounded pride can invent. Withhold the ballot,
and every arm ot the negro, which was raised in
the army, will stand as a token of shame agaiust
you; and every gun-shot they tired at the enemy
will re-echo down the ages as a token of shame
apainst the i men who first tailed for their aid,
and who, having received it, doserted them.
Give them their rights, and save your own repu
tation. Give them their rightsand God will
bless you. ftive them their rights, and
'The stars upon your banners will burn with a fairer
AU1 Vhm lBI" MtrlIes n0 'OKr be eniblema of your
The h'". nade like the white man, Iu th ltuaae of
' whtSY, nbinCK n. longflr tb.onpresaor'srod.
lw!a auguish, of want and woe. aball
nd freedom's radiant morning will dawn on hltn at
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And with thy pen Immortal, (a ehararters of finnie. i
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A. S. ROBINSON.
French Flate Looking-Olasses,
ESCBAYISGS TAIHTINCSJ DRAWING 3'. ETC.
Kanufacturer of all kinds of
LOOKING-GLASS, PORTE AIT, AND FICTXTEI
FBAKES 10 CEDES,
No. OlO CHESNUT STREET.
THIRD DOOM ABOVE THE CONTINENTAL,
"HlLlDBLPniA. S 155
STOVES, RANGES, ETO.
CULVER'S NEW PATENT
Deep Sand-Joint
HOT-AIR F U R N A C E.
RANGES OF ALL SI.OES.
Alao, Phllegar'a Mew Low Preaaura
Steam Heating Apparatus.
IOR SALE BY
C1JARLES WILL.IAMS,
S10 No. 1182 MARKET Street.
THOMPSON'S LONDON KITCHENER.
ICR EUKOl'EAN RANGE, for KamlheHjUotels,
or I'UDiio uiBuiuuoun, in inr.nii vie
FEBEAT fil&KH. Also. Philadelphia Banirea.
Iiot-Atr Furnaces, Portable Heatera, Lowdown Urates,
Fireboard Moves, Batb Ballets, Btewbole Plates,
Boilers, Cooking Htovea, etc., wholesale and retail, br
tbenanulacturers. bHAKFJS fe THOMSON,
11 n stin n Bm- Ko. 209 N. 8EC0NU Street.
CUTLERY, ETC.
CUTLERY.
A fine assortment of POCKET and
TABLE CUTLEKY. RAZOK8, KA
ZOR STROPS. LADIES' SGISSORH
1-Ai-i.K Al TAILORS BHEABM, ETC.. at
L. V. HELMOLD S
Cutlery Store, No. 13Aonth TENTH Street,
IRt Threedoors above Walnut'
' GOVERNMENT SALES.
aOVERNMENT SALE AT CHARLESTON,
S. C.
The following ORDNANCE FROrERTY will
be sold at Publio Auction, at the United States
Arsenal, Charleston, H. C, on MONDAY, March
4, 1807, commencing at 10 A. M.:
About 200 nut tons (cannon) Cast Iron.
About 750 nel tousSliot, Shell, etc. (about one
half have valuable soft metal attached).
About 100 tons Loaded Shell.
About 15 tons Scrap Wrought Iron.
About y tons Scrap Brass, Copper, etc.
637 wooden Artillory Carriages, ironed.
L'iO wooden Chassis. Ironed.
About 750 Cavalry Saddles, 7.50 Bridles. 8500
Cartridge Boxes, and a quanuiy oi other leather
work'.
1 large Hand Fire Engine, built by Agnew,
l'hllaueipnia.
A bout 1300 barrels Unserviceable Towder.
aIro. a laree nuantitv of other Dronertv. con
sibling principally ol Musket Appendages, Rags,
etc.
Terms Cash on the day of the sale, In United
States currency.
Amrjle time allowed for the removal of the
property, at the expiration of which that not
removed will revert to the Government.
By authority of Chief of Ordnance.
F. H. PARKER,
Captain Ord., and Brevet Major U. 8. A.,
2 7ft 13 lri 20 ' Comm'g Charleston Arsenal.
JARQE SALE OF ARMY CLOTHING.
Depot Quartermaster's Office.
Baltimore Md., February 0, 1867. J
Will be sold at Publio Auction, in the city
of Baltimore (at Government Storehouse. No.
1L0 S. EUTAW Street), on WEDNESDAY, 12
M., February 27, 1807, a lot of
ARMY CLOTHING,
consisting of
S478 NEW YORK JACKETS,
of irregular pattern, and otherwise unsuitcd for
issue to troops.
By reason of its leng retontion in store, the
material Is in some instances more or less
damaged.
Sale will take place In lots to suit purchasers.
Terms Cash In Government funds, on day ol
sale.
Three days allowed to remove purchases.
By order of the Quartermaster-General,
A. S. KIMBALL,
Captain and Assistant Quartermaster, U. S. A.,
Depot Quartermaster.
ADREON, THOMAS & CO..
No. 18 S. CHARLES Street,
2 7 7t Auctioneer
M PORT ANT SALE OF GOVERNMENT
. VESSEL.
Depot Quartermaster's Office.
J
lutiiiurir 3il !Ati7.
Will be sold at Public Auction, at the port of
Baltimore (Henderson's Wharf, East Balti
more), on THURSDAY, 12 M., February AJ,
17, the r A
COSMOPOLITAN,
r ffw.t. rirMnilth of beam, oi
feet; depth of hold, 13 feet; cylinder, 60 inches
A rare opportunity Is afforded, In the sale of
this steamer, to persons desiring to purchase a
ronlly tirst-class vessel.
She Is of light draught, the engine and boiler
are in moBt excellent condition, aud the hull
perfectly sound and strong.
It Is believed that, for size and build, the COS
MOPOLITAN surpass any vessel hitherto
ottered by Government for Mule at this port.
Terms Cash, in Government funds, on day of
Further particulars may be learned on appli
cation to the undersigned, or to the Auction
ecru, Messrs. ADKkON, THOMAS 4 CO., No. li
South CHARLES Street.
By order ol tho Quartermaster-General,
A. H, KIMBALL,
Captain and A. Q. M., U. H. A.,
22t27 Depot Quartermaster.
N1TED STATES REVENUE STAMPS
Principal Depot. Ko. H4 CHE8NUT Street,
Central Depot, No. 1U3 8. FIFTH street, one door below
central vv "CUomut EstabliBbed lutij.
Revenue stamp of every description constantly on
hand in any amount .
orders by W all or Express promptly attended to.
United states Notes, Dratts on Philadelphia or New
York, or current tuuds received In paruieuu
Particular attentiou paid to small orders.
: Tbe decisions ol the CommixiOon can be consulted
ana any iulorawUtfu regarding tlia lw cUevnuily
gtvea.
INSURANCE COMPANIES
I AKLiAVt AUK MUTUAL HllTTV , IK'Ktt
ELAVS AUK
XJ R4KCK COMPANY. Iluv.mnr.. h Ih. !...
latere ot Pennsylvania, 1. ---..-"--Office.
8. K. flnrner Tniuit - at n. . . . 1
. . nauaut tjtree i
MARIN. INSURANCES
on Tsel. earfojtd ...ri. of th. wor 1 o
on (roods hy river, canal, lake, and land carrUwe. to a
parts ofthe Union. w "
.. JfIRB ifsciuiicia
on merchandise freneral'y.
On Stores, .Dwelling tionses, Etc. .
ASSETS OF THF. COMPAHT. ' '
hovember 1, lj8.
100,000 TTnltcd States 6 Per Cent. Loan, '
i7i tm,oo i
120.000 in I ted butei Per Ceuk Loan,
1h 138,500
S00.O00 United ghttea 7 8 10 Per Cent. .
Loan, TreHsiirv Note 211,800. (
125,000 City ot Pliilaoe.phlaoix Per cent.
Loan (exempts) 126,561 SO
64,000 Hi ate ol Pennsylvania blx Per
Cent. Loan 64,700-0
4A,000 Ktate of Pennsylvania live Per
Cent, Loan 44,620-00
60,000 State of ew Jersey Blx Per Cent.
Loan 60,750-0
20,000 Penrmvlvanla Kailroad, 1st Mort- ,
pniie, Six Per Cent. Bonds 40,50000
25,000 Pennsylvania Hon road 'id Mort- '
Miro Wx per Cent. Bonds 24,250-00
26,000 Western Pennsylvania! Kallroat
Blx. Per Cent Bonds (Penna. B.U.
Boaranteest , 20,750-00
SO 00ft Mate of Tennessee Five Per Cent.
Loan t. 18.000 00
7,01,0 Htaie of Tennessee Hlxl'eriCont.
Loan 8,040-00
15,000 30i Share Ktock oi Oermantovm
, M uas Company (principal and Inte
rest uaranteed by tbe city of .
Philadelphia) & 15,000 Ot
7,150 143 Shares Stock ot Pennsylvania .
Kalboad Company 8,258 25
6 OOOlflfl Shares Htockot North Penn
sylvania Railroad Company ' 1,95000
20,000 80 Shares stock or Philadelphia ,
and Southern Mall steamship .
' Company 0.000-00
195,900 Loans on Bonds and Mortgage, .
1st Liens, on City Property 195,900-00
1,016,050 par.
Market ralus, 1,010,280-7
Real Estate 66,000 0
11 n Is receivable for Insurances
made 27,667-3
Balance due at agencies. Pre
miums on Marine Policies, Ac
crued Interest, and other debtl
due tbe Company , 38239
Scrip and Mock of sundry Insu
rance and other iCompauici, .
V173. Estimated value 2,930-00
CaHh in Bank ,102-28
vasu in drawer wi
41,54
1,407,3-Jl 58
'This belnga new enterprise, the 'far Is assumed as
1 nomas C. Hand
Bamnel K. Stokes,
Henry Sloan,
William U. Boulton,
Kdward DarllnKton, , -
11. JoncB Brooke,
Kdward Laiburcade,
Jacob P. Jones.
J aiiies B. Mct arland,
Joshua P. Pyre,
Spencer Mcllvlne,
J. B. Bemple, Pittsburg
A. B. Berber,
D. X Morgan.
George W. Bernardon,
C. HAND. President.
John C. Davis,
I dinund A boudcr,
Theophiltis Pauldlntr,
John H. Penrose,
Jailiee Traquarr,
Henry C. liallett, Jr.,
James C. Hand,
William C. Ludvlg,
Joseph U. Seal,
George (J. i.elper,
IlUKh Craig,
John D. 'iaylor,
Jacffh Rleuel.
THOMAS
JOHN C
IA VIS, Vice President.
Bxkbt Ltlbdbn, Secretary
185
1829CnARTER PERPETUAL,
Franklin Fire Insurance Co.
OF
PHILADELPHIA.
Assets on January 1, 18 GO
2,500,85106.
Capital
Acciueu Surplus
Premiums
WW .000 -Ik
944,543 1A
.Utt,-J08-t,l
UXSETTLED CLAIMS, IffCOMB FOB 18M
. 11,46T51. WW.
LOSSES PAID SINCE 18 QVEB
O.UUU.UUU.
Perpetual and Tern porary Policies oa Liberal Tarmj.
Charles M Bancker,
t-dward C.Dale,
George Falea.
Allred Fltieri
Francis W. Lewis, af.
juuims vr aguer,
Bmiiuel Grunt,
George W.Bicbardg,
luaaoLea,
JAB. W. Mo A L LIbT K . B e iary pro SmT HI
KOVID1SWT L.IFK AND TKUbT CWkLPAATV
OF PHILADELPHIA
So. Ill Boutb FOUKTU Btreet
rjtCOKPOKA'iLI) 3d MOU'l'H, 'i'id., IgfiJ. I
CAPITAL, 150,000, PA1B IS. 1
Insurance on Lives, by Yearly Premiums : or bv5 .IB .
or HO vear Premiums, Kon-luneiture.
Endowments, payable at a future age, or oa prior
decease, by Yearly Premiums, or 10 year PrenUuniM
both clauses Mon-lortelture.
Annuities granted on favorable terms.
Term Policies. Children's Endowments.
lhis Company, while giving the insured tbe security
ota paid-up Capital, will divtce tbe enure profits ot taa
Liie business among Its Policy holders.
Moneys received at Interest, and paid on demand.
Authorized bv charter to execute Trusts, and to act
Executor or Administrator, Assignee or Guardian, aii
in other fiduciary capacities, unuer appointment ot any
Court of this Commonwealih, or of any person ora er
sons, or bodies politic or corporate.
D1KKCTOBM.
SAMUEL B. SHirLEl, HENRY HAINES,
JObUUA H. MOKKIH, T. W1BTAK JiROWW,
KH'HABD WOOL-,"" WM. C. LOUGSTRirfn,
B1CHA1UCADHUBT. WILLIAM UAfeKEK.
. CHABLKa F. COFFIN.
BAliUELB SHIPLEY. BOWLAND FABRY,
President. Actuarr
THOMAS WI8TAB,M.I., J. B. TOWNSESD,
7211 Medical Examiner. Legal Advtoer,
"NORTH AMERICAN TRANSIT
INSURANCE COMPANY,
No. 33 South FOURTH Street
PHILADELPHIA.
Annual Policies issued against General Accidents of
all descriptions at exceedingly low rate.
Insurance efleoted lor one year. In any nam from 9100
to lu.Oufl, at a premium of only cue-half per cent-
eourlng the lull amount Insured In case of death, and
a compensation each week eQual to the whole pre
mium pain
bhurt time Tickets for 1, It 3, 5, 7, or 10 days, or 1. 3, oi
6 mouths, at 10 cent a day, insuring in the sum of 30OO.
or giving ala per week if disabled, to be bad at tna
General Onioe, Ho. 1MB. rOLKTH Street, fhUadel.
phla, or at the various BaUioad llcket unices. Be sara
to purchase the tickets oi the Sort American Tranal
Insurauce Company.
For cironlara and farther Information apply at tha
General Gthce, or of any ul the authorUod Agonla ol tha
Company.
' LEWIS L. HOUPT, President.
JAMES U. COMRAD, Treasure!
HKNEY C. HHUWK, Secretary.
iOUX c. J1l(JJ0,aollclt"'
51" r Houpt, late of Pennsylvania Bailroad Company
I. E. Klngsley, Contineatal Hotel. rmmj
Bamuei C. Palmer. Cashier 01 Com. National Bank.
II. G. LeisenriUK.&oa. 231 and 239 Doc street.
Ma?at"treet.0U Ut Conr,d W'wn, Ko. 62
Enocn Lewis, late Gen. Bop't Penna B. It.
feeuTeW 4el"neJr 8- w' corner ot Third and Walnut
G. c' Franciscns. Gen. Agent Penna. B. K. Co.
Thomas K. 1iertoii, Ho. 3iiM Market street.
Third street.
" n. mm. nrm of X.uitz m Howara. Ko. 9.1
10 ly
PHXW&JXSV COMPANY OF
PHILADELPHIA.
INCOBf-OliAlED 1864-CHABTER PERPETUAL.
0'iwiWAV.T1' Stret, opposite the Exchan.e.
In addition to MAK1NK and INLAND LSBLBAlJcE
this Company Insures lrom loss or damage by F1BE
or liberal terms on buildings, merchandise, furniture,
t o. , lor l imi ted periods, and permanently on buildings,
by deposit pi premium.
hril,aVvmSaS?,L88 been "ctlve operation for more
than BIi.1 YEaBb. during which ail losses have been
promptly adjusUd and Dald. va
John L. Bodge,
PUIKCTOBS.
m it. juanony,
John T. Lewis.
William h. Grant,
Robert W. Learning,
1. C'ark Wharton,
Samuel Wllenv
Iavld Lewis,
Benjamin Ettlng.
Thomas H. Powers.
A. B.McHenry,
Edmund Custillon. ' 1
WLCHEBEB, President.
, v m
TTURE INSURANCE EXCLUSIVELY. TUB
i1 PENNSYLVANIA FIBE INSPBANCE COM
LAAir,ui?,rport'1 l7-'Jrter Perpetuai-Mo. 610
WALiiU'l' btreet, opposite Independence Buuanj.
lhis Company, favorably known to the coiumnnitv
for overfurty jeMrs.contmue to Insure awiustloss or
Psmage by Are on Publio or Privaw BuUdUigs. either
Permanently or for a limited time. AUo on i urai ,
Urn0' Goods, and Merchandise geueraijy, ou UbenU
Their Caoltal. together with arge Snrplos Fandj.
Invested in the most careiul mauuer. which enable
S?ou2S. " unaou''w,1 ostmty In th!
i , ui. t ikctob.
Daniel Smith, Jr, i John Deverens.
Alexasder rJenson,l Thumas Bniltu
Isaac Haileburst, I Henry Lewis.
Thomas Bobbins, J. GUlljwhaiu FelL
Daniel B a.ldock . J r
DANIEL hMirn,Jrwldent.
WttUAk O. C0WKl.L Becreur , 7
INSUHANCE COMPANIES!
LivEr.rooL and l o n d o m
Asm - - -
GLOBE INSUnirtCE COHT
Capital and Assets, (16,000,000.
Invested in United States. tl.500.0aa.
Total Premiums lleceived by iSxm
Company in 18G5. 4.947.175.
Total Losses Paid in 1865. $1018,253
-.n uiki inumvuy aujumea wiuioas reterenoa t
England, ,
' ATWOOD SMITH,
General Agent for Pennsylvania. ,
No. 6 Merchant' Exohanea
PUIl illtrl unii in nd-
INSURANCE COMPANY
OF
NORTH AMERICA.
OFFICE, KO. 233 WALNUT ST., PHILADELPHIA
XXCOBPOBATED 1794. CHABTEB PEBPtrffAU
' CAPITAL, S500.000
Assets, January 8, 1867, $1,763,267-33.
INSURES MAR1KE,
INLAND TBAfis?OEAU0M and FLEX BISKS
mnvrrnvs.
Arthur O. Cofflii, , tieorire L. Barriaaa. ;
S&mUAl W. Jni.a.
' Francis It.
John A. Brown,
Cbaries Iaylor.
Ambro.o White,
Bichard D Wooc",
William Welsh. .
H Morris Wain, .
Folia Mason,
Edward H. Trotter.
Fdward S. Claris,
William Cummins.
T. Charlton Henry,
Allr.d b. Jessap.i
John P. White,
a-ouis u Madeira
i ABTHTTIt fl. rniririv t.m.
- vv....,.!..,),
CHAflUB PtATI, Secretary.
WILLIAM BOEIILEK. HarrlsbnrR, Ps,, Central
A gent for the Sta teof Pennsylvania.
WHISKY, BRANDY, WINE, ETC.
JpREDERICK BALTZ & CO'8
PIKST IMPORTATION
10 GALLON PACKAGES GIff.
Just arrived and in bond, to Packages 40 G alien Et.
CEL8IOB 6HEDAM QIN, which we are now seat
the lowest figure. We claim to be the
FIRST IMPORTERS OF
FORTY GALLON PACKAGES 1
SHEBBT AKD POST WINE. ; .
8ole Agcnta alao lor RTVIZBX QABDEAT k C9.1
COGNAC.
No. 11G WALNUT Street;
1 12 lm PHILADELPHIA.
CALIFORNIA Vim C031PMY
"WHSTES,
From tbe Vineyards of Sonoma, Loa AngeJoa,
and Wapa Counties, California, consist.
ing of tne following:
WISE BITTEB8,
AliUELlUA.
BHEKBV,
HOCK,
. MUSCATEL,
CATAWBA,
CLABET,
POKT,'
BKANDTJ
These WIRES are warranted to be tbe pure juloe
grape, unsurpaseed by auy In the market, and are
recummendedUor Medicinal and iamily nurooaea.
EOB SALE BY, "
E. L. CAUFFMAN, ,
AGENT, ' ;
No. 1 North FOURTH 8 treat
1 thstn2m PHILAKLPHX1
Q-REAT REVOLUTION
IK THE
TOE TRADE OF THE UNITED STATES I
Pure California Champagne,
Made and prepared as lfdone In France, from sor
CaUfornla Wine, ond taking the plana of Imported
Champagne.
Ihe undersigned -would call the attention 0 Wino
Dealers and Hotel Keepers to the following; letter
ifHcliitijriijd correct idea of inequality ot (fcel'
"Contikbhtai, Hotel, PaaiDsu-HiA, Oct Zi. um.
"Uemiks. Boccueb Jt Co. : mm,
'-Uentiemens Having slven your Calirornla Ckam.
pagne a thoiouah test.we Uke pleasure In saylaa tha
we think it the best American Wine we have ever used
We shall at once place It on out bill of fare.
"fours truly, J. E. KXNG8LET CO.
CALL and TST OUB CALIEOlUilA CHAMP AG.
BOUCHER & CO.,
11 20 tuthsSm Ko. 36 DET Street, New Tort.
A. 1IAYEB, Agent. 710 BAKSOM 8u, PhUadelpnU.
SHIRTS, FURNISHING GOODS,
J. W; SCOTT 6 00,,
SHIST MANUFACTUEEES,
ABD DEAXXRS U
MEN'S FURNISHING GOODS'
No. 814 CHESNUT Street,
FOrB D00B8 BELOW THE "OOHTWWtTAL, ,
5rp PHIT.Anur.PHi a
PATENT SHOULDER-SEAM
BHIRT MANUFACTORY
AKD GENTLEMEN'S FURNISHING 6T0BI,
' PERFECT FITTIKO BHIBT8 A-KD DKAWES
made from measurement at very short notice.
All other articles ol UEMLEMEJi a D1CE83 CrOOM
In toil variety.
WINCHESTER ft OOh
Ko. 706 CHE8HUT Btreetl
MERICAM LEAD PENCIL C0MPABT
NEW YORK,
VACTORIT, HUDSON CITT, . J,
This Company Is now fully prepared to fumlsb
LEAD PENCILS.
Kqual In tuailltjr to th Beat Bmmdt,
The Company has taken great pams and avestsd
rt,e capital In fitting up their lactory, ana now ask th
Amejican publio to give their pauclis lair trial.
All Styles and Grades art Kaau&ctured.
Great care has been bestowed to the manufacturing o
BUPkBlOK HEXAiiVH 1BAH IAiO 1EAC1LS. spe
cially prepared lur lbs use oi Engmeers, Architects,
Artlsta, etc.
A complete assortment, constantly oa band, la offered
at lair terms to tbe trade at their Wholesale tlalesroou,
No. 34 JOHN Street, New York.
The Pencils are to be bad of all principal Stationer!
and Notion iteaiers. ,,,.
Ask for American Lead Pencil CIO 1 ftnw6qt
ROBERT SHOEMAKER & CO.
WHOLESALE DKCCGISTS,
JlND DEALERS 13
Taints, Tarnishes, and Oils,
No. 201 NORTH" FOURTH STREET,
so COSKEK Of BACK-

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